I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

4:00pm

Local Board Office
7-13 Pilkington Road
Panmure

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Josephine Bartley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Don Allan

 

Members

Debbie Burrows

 

 

Bernie Diver

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Chris Makoare

 

 

Alan Verrall

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Philippa Hillman

Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

21 February 2017

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 570 3840 / 021 706 137

Email: philippa.hillman@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum : Fakatouato Community Trust                                                  5

9.2     Public Forum : Monju and Indrajit Sarkar - Resource Consent for 60 Onehunga Mall                                                                                                                                6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                             9

13        Request for a Temporary Alcohol Ban for the Justin Bieber and Adele concerts at Mount Smart Stadium in March 2017                                                                                    11

14        New Road Name Approval for Six New Roads at 33 Panama Road, Mount Wellington                                                                                                                                       23

15        Tāmaki Open Space Network Plan Key Moves                                                        39

16        Auckland Transport monthly report - December 2016/January 2017                   45

17        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board
For Quarter Two, 1 October - 31 December 2016                                                   
67

18        Re-establishment of Te Oro Committee                                                                 111

19        Appointment of board members to Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group  195

20        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board business meeting venues - April 2017 to August 2019                                                                                                                                      201

21        Urgent Decision made by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, submission to Pt England Development Bill                                                                                        205

22        Urgent Decision made by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, freedom camping pilot                                                                                                                                     223

23        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops - February 2017      241

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     247

25        Board Members' Reports                                                                                         251

26        Chairperson's Report to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board                       253  

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 6 December 2016, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum : Fakatouato Community Trust

Purpose

1.       To provide the Fakatouato Community Trust the opportunity to present regarding council lease opportunities.

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Fakatouato Community Trust with the opportunity to present regarding council lease opportunities within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area for their Tongan Language School which operates as an early childhood education centre (see attachment A).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

a)      thank Fakatouato Community Trust for their attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Letter from Fakatouato Community Trust........................................... 257

 

 

9.2       Public Forum : Monju and Indrajit Sarkar - Resource Consent for 60 Onehunga Mall

Purpose

1.       To provide Monju and Indrajit Sarkar opportunity to present to the board regarding the Resource Consent for development of 60 Onehunga Mall.

Executive summary

2.       Providing Monju and Indrajit Sarkar opportunity to present to the board regarding the Resource Consent for development of 60 Onehunga Mall (see attachments).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

a)      thank Monju and Indrajit Sarkar for their attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Council notification............................................................................... 259

b          Submission........................................................................................... 261

c         Drawings.............................................................................................. 271

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2017/01181

 

  

 

Executive Summary

 

Providing the Governing Body Member, Denise Lee, the opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on projects, meetings, events and issues she has been involved with since the last meeting. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receive the Governing Body Member’s report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Request for a Temporary Alcohol Ban for the Justin Bieber and Adele concerts at Mount Smart Stadium in March 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/00665

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek a decision on a temporary alcohol ban on streets and parks surrounding Mount Smart Stadium for the Justin Bieber and Adele concerts in March 2017.

Executive summary

2.       Temporary alcohol bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified areas for specified times. Alcohol bans are enforced by the New Zealand Police (police). The police consider that temporary alcohol bans significantly assist in reducing alcohol-related harm and offending in public areas. Temporary alcohol bans have been adopted for major events at Mount Smart Stadium in the past.

3.       On 25 January 2017, police requested that the local board adopt a temporary alcohol ban on streets and parks surrounding Mount Smart Stadium for the following concerts:

·        Justin Bieber on 18 March 2017

·        Adele on 23, 25, and 26 March 2017.

The requested temporary alcohol bans are to be from 6am the morning of the scheduled concert until 6am the following day. (Attachment A).

4.       Under the Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014, local boards have the delegated authority to adopt temporary alcohol bans.

5.       In determining whether to make the temporary alcohol ban, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board must be satisfied that there is evidence of a high level of crime or disorder caused or made worse by alcohol consumption in the area, and that the ban is proportionate and can be justified as a reasonable limitation on people's rights and freedoms. These criteria were introduced in 2014 and require a much higher evidential threshold to be met than in the past.

6.       Staff have identified reasonably practicable options for the board to consider:

·        Option 1 – decline to adopt a temporary alcohol ban

·        Option 2 – adopt a temporary alcohol ban

7.       Staff recommend adopting option 1 due to insufficient documented evidence to meet the higher evidential threshold.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

EITHER

a)      decline to adopt a temporary alcohol ban on streets and parks surrounding Mount Smart Stadium for the Justin Bieber concert on 18 March and Adele concerts on 23, 25 and 26 March 2017.

OR

b)      adopt a temporary alcohol ban on streets and parks surrounding Mount Smart Stadium as shown in Attachment B, for the Justin Bieber and Adele concerts, from:

·    6am Saturday 18 Mach until 6am Sunday 19 March 2017 (Justin Bieber)

·    6am Thursday 23 March until 6am Friday 24 March 2017 (Adele)

·    6am Saturday 25 March until 6am Monday 27 March 2017 (Adele).

 

Comments

Background

8.       Temporary alcohol bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified areas for specified times.

9.       Temporary alcohol bans are enforced by the police. Under section 169 and 170 of the Local Government Act 2002, police have the powers of search, seizure and arrest for the specified times and places that a ban applies.

10.     Police currently also have powers to address any incidents of crime or disorder under the Summary Offences Act 1981.

11.     Police consider that temporary alcohol bans significantly assist in reducing alcohol-related harm and offending in public areas.

12.     Police maintain that they are able to effectively manage alcohol related crime or disorder at these venues because:

·        the bans act as a deterrent for people drinking alcohol and engaging in crime or disorder in the vicinity of the Mount Smart Stadium

·        the bans provide police with the powers to effectively deal with problems when they arise.

Request for temporary alcohol ban

13.     On 25 January 2017, the police requested (refer Attachment A) a temporary alcohol ban for the Justin Bieber and Adele concerts as follows:

·     adopt a temporary alcohol ban to operate from:

o   6am Monday 18 March until 6am Sunday 19 March 2017 (Justin Bieber)

o   6am Thursday 23 March until 6am Friday 24 March 2017 (Adele)

o   6am Saturday 25 March until 6am Monday 27 March 2017 (Adele).

·     cover streets and parks near the Mount Smart Stadium as shown in Attachment B.

Making temporary alcohol bans

14.     Local boards have the delegated authority to make temporary alcohol bans under Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 (resolution GB/2014/121). The requested ban area is located in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

15.     In determining whether to make a temporary alcohol ban, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board must be satisfied that:

·        there is evidence of a high level of crime or disorder caused or made worse by alcohol consumption in the area

·        the ban is proportionate

·        the ban can be justified as a reasonable limitation on people's rights and freedoms.

16.     This is a higher threshold than in the past and was driven by alcohol reform legislation that was introduced into the Local Government Act and subsequently the Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014.

 

 

Evidence

17.     Temporary alcohol bans have been approved for major events at Mount Smart Stadium in the past. This may have reduced evidence of alcohol related crime or disorder available.  There is no specific documented evidence to support this temporary alcohol ban request. Staff have been able to identify only one related submission. The New Zealand Police have not provided council with evidence of alcohol related crime or disorder.

18.     During the permanent alcohol bans 2015 review, the local board received one submission referring to Mount Smart Stadium (Attachment C). The submission provides evidence of broken glass bottles and damaged equipment in Buchanan Park and surrounding streets following sports events or concerts. This area is outside of the requested temporary alcohol ban area.

19.     Buchanan Park, Captain Springs Reserve, Church Street Reserve and Church Street Corner Reserve all have an evening alcohol ban in place from 10pm to 7am during daylight saving and 7pm to 7am outside daylight saving.

Options

20.     Staff have identified two reasonably practicable options for the board to consider:

·        Option 1 – decline to make an alcohol ban

·        Option 2 – adopt a temporary alcohol ban that operates from:

o 6am Saturday 18 March until 6am Sunday 19 March 2017

o 6am Thursday 23 March until 6am Friday 24 March 2017

o 6am Saturday 25 March until 6am Monday 27 March 2017.

21.     The tables below assess the advantages, disadvantages and risks associated with each option.

Assessment of Option 1 – decline to make a temporary alcohol ban

 

Analysis

Advantages

·      no risk of legal challenge due to insufficient evidence

·      no unreasonable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms

·      no temporary alcohol ban implementation costs.

Disadvantages and Risks

·      alcohol related crime or disorder may occur that otherwise might have been prevented by a temporary alcohol ban.

Risk mitigation

·      police can use powers under the Summary Offences Act 1981 to address incidents of crime or disorder if they occur.

 

Assessment of Option 2 - adopt a temporary alcohol ban

 

Analysis

Advantages

·      addresses concerns about alcohol related crime or disorder around Mount Smart Stadium as raised by police.

Disadvantages and Risks

·      possible challenge in the High Court on the basis that the high evidential threshold has not been met

·      temporary alcohol ban implementation costs.

Risk mitigation

·      the risk of legal challenge in the High Court is considered to be low.

 

 

Staff recommendation

22.     Staff recommend that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board decline the request to adopt a temporary alcohol ban (Option 1) due to insufficient documented evidence to satisfy the legal requirements for decision-making.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

23.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board previously supported police requests for temporary alcohol bans at Mount Smart Stadium for the Foo Fighters, Future Music, West Fest, The Eagles and Coldplay concerts in summer 2015 and 2016.

24.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has also made a request for staff to provide a report on the option for an events venue alcohol ban at Mount Smart Stadium (resolution MT/2016/207). Staff are currently gathering information and intend to provide a report to the local board in March.

Māori impact statement

25.     Managing alcohol related harm associated with events increases opportunities for health and wellbeing, which is consistent with the outcomes of the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. Iwi have been consulted widely on the use of alcohol bans and have previously been supportive.

Implementation

26.     If Option 1 (decline to make a temporary alcohol ban) is adopted, police can use existing powers under the Summary Offences Act 1981 to address incidents of crime or disorder if they occur.

27.     If Option 2 (temporary alcohol ban) is adopted, Regional Facilities Auckland will manage its implementation. Regional Facilities Auckland’s proposed alcohol management strategy for the Justin Bieber and Adele concerts in March 2017 includes:

·        standard Auckland Council signage to inform of the dates, times and location of the temporary alcohol ban area. This will be in English and Te Reo

·        involving the police in the event planning and having sufficient resources to enforce the temporary alcohol ban

·        advising the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of the type and conditions for on-site alcohol licenses granted for this concert

·        asking Auckland Council alcohol licensing inspectors to visit all licensed premises in the temporary alcohol control area prior to the concert

·        signage for off-license premises advising of the temporary alcohol ban to be supplied to premises inside the temporary alcohol ban area

·        advising ticket holders of the conditions of entry, public transport options, parking restrictions and the temporary alcohol ban areas prior to the event

·        sending a notification letter to all local businesses and residents informing them of the temporary ban area dates and times.

28.     The costs associated with implementing the temporary alcohol ban will be covered by Regional Facilities Auckland. These costs may include the statutory requirement of a public notice in either the local paper, the Central Leader, or the New Zealand Herald advising of the temporary alcohol ban, temporary signage, and any other reasonable requirements of the police or the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Police request for a temporary alcohol ban

17

b

Map of temporary alcohol ban area

19

c

2015 alcohol ban review submission

21

     

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Wilson - Policy Analyst - Social Policy & Bylaws

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

New Road Name Approval for Six New Roads at 33 Panama Road, Mount Wellington

 

File No.: CP2017/00883

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to name six new roads within an approved development at 33 Panama Road, Mount Wellington.

Executive summary

2.       This report outlines the background for the naming of six new roads, created by land use resource consent reference R/LUC/2013/1686, and subdivision consent reference R/SUB/2014/4318. These roads are part of Stage 1 of the ‘Richmond’ housing development, intended to provide over 600 new dwellings on the site over the next 3-5 years. The road naming application has been compiled by Wilshire Group Limited.

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has a road naming policy and guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of Auckland Council for naming a new road. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland region.

4.       Following assessment against the road naming policy and guidelines, all of the proposed road names were determined to meet the road naming criteria, except that some of the names refer to significant but still living persons, which is not encouraged.

5.       Local iwi groups were consulted by the applicant and no comments or objections were received concerning the proposed names.

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the following six new road names proposed by the applicant, for the new created by way of subdivision at 33 Panama Road, Mount Wellington, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of  the Local Government Act 1974:

i)        Road 1: Tahuhu Road

ii)       Road 2: Mangahoe Road

iii)      Road 3: Whale Road

iv)      Road 4: Alyssum Road

v)      Road 5: (Lane): Wiki Lane

vi)      Road 6: (Lane): Komanawa Lane

 

Comments

6.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Road Naming Policy and guidelines allow that, where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the local board’s approval. This also applies to private roads (including Jointly Owned Access Lots and Rights of Way) that serve more than five properties.

7.       The six new roads to be named form Stage 1 of the ‘Richmond’ residential housing development on the large site at 33 Panama Road, Mt Wellington. Land use resource consent for Stage 1 was approved in 07 October 2013 (Council reference R/LUC/2013/1686) and subdivision consent for Stage 1 subdivision was approved on 19 August 2016 (reference R/SUB/2014/4318). In total there are 7 stages planned for development over the next 3-5 years. Any proposed road names not chosen for Stage 1 will be proposed for future stage road naming applications.

8.       The six new roads to be named are as follows (also depicted on Attachment 1 scheme plan):

·        Road 1 (A1): One of 3 main roads into the development, to be vested in Council. This is a new road off Panama Road. 9 Lots in Stage 1 will use this as their address, with further homes in Stages 2, 3 and 6 of the development.

·        Road 2 (B2): One of 3 main roads into the development, to be vested in Council. This is a new road off Hillside Road. 16 Lots in Stage 1 will use this as their address, with further homes in Stages 2, 3 and 6 of the development.

·        Road 3 (C2 & C3): This road is in Stage 1 of the development only, to be vested in Council. It is a smaller road within the development, connecting to the aforementioned main Road 1 (A1). 21 new homes will use this as their address.

·        Road 4 (C5): This road is in Stage 1 of the development only, to be vested in Council. 22 lots will use this as their address.

·        Road 5 (Lane, D1): A private lane / road that will be owned by the Resident’s Association. This is a new road off main Road 1 (A1). 21 homes will use this as their address.

·        Road 6 (Lane, D2): A new private lane / road laneway off of Road 2 (B2) and Road 3 (C3) that will be owned by the Resident’s Association. 7 homes will use this as their address.

9.       Due to the large scale of the project, the applicant has explored various themes relevant to the site for road naming options. Further details can be found in the Consultation document attached (Attachment 2). The general themes are:

·        Historic significance to the site – including past owners and Maori history

·        Location: the site is close to the Tāmaki estuary and has a natural spring and soakhole. Its fertile soils were used for pre European gardens.

·        Plant varieties: native plants, ferns and nursery plant varieties. The site was used for a nursery in modern times but research shows that the fertile and free draining soil was attractive for pre-European Maori gardening as well.

·        People with ties to the wider area, including significant sportspeople


 

10.     The proposed road names provided by the applicant are summarised in the table below:

Road reference

Proposed name & preference

 

Theme and Meaning

Road 1 (A1)

 

Tahuhu Road (preference)

Historic significance - Tāhuhu', a Maori ancestor Tāhuhu-nui-a-Rangi who settled the area.

 

Kaimanu Road

Plant varieties - New Zealand passionfruit ‘Passiflora tetrandra’ - native tendril climber with alternating, pointed, shiny leaves, white flowers (smaller than the garden passionfruit) and orange-coloured, pear-shaped fruit.

Road 2 (B2)

 

Mangahoe Road (preference)

Location (Te Reo) – Definition: ‘stream of canoe paddles’. This, in reference of Te Apunga o Tainui, refers to the prow of the Tainui canoe.

 

Pepene Road

Historic significance - Ihaka of Te Waiohua and members of his family, including his father Pepene, were interned in the military camp at the base of Te Apunga o Tainui McLennan Hills. Pepene and two of Ihaka’s daughters died in custody.

Aloe Road

Plant varieties - Aloe vera is a plant species of the genus Aloe, chosen due to their history of being good nursery plants that could have been grown on this site.

Road 3   (C2 & C3)

 

Whale Road (preference)

Historic significance - Ivan Whale was the owner of the quarry that existed on the site from 1940’s – 1980’s.

 

Puia Road

Location (Te Reo) – Definition: ‘volcano’. This is in reference to the 4 volcanic cones that once existed on this land.

 

Powhiwhi Road

Plant varieties - A native climbing plant with twining stems and alternating, triangular/heart-shaped leaves on long stalks. The white or pink flowers are large and funnel-shaped.

Road 4 (C5)

 

Alyssum Road (preference)

Plant varieties - A species of flowering plants, chosen due to their history of being good nursery plants that could have been grown on this site.

 

Windross Road

Historic significance - Graham Windross was the owner of the nursery site that moved to the property in 1990.

Road 5 (Lane, D1)

 

Wiki Lane (preference)

People - Ruben Wiki is a local boy who lived on / near Panama Road growing up. Ruben was a member of the local league team at Mt Richmond and went on to be a NZ Kiwis Captain from 2003 – 2005.

 

Mahinga Lane

 

Location (Te Reo) – Definition: ‘garden, cultivation’. This is in reference to the fertile soils that once were on the site.

 

Bellis Lane

Plant varieties - Bellis perennis is a genus of flowering plants in the sunflower family, also known as ‘English Daisies’, chosen due to their history of being good nursery plants that could have been grown on this site.

Road 6 (Lane, D2)

 

Komanawa Lane (Preference)

Location (Te Reo) – Definition: ‘spring (of water)’. This is in reference to the natural spring that still exists on the land.

 

Waka Nathan Lane

People - Waka Nathan - a Rugby Union player/All Black and ex-student of Otahuhu College.

 

Zinnia Lane

Plant varieties - Zinnia is a genus of sunflower plants within the daisy family, chosen due to their history of being good nursery plants that could have been grown on this site.

11.     The applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Road Naming Policy and Guidelines. In this instance the proposed names meet all criteria, except that some options refer to significant but still living people (Wiki Lane, Waka Nathan Lane), the use of which is not encouraged.

12.     New Zealand Post and Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) have commented that the proposed names meet their criteria and standards, as per the New Zealand and Australian ‘Standard for rural and urban addressing policy AS/NZS 4819:2011’. This means that there is no applicable duplication of the names and no similar names already in use in the area that would lead to confusion for emergency and/or postal services.

13.     The proposed suffix ‘Road’ is considered appropriate in the circumstances as ‘Appendix C’ of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Road Naming Guidelines references ‘Road’ as being an open roadway primarily for vehicles. This applies to Roads 1 – 4.

14.     The proposed suffix ‘Lane’ is also considered appropriate in the circumstances as ‘Appendix C’ of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Road Naming Guidelines references ‘Lane’ as being a narrow road between walls, buildings, or a narrow country road. This applies to Roads 5 and 6, which are fairly narrow when compared to the other roads to be named.

15.     In terms of community consultation, the applicant consulted the following groups / parties:

·        Richmond Residents Association – Principle members have all seen and approve of the road naming strategy and proposed names.

·        Otahuhu Historical Society Inc. – the applicant sent an email requesting any information on history that could be used for street names. Received an email response on 14/10/16 with a brief history that has been used in the road naming strategy (see Attachment 2).

·        Local schools - Otahuhu College and De La Salle were contacted to enquire about any well-known past pupils that could be suitable. These names have been included.

·        Penrose Business Association (PBA), for businesses in Penrose, outer Mt. Wellington, Panmure, Onehunga and Ellerslie – the applicant sent a draft name recommendation document and message via their Facebook Page (no email was available). The message has been seen but no comments were received.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

16.     The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to the Local Boards.

17.     The decision sought from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

18.     The decision sought from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Māori impact statement

19.     The applicant consulted all 15 iwi relevant to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area. All of these iwi were invited to a project information meeting held in December 2016. Representatives from Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki and Ngati Te Ata attended this meeting. Ngati Te Ata commented that the names were well chosen, with good ‘cultural balance, meaning and nature’.

20.     The remaining iwi who did not attend the meeting were contacted again by email and given the opportunity to provide feedback on the development and proposed names. No further comments or objections were received. It is therefore concluded that the proposed names are considered acceptable by all relevant iwi.

Implementation

21.     The cost to Auckland Council in processing the approval of the proposed new road name is recoverable in accordance with Auckland Council’s Administrative Charges.

22.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment 1 - Scheme Plans, 33 Panama Road

29

b

Attachment 2 - Consultation Document

31

     

Signatories

Authors

Emerald James - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Tāmaki Open Space Network Plan Key Moves

 

File No.: CP2017/01519

 

  

Purpose

1.       To present the key moves for the development of the Tāmaki open space network plan.

Executive summary

2.       An open space network plan is being prepared for the Tāmaki regeneration area, which also includes land in the Ōrākei Local Board area. The open space network plan will set out key moves for the development of open space over the next 10 to15 years.

3.       The key moves will inform a set of actions which will be prioritised to assist local board decisions. These actions respond to the current open space needs and the growth anticipated in the Tāmaki area.

4.       Staff have worked with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei Local Boards to develop key moves to guide the development of the network plan. The key moves focus on improving the quality of, and access to, open space.

 

Recommendation

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the following key moves to guide the development of the Tāmaki open space network plan:

i.        improve open space quality

ii.       improve connectivity

iii.      provide for play and informal recreation

iv.      improve the design of open space to accord with best practice

v.       improve biodiversity.

 

Comments

Background

5.       An open space network plan is being prepared for the Tāmaki regeneration area, which also includes land in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

6.       This work is being prepared as a priority to allow the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei Local Boards to respond to open space development and land exchanges proposed by the Tāmaki Regeneration Company. It is expected that the open space network plan will be completed by the end of April 2017.

7.       The open space network plan will set out key moves for the development of open space over the next 10 to 15 years. The key moves respond to the current open space provision and the growth anticipated in the Tāmaki regeneration area.


Demographics

8.       Tāmaki is a young and culturally diverse community:

·        47% are Pacific Islanders

·        23% are Māori

·        10% are Asian

·        29% of residents are under 15 years of age.

9.       A large number of people in the Tāmaki area are seeking work and a high number of residents receive support from the government.

Population growth

10.     The Tāmaki area is a key growth area in the Auckland Region. By 2031, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki’s population is expected to rise from 70,002 people (in 2013) to 100,000 people. Substantial parts of this growth are expected to occur in Tāmaki as well as neighbouring areas.

11.     There are 2800 social houses in the Tāmaki area and the Tāmaki Regeneration Company has been mandated to replace 2500 social houses with a minimum of 7500 mixed tenure houses over a period of 10 to15 years, which would increase the overall density of housing within the same area. This includes land in the mixed housing urban, terraced housing and apartment zones in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

Current open space status

12.     Staff have researched the current state of open space in the Tāmaki area through desk-top research, user surveys and site visits.

13.     The analysis has identified the following key points about existing open space:

·        the network plan area has approximately 170ha of open space

·        Panmure does not have a civic space

·        a number of parks in the network plan area have poor access and are unsafe because of poor surveillance and connectivity.

14.     A portion of Point England Reserve owned by the Crown may be transferred to Ngāti Paoa as part of a Treaty of Waitangi settlement. This could lead to the loss of passive recreation areas, two full sized sportsfields and a training field.

15.     These sportsfields make up 13 per cent of the winter sportsfield provision in the Tāmaki regeneration area.

Open space provision

16.     In high and medium density areas, the Open Space Provision Policy target is to provide access to a neighbourhood park within a 400 metre or five minute walk of every household.

17.     There are six locations where increased provision could be required in response to growth. For example, a civic space in Panmure could provide an area for community events and informal recreation.

Open space quality

18.     There is a lack of useable flat areas for informal recreation. The Tāmaki area features a number of drainage reserves, which are steep and characterised by poor access, surveillance and connectivity.

19.     There are very few opportunities for informal recreation in the study area. The play spaces are of a similar design and age and do not provide for a wide range of age groups. There is little other recreation infrastructure in the parks.

20.     Many of the open spaces in Tāmaki have poor street frontage and are surrounded by high fences, which is not consistent with crime prevention through environmental design principles. Anti-social behaviour occurs in these areas as evidenced by burnt out rubbish bins, tagging, vandalism of park assets and broken glass in the parks.

21.     Twenty-five parks in the open space network plan area have permanent alcohol bans, eleven of these bans are 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

22.     In 2015, research to understand people’s thoughts about parks and the way they use parks in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area was undertaken. The research identified the that 86 per cent of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their neighbourhood park. People who were most likely to be dissatisfied with their neighbourhood parks were families with children under five, 15 to 24 year olds, organised sport participants and people of Māori, Pacific or Asian backgrounds.

23.     Suggested improvements to the network of parks included:

·        updating the playgrounds to make them more suited to younger age groups

·        updating park facilities such as providing more rubbish bins and park benches, more toilets

·        increased shade and seated areas

·        increased maintenance.

Sports

24.     The Sport New Zealand Insights Tool shows jogging, dance, boxing, touch rugby, and basketball are key sports in the network plan area which have high participation rates compared with the national average.

25.     Mt Wellington War Memorial Reserve, the Colin Maiden Precinct and Point England Reserve provide for cricket, rugby and football. Football is also provided for at Bill McKinlay Park. As with most of central Auckland, the Tāmaki area has a shortage of sportsfields and the number of teams using them is expected to grow by 30 per cent by 2025 as the population increases.

26.     Masterplans for the Colin Maiden Park Precinct and Mt Wellington War Memorial Reserve recommend improving the quality of the existing sportsfields to allow for more intensive use by winter sports codes. Hockey is also provided for as a new user at Colin Maiden Park.

Greenways

27.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei Local Boards have prepared greenways plans to connect pedestrians and cyclists to employment, shops and recreation opportunities. The open space network plans provide the opportunity to implement the greenways plans and to identify further greenways connections, including opportunities to connect to the new Te Ara Ki Uta Ki Tai shared path.

Open space network plan key moves

28.     Key moves are developed to inform and analyse the development of options in the open space network plan. Ideally they respond to the current state and the anticipated growth in the area.

29.     Staff have worked with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei Local Boards to develop key moves through a series of workshops in November and December 2016. The two local boards have similar aspirations for the open space in the network plan area. These are outlined in Table 1 below:


Table 1: Local Board priorities

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board priorities

Ōrākei Local Board priorities

Improve open space quality

Invest in improving the quality of existing open space

Improve ecological quality

Improve ecological corridors

Improve safety and surveillance

Retain Merton Reserve to provide open space in a growth area

 

Develop a network of play opportunities including provision of destination play spaces

 

30.     Based on the current state analysis and feedback from the local boards, staff recommend five key moves to inform the options development and analysis to improve the quality of open space in the Tāmaki area. These are outlined in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Key moves and issues

Key move

Issue

Improve open space quality

 

·          Increase access to open space

·          Increase sportsfield quality

  • Provide for growth

Improve connectivity

  • Poor connectivity between open space particularly access to the coast
  • Poor access and poor street frontage

Provide for play and informal recreation

 

  • No flat spaces
  • Little informal recreation infrastructure
  • No network of play opportunities
  • Playgrounds of a similar age, quality and design

Improve design of open space to accord with best practice

 

  • Poor park configuration
  • Poor street frontage
  • Anti-social behaviour

Improve biodiversity

  • No water sensitive design in parks
  • Limited native planting

 

31.     The key moves will also inform consideration and assessment of land exchanges and open space development proposed by the Tāmaki Regeneration Company.

Next steps

32.     Staff will prepare an open space network plan for the Tāmaki regeneration area using the key moves. The draft plan will be presented to local board workshops in March 2017 for feedback and reported to the April 2017 local board meetings for adoption.

33.     Staff will consult on the content of the draft plan with key stakeholders, including local sports groups and open space users in February and March 2017.

Risks and mitigation

34.     There is a small risk that the local boards may not agree on the key moves or the content of the open space network plan as the open space network plan is being prepared across two local board areas.

35.     A joint workshop with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei Local Boards is being scheduled to allow the local boards to discuss content of the open space network plan together.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

36.     A series of workshops have been held with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei Local Boards to present the key open space issues in the network plan area and to develop the key moves. These are outlined in Table 1 above.

Māori impact statement

37.     Data from the 2013 census show that the Tāmaki area has a higher Māori population (22%) than the average population across Auckland (10.7%). Improving the quality of open space will have a positive impact on all residents in the network plan area including Māori.

38.     Māori participation rates in sport and recreation in Auckland are slightly higher than the national average. Approximately 85.4 per cent of Māori participate in sport and recreation each month according to Active New Zealand Survey – Auckland Results (2013/14). This figure is relatively comparable to other ethnic groups however, Māori are disproportionately represented among those with sedentary lifestyles and there is a higher incidence of mortality and morbidity associated with inactivity.

39.     The provision of quality parks and open spaces will facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

40.     The Tāmaki Regeneration Company Mana Whenua panel will be consulted in February 2017. Staff will engage local Māori through community partners including the Ruapotaka marae.

Implementation

41.     The open space network plan will be implemented over the next 10 to15 years. An implementation plan will form part of the network plan. There is no funding in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 to implement projects in the open space network plan beyond renewal of existing assets and planned capital expenditure. Priorities will be implemented as budget becomes available.

42.     Budgeted items will follow through to implementation via an Infrastructure Funding Agreement between Auckland Council and the Tāmaki Regeneration Company. The agreement means that development contributions paid by the Tāmaki Regeneration Company can be reinvested in the Tāmaki area for public assets including open space. The local boards are responsible for allocating this funding to parks and open spaces projects.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Shyrel Burt - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Team Leader

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly report - December 2016/January 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/01783

 

  

Purpose

1.       To update the board on transport issues in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area currently being addressed by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager.

Executive summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific relevance for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board and its community, as well as matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport (AT) activities of the transport sector.

3.       In particular, this report provides information on:

·        AMETI geotechnical investigation

·        AMETI Notice of Requirement

·        East/West – Neilson Street bridge removal

·        Quarterly Report

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Transport monthly report update.

 

Comments

AMETI update

Geotechnical investigation

4.       The AMETI team is conducting a series of geotechnical and pavement investigations along and around Lagoon Drive, extending from the Panmure roundabout to the eastern side of Panmure Bridge.

5.       Geotechnical investigations are being carried out to obtain information on the physical properties of the ground conditions in the Panmure area in order to complete the detailed design of the proposed scheme. It is standard practice to do so before starting any major construction work.

6.       The geotechnical investigations will mainly be undertaken outside the road corridor and will involve the use of a small drill rig which may generate some noise. All impacted residents and stakeholders have been notified of this possibility.

7.       Work started on 25 January and is expected to take six weeks to complete (weather and ground conditions dependent).

8.       Some locations for the pavement and services investigation work will require a traffic management plan and these works are planned to be undertaken between 9am and 3.30pm.

Notice of Requirement (NoR)

9.       The Panmure to Pakuranga busway section of AMETI Eastern Busway has been publicly notified by Auckland Council and is open for submissions from members of the public (7 February onwards for a period of 20 business days)  This process allows any member of the public to make submissions supporting or challenging the proposal.

10.     The project will deliver the initial stage of New Zealand’s first urban busway, allowing bus travel on congestion free lanes between Panmure and Pakuranga.

11.     Safeguarding the route through the Notice of Requirement will provide certainty to both existing and future property owners.

12.     Following public submissions there will be a public hearing by independent commissioners to test Auckland Transport’s application for consents for the proposal.

13.     Auckland Transport held public information sessions as detailed below and invited local residents and businesses to get involved and make submissions: (Please note, at the time of writing this report an additional information evening in Panmure is planned, but details were unavailable).

Date

Time

Venue

14 February 2017

6:30 am – 9:30 am

Panmure Station, mezzanine level

16 February 2017

4 pm – 9 pm

Pakuranga Plaza (outside Farmers)

18 February 2017

6 pm – 10 pm

Pakuranga night markets, Westfield (under The Warehouse)

 

East/West Connection

Neilson Street bridge removal

14.     The bridge demolition project and the Neilson Street road rebuild work has been completed. This is the first enabling project for the East/West connection expected to begin construction in 2018.

15.     Work commenced as planned on 27 December and progressed quicker than expected, allowing the opening of Neilson Street on Saturday 14 January, two days earlier than planned.  This was largely due to the collaborative coordination and thorough planning, by the project team.

16.     Over the Christmas period there were a large number of traffic diversions in place and extensive messaging requesting motorists to use alternative routes.  This was effective and the level of congestion on Neilson and Church Streets was lower than anticipated.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) update

17.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF is $568,009 per annum. (see financial summary below)

18.     As the electoral term sits outside the financial year, it is also possible to anticipate the allocation from the first year of the 2019/2020 term.


Financial Summary

Quarterly Report

19.     Attached is the quarterly report up to December 2016. This is a retrospective look at work completed by Auckland Transport regionally and locally.

·        QR Attachment A – Report from Auckland Transport departments on what they have done in each local board area over the past quarter

·        QR Attachment B – Report on Travelwise Schools activities

Consideration

Local board views and implications

20.     The board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Implementation

21.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Quarterly reporting - work programme

49

b

Quarterly reporting - Travelwise activity

65

     

Signatories

Authors

Melanie Dale - Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Manager, Elected Member Relationship Unit

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board
For Quarter Two, 1 October - 31 December 2016

 

File No.: CP2017/02026

 

  

Purpose

1.       To provide the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board members with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two 2016/2017, against the local board agreement work programme and to allocate funding towards Local Board Plan engagement work.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, including; financial performance, progress against local board key performance indicators, progress against each operating department work programme, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks associated with delayed delivery against the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki 2016/2017 Work Programme.

3.       Of significance this quarter, the Tāmaki Path project (aka Tāmaki Estuary Coastal Walkway/Greenway) completed the first stage of consultation on the path alignment and have made adjustments to the design to reflect feedback; officers have started the project planning for implementation of parts of the Onehunga Bay Concept Plan using $100,000 received from the Growth Fund and tender evaluation was underway for the redevelopment of the space at 7-13 Pilkington Road, above the local board office.

4.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has an approved 2016/2017 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events, approved on 16 June 2016

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation, approved on 16 June 2016

·        Libraries and Information, approved on 16 June 2016

·        Community Facility Renewals, approved 16 June and 21 July 2016

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services, approved 21 July

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes, have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery (attachment B), with most items reported as ‘green’ status (on track) except for a few items which have an ‘amber’ status (possible risk). There was no item given ‘red’ status or considered to be behind delivery/significant risk.

6.       The Financial Quarterly Performance Report is attached as Appendix C. Overall, the financial performance of the board against quarter two of 2016/2017 is on track and there are no known issues.

7.       The Key Performance Indicators for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board show a trend of delivery that is meeting the indicators, with the exceptions in the Parks, Sports and Recreation and Community Services delivery areas (attachment D). These are explained further in detail in the report.

8.       The overall snapshot for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board indicates performance in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area is tracking positively (attachment A).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter ending 31 December 2016

b)      allocate up to $20,000 from the community response fund to provide additional support to resource local board public engagement on the Local Board Plan.

 

Comments

 

Key highlights for quarter two

 

9.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has a number of key achievements to report from the quarter two period, which include:

·        Funding and delivery of 2 local events – Glow in the Park (2364) and Onehunga Christmas Lights (2361 and 2360)

·        Funding agreement with Ruapotaka Marae was completed (3741) Initiatives identified by the marae community include the opportunity for Ruapotaka Marae to strengthen their historical and cultural resources.

·        The recruitment of a new centre manager at Riverside Community Centre was completed (2901)

·        Libraries continue to be a hub of activity and an important place for meeting and reaching members of the community. Throughout this quarter they delivered various activities that ranged from cultural diversity events (814),  working with the Auckland Museum Digital Cenotaph to celebrate local stories at Glen Innes (813), literacy programmes including digital literacy (812, 811, 808), school holiday or after school programming (809, 807), preschool programmes (806) in addition to information and lending services (805).

 

Key project updates from the 2016/2017 Work Programme

 

10.     All operating departments with an approved 2016/2017 Work Programme have provided performance report updates for quarter two (attachment B). The following are progress updates against key projects identified in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan:

·        Tāmaki Path project 3725 (aka Tāmaki Estuary Coastal Walkway/Greenway) completed the first stage of consultation on the path alignment and have made adjustments to the design to reflect this feedback. A workshop was held with the local board on 13th December 2016 to discuss these findings and to confirm the scope of the Stage 2 consultation to take place in quarter 3. The local board is expected to make a final decision on the project scope in the first half of 2017.

·        Waikaraka Park concept plan A workshop was held with officers to give direction on the development of the concept plan which will be finalized in 2017. This concept plan will provide for the reconfiguration of and guide investment in Waikaraka Park.

·        Panmure Basin projects – Jubilee Bridge Upgrade (3724) and Panmure Basin Masterplan projects implementation (3389) Consultation with mana whenua on the bridge design continued in quarter two. With regards to other projects that will implement the masterplan officers were working to finalise procurement for a professional services contract to carry these out.

·        Onehunga Bay Reserve 3391- Project planning for this project has now started. There is an existing concept play for the Onehunga Bay Reserve and some elements have not yet been allocated funded. Some money was secured to progress some of these elements. Officers will be checking in the local board in due time to get feedback on the proposed design.

 

Risks identified in the 2016/2017 Work Programme

11.     There are no items that have been given ‘red’ status (behind delivery, significant risk). The following are areas of possible risks where the progress and performance indicator has been set to ‘amber’.

Arts, Culture and Events – Safety and Alcohol Harm Reduction Plan (2447)

12.     The implementation of the Safety and Alcohol Harm Reduction Plan was revisited in quarter 2 by a working group that was established by the local board. New direction was given to officers who will now work to implement in quarter 3.

13.     One of the recommendations made by the working group was the reestablishment of a Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Safety Forum. Officers working on this project will be designing how this forum will be structured and will continue to discuss with the local board in quarter 3.

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation – various projects:

Point England Reserve proposed investment in a sportsfield development (3397); concept planning at Point England Reserve (4148)

14.     These projects are on hold pending a decision on the proposed change in use of parts of Point England Reserve.

Sportspark upgrade at Waikaraka (546 and 4155), Waikaraka fields extension (4154)

15.     These projects and other planned work in the areas that will or may be affected by the East West Link projects are on hold due for the time being. There is also a Waikaraka Park concept that is being developed that will guide future improvements and upgrades will at Waikaraka Park.

Sir Woolf Fisher Park stage one development (547)

16.     The development at Sir Woolf Fisher Park was delayed slightly because of the weather but is now in progress.

Te Papapa Onehunga Rugby and Sports Club $300k facility partnership grant (2578)

17.     There continues to be a delay in funds draw down by the Te Papapa Onehunga Sports Club. We understand this to be due to the club re-scoping and adjusting of budgets.

Community Facilities – Community Leases for Panmure Lagoon Sailing Club (1741), Ruapotaka Marae Society Inc (1730), Tāmaki Model Aero Club Incorporated (1731 and 1732)

18.     These renewals of these leases are currently on hold for various reasons. Officers will discuss each in detail at a workshop in quarter 2.

Financial performance

19.     Revenue from community centres and community halls are on target for the six months.

20.     Overall operating expenditure is near phased budget. Expenditure on parks maintenance work programmes are ahead of budget while locally driven initiative programmes in community services are in progress, although lagging behind in expenditure.

21.     Capital expenditure performance is below budget as planning is in progress for growth projects and coastal asset renewals.  There is still some locally driven initiatives Capex funding to be allocated by the local board.

 

Key performance indicators

22.     In this section, insert a summary of the KPIs and in particular highlight those which are not on target. For those not on target, use the commentary the department has provided to indicate why the target has not been met.  Note, not all KPIs will have a quarterly performance indicator. If any KPIs are mentioned as not on track in paragraph 6 of the executive summary, need to provide more detail here.

23.     The year-end outlook is for 30 per cent of measures to not achieve target.

24.     The local environmental management, and local planning and development measures are on track, but there are a few measures across the remaining service delivery areas where performance needs to be lifted into order to achieve target.

25.     Measures that are not on track to be achieved include:

·        Percentage of residents satisfied with the provision (quality, location and distribution) of local parks and reserves. Projects underway to help improve this area include play space renewals at Jellicoe Park, One Tree Hill, Onehunga Bay, Talbot Reserve and Mt Wellington War Memorial Reserve, and Tāmaki Estuary coastal greenway and walkway development.

·        Percentage of funding/grant applicants satisfied with information, assistance and advice provided. A series of community workshops is planned for FY17 to build community groups’ capacity to submit quality applications and to provide further advice to applicants.

·        Percentage of Aucklanders that feel connected to their neighbourhood and local community. The empowered communities approach being implemented across these activities in FY17 aims to increase this.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     This report informs the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of the performance to date for the period ending 31 December, 2016.

Māori impact statement

27.     The local board remains committed to integrating and supporting work that contributes to outcomes for Māori including enhancing partnerships and collaborative ways of working with mana whenua and mataawaka.

28.     Some of the activities in the approved work programmes (Appendix B) that have a specific focus on Māori include Support to Ruapotaka Marae Support (3741). The local board has been made aware of the aspirations of Ruapotaka Marae and will be advocating for the funds set aside in the current Long Term Plan (starting in 2018/2019) for Maori Transformation Capital Projects to prioritise funding of improvements at Ruapotaka Marae. This will be pursued as part of the discussions on the next Long Term Plan.

29.     Within many other activities the local board is specifically encouraging an improved understanding of Māori aspirations or requesting the tailoring of some outcomes to Māori. These other activities include Youth Connections (2444), spatial planning for Tāmaki (2633), Riverside Community Centre operations (2900), Cultural Diversity celebrations (814), Regional Sports and Rec Grants Programme (2610), riparian restoration (2049), Housing quality improvement project (2449)

Implementation

30.     The Senior Advisor Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will continue to facilitate performance updates to the local board.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme snapshot

73

b

Work programme update

75

c

Financial performance update

97

d

Performance measure results

105

     

Signatories

Authors

Shirley  Coutts - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Re-establishment of Te Oro Committee

 

File No.: CP2017/01140

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To re-establish the Te Oro Committee (committee) of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board and appoint three local board representatives to the committee.

Executive summary

2.       The Te Oro Committee is a committee of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board established to help set and oversee the delivery of Te Oro’s work programme.

3.       The committee held its first meeting on the 4 September 2015, it has only been established for a little over a year before the electoral term came to an end.

4.       The committee is made up of three local board members, two community representatives and a representative from mana whenua.

5.       In order for the committee to continue its work and perform its functions under the Te Oro Charter, the local board needs to resolve to re-establish it.

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      re-establish the Te Oro Committee of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

b)      appoint three representatives of the board to the committee.

c)      re-appoint the current community representatives Georgie Thompson and Tara Moala to the committee.

d)      re-appoint Ken Kerehoma as primary and Emily Karaka as alternate mana whenua representative to the committee.

e)      note that the meeting fees for the external committee members will be calculated as per the Auckland Council Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed members.

f)       approve the meeting fees for the external committee members to be paid from the funds earmarked for this purpose in the Te Oro operations budget.

 

Comments

Background

6.       Te Oro is a music and arts centre in Glen Innes that came about a result of community advocacy. There is a high level of community ownership of this centre.

7.       Following construction of the facility, the board established the Te Oro Committee as a mechanism that acknowledged ownership of the centre by the local community in a meaningful way.

8.       The composition of the committee was designed to include external appointments including mana whenua. Its purpose was to provide scope for the community to be involved in setting the work programme at the centre, ensuring that all programming meets the criteria set out in the Te Oro Charter (the charter).

9.       The charter, which forms appendix two of the Terms of Reference document, was developed in consultation with the community. It provides the vision and values that drive and guide the programming and activities held at the centre.

10.     The committee is made up of three appointed local board members and two community representatives (Georgie Thompson and Tara Moala) who were appointed coming out of an expressions of interest process. The last seat, reserved for mana whenua, was filled by Ken Kerehoma (primary mana whenua representative) and Emily Karaka (alternate).

Delegation and decision making

11.     Te Oro is a local facility therefore budget decisions and department work programmes are the responsibility of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

12.     The committee is responsible for setting and overseeing the delivery of the work programme at Te Oro within the operational budget set by the local board and ensuring that the values and goals as set out in the Te Oro Charter are met.

13.     The committee can make recommendations to the board on all other matters relating to Te Oro.

14.     The committee holds a workshop and formal committee meeting on a quarterly basis to which council staff provide the committee with a quarterly performance report that track progress, deliverables and updates as they relate to the Te Oro’s work programme.

Meeting fees for external appointments

15.     External committee members are paid a meeting fee to attend committee meetings. Meeting fees paid are subject to the Auckland Council Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members and will cover preparation time and meeting attendance.

16.     There is a budget allocation of $3220.00 for financial year 2016/17 to cover the meeting fees for external members. 

17.     The estimated amount of time the appointed members will spend on preparation and meeting attendance is approximately 8 hours per quarter.

18.     Local board representatives are not paid to attend the committee meetings as the role falls under local board responsibilities and is seen as business as usual.

Considerations for re-establishment

19.     The committee has ceased to exist due to the electoral term end and not to any other reason. It is necessary to re-establish the committee for various reasons including that:

a)    The board’s intention was to establish a long term governance committee that provided a meaningful mechanism for continued community and mana whenua input into the centre.

b)    The committee has been in place for one year and permanent disestablishment after this short time is undesirable and carries a reputational risk for the local board.

c)    Noting resolution MT/2015/150 (below) from which we can infer mana whenua expectations that this committee will exist for at least four years and then be reviewed after that time.

  Resolution number  MT/2015/150

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

b)      appoints Ken Kerehoma of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei to the mana whenua seat on the Te Oro Committee for its first term, noting the preference expressed by mana whenua that this appointment remain in place until the end of the next triennium (four years in total)

c)      appoints Emily Karaka of Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki as the alternate for the mana whenua seat on the Te Oro Committee for its first term, noting the preference expressed by mana whenua that this appointment remain in place until the end of the next triennium (four years in total)

f)       notes that mana whenua have expressed a desire for a review of Te Oro’s governance arrangements to take place after four years of its operation.

 

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

20.     In accordance with Standing Orders 2.7.1 the Local Board may appoint a committee to which it can delegate decision-making powers.

21.     The board’s view when establishing the committee was that the committee would be a long term arrangement.

22.     Historically the committee has met on a Thursday, local board representatives on the committee will need to make themselves available for workshop and committee meeting outside of the board’s agreed day of council business.

23.     Should the board wish to conduct a review of the committee it is proposed that the board request staff to commence the review in 2018.

Māori impact statement

24.     Ngāti Paoa, Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei have noted an interest to be involved in governance at the centre. Mana whenua have requested a review of the governance arrangements to be undertaken after a period of four years.

Implementation

25.     Should the board re-establishment of the Te Oro Committee, the board’s decision will be communicated to external Te Oro committee members and council staff and preparations will be made for the first committee meeting of the 2016-2019 term.

26.     Local Board Services department are discouraging the use of committees as a mechanism for carrying out local board work due to its resource intensive nature. However, due to the risks identified in this report staff are prepared to support this arrangement in the current term.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference

115

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Appointment of board members to Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

 

File No.: CP2017/01189

 

  

Purpose

1.       To appoint a board representative and alternate to the Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group.

Executive summary

2.       Twelve local boards provide representation for their local board on the Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Committee (Mangere-Otahuhu, Otara-Papatoetoe, Manurewa, Howick, Franklin, Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, Whau, Orakei, Waitakere Rangers, Papakura and Maungakiekie-Tāmaki).

3.       Local board representatives are appointed for the duration of the electoral term unless the board passes resolution providing a change of appointment. The activities of the group are outlined in the Terms of Reference document (Attachment A).

4.       The group meets every three months. The board is requested to appoint a primary and alternate local board member to represent the local board at future meetings of the group.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      appoint a primary and alternate as board member representatives on the Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group.

 

Comments

Board appointments

5.       As local board representatives, the nominated members represent the board, not in a personal capacity.  Board members will provide updates at local board meetings to keep the board regularly informed of discussions and decisions made of their activities unless good reasons exist for confidentiality, these updates are in the form of board member reports to business meeting which maintain public transparency.

6.       In making decisions about appointments, it is suggested that local board are mindful of:

·        the elected members availability

·        any conflict of interests, including whether the local board provides funding to the entity

·        relevance

·        historical relationship with the organsation and Auckland Council .

7.       Members are delegated in their capacity as elected local board members. Should they no longer be a local board member, their nominations would be automatically repealed.

8.       Board members may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests and are encouraged to disclose memberships to external organisations in the conflict of interest register.


 

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

9.       The Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group (ANCCG) was set up under the conditions of Auckland Airport’s designation in the Manukau Operative District Plan. It is an independently chaired group that makes recommendations to Auckland Airport on aircraft noise issues and concerns that arise from the airport’s operations and activities. Please refer to attachment A for more detail regarding the consultative group.

10.     September 2016 was the last meeting held of the Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group.  See the following website:  https://corporate.aucklandairport.co.nz/corporate-responsibility/managing-aircraft-noise/being-a-good-neighbour/auckland-noise-community-consultative-group.

11.     The group meets three monthly between 2pm to 5pm.  The next meeting of the group is scheduled for the 28 February 2017.

12.     The previous local board representative was Simon Randall.

13.     The local board is asked to appoint one member (and an alternate) to the Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

14.     This report seeks the local board’s decision on representatives to the Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group.

Māori impact statement

15.     This report has no specific impact on Māori. It covers an appointment of local board representation to an external community consultative group to represent the view of local communities, including Māori communities.

Implementation

16.     There are no implementation issues as a result of this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group Terms of Reference

197

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board business meeting venues - April 2017 to August 2019

 

File No.: CP2017/01782

 

  

Purpose

1.       To approve the venues for the business meeting from April 2017 to August 2019.

Executive summary

2.       At its business meeting on the 22 November 2017 the board agreed its 2016/2019 electoral term schedule of business meetings (MT/2016/211).

3.       The board passed a resolution requesting officers come back to the board with alternating venue options for the business meeting to be held in Maungakiekie and Tāmaki subdivisions.

4.       Initial set up of equipment and services to support an additional business meeting venue will cost $4,053.24 in the 2016/17 financial year. Ongoing service costs are estimated to be $350.00 in 2017/18 financial year.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Approves the venues for its business meetings from April 2017 to August 2019 outlined below:

Year

Date

Time

Venue

2017

18 April

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

23 May

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

27 June

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

25 July

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

22 August

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

26 September

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

24 October

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

28 November

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

12 December

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

2018

27 February

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

27 March

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

24 April

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

22 May

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

26 June

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

24 July

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

28 August

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

25 September

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

23 October

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

27 November

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

11 December

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

2019

26 February

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

26 March

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

23 April

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

28 May

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

25 June

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

23 July

4pm

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

27 August

4pm

Onehunga Community Centre, 83 Church Street, Onehunga

 

b)      agree to hold an extra business meeting on the Tuesday, 2 May 2017, 4pm at the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure to sign off on the Annual Budget 2017/18 draft local board agreement and advocacy items.

 

Comments

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       Adopting a business meeting schedule also allows for a planned approach to workloads and ensures that local board members have clarity about their commitments.

8.       Commencing the business meeting during business hours will enable meetings to be productive and ensures best use of resources.   

9.       There are some instances for which the local board may need to have meetings in addition to this schedule. For example, the local board plans (developed every three years) and local board agreements (developed annually). The specific times and dates for those meetings, public engagement and any hearings process for these matters are yet to be finalised and are therefore not included in the schedule above.

Alternating venues

10.     At its 22 November business meeting the board passed a resolution requesting officers come back to the board with alternating venue options for the business meeting to be held in Maungakiekie and Tāmaki subdivisions.

11.     The board currently has a meeting venue fit for purpose to hold business meetings at its local board office in Panmure, located in the Tāmaki subdivision.

12.     Initial set up of equipment and services to support an additional business meeting venue will cost $4,053.24 in the 2016/17 financial year. Ongoing service costs are estimated to be $350.00 in 2017/18 financial year.

13.     The use of the Onehunga Community Centre as the alternate venue means potential loss of revenue from hirers.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     The implication of this report is to ensure that the local board meets its legislative responsibility, as outlined in paragraph six.

Māori impact statement

15.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report.  Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest.

Implementation

16.     If there is any need to depart from the resolved dates, Auckland Council will publically notify the updated details. Local Board Services Department staff support local board business meetings.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Urgent Decision made by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, submission to Pt England Development Bill

 

File No.: CP2017/01193

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To advise the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of urgent decision signed under delegation for the board’s submission to the Point England Development Enabling Bill (Attachment A).

Executive summary

2.       At the 22 November 2016 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting the board considered the urgent decisions process and passed resolution MTLB/2016/210:

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum;

b)      delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board;

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off the authorisation memo;

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.   CARRIED

3.       The first business meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board in 2017 is scheduled for the 28 February. Due to the timing of the close of submissions to the Point England Development Bill on the 31 January 2017, the board implemented the urgent decision making process in order to meet submission timeframes.

4.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board sought the views of the community at a public meeting held on the 27 January 2017 which have been included with the board’s submission.

 

Recommendation/s

The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board note the decision made under urgency, that the board:

a)      Welcomes the opportunity to submit on the the Bill.

b)      Notes that this submission presents the specific views of the board in addition to the submission made by Auckland Council.  The board wishes to be heard in relation to this submission, and requests that the board and council submissions are heard concurrently by the Committee.

c)      Supports Māori social and economic development, and in particular Treaty settlements.  It acknowledges that the Tāmaki area, comprising the modern-day suburbs of Panmure, Tāmaki, Point England and Glen Innes, is historically and culturally significant to Ngāti Paoa.  The historical grievances of Ngāti Paoa should be addressed and remedied and, therefore, the Local board supports a Treaty settlement with the Crown and supports Ngāti Paoa’s right to use their land as they see fit. 

d)      Submits that it opposes the Point England Development Enabling Bill as the mechanism for achieving increased housing development and is deeply concerned that this Bill:

i)        sets a dangerous precedent by cutting across the existing requirements of the Resource Management Act and the Reserves Act;

ii)       fast tracks development and avoids a robust public consultation process including a right of appeal;

iii)      does not specifically reference Treaty settlements.

e)      Submit that if the Crown pursues the course of action proposed by the Bill it requires:

i)        reinvestment of 100% proceeds back into the local Tāmaki community for development and enhancement of public open space;

ii)       the proposed development land, if sold, should only be sold to Ngāti Paoa as a component of their Treaty settlement or otherwise remain as reserve land;

iii)      good faith negotiations to enable the footprint of the current sportsfields to be retained;

iv)      measures to protect the endangered dotterels, other shorebirds and their habitat;

v)      measures to address the impact of the development on the environment in particular water quality.

f)       Are disappointed about the lack of public consultation and the release of the Bill over the summer holidays.

g)      Held a public meeting on Friday 28 January 2017 and attach the notes from the meeting (Attachment A).

h)      Respectfully request that the hearings of the Select Committee be held in Auckland to allow for our community to attend.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local Board submission to Point England Development Enabling Bill

207

b

Point England Development Enabling Bill

213

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Urgent Decision made by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, freedom camping pilot

 

File No.: CP2017/01192

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To advise the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of urgent decision signed under delegation for the implementation of the freedom camping pilot project.

Executive Summary

2.       At the 22 November 2016 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting the board considered the urgent decisions process and passed resolution MTLB/2016/210:

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum;

b)      delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board;

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off the authorisation memo;

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.   CARRIED

3.       Approval was sought by officers to implement the freedom camping pilot project in Domain Reserve and Panmure Wharf Reserve.

4.       The first business meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board in 2017 is scheduled for the 28 February. Due to the timing of the pilot project to cater for the peak summer season from 7 February to 30 April, officers sought approval through the urgent decision process.

5.       Details are contained in the urgent decision document included with this report as Attachment A.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the decision made under urgency providing approval for the implementation of the freedom camping pilot for the period 7 February to 30 April in Domain Reserve and Panmure Wharf Reserve.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision - freedom camping pilot

225

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops - February 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/01161

 

  

 

Executive summary

1.       The attached workshop records provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for January/February 2017.

2.       These sessions are held to give an information opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects, and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Recommendation/s

That the record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the workshops report for January/February 2017.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Record of workshops January/February 2017

243

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2017/01694

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Executive Summary

2.       This report provides a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings over the next 12 months. The governance forward work calendar for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings and distributed to relevant Council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

Comments

5.       Council’s Quality Advice Programme aims to improve the focus, analysis, presentation and timeliness of staff advice to elected representatives. The forward work calendar provides elected members with better visibility of the types of governance tasks they are being asked to undertake and when they are scheduled.

6.       The calendar brings together one schedule reporting on all of the board’s projects and activities previously approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes governing body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response.

7.       This initiative is intended to support the boards’ governance role. It assists staff to support local boards, as an additional tool to manage workloads and track activities across council departments, and it allows greater transparency for the public.

8.       The board in its governance role carries out decision making in accordance with its obligations under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015.

9.       The calendar is arranged in three columns, “Topic”, “Purpose” and “Governance Role”:

·    Topic describes the items

·    Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates

·    Governance role is a higher-level categorisation of the work local boards do. Examples of the seven governance categories are tabled below:

Governance role

Examples

Setting direction/priorities/budget

Capex projects, work programmes, annual plan

Local initiatives/specific decisions

Grants, road names, alcohol bans

Input into regional decision-making

Comments on regional bylaws, policies, plans

Oversight and monitoring

Local board agreement, quarterly performance reports, review projects

Accountability to the public

Annual report

Engagement

Community hui, submissions processes

Keeping informed

Briefings, cluster workshops

 

10.     Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar. The calendar will be updated and reported back every month to business meetings. Updates will also be distributed to relevant Council staff.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

11.     All local boards are being presented with governance forward work calendars for their consideration.

Māori impact statement

12.     The projects and processes referred to in the governance forward work calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Implementation

13.     Staff review the calendar each month and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Calendar

249

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Board Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2017/01182

 

  

 

Purpose

Providing Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receive the board members report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

Chairperson's Report to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

File No.: CP2017/01185

 

  

 

Executive summary

Providing the Chairperson, Josephine Bartley, with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

     

  


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 9.1      Attachment a    Letter from Fakatouato Community Trust     Page 257

Item 9.2      Attachment a    Council notification                                        Page 259

Item 9.2      Attachment b    Submission                                                    Page 261

Item 9.2      Attachment c    Drawings                                                        Page 271


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 February 2017