I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

5.00pm

Manukau Chambers
Level 1, Manukau Civic West Annex
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lotu Fuli

 

Deputy Chairperson

Ross Robertson, QSO, JP

 

Members

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

 

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

 

Mary Gush

 

 

Donna Lee

 

 

Dawn Trenberth

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carmen Fernandes

Democracy Advisor

 

14 March 2017

 

Contact Telephone: 09 261 8498

Email: carmen.fernandes@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     The Living Wage Movement                                                                               5

8.2     Wiri BID Expansion                                                                                              6

8.3     Manukau BID Expansion                                                                                     6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Manukau Ward Councillors Update                                                                            9

13        Board Members' Report                                                                                             11

14        Chairperson's Announcements                                                                                 13

15        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts                                           15

16        2016 Elections - Highlights and Issues                                                                     99

17        Draft Air Quality Bylaw and Statement of Proposal                                              113

18        Hampton Park, 334R East Tamaki Road, East Tamaki                                         181

19        Auckland Transport Update – Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board March 2017       187

20        Disposals recommendation report                                                                          191

21        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Gagan Preet Singh at 172 and 172A Portage Road, Papatoetoe                                                                      197

22        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board - Additional Business Meetings                         203

23        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                                  205

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     213  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               217

15        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts

e.      Supplier Specific Information                                                                         217

h.      Contract Information                                                                                       217  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 February 2017, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       The Living Wage Movement

Purpose

1.       To enable Felicia Scherrer and Fala Haulangi from The Living Wage Movement to update the local board about the Living Wage Campaign and the submission process for the Annual Plan. 

Executive summary

2.       The Living Wage Movement would appreciate the opportunity to connect with the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board to thank the local board for their support of the Living Wage and hope they will further support The Living Wage Movement in their submission to the Annual Plan.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thank Felicia Scherrer and Fala Haulangi from The Living Wage Movement for their presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Living Wage Briefing................................................................................ 5

 

 

8.2       Wiri BID Expansion

Purpose

1.       Audrey Williams, Manager, Wiri Business Association will update the local board on the Wiri Business Improvement District (BID) expansion ballot.

Executive summary

2.       Election Services were contracted to conduct the Wiri BID expansion ballot on behalf of Wiri Business Association and Auckland Council. Voting opened on Monday,
13 February and closed at midday on Monday, 13 March 2017.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thank Audrey William, Manager, Wiri Business Association, for her presentation.

 

 

8.3       Manukau BID Expansion

Purpose

1.       Kerry Burridge, General Manager, Manukau Business Association will update the local board on the Manukau Business Improvement District (BID) expansion that took place last year.

Executive summary

2.       Manukau Business Association went through a BID expansion last year and want to update the local board about it.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thank Kerry Burridge, General Manager, Manukau Business Association, for her presentation.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Manukau Ward Councillors Update

File No.: CP2017/02997

 

  

 

Purpose

A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Board Members' Report

 

File No.: CP2017/02760

 

  

Purpose

Providing Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the Board Members’ written and verbal reports.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

File No.: CP2017/02761

 

  

 

Purpose

This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the Chairperson’s verbal update.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts

 

File No.: CP2017/03448

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek feedback from local boards on maintenance contracts for parks, buildings and open space, prior to Finance & Performance Committee approval on 28 March 2017.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council manages over 5,000 sites across the region including parks, buildings and open space. Existing Auckland Council maintenance contracts for these sites expire on 30 June 2017. 

3.       Project 17 was setup to procure and implement new maintenance contracts due to take effect 1 July 2017. This includes Full Facilities, Arboriculture and Ecological services across the Auckland Council region.

4.       Over the last twelve months, Community Facilities has engaged with elected members through both formal and informal processes, to shape up the direction of this project and seek feedback on maintenance requirements and service levels.  Refer to Attachment A for the Political Engagement Timeline.

5.       Elected member feedback, including local priorities, informed the Request for Proposal document which was the basis of negotiation with suppliers. Refer to Attachment B for this local board’s resolutions dated September 2016.

6.       This report outlines the following documents which will form part of final maintenance contracts and standard service levels:

·         Attachment C      Standard and Enhanced Assets;

·         Attachment D      Full Facilities Contract Service Specifications;

·         Attachment E      Supplier Specific Information (CONFIDENTIAL);

·         Attachment F       Contractor Performance Balanced Scorecard;

·         Attachment G      Tupuna Maunga Values Specifications; and

·         Attachment H      Contract Information (CONFIDENTIAL).

7.       Community Facilities seek feedback from local boards on Attachments C, D and E, prior to Finance and Performance Committee approval on 28 March 2017.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on:

i.     Standard and Enhanced Assets (Attachment C);

ii.    Full Facilities Contract Service Specifications (Attachment D); and

iii.   Supplier Specific Information (Attachment E).

b)      note that the local board will have the opportunity to meet successful suppliers in April and May to discuss and refine local service level variations.

 

 

Comments

Process

8.       Over the last twelve months, Community Facilities has engaged with elected members through both formal and informal processes, to shape up the direction of this project and seek feedback on maintenance requirements and service levels. Refer to Attachment A for the Political Engagement Timeline. 

9.       An open, competitive tender process seeking proposals for the supply of full facilities, arboriculture and ecological maintenance services of council assets was conducted as follows:

·         On 10 August 2016, an Expression of Interest was published to identify market interest in providing maintenance services for buildings, parks and open spaces to Auckland Council.  36 Expressions of Interest were received.

·         Formal feedback from local boards on the project approach and proposed service specifications was received in September 2016.  

·         Feedback was also sought from local boards on the list of assets in their area, used as the basis of asset data in the Request for Proposal. 

·         Refer to Attachment B for this local board’s resolutions.

·         Feedback was used to inform the Request for Proposal document which was released on 28 October 2016 and submissions closed 9 January 2017.

·         Submissions were assessed and scored by an evaluation team against weighted criteria including methodology, resources and capability, innovation and SMART procurement, and price.

·         Negotiations are now underway with shortlisted suppliers, due for completion 10 March.

·         Recommended contracts for five areas across the region, including pricing and baseline service levels, will be presented to the Finance & Performance Committee on 28 March 2017 for final approval.

10.     Community Facilities seek feedback from local boards on Attachments C, D and E, prior to Finance and Performance Committee approval on 28 March 2017.

 

Approach

11.     Following a review last year of management and maintenance processes of council’s assets, this project has adopted an improved approach to maintenance services, to:

·         focus on the whole-of-life cycle of assets;

·         deliver more services without compromising quality;

·         encourage and incentivise contractors to be accountable for the assets and develop ownership at all levels of their service delivery;

·         provide a contractual framework that enables contractors to employ innovate ideas and methods without compromising on quality delivery; and

 


·           implement five new contract areas (called Tahi, Rua, Toru, Whā, Rima) to allow for better economies of scale.  The local boards represented within each area are:

Contract Area

Tahi

Rua

Toru

Whā

Rima

Devonport-Takapuna

Hibiscus & Bays

Kaipātiki

Upper Harbour

Albert-Eden

Great Barrier

Puketāpapa

Waiheke

Whau

Henderson-Massey

Rodney

Waitākere Ranges

Howick

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Orākei

Waitematā

Franklin

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Manurewa

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

Papakura

 

12.     A key change is that contracts will have a more outcome-based focus on service levels, as opposed to predictive or frequency based maintenance schedules (unless where necessary). This ensures service standards are consistently maintained and managed by suppliers.

13.     A standard maintenance service level is applied to every asset to ensure it is fit for purpose, in good condition and achieves community outcomes.

14.     Where an asset may have specific known demands such as high frequency use, high reputational risk, requires attendance due to its nature (e.g. old, troublesome asset) or is a heritage site, an enhanced level of service may be applied to the asset. 

15.     An enhanced service level should not be confused with poor performance from a supplier to provide the agreed standard service level.

16.     Refer to Attachment C outlining the updated asset list (including those requiring an enhanced service level) for this local board area as at March 2017. Please note that this asset list is continually reviewed to ensure up to date data in alignment to council decisions and asset assessments.

17.     Maintenance contracts have been negotiated to cover three core functions across the five areas:

·         Full Facilities;

·         Specialist Arboriculture; and

·         Specialist Ecological.

18.     Council may immediately terminate (or suspend the supplier’s performance of) the contract in whole or in part, by written notice to the supplier, if a persistent performance breach occurs. Please refer to the Contractor Management section in this report for further details.

19.     Refer to Attachment H (confidential) for further information about contract terms and Attachment E (confidential) for supplier specific information. 

Standard Service Levels

Full Facilities Contract (FFC)

20.     Service specifications determine the criteria and outcomes associated with maintaining an asset or facility, which then sets the foundation of a contract agreement.

21.     Refer to Attachment D for the Service Specifications expected across the Auckland region for Full Facilities maintenance work. In summary, these are service level output statements by category:

 

Full Facilities Category

Output Statement

Open Space

Parks, reserves and roadsides within Auckland are maintained and developed to provide a sustainable, safe, clean and healthy environment while assets are maintained and enhanced to meet the amenity and use needs of council, Auckland residents and visitors.

Arboriculture

 

Trees (under three metres in height) are maintained to an aesthetically pleasing state which promotes healthy growth with the tree adding to the resident or visitors experience with targeted maintenance activities to achieve healthy and safe trees.

Locking and Unlocking

Assets are actively managed to minimise vandalism and anti-social behavior

Buildings - Maintenance

All Auckland Council owned and/or operated facilities require on-going Planned and Response Maintenance (compliance and non-compliance) to ensure that all facilities provided for public and Auckland Council staff use are functional, fit-for-purpose, safe and where possible ensure that the building services are optimised to reduce disruption to the facilities operation.

Buildings –
Cleaning

All Auckland Council owned and/or operated buildings that require planned and response cleaning shall be cleaned to a standard that allows all buildings users to utilise a sanitary, hygienic, safe, functional and fit for purpose space for their operation. All litter and debris shall be removed from site and done so in a sustainable manner.

 

22.     Standard Operating Procedures have been developed to agree minimal functional requirements such as height of grass mowing, mulching thickness, goal post painting etc.  These procedures have been developed through expertise knowledge and are operational in nature.  

23.     Minor Capital Works (low value, low risk) is included in these contracts to ensure appropriate mitigation measures are incorporated when maintaining assets.

24.     The baseline service level for specialist sportsfield maintenance ensures sports playing surfaces are managed to provide surfaces and assets that are ‘fit for use’ for the type and level of sport being played and which maximise usage and support organised sporting activities.

25.     Specialist sportsfield renovation work includes:

·         Fertilisation, application, fertilisers;

·         Winter treatment - cambridge rolling, slicing and spiking, solid tine vertidraining, ground breaking, vibramoling;

·         Summer - vertimowing, dethatching, organic matter removal, leaf collection, scarifying/ dethatching, coring/hollow tine, core harvesting, undersowing/oversowing, sand topdressing, soil topdressing, vibramoling, mole plough, verti-draining, ground probe aeration, weed control, weed control (couch), agrichemical controls on sportsfields, top planning;

·         Turfing – turf replacement (minor);

·         Artificial - cleaning, rubber top-ups, grooming, repair, hygiene;

·         Supply bulk supply materials - eg sand, soil, seed, agrichemicals, turf (winter and summer species), fertilizer;

·         Renovation works programme development; and

·         Not that the Full Facilities contract incorporates sports mowing, line marking, goal posts/furniture, soil and/or tissue sample analysis, grass selection, pest and disease detection, minor turf repairs, renovation works programme report, cricket.

26.     Sportsfield renovations seasonally renovate surfaces back into condition for subsequent sporting code use, including renewal of surfaces that have reached their life span, or reinstating an asset that has been damaged through excessive overuse.

27.     Sportsfield renovations are collaboratively implemented to complement maintenance activities in the contract.

28.     When asset components are replaced (e.g. turf type), the same style and material type is supplied, unless otherwise directed by Auckland Council.

Arboriculture Specialist Contract

29.     The scope of the arboriculture contract covers the management of council owned trees i.e. it’s ‘urban forest and rural surrounds’

30.     The arboriculture contract includes, but is not limited to, the following services:

·         general administration and communication;

·         inspections and programmes;

·         pruning;

·         reactive works;

·         clean-up;

·         tree removal;

·         planting;

·         aftercare maintenance; and

·         tree asset inventory.

31.     The arboriculture contract will be managed as a prescriptive measure and value contract, but may shift to output basis through the term of the contract. Work will be managed on both a scheduled and reactive basis.

32.     Auckland Council will retain ownership of all chipped bio-mass (foliage, brushwood and wood) resulting from Arboriculture Specialist contracts. 

33.     It will be expected that the supplier takes a proactive approach in relation to Council’s assets, including those not directly related to the contract’s scope. This will involve reporting any faults or issues, regardless of asset ownership in a timely manner e.g. reporting a vandalised bus shelter (Auckland Transport) next to a street garden.

34.     The management of Kauri Dieback and weeds are incorporated into Standard Operating Procedures included in the Arboriculture Specialist contract.

Ecological Specialist Contract

35.     The ecological contract provides for the maintenance of Auckland Council’s high value ecology sites, and significant bush and natural areas. The prioritised targeted removal of animal and plant pests from council’s open spaces is a core service within this contract. The overarching objective is to restore and rehabilitate native biodiversity in a sustainable and long term approach.

36.     The scope of the ecological contract includes:

·         preparing ecological restoration plans that take a long term perspective and provide the optimum cost effective management to reinstate the ecological processes, so the site environmental values are conserved and enhanced;

·         assessing, monitoring and controlling pests impacting the ecological processes and or values at each site. This includes but is not limited to plant, animal and invertebrate pests; and

·         restorative planting of sites.

37.     The supplier is required to have all vehicles to carry a web based GPS tracking system.  This enables reports to be produced on journey length and stay.

38.     The ecological contract is supplemented by an Ecological and Environmental Pest Control Standard Operating Procedure which provides guidance to methodologies and site-specific requirements.

39.     The supplier is required to report any hazardous dumping to Auckland Council’s Pollution Hot Line immediately

Other Maintenance Priorities

SMART Procurement

40.     The following SMART procurement outcomes are requirements outlined in maintenance contracts:

·         Increase capability and capacity – suppliers are required to create sustainable businesses that provide training and development to ensure continued quality delivery of services over the term of the contract;

·         Youth employment - contracts should facilitate connecting work-ready youth to local employment by creating local jobs with training and development opportunities;

·         Diversity and inclusion - contracts should promote inclusion, reduce discrimination and remove barriers to opportunity and participation, particularly for disadvantaged groups who face barriers to employment e.g. long term unemployed, and people with disabilities;

·         Valuing Māori - suppliers are required to work collaboratively with council to achieve better outcomes with Māori, by supporting skill development and labour market participation, and engagement with Māori owned businesses;

·         Pacific Auckland - contracts should support further training, development and labour market participation for Pacific youth and communities; and

·         Local community and economy - contracts should support local business where reasonable/practical, and should meet the social needs of the delivery area.

41.     Contracts have retained flexibility to remove assets (by contract variation) to facilitate active participation by the third sector/volunteers to deliver maintenance outcomes.

42.     Suppliers (and subcontractors) are required to establish, document, implement, maintain and continually improve an environmental management system. This will capture practices such as an environmental policy, environmental impacts of significance, legal requirements, environmental objectives and targets. At a mimimum the management system will monitor and measure energy conservation, water conservation, waste management and recycling, chemical use, Scope 1 and Scope 2 Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

43.     Suppliers are proposed to annually reduce the carbon footprint from year two onwards.

44.     The environmental management system must be certified by an accredited third party to the standard of ISO14001, EcoWarranty, Enviro-Mark or an agreed-upon alternative programme. Where the supplier has certified to the Enviro-Mark programme they will commit to attaining the highest level of certification, Enviro-Mark Diamond.

45.     Please refer to Attachment E for further supplier specific information.

Weed Management

46.     A memorandum from Barry Potter, Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services, was circulated to local board members on 15 November 2016 regarding weed management. A second memorandum was circulated to all elected members on 16 December 2016 providing an update on the implementation of Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy, particularly with regards to this project. 

47.     New maintenance contracts have been designed to reflect the objectives of Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy which includes implementing the following changes:

48.     What will change?

·         Minimise agrichemical use

§  the new contracts require a reduction in agrichemical usage and this will be closely monitored - a 10% penalty of the monthly invoice to the supplier will be applied if the ‘annual reduction in use of agrichemicals’ KPI is not met;

§  chemical usage will be reported monthly by suppliers and tracked on a local park by local park basis.  Please refer to the Contract Management section in this report for further information on reporting, auditing and KPI’s;

§  contracts will standardise which type of glysophate will be used across the region by all suppliers;

§  manual and mechanical weed control methods are currently used in and around children’s playgrounds across the region.  Agrichemicals are not used within these spaces. This will continue under new contracts; and

§  mechanical edging will be applied along paving and other hard edges. 

·         Integrated weed management, ensure best practice and value for money

§  the volume of mulch in gardens and garden beds will be increased to reduce other methods of weed control;

§  change from frequency based maintenance contracts to a focus on environmental outcomes, to encourage suppliers to be more innovative in their approach to weed management and edge control;

§  learnings from innovations will be socialized across all suppliers to promote continuous improvement and best practice methodology;

§  suppliers will be encouraged and rewarded for innovation in weed management at quarterly supplier forums;

§  development of a weed management manual which is currently being reviewed by the Best Practice Reference Group;

§  establishment of the Best Practice Reference Group made up of external technical experts and community representatives as per the policy action plan; and

§  a No-Spray register will be used by suppliers to ensure consistency in practice and process.

·         Empower the community to manage weeds in accordance with the policy

§  weed control programmes in ecological restoration contracts will be planned and agreed in advance of the works;

§  targeted weed control, including the use of volunteers, will be enabled to ensure that agrichemical usage is minimized and integrated with other sustainable practices such as replanting  with eco-sourced species to prevent weed re-infestation;

§  contracts include supplier inductions and training on public awareness of vegetation controls, including herbicides and the importance of public education, including signage when spraying; and

§  improved information on council’s website outlining how and why council controls weeds.

49.     At the 13 December 2016 Finance and Performance Committee meeting, the following resolutions relating to weed management were approved:

·         an addition to recommend to the Environment and Community Committee as follows:

a)      Note that significant funding reallocations are not within the scope of the Annual Plan process

b)      Endorse glysophate reduction targets within the current budget

c)      Express support for the continued implementation of the Weed Management Policy

d)      Agree that a political group be appointed by the Mayor, monitors and reviews the implementation of Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy and practice

e)      Recommend that a review and consultation of allocated funding take place through the upcoming Long-term Plan process

·         resolution d) reshapes the weed management political advisory group

Co-Governance

50.     As pre-agreed with co-governance partners, suppliers submitted a detailed report and costings on how they would manage and provide specific services to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority and / or Parakai Recreation Reserve in their preferred areas. 

51.     This report is being socialised with leaders and representatives from co-governance entities with the outcome being determined at the end of March 2017 with either of the following options being the preferred solution:

·         maintain the status quo;

·         offer maintenance services to the supplier in the specific area; or

·         offer maintenance services to only one supplier who would be accountable for all outcomes.

52.     Whenua Rangatira (Bastion Point) – no change proposed to current maintenance agreements where iwi are responsible for managing this site.

 

Community Empowerment

53.     Local boards expressed strong support to enable community empowerment including volunteers, through these contracts.

54.     Contracts have the flexibility to accommodate contract variations such as community empowerment initiatives, however compliance with Health and Safety, legislative obligations, agreed service levels and operating procedures are critical in these cases.

55.     Local boards should work with their strategic brokers (within the Arts, Community and Events team) to identify requirements and opportunities, who will then liaise with Community Facilities to agree and implement suitable solutions.


Contract Management

Contractor performance

56.     Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) measure how well the Supplier is doing to meet specifications and outcomes. KPI’s cover five categories:

·        quality;

·        innovation;

·        management;

·        smart procurement and environmental management; and

·        stakeholder, customer and community impact.

57.     Health and Safety (H&S) is a contractual obligation.

58.     KPI’s are measured monthly, bi-monthly, quarterly or annually.

59.     Suppliers are required to meet Full Facilities Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) and Minor Capital Work KPI’s to have their level of direct award for Minor Capital Works increased, as an incentive for good performance.

60.     For each category component failed, suppliers must provide an improvement plan to resolve the performance issue.

61.     If a supplier continues to fail on a category component beyond the performance resolution improvement plan deadline, council will be entitled to withhold payment of 10% of each month's invoices (excluding minor capex) until the supplier starts meeting the category component target.

62.     Suppliers have the right to earn back withheld payments relating to category components if they start meeting required target levels by a timeframe set by council.

63.     Attachment F outlines the Contractor Performance Balanced Scorecard that will be monitored and applied across the region.

Auditing

64.     Auditing of contractor performance was previously conducted by external parties. However, this function is now being conducted internally by Community Facilities.  A team of auditors conduct spot checks onsite targeting 10% of all maintenance work conducted by each supplier.

Response maintenance

65.     Response maintenance work will be categorised by urgency and a maximum response time determined.  Criteria is still under negotiation and agreement for some suppliers.

66.     The supplier will undertake programmed maintenance, responsive maintenance and all other minor contract works (including emergency works on an as needs basis only) on Monday to Sunday, restricting noisy and any activities that may cause a nuisance to between the hours of:

·        7:00am and  6:00pm (52 weeks of the year); and

·        10:00am and 6:00pm (Saturdays and Sundays and statutory holidays).

67.     The supplier will provide a call out service 24 hours, 7 days a week, carried out as part of normal duties.

68.     Following completion of response maintenance work, the supplier will call the customer (between 8:00am and 6:00pm unless otherwise stated), to inform them that works have been undertaken and check that the customer is satisfied.


69.     It is expected that suppliers assist with ‘whole of life’ asset management which requires the supplier to assess and make recommendations on the optimal most cost effective balance of programmed maintenance, responsive maintenance, and renewal of assets across their whole life.

70.     Suppliers are required to update a condition assessment grading once a maintenance service has been undertaken, to be included in council’s asset management system, and to notify council of any significant degradation.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

71.     Project 17 has engaged with local boards through various channels including:

·        Local Board Chairs Procurement Working Group;

·        Local Board Chairs Forum presentations;

·        memorandums;

·        cluster workshops;

·        individual local board workshops; and

·        business meeting reports.

72.     Refer to Attachment A outlining the political engagement timeline.

73.     Community Facilities is now seeking feedback from local boards during the final stage of this procurement process, prior to Finance and Performance Committee approval of contracts.

Māori impact statement

74.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori.

75.     Māori responsiveness requires the collective effort of everyone. Under the new contracts, suppliers will work collaboratively with council to achieve better outcomes with Māori and for Auckland. This will include:

·        building positive relationships with Māori – effective communication and engagement with Māori, developing resilient relationships with mana whenua;

·        significantly lift Māori social and economic well-being; and

·        building Māori capability and capacity.

76.     Through these contracts, opportunities to support local community outcomes and economic development include (but are not limited to):

·        providing employment opportunities, in particular for local people and for youth;

·        increasing capability and capacity (apprenticeships, cadetships or equivalent) in particular for youth;

·           building on community and volunteer networks.

77.     The Request for Proposal outlined Tūpuna Maunga Value Specifications as outlined in Attachment G, which suppliers are required to support as part of new maintenance contracts. 

Implementation

78.     The transition into new contracts will commence once formal approval is agreed by the Finance & Performance Committee.

79.     Local boards will have the opportunity to meet new suppliers in April and May 2017 to discuss specific local priorities. Any local service level variations may need to be reflected in contract variations and implementation timelines agreed with the supplier.

80.     New maintenance contracts take effect on 1July 2017. Note that there will be approximately six to twelve months to bed in changes, in particularly systems and reporting.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Political Engagement Timeline

5

b

Local Board Resolutions (September 2016)

5

c

Standard and Enhanced Assets

5

d

FFC Service Specifications

5

e

Supplier Specific Information (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

f

Contractor Performance Balanced Scorecard

5

g

Tupuna Maunga Values Specifications

5

h

Contract Information (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh – Principal Business Analyst

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


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2016 Elections - Highlights and Issues

 

File No.: CP2017/03245

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide local board input into submissions to the Justice and Electoral Select Committee’s “Inquiry into the 2016 local authority elections”.

Executive summary

2.       This report has been presented to the Governing Body which has agreed that the report will be presented to all local boards for their feedback on submissions to the Justice and Electoral Select Committee’s “Inquiry into the 2016 local authority elections”.  The issues on which submissions might be based are outlined under the heading later in the report “Submission to Justice and Electoral Select Committee on legislative change”.  Local board comments will be reported back to the Governing Body, to decide the final form of the submission.

3.       Planning for the 2016 elections commenced at the end of 2014.  Staff presented a report to the Governing Body in March 2015, which set out the areas of focus for achieving outcomes in terms of voter and candidate experiences and turnout.

4.       This report:

(i)         describes initiatives taken in the areas of focus

(ii)        evaluates the achievement of the outcomes

(iii)       notes other activities associated with the election, such as inaugural meetings

(iv)       summarises the budget and forecast expenditure 

(v)        identifies issues for the council to follow up 

(vi)    proposes submissions to make to Parliament’s Justice and Electoral Select Committee’s “Inquiry into the 2016 local authority elections”

(vii)    outlines the timetable for the review of representation arrangements leading up to the 2019 elections.

5.       The 2016 elections were successful. Particular highlights were:

(i)     a successful marketing campaign based on the ‘showyourlove’ brand

(ii)     innovative approaches to engaging with the community, including through social media, websites and the Love Bus

(iii)    increased participation in Kids Voting

(iv)   personal assistance provided to the visually impaired

(v)    increased turnout over 2013

(vi)   the elections came within budget.

6.       This report is presented to local boards to provide input to a submission to the Select Committee, with the final submission presented back to the Governing Body in May 2017. The submission needs to be lodged by December 2017.

 


 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      agree its comments to be reported back to the Governing Body for inclusion in the Auckland Council’s submission to the Justice and Electoral Select Committee’s “Inquiry into the 2016 local authority elections”.

 

Comments

7.       A report to the Governing Body in March 2015 set out the strategic approach to the 2016 elections.  It identified the following areas of focus:

·    communications and community engagement

·    candidate awareness

·    on-line voting

·    optimum use of council resources.

 

Those areas of focus were to deliver the following outcomes:

·          an excellent experience for candidates and voters

·          a voter turnout of at least 40 per cent

·          a candidate-to-member ratio of three

·          user-centric, innovative and transparent local body elections.

 

8.       The following sections describe initiatives taken in these areas of focus and the achievement of the outcomes.

Actions taken in areas of focus

Communications and community engagement

9.       Voter participation statistics showed that previous participation rates were low among 18 - 39 year olds and this age group was a key focus for the Election Planning Team. 

10.     Initiatives included:

·        a comprehensive marketing campaign based on the “showyourlove” brand

·        advertising – billboards, adshells, bus backs, press, magazine, radio, digital, ethnic radio and newspapers

·        heart ballot boxes

·        digital bus shelter voting tallies

·        targeted social media: videos and articles via VoteAkl social media sites, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube

·        “Our Auckland” council’s news channel

·        Auckland Council channels for posters, such as libraries and service centres

·        the Love Bus and community presentations

·        showyourlove.co.nz web pages for information about candidates

·        Kids Voting programme in schools.

 


11.     The Election Team tested the “showyourlove” brand with audiences.  Feedback, particularly from young people, has been very positive.  Wellington City Council also developed its own brand, using our ‘love’ concept.  Auckland Council and Wellington City Council experienced greater increases over 2013 turnouts than other metropolitan councils.

12.     The Love Bus provided a visual reminder of the elections.  It stopped at various locations where people gathered, such as at malls, and staff engaged with passers-by.

13.     An engagement programme included making presentations to community groups:

·        80 events including: 22 Love Bus events, 11 English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) events, 22 community presentations (total attendance at these presentations was approximately 800), three meetings or informal chats, five5 information stalls

·        10 of these events were run in conjunction with the Electoral Commission

·        sessions were facilitated by the deaf community, Disability Network NZ, Tongan and Samoan churches and Korean Youth Leadership Institute independent of council support

·        24 engagement sessions included an interpreter for at least one language; interpreters for eight different languages, including New Zealand sign language, were used

·        groups reached included faith communities (Jewish, Muslim), Rainbow communities, Youth, Korean, Chinese, African, Indian, Tongan, Samoan, Sri Lankan, Somalian, Ethiopian, Rwandan, Filipino, West Indian, Burmese, Cambodian and Japanese

·        all advisory panels contributed to the elections programme

·        engagement activities and events were run in 15 of the 21 local board areas

·        approximately 24,000 Aucklanders were reached by engagement activities.

 

14.     The showyourlove.co.nz website provided information about candidates for voters.  People often state, when asked in surveys, the reason they do not vote is they lack information about candidates.  This website was planned very carefully to ensure that council did not provide any candidate with an electoral advantage.  All candidates were given the same opportunity to provide information in addition to the information in their candidate profile statements.

15.     A survey conducted after the 2016 elections gauged the effectiveness of these initiatives.  The sample size was 1,259 people.

16.     Awareness and likelihood of voting:

·        awareness of the elections rose from 83 per cent before the campaign to 93 per cent following the campaign

·        before the election, 75 per cent intended to vote but after the election only 63 per cent (of the survey sample) actually voted

·        of the 35 per cent who did not vote, 56 per cent intended to vote but did not

·        reasons given for not voting by the 35 per cent who did not vote include:

o   don’t know anything about the candidates (25 per cent)

o   don't know enough about the policies (22 per cent)

o   did not know when voting finished, missed deadline (18 per cent)

o   forgot to vote (18 per cent)

o   can't work out who to vote for (16 per cent)

o   not interested in politics or politicians (14 per cent)

o   didn’t think vote would make a difference (11 per cent)

o   couldn’t be bothered voting (11 per cent)

o   too much effort to select the candidate (10 per cent)

o   had other commitments during that time (10 per cent).

17.     Effectiveness of messaging:

·        53 per cent said the ads made them think of their community

·        44 per cent said the ads reminded them of what they love about their city

·        46 per cent said the ads made them more likely to vote.

18.     21 per cent used the web and social media for information about the elections – mostly the Auckland Council website.

19.     Of those who intended to vote but did not vote, 25 per cent said on-line or app based voting would encourage them to vote.

20.     74 per cent said they would prefer on-line voting over postal voting with 18 per cent preferring postal voting; those who preferred on-line voting were spread amongst all age groups but were mainly in the younger age groups.

21.     The Kids Voting programme was an on-line voting experience for students.  Students cannot legally take part in the actual election, but Kids Voting creates awareness of the elections which often flows from the participating students to their families. The Election Team prepared teaching kits class teachers could use to explain how council works.  There was a hypothetical referendum question that students voted on using the STV voting system.  11,730 students and 56 schools registered to take part, compared with 8,319 students and 44 schools in 2013.  4,748 students from 41 schools actually voted.  The lessons provided to the schools by the Election Team were:

·        an introduction to Auckland Council

·        an introduction to elections and voting

·        a real world on-line referendum case study

·        Local boards, wards and local issues

·        researching candidates.

Candidate awareness of election information

22.     The council’s website provided information for candidates.  This included:

·        candidate information handbook

·        candidate audio booklet

·        FAQs

·        research material

·        how to be nominated

·        election timetable

·        video explaining Auckland Council

·        posters on all Auckland Council channels

·        ads in newspapers

·        radio

·        digital ads.

23.     The Election Team focused on on-line content over hard copy booklets.  It did not hold candidate information evenings following the experience in 2013 of twenty-eight information evenings gathering only small attendance.

24.     Wellington City Council publicised community-based candidate meetings on its website which people apparently found useful.  The council could consider this for 2019.

On-line voting

25.     Prior to the elections, the Associate Minister of Local Government announced that trials for on-line voting would not take place for the 2016 elections. 

26.     The community expects to have an on-line option, provided concerns about the security of on-line voting are addressed.  In the post-election awareness survey, 74 per cent said they would prefer on-line voting over postal voting.

27.     The Finance and Performance Committee resolved in December 2016 to request the Minister of Local Government to explore a pilot trial of an electronic voting system including for by-elections.

Optimum use of council resources

28.     Key areas of the council involved in the elections were:

·        Democracy Services and Communications and Engagement

·        libraries and service centres held election information, received nominations and issued special votes

·        communications staff undertook advertising, branding, web content, social media with assistance from the design studio

·        bylaws compliance staff enforced the Auckland Transport Elections Signs Bylaw

·        Legal Services provided legal advice when required

·        Research and Evaluation (RIMU) staff provided advice on demographic data and undertook research for the report on the order of names.

29.     Elections planning staff worked closely with the Electoral Commission, Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) and the Society of Local Government Managers (SOLGM).

30.     Council’s election services provider (Independent Election Services Ltd) was based in the central business area, in Anzac Avenue, and was the main central city office.  Staff later provided limited services at the Bledisloe service centre in response to demand.

Achievement of outcomes

31.     The desired outcomes were:

·        an excellent experience for candidates and voters

·        a voter turnout of at least 40 per cent

·        a candidate-to-member ratio of three

·        user-centric, innovative and transparent local body elections.

Candidate experience

32.     For the first time, the council conducted an on-line survey of candidates. 150 candidates took part.  This feedback shows a positive candidate experience. 


33.     Key findings were:

·        76 per cent said it was easy, or very easy, to find information

·        88 per cent said that overall they could access the information they needed

·        87 per cent said they used resources on the Auckland Council website

·        83 per cent were aware of the “Love your Auckland – stand for council” campaign

·        80 per cent contributed to their information on the showyourlove.co.nz website

·        50 per cent said this was their first time standing for elected office with Auckland Council and 50 per cent said it was not their first time.

34.     The Election Team has noted some candidate issues for following up or improvement:

(i)    a couple of candidates were nominated for positions for which they did not intend to stand.  In one case a number of candidates on the one ticket arrived at a service centre together, creating increased demand on staff at the last minute.  In the future, the Election Team will co-ordinate with ticket campaign managers to help manage the processing of nominations and will provide additional briefings to staff helping at service centres.  Legislative change to allow electronic submission of nominations to improve these processes will be sought.

(ii)   there was a question whether a Samoan matai title could be used on the nomination form.  The legislation prohibits “titles” but does not define “title”.  The Electoral Officer, after receiving legal and cultural advice, allowed matai “titles” on the basis they were used more like names than titles.  It would be helpful to have legislative guidance on this.

(iii)  some candidates expressed concern about the requirement to state in the profile statement whether they lived in the area for which they were standing.  The council previously submitted in opposition to this requirement.

Voter experience

35.     The awareness survey showed that voters used on-line tools to find out about voting and about candidates.

36.     Issues which negatively affected the experience of voters (some outside the control of council):

(i)    a small number of voters in one area did not receive voting documents.  The Electoral Officer received about 90 applications for special votes from voters in that area.

(ii)   voters outside the area during the voting period either could not vote or had to apply for a special vote. An example was a voter who was overseas and who had arranged for a special vote to be posted to them but who could not meet the deadline for posting it back from overseas.  An ability to supply the voting documents electronically would assist

(iii)  an issue which continues to affect the voter experience is the mixture of different voting systems on the one voting document and different orders of candidate names.

37.     Ten staff volunteered to assist blind people with their voting.  This was arranged in partnership with the Blind Foundation and the volunteers were trained and made declarations as electoral officials.  The volunteers visited voters at their residences and help them mark their voting documents.  The Auckland Branch of Blind Citizens NZ wrote an appreciative letter to the mayor and chief executive.

Voter turnout

38.     The council aimed for a 40 per cent turnout.  The turnout was 38.5 per cent, an increase of 3.7 per cent over the 2013 turnout.


39.     Across all of New Zealand, there was a slight increase over 2013:

2010

2013

2016

Change

%

National voter turnout %

49.0

41.3

42.0

+0.7

 

40.     Across metropolitan councils, Auckland and Wellington achieved the two highest increases:

Voter turnout % - Metro

2010

2013

2016

Change

%

Auckland

 51.0

 34.9

 38.5

+3.7

Christchurch City

52.2

42.9

38.3

-4.6

Dunedin City

 53.0

 43.1

45.2

 +2.1

Hamilton City

 37.8

 38.3

33.6

-4.7

Hutt City Council

 40.4

 36.6

37.8

 +1.2

Nelson City

 52.2

 52.2

52.1

-0.1

Palmerston North City     

 43.2

 38.7

39.1

0.4

Porirua City

 39.1

 36.6

38.0

+1.5

Tauranga City

 43.8

 37.8

38.0

+0.2

Upper Hutt City

44.3

40.8

41.0

+0.2

Wellington City

 40.0

 41.5

45.6

+4.1

Total

 45.0

 38.0

39.3

+1.3

Candidate to member ratio

41.     The target was three candidates per position.

42.     There were 19 candidates for mayor.  In 10 out of 13 electoral ward issues for councillors, the ratio of candidates to positions was 3 to 1, or greater.

43.     There were 32 local board electoral issues (there are 21 local boards but elections in some local board areas are on a subdivision basis).  In 9, the ratio of candidates to positions was 3 to 1 or greater.  For a local board that is not divided into subdivisions, it is harder to achieve the ratio because the number of positions is greater.

44.     Overall, there were 468 candidates for 170 positions, which is a ratio of 2.8 to 1.

User-centric, innovative and transparent local body elections

45.     The key ‘users’ in an election are the candidates and the voters.  Feedback shows:

·   candidates got the information they needed

·   compared to previous elections voters could find out more about candidates, through the “showyourlove” website

46.     Assistance was provided to voters who were blind. Blind Citizens NZ communicated its appreciation back to the council.

47.     The report details above a number of innovative activities such as the Love Bus and Heart Ballot Boxes.

48.     Aspirations to have on-line voting were not met.  There is a need to provide a user-friendly option for voters who do not use postal services.  Voters who are not in the area during the voting period also have issues. If a voter is overseas, by the time voting documents have been posted to them (if they have a reliable postal address) there is not sufficient time to post them back.  The ability to download blank forms, and to scan and email completed forms, should be investigated.

49.     For candidates, there is only the one option of paper-based nomination forms.  Submitting nominations electronically needs to be investigated.

50.     The communications and community awareness programmes were innovative and received positive feedback, as noted above under “Communications and Community Engagement”.

51.     Ensuring candidates and voters had sufficient information assisted the transparency of the elections.

Other activities relating to the elections

52.     The Executive Leadership Team adopted a staff policy around political neutrality and involvement in the election process outside of work hours.  The Governing Body adopted an elected members’ policy dealing with issues such as the use of council resources by incumbent members.  The policy required close management of council communications during the sensitive period and a panel met weekly to monitor this.

53.     Council staff enforce the Auckland Transport Election Sign Bylaw and dealt with 162 complaints.  Earlier in the year there was media coverage about the use of commercial billboards.  This will be addressed in a review of the Auckland Transport bylaw.

54.     Following each election there are a number of activities arranged for elected members:

(i)      induction sessions for members

(ii)      refreshing the technology provided to members

(iii)     powhiri for all members

(iv)    inaugural meetings of the governing body and the local boards at which members make their statutory declarations.

Cost of the election

55.     Summary of budget and expenditure:

Budget

Planned

Actual

(at 31/01/17)

Forecast

Comments

Election Services - IES

$4,893,000

$4,515,500

$4,653,490

Amount payable to IES as per contract plus a 10 per cent buffer for variable costs to be determined at wash-up in Feb ’17, Whilst costs are currently forecast to arrive over contract amount, these are expected to be within budget (including buffer).

Communications & Engagement (internal charge)

$1,221,000

$1,160,960

$1,221,498

Expected to meet budget once final costs are confirmed.

Staff

$620,000

$659,637

$669,637

Slight over-spend in staff due to increased programme scope and staff turnover.

Kids Voting

$50,000

$49,424

$49,424

Steering Group approved exceeding budget for increased number of participating schools and students. This includes $30,000 for IES for on-line voting capability.

Community Engagement

$40,000

$27,441

$27,441

Initial Elections budget had no allocation for Community Engagement hence in 2016 $40k was reallocated from other items. Under-spend here due to final budget being confirmed after a lower cost engagement schedule was already planned. $10k for translations and accessibility was covered by C&E budget.

Governing Body Inaugural Meeting

$57,000

$49,661

$52,697

Initial budget had allocated $81,000 for post-election costs of which specifics were not known to Elections team. This was reduced to cover Inaugural Meeting only and then further to fund Community Engagement. In 2013, Inaugural Meeting cost was $57,000.

Local board inaugural meetings

$129,300

$97,921

$129,300

The budgets for travel and equipment hireage were not fully utilised.

Research

$20,000

$6,404

$8,700

This amount was reduced from $30,000 to fund Community Engagement.

Pre-election IES, DDB & Buzz

$0

$48,980

$48,980

Unplanned costs for development of elections strategy were funded by Democracy Services in 2015.

Miscellaneous

$0

$9,244

$9,244

Includes judicial recount, costs associated with services at libraries and service centres, other programme-wide costs and office expenses.

Recoveries - DHBs & LTs

-$1,500,000

-$622,500

-$1,517,964

Full recoverable amount will be determined at wash-up in February 2017. Current estimates expect to meet planned amount.

Total

$5,530,300

$6,002,672

$5,352,447

Overall budget under-spend expected once wash-up is confirmed in February 2017.

56.     The costs of the Howick by-election ($104,000) will be absorbed in the budget if possible.

Issues to progress further

Howick by-election

57.     A member of the Howick Local Board resigned at the inaugural meeting of the board.  The council held a by-election at a cost of $104,000, which the Finance and Performance Committee has approved as unbudgeted expenditure.  The committee considered the council should have the option of appointing to a vacancy that occurs within six months of an election and that the council should have the option of conducting a by-election on-line. The committee resolved:

“That the Finance and Performance Committee:

c)    agree that the Mayor will write to the Minister of Local Government requesting, among other amendments to the Local Electoral Act 2001 necessary to improve the conduct of local elections, an amendment to section 117 to allow a local authority using the first past the post electoral system to determine by resolution whether to fill an extraordinary vacancy which occurs up to six months after the previous triennial local government election either by appointing the highest polling unsuccessful candidate from the previous triennial local government election, or by holding a by-election.

d)    request the Minister of Local Government to explore a pilot-trial of an electronic voting system including by-elections.”

(Resolution number FIN/2016/1)

58.     Both of these issues are discussed further in this report.

On-line voting

59.     Survey results show the community prefers on-line voting.  The government previously established a working party which made recommendations for a staged approach with trials in 2016.  The government supported this and set out the requirements to be met for a council to establish a trial. Auckland Council was considered to be too large for a trial and was not eligible.  In April 2016 the Associate Minister of Local Government announced the trial would not proceed as requirements had not been met.

60.     The government wants local government to lead on-line voting, subject to its requirements being met.  LGNZ should co-ordinate the local government sector’s development of on-line voting and Mayor Goff and Councillor Hulse will be pursuing this with the Local Government New Zealand National Council.

Voter participation

61.     In order to prepare for the 2019 elections a voter participation project has been established.  The main aims of the project are to reduce barriers to participation, encourage diversity and increase awareness and understanding of council and local elections. 

62.     The planning team for the 2016 elections has now completed its task and has been disbanded, however a position of Senior Advisor, Voter Participation, has been established within Democracy Services to provide continuity between the work that was carried out for the 2016 elections and the engagement that needs to occur for the 2019 elections. 

Research on order of names

63.     An analysis of the 2010 and 2013 election results was undertaken so that the council could decide whether the order of names on voting documents should be alphabetical or random.  Further research will be undertaken and provided to the council when it next makes a decision on the order of names.

Review of Auckland Transport Election Signs Bylaw

64.     Auckland Transport has undertaken to review the bylaw.  The review will take place in time for implementation for the 2017 parliamentary election.

Submission to Justice and Electoral Select Committee on legislative change

65.     The Justice and Electoral Select Committee conduct an enquiry following each election.  Submissions on the inquiry into the 2016 elections will close in December 2017.

66.     This report seeks input from local boards for the submission, particularly on the following issues. A proposed submission will be reported to the governing body later in 2017.

(i)      Matai names

     The Local Electoral Act 2001 prohibits the use of official titles when listing candidate names on the voting document.  Names that can be used include a registered name or a name by which the candidate has been commonly known for the six months prior to an election.  Although sometimes referred to as ‘matai titles’, legal advice provided to staff is that these are more in the nature of names than of a title denoting the holding of some sort of office.  To avoid doubt, the legislation should give guidance.

(ii)      Vacancies occurring within six months of an election

     Since the 2016 elections were held, three vacancies have occurred – Auckland (resignation of local board member), Bay of Plenty Regional Council (death) and Waikato Regional Council (death).  When considering the budget for the Howick  by-election, the governing body resolved to seek a law change allowing a local authority using the first past the post electoral system to appoint the highest polling unsuccessful candidate to a vacancy occurring within six months of an election.

(iii)       Legal requirement for candidate to state whether residing in area

     Some candidates complained about this requirement.  The council has previously submitted in opposition to it and may consider doing so again. Following the 2013 elections, the select committee recommended that the requirement be removed and noted that candidates for parliamentary elections did not have to make a similar statement.  However, it has not yet been removed.

(iv)       Timing of school holidays

     The school holidays overlap with the postal voting period.  Many people go out of the area during school holidays and do not vote.  Currently local government elections are on the second Saturday in October. Moving election day to the first Saturday in October would provide one week before election day that would not overlap with school holidays. This still gives time to adopt the annual report and it provides an additional week between the elections and the end of the year for the new council to attend to business, such as a draft annual plan.

(v)          Electronic transmission of voting documents to and from voters overseas

     Voters who are overseas during the postal voting period often do not have enough time to post back voting documents prior to election day, after receiving their voting documents in the post.  The select committee has previously recommended electronic transmission.  The government has supported sending blank voting documents electronically but has opposed the return of completed votes electronically.  On-line voting would also solve this issue.

(vi)       Electoral Officer to have access to the supplementary roll

     The processing of special votes relies on the Electoral Commission checking that voters are on the electoral roll.  If the EO had access to the supplementary roll, the EO could do this, with the potential to speed up the counting of special votes. This has previously been supported by the select committee and the government.

(vii)      Access to data associated with electoral roll

     It is a concern that local government election turnouts are low. Having access to statistical data associated with the electoral roll, such as age groups of electors, would be helpful when planning election awareness campaigns. Currently the Electoral Act only allows this information to be supplied for research into scientific or health matters.

(viii)     Electronic nominations and candidate profile statements. 

     The option to submit nominations electronically would benefit the candidate experience and it would lead to more accurate representation of candidate profile statements.  Currently there are over 600 profile statements to be typed, from copy supplied by candidates, and then proof-read.  Occasionally this leads to mistakes. 

(ix)    Legislative confirmation that local authorities may promote elections

     Legislation should give a clear mandate to local authorities to promote elections. This is to avoid any uncertainty about public funds being used for election promotion purposes.

(x)     Time period for printing electoral rolls

     Electoral rolls were not printed in time for the start of candidate nominations because the legislated time period is too short.  Extend time period for printing. This corrects a previous change to timeframes which shortened the time for printing the rolls.

(xi)    Electronic access to electoral rolls for election staff

     When processing candidate nominations, staff at service centres need to check whether nominators are on the electoral roll for the specified area.  They may only have one hard-copy version to share between staff processing nominations for different candidates.  It would be more efficient to access the current roll electronically.

(xii)    Close of voting time

     Extend voting later into the last day and create one full 'voting day'. The Electoral Officer received 18,000 votes on the Saturday morning via our ballot boxes. Extra time on the final Saturday would give voters more time to vote and could help turn the final Saturday into a voting day celebration.

(xiii)   Discourage inappropriate use of elections

     There were 19 candidates for mayor.  Clearly some of these had no chance of being elected but presumably used the opportunity to promote their cause. Consideration could be given as whether this is an issue that needs to be addressed.

(xiv)  Separation of DHB elections.

     A variety of election issues on the one voting document together with different voting systems and ordering of names confuses voters.  It would be better to hold DHB elections on a separate time, for example a separate year, or with the parliamentary elections.  However, this would increase the cost of an election to Auckland Council, which currently receives $1.5 million in recoveries from DHBs and Licensing Trusts.

(xv)   Candidate information in different languages

·       Candidate profile statements are limited to 150 words.  If a candidate profile statement is provided in English and Māori, then each version may have 150 words as Māori is an official language.  If a candidate profile statement includes English and a language other than Māori it is limited to 150 words in total. Consideration could be given to other options for candidates to provide information in languages relevant to their constituents.

(xvi)  Consistency between Electoral Regulations and Local Electoral Regulations

·         The Electoral Regulations include provisions that would be helpful to local elections such as:

o    Telephone dictation for voters with disabilities

o    Receipt of special votes electronically.

(xvii)  Relationship with Electoral Commission

·       Some voters, confused about who was responsible for running the council elections, contacted the Electoral Commission.  The Electoral Commission typically referred callers to the council and enquirers ended up calling the council call centre only to be referred on to Independent Election Services. There should be consideration to jointly promoting awareness about who enquirers should contact with queries about local elections. This does not require a legislative change but could be implemented through Local Government New Zealand.

Timetable for 2019 elections

 

Electoral system

67.     If the council wishes to change the electoral system from First Past the Post to Single Transferable Vote, a resolution is required by 12 September 2017. Such a resolution might then be subject to a petition for a poll. Alternatively the council could conduct a poll.

Māori wards

68.     If the council wishes to establish Māori wards, a resolution is required by 23 November 2017. Such a resolution might then be subject to a petition for a poll.  Alternatively the council could conduct a poll.

Review of representation arrangements

69.     The council is required to review:

(i)         whether the election of councillors is on a ward basis or at large and, for each local board, whether election of board members is on a subdivision basis or at large

(ii)        the number of members in each local board within a minimum of five and a maximum of twelve

(iii)       if there are wards or subdivisions, what the boundaries are and how many members there are in each

(iv)       the names of wards, subdivisions and local boards.

70.     Unlike other councils, the council cannot review the number of members of the Governing Body because the legislation sets this at 20 members.


71.     The statutory timetable for the review is:

Due dates

Requirement

No earlier than 1 March 2018 

A council resolution setting out the council’s initial proposal

Within 14 days of resolution but no later than 8 September 2018

Public notice of the resolution, providing at least one month for submissions

Within 6 weeks of close of submissions

The initial proposal may be amended after considering submissions.

Public notice of the final proposal

20 December 2018

Appeals from those who submitted on the initial proposal and fresh objections to any amendments are received

http://acsapcrm-sap.aucklandcity.govt.nz:8003/SAP/BC/BSP/SAP/thtmlb_styles/sap_skins/default/images/1x1.gif?sap-client=310&sap-language=EN&sap-domainRelax=min15 January 2019

Appeals and objections are forwarded to the Local Government Commission

11 April 2019

Appeals and objections are determined by the Local Government Commission, which may conduct hearings in order to do this

 

72.     The review will be conducted as one component of the wider governance framework review reported to the Governing Body last December.   The Governing Body established a political working party comprising 7 governing body members and 7 local board members.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

73.     The report is being presented to all local boards for their views, before being presented back to the Governing Body to finalise a submission to the select committee. 

Māori impact statement

74.     Initiatives that encourage the community to engage with elections will have a positive impact on Māori.  There are activities associated with elections that are particularly significant to mana whenua, such as the pōwhiri to welcome all elected members following the elections.

75.     The survey of candidates asked candidates to identify their ethnicities. Ten per cent of candidates were Māori, compared to 9 per cent of the total Auckland population.   As a result of the election, 7 per cent of elected members are Māori (115 of 170 elected members replied to the survey).

76.     There will be an opportunity to consider the establishment of Māori wards for the 2019 elections.

Implementation

77.     This report will be presented to local boards for their comments, to be included in a report back to the Governing Body so that the Governing Body can finalise its submission to the select committee.


 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Phil Wilson - Governance Director

Stephen Town - Chief Executive

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Draft Air Quality Bylaw and Statement of Proposal

 

File No.: CP2017/03394

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To invite local boards to provide feedback on the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires.

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting held on 23 February 2017, the Governing Body resolved:

Resolution number GB/2017/15

MOVED by Mayor P Goff, seconded by Cr L Cooper:

That the Governing Body:

a)     adopt the statement of proposal (Attachment B of the agenda report), which includes the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires, for public consultation under section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002.

b)     forward the statement of proposal (Attachment B of the agenda report) to local boards for their views.

3.       The council publicly notified the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires on
27 February 2017.  The public can make written submissions until 27 March 2017.

4.       Local boards are invited to provide feedback on the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires as follows:

·          in writing by 3 April 2017, and/or

·          orally at the local board hearings session scheduled for 19 April 2017. Staff request that local boards wishing to attend the hearing please notify the hearings team by
3 April 2017.

5.       The original report to the Regulatory Committee is provided in Attachment A.

6.       The Statement of Proposal: Draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires is provided in Attachment B.

7.       More information, such as the summary proposal and the submission form is also available, on the Shape Auckland website.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the opportunity to provide feedback on the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires

b)      agree to provide feedback on the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires in writing and/or by attending the local board hearings session on 19 April 2017.

 


Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Report to regulatory Committee - Statement of Proposal: Draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires

5

b

Statement of Proposal: Draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires

5

     

Signatories

Authors

Jasmin Kaur – Policy Analyst

Belinda Hansen – Team Leader Solicy Policy and Bylaws

Authorisers

Michael Sinclair – Manager Social Policy and Bylawas

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

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21 March 2017

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Hampton Park, 334R East Tamaki Road, East Tamaki

 

File No.: CP2017/03064

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To support

(a)  the revocation of the resolution passed by the Manukau City Council on 27 November 2008 (Minute No.CL/NOV/1214/08) declaring Lots 2 and 5 DP 63604 to be classified as a historic reserve in terms of Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, and

(b)  to replace that resolution with another resolution pursuant to Section 14 (1) of the Reserves Act declaring Lots 2 and 5 DP 63604 to be a reserve within the meaning of the Reserves Act and to be held for historic purposes.

Executive summary

2.       Hampton Park comprises 12 hectares and lies at 334R East Tamaki Road in East Tamaki.   Hampton Park is owned by the Auckland Council and is held as a classified historic reserve under the Reserves Act. 

3.       Lots 2 and 5 DP 63604, together with another four adjoining land parcels, form Hampton Park.    In March 1985 Lots 2 and 5 were both acquired by the Manukau City Council from a private land owner under the Local Government Act 1974 and were not acquired for reserve purposes under the Reserves Act.

4.       In November 2008 the Manukau City Council resolved pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act to classify Lots 2 and 5 as a historic reserve.  Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act was the incorrect provision to use since Section 16 (2A) can only empower a council to classify council owned land where such land is already held by the council under the Reserves Act.  

5.       Section 14 (1) of the Reserves Act empowers any council owned land to be declared to be a reserve within the meaning of the Reserves Act and should have been used in this case to declare Lots 2 and 5 to be a reserve within the meaning of the Reserves Act and to be held for historic purposes.

6.       Provided the council agrees to pass such a resolution in terms of Section 14 (1) of the Reserves Act, the council’s Minister of Conservation’s delegate can then sign a gazette notice declaring this action.  Once that notice has been published in the New Zealand Gazette, Lots 2 and 5 will both be automatically classified as a historic reserve by virtue of Section 16 (2) of the same Act.   

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      support a recommendation to the Environment and Community Committee that the resolution passed by the Manukau City Council on 27 November 2008 declaring Lots 2 and 5 DP 63604 to be classified as a historic reserve in terms of Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act be revoked.

b)      support a recommendation to the Environment and Community Committee that pursuant to Section 14 (1) of the Reserves Act the Committee resolves to declare Lots 2 and 5 DP 63604 to be a reserve within the meaning of the Reserves Act and to be held for historic purposes.

 

 

Comments

7.       No prior public advertising or local iwi consultation is required because there is no statutory change being made to the reserve under the Reserves Act, ie the historic reserve classification will remain the same as will both the ownership and management of the reserve as a historic reserve.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.       The recommendations within this report fall within the Local Board’s authority relating to local recreation, sports and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

9.       There is no need to consult with local iwi because there is no statutory change being made to the reserve under the Reserves Act.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Diagrams & Maps of Hampton Park

5

     

Signatories

Authors

Dave Bayley, Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor, Stakeholder & Land Advisory, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Remy De La Peza - Manager Land Advisory Services

Kim O’Neill - Head of Stakeholder & Land Advisory, Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board March 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/03594

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to respond to resolutions and requests on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), request approval for new LBTCF projects, provide a summary of consultation material sent to the board and, provide transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board and its community.

Executive summary

2.       In particular, this report covers:

·    Auckland Transport’s strategic alignment

·    A Local Board Transport Capital Fund update

·    Auckland Transport project that are being delivered in Otara-Papatoetoe

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board note the Auckland Transport update March 2017 report.

 

Comments

Strategic alignment

3.       In the local area, the roll out of the Southern New Network and construction of the Manukau Bus Station form part of the wider strategic plan for Manukau. These projects are aligned with the local board plan priority ‘to create a thriving heart for Manukau’, as well as the Auckland Plan priority of ‘a transformational improvement in the speed, capacity, reliability and connectivity of the public transport system’ (chap. 13).

4.       The roll-out of the Southern New Network was preceded by a number of major regional projects across Auckland which all contributed to improving the connectivity of the public transport system and included:

·    AT HOP: Introduction of the AT HOP card provided an efficient and simple system for transferring from bus to train or vice-versa.  The system simplifies transfers to a card swipe to ‘tag-on / tag-off’. 

·    Development of new transport ‘hubs’ to better connect buses to trains: The ‘New Network’ is based on the capacity of trains, as the backbone of the network, to efficiently move higher numbers of people around the city. Buses have more localised routes and connect to transport hubs where they can meet trains.  A number of stations have been built or upgraded to create these ‘hubs’ and include:

Panmure Bus and Train Station

Manukau Bus Station located next to the existing train station.

· Ōtāhuhu Bus Station, opened in October 2016


· Simpler Fares: In August 2016 Auckland Transport introduced ‘Simpler Fares’ that were based on ‘zones’ rather than ‘stages’ (map can be found at the following link - https://at.govt.nz/bus-train-ferry/fares-discounts/how-simpler-fares-work/#wherezones ). With Auckland Transport HOP card, instead of paying for each bus or train separately, you can make multiple transfers and pay a single trip.

·   More AT HOP retailers: The number of retailers selling AT HOP cards has increased.  This includes the recent move to stock AT HOP cards in supermarkets. The full list of retailers can be viewed at the following link - https://at.govt.nz/bus-train-ferry/at-hop-card/at-hop-retailers/#south

 

Auckland Transport’s actions against advocacy plans

5.       This section provides a report about how Auckland Transport is supporting the Otara-Papatoetoe local boards ‘Advocacy initiatives’ from the 2014-17 Local Board Plan. The table below notes the local board’s key transport related ‘advocacy initiatives’

6.       Table 1: Advocacy Initiative Status

Advocacy Initiative

Key Initiative

Status

Manukau centre is a visitor destination of choice

Develop Manukau as a tourist destination

Manukau Bus station is currently under construction. The station is due for completion in May 2018

 

 

Transport capital fund update

Updates

7.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a capital budget provided to all local boards and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local Boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they deem important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. The limitations being that the project must:

·        Be safe

·        Not impede network efficiency

·        Be in the road corridor. Although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome

8.       Otara-Papatoetoe local board annual funding is approx.

·        $44,045 carried over from 2016/17 financial year

·        $594, 996 for the 17/18 financial year

·        $612,251 for the 18/19 financial year

·        $630,619 for the 19/20 financial year (although the election is in 2019 the 19/20 Financial Year starts before the election so this money can be spent by this term’s local board). 

·        The annual increase is because the fund will now be adjusted for inflation each year.

9.       Local Boards can consolidate up to three years of the funding available to them in an electoral term to allocate to projects. For the Otara-Papatoetoe local board this means a total of approximately $1.8 million could be spent on transport projects in this electoral term.

10.     Auckland Transport encourages all local boards to identify potential projects early in their electoral term to ensure that project planning, procurement and delivery can be undertaken within the current electoral term

Projects

11.     The Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board is currently undertaking work to identify possible projects through a planning workshops held on 7 March 2017. A follow up workshop will be held to prioritise potential projects to be further investigated.

12.     These will be formally reported to the local board to resolve those projects to be progressed.

13.     Table 2: LBTCF – Current projects

Projects

Current Status

 

Problem or Opportunity Being Addressed

Current Status

Hunters Corner Street lighting

 

Improving lighting

‘Detailed Design’ authorised $280k by OPLB in Oct. 2014. Revised costings approved by OPLB in June 2015 for $292k. Further revised costings of $320k approved in Sept. 2015 to extend project area.

Construction’ Currently, major portion of lights installed and working. Construction issues were identified and redesigned pole structures were ordered. Project completion now estimated to be April 2017.

 

Notes:

A ‘traffic light’ code is used to summarise the status of projects. The colours are used as follows:

Green – Project progressing ‘on time’ and on budget.

Orange – An issue has been identified that may need to be resolved.

Red - An major issue has been identified that needs to be resolved

Black – The project has been investigated and the OPLB has decided not to pursue it at this time.

 

Manukau Bus Station

14.     As noted in last month’s report, the Manukau Bus Station construction is progressing to plan and expected to open in May 2018

15.     The closure of Putney way is expected to commence in April 2017 and is scheduled to be reopened in November 2017. This may change with the inclusion of Panuku’s contribution to the redevelopment of Putney Way, which is currently under design, to early 2018.

16.     The signalisation of Davies Ave is currently underway and is due to be completed by May 2017

17.     A workshop has been requested to provide the local board with an update on this project.

Upcoming projects and activities

Consultations

18.     Auckland Transport provides the Otara-Papatoetoe local board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in this local board area.

19.     In this reporting period for February, no projects were put forward for comment by the local board. 

20.     Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions are reported on a monthly basis. In January and February there were no TCC decision in the local board area.

 

Regional and sub-regional projects

Roads and Streets Framework (RASF) and Transport Design Manual (TDM)

21.     Auckland Transport is reviewing the Auckland Transport Code of Practice (ATCOP) with the resulting outcome is its replacement with:

·    A ‘Roads and Streets Framework’ – That will guide decision-making in the road corridor to provide a better balance between local place-making and transport movement, functions and priorities.

·    A ‘Transport Design Manual’ – That provides technical direction about design standards.

22.     The aim is to make guidelines for road corridor infrastructure more flexible and responsive to local needs but still maintain high technical standards.

23.     Sub-regional workshops are currently being scheduled for 20/27 March 2017. Details will be confirmed shortly and local board invites sent out promptly. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

24.     The board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Māori impact statement

25.     No specific issues with regard to impacts on Maori are triggered by this report and any engagement with Maori will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Implementation

26.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Kenneth Tuai, Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship unit

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Disposals recommendation report

 

File No.: CP2017/01747

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s endorsement for Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) to recommend to the Finance and Performance Committee the divestment of 6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe.

Executive summary

2.       The council-owned site at 6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe has been identified as potentially surplus to council requirements through a review process.  The rationalisation process for 6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe commenced in November 2016.  Consultation with council and its CCOs, iwi authorities and the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has now taken place.  No alternative service uses have been identified for this property through the rationalisation process.  Due to this, Panuku recommends disposal of the site. 

3.       Resolutions approving the disposal of the subject site are required from the governing body before the proposed divestment can be progressed. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board endorse Panuku Development Auckland’s recommendation to the Finance and Performance Committee to dispose off 6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe.

Comments

4.       Panuku and Auckland Council’s Stakeholder and Land Advisory team in Community Facilities work jointly on a comprehensive review of council’s property portfolio.  One of the outcomes of the review process is to identify properties in the council portfolio that are potentially surplus to requirements and may be suitable to sell.  The subject site was identified as potentially saleable through the review process.

5.       Once a property has been identified as potentially surplus, Panuku engages with council and its CCO’s through an expression of interest process, to establish whether the property must be retained for a strategic purpose or is required for a future funded project.  Once a property has been internally cleared of any service requirements, Panuku then consults with local boards, mana whenua and ward councillors.  All sale recommendations must be approved by Panuku’s Board before it makes a final recommendation to the Auckland Council governing body. 

Property information

6.       6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe is an 860m2 council-owned site that was acquired by the former Papatoetoe City Council for the purpose of a carpark development in 1983.  Land held for parking purposes is a public work within the meaning of the Public Works Act 1981.

7.       6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe was managed by Auckland Transport (AT) as part of their car parking network.  In 2015, the AT Board resolved that it was no longer required for AT’s infrastructure purposes.  6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe was subsequently transferred to Panuku for rationalisation.

8.       The Unitary Plan zoning of 6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe is residential-mixed use urban zone.  It has a 2014 capital value of $465,000. 

9.       The rationalisation process commenced in November 2016.  No alternative service uses were identified through the rationalisation process.

10.     There is no requirement for 6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe to be offered back to the former owners under section 40 of the Public Works Act 1981.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     Local Boards are informed of the commencement of the rationalisation process for specific properties.  Following the close of the expression of interest period, relevant Local Boards are engaged with. 

12.     Panuku attended a workshop with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board regarding 6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe in February 2017.  The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board provided informal advice that it supported the proposed divestment of the subject site given the long standing concerns from the local community, New Zealand Police and neighbouring property owners regarding anti-social behaviour and crime associated with the property.

13.     This report provides the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with an opportunity to formalise its view regarding the subject property. 

Māori impact statement

14.     12 iwi authorities were contacted regarding the potential sale of 6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe. The following feedback was received;

a)      Te Runanga o Ngāti Whatua

No site specific feedback received for this site, noting that as per earlier conversations with Te Runanga representatives, it is understood that any cultural significance considerations will be raised at hapū level and that all Ngāti Whatua hapū have been contacted about properties in their rohe.

b)      Te Kawerau a Maki

No feedback received for this site.

c)      Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki has drawn attention to their recent settlement and signaled an increased interest in council owned property that may come available for sale in their rohe.

d)      Ngāti Tamaoho

No feedback received for this site.

e)      Te ākitai - Waiohua

No feedback received for this site.

f)       Ngāti Te Ata - Waiohua

No site specific feedback received for this site; however Ngāti Te Ata has expressed general cultural interest across Tāmaki Makaurau, has potential commercial interest in any council owned land that comes available for sale in their rohe and notes specific association with the south western area of Auckland, focusing around Manukau and the western coastline.

g)      Te Ahiwaru

No feedback received for this site.

 


h)      Ngāti Paoa

Ngāti Paoa has reinforced their desire to be kept in the loop for property disposals.

i)       Ngaati Whanaunga

No feedback received for this site.

j)       Ngāti Maru

No feedback received for this site.

k)      Ngāti Tamatera

No feedback received for this site.

l)       Waikato-Tainu

Waikato-Tainui signaled both cultural and commercial interest in the site and recommended any development align with the Waikato-Tainui Environmental Plan including consultation with marae. 

Implementation

15.     Resolutions approving the divestment of the subject site are required from the Finance and Performance Committee before the proposed disposal can be progressed. 

16.     Following receipt of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board resolutions, the site will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee with a recommendation to divest.  If the Finance and Performance Committee approves the proposed disposal of 6 Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe, Panuku will seek to divest of the site in a manner which provides an optimal outcome and return to council. 

17.     The terms and conditions of any disposal would be approved under appropriate financial delegation.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Images of 6 Bulter Avenue, Papatoetoe

5

     

Signatories

Authors

Anthony Lewis - Senior Advisor Portfolio Review

Authorisers

Letitia McColl - Team Leader Portfolio Review, Panuku Development Auckland

Carol McKenzie-Rex, Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Gagan Preet Singh at 172 and 172A Portage Road, Papatoetoe

 

File No.: CP2017/02574

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board, for a new road name for a road created by way of subdivision at 172 and 172A Portage Road, Papatoetoe.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Deepak Lane’ (applicant’s preferred road name), ‘Neha Lane’ and ‘Aggarwal Lane’ were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria. 

4.       Local iwi groups were consulted and the only response received was from Te Ahiwaru. They queried whether any consideration had been given to a Maori option for the road name, and expressed that they would support names associated with the natural features and/or historic events associated with the Papatoetoe area.

5.       The name ‘Deepak Lane’, proposed by the Applicant and the names ‘Neha Lane’ and ‘Aggarwal Lane’, are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, consider for approval, the road name Deepak Lane’, proposed by the Applicant, for the new road created by way of subdivision at 172 and 172A Portage Road, Papatoetoe, while noting that Neha Lane and Aggarwal Lane, also meet the road naming criteria.

Comments

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allowed that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

7.       A new jointly owned access lot (private way) is created as a result of a ten lot integrated land use subdivision, granted under resource consent 46443, SP11688. The new road will be accessed from Portage Road, Papatoetoe.

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the road created as part of the development at 172 and 172A Portage Road, Papatoetoe. 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Deepak Lane

The surname of the property developer.

First Alternative

Neha Lane

The name of one of the developers involved.

Second Alternative

Aggarwal Lane

Family name of the developer.

 

Decision Making

8.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

9.       The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

10.     The proposed road names all meet the criteria for reasons including the following:

·    The names are relatively easy to pronounce, spell and write.

·    There are no existing similar/ same road names within Auckland Council’s boundary.

11.     As the Applicant’s preferred name (Deepak Lane) meets the criteria, it is recommended for consideration for approval while noting that the alternative names proposed (Neha Lane and Aggarwal Lane) are also appropriate as they comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

12.     It is noted that the following is stated under Principle 3(8) of the road naming guidelines: “The names of people who are still alive should be avoided as community attitudes and opinions can change over time.

The proposed names belong to people who are still alive, but are not first names in conjunction with a surname.

Consideration

Significance of Decision

 

13.     The decision sought from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Maori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Consultation

15.     The relevant iwi groups were consulted and only Te Ahiwaru responded.

They queried whether any consideration had been given to a Maori option for the road name, and expressed that they would support names associated with the natural features and/or historic events associated with the Papatoetoe area.

The applicant’s agent responded with the following, and did not receive further correspondence from Te Ahiwaru since:

“The developer considered naming the road in a Maori name/after an event or feature but was unable to come up with a suitable name that was not already used in Auckland.

He requested the name shown below after his family name due to the road being privately owned by the 10 Lots that use it and not being a Council road, and that he will keep ownership of some of the lots in the subdivision.”

16.     Consultation was undertaken with NZ Post, and they have confirmed that the three proposed names are acceptable to them.


Financial and Resourcing Implications

17.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

18.     The decision sought from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

19.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

172 & 172A Portage Road Plan

5

     

Signatories

Authors

Virginia Loh - Resource Consents Administrator

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

    

 

 

Text Box: PORTAGE 
ROAD
 

 

Figure One: Location and Layout of new Road

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board - Additional Business Meetings

 

File No.: CP2017/02684

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for additional business meetings to be held on Tuesday, 2 May 2017 and Tuesday, 6 June 2017 to enable the local board to make formal decisions around its 2017/18 annual budget and local board agreement.

Executive Summary

2.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is required to hold two additional business meetings, one before 5 May 2017 and the other in early June

3.       The May meeting of the board is scheduled for Tuesday, 16 May 2017. 

4.       The board is required to adopt LDI capital projects and request any additional funding by
5 May 2017 to allow enough time
to report to the Governing Body’s May business meeting

5.       In order to meet this timeframe, it is proposed to hold an additional meeting on Tuesday,
2 May 2017 after the local board workshop.

6.       The date for the June meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, 21 June 2017. 

7.       The board is required to adopt a 2017/18 local board agreement, fees and charges schedule and work programmes in early June to allow enough time to report to the Governing Body’s June business meeting

8.       In order to meet this timeframe, it is proposed to hold an addition meeting on Tuesday,
6 June 2017after the local board workshop.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve an additional business meeting to be held on Tuesday, 2 May 2017 at 12.30pm at the Woodside Room, Level 1, Manukau Civic, 31-33 Manukau Station Road, Manukau in order to be able to report to the Governing Body’s May meeting.

b)      approve an additional business meeting to be held on Tuesday 6 June 2017at 12.30pm at the Woodside Room, Level 1, Manukau Civic, 31-33 Manukau Station Road, Manukau in order to be able to report to the Governing Body’s June meeting.

Local Board Views

9.       This decision falls under the local board’s delegated authority.

Implementation Issues

10.     Meetings of the local boards are supported by Auckland Council’s Local Board Services Department.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2017/02765

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.   Attached are the notes for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshop held on 7, 14 and 28 February 2017.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the workshop notes from 7, 14 and 28 February 2017.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

7 February Workshop Notes

5

b

14 February Workshop Notes

5

c

28 February Workshop Notes

5

    

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2017/03002

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Executive Summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

5

     

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

    

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

15        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts - Attachment e - Supplier Specific Information

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to damage the public interest.

In particular, the report contains.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

15        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts - Attachment h - Contract Information

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to damage the public interest.

In particular, the report contains.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Living Wage Briefing                                          Page 5


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 March 2017