I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

2:00pm

Waitematā Local Board Office
Ground Floor
52 Swanson Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Pippa Coom

 

Deputy Chairperson

Shale Chambers

 

Members

Adriana Avendano Christie

 

 

Mark Davey

 

 

Richard Northey, ONZM

 

 

Vernon Tava

 

 

Rob Thomas

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Sibyl Mandow

Democracy Advisor

 

3 April 2017

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 307 6071

Email: sibyl.mandow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: Natalie McCondach and Cheryl Laurie - Highwic House           5

8.2     Deputation: Sandra Murray - New Zealand Product Stewardship Council  6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Councillor's Report                                                                                                       9

13        Waitematā Quick Response Round Three 2016/2017 Grant Applications           11

14        City fringe local economic development action plan refresh                                 49

15        ATEED six-monthly report to the Waitematā Local Board                                     55

16        Auckland Transport Update - March 2017                                                                69

17        Landowner approval for temporary use of Ayr Reserve for construction vehicle parking                                                                                                                                        79

18        Draft air quality bylaw and statement of proposal                                                  87

19        2016 Elections - Highlights and Issues                                                                   155

20        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts                                         169

21        Chair's Report                                                                                                            251

22        Board Members' Reports                                                                                         269

23        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     275

24        Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records                                                          279  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               289

20        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts

e.      Supplier Specific Information                                                                         289

h.      Contract Information                                                                                       289  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

An apology from Member Northey had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 8 March 2017 as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Natalie McCondach and Cheryl Laurie - Highwic House

Executive Summary

1.       Natalie McCondach and Cheryl Laurie will be in attendance to speak about Highwic House.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Natalie McCondach and Cheryl Laurie for their attendance and presentation about Highwic House.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Sandra Murray - New Zealand Product Stewardship Council

Executive Summary

1.       Sandra Murray will be in attendance to speak about the New Zealand Product Stewardship Council.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Sandra Murray for her attendance and presentation about New Zealand Product Stewardship Council.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Councillor's Report

 

File No.: CP2017/03952

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waitematā Local Board on regional issues.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Waitematā Quick Response Round Three 2016/2017 Grant Applications

 

File No.: CP2017/02163

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present applications received for Waitematā Quick Response Round Three, 2016/2017. The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

2.       In addition, reallocate the Lifewise Trust accommodation grant to a different operational address.

Executive summary

3.       The Waitematā Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $125,000 for the 2016/2017 financial year. A total of $56,948.00 remains to be allocated for a further two quick response and one local grant round for 2016/2017.

4.       Ten applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $22,248.00.

5.       In addition, The Lifewise Trust has requested the grant received in the accommodation support round 2015/2016 for rental at 385 Queen Street location be transferred to allocate the grant to the 453 Karangahape Road location (WTM/2016/18).

6.       The local board is also requested to modify the local grant round one date in 2017/2018 to enable more opportunities for  applicants to apply for a grant from Waitematā Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in quick response grant round three listed in table one.

Table one: Waitematā quick response round three grant applications

App ID

Applicant

Project

Requested

Eligibility

QR1720-310

Arts and culture

Splice (legal name Methodist Mission Northern)

Towards studio time, artwork design and manufacture costs of “Street Wisdom Vol 2.”

$2,000

Eligible

QR1720-317

Arts and culture

Opera Factory Trust

Towards accompanists fees, venue hire, project coordinator, piano tuning, marketing and catering for “Morning Melodies concert series 2017.”

$1,409

Eligible

QR1720-321

Arts and culture

Auckland and District Pipe Band Incorporated

Towards acoustic paneling and installation for the band practice room.

$2,442.00

Eligible

QR1720-323

Arts and culture

Ms Nina Seja

Towards publishing the catalogue and photographic reproductions for “Real Pictures: Imaging XX.”

$1,000

Eligible

QR1720-302

Community

Citizens Advice Bureau Auckland City

Towards replacement of furniture for Citizens Advice Bureau Central Auckland.

$2,910

Eligible

QR1720-306

Community

ImpactNPO

Towards catering for “impactNPO’s” February 2017 symposium weekend.

$1,674

Ineligible, costs are retrospective

QR1720-309

Community

The Parenting Place - Attitude Youth Division

Towards delivery of Attitude life-skills presentations and printing handbooks Drug and alcohol education for Waitematā High Schools.

$3,000

Ineligible, applicant applied for the same project this financial year (Quick Response Round Two 2016/2017)

QR1720-318

Community

The Peace Foundation

Towards the production of a plaque and the unveiling ceremony for the Pohutukawa Peace Tree in Auckland Domain

$1,849

Eligible

QR1720-320

Community

Communities Against Alcohol Harm

Towards the production of material, hosting meetings and research of webcam technology for Surrey Crescent Shops community alcohol monitoring project.

$3,000

Eligible

QR1720-322

Sports and recreation

Auckland Indian Sports Club Incorporated

Towards venue hire to host the New Zealand Indian Sports Association National Indian Sports Tournament.

 

$3,000

Ineligible, applicant applied for the same project this financial year (Quick Response Round Two 2016/2017)

Total

 

 

$22,284

 

b)      approves the reallocation of the The Lifewise Trust accommodation grant from 385 Queen Street to the 453 Karangahape Road rental address (application reference CASF_161700079) (previous resolution WTM/2016/18).

c)      approve date changes for local grant round one 2017/2018 for Waitematā local grants programme as follows:

2017/2018 funding rounds

Opening

Closing

Projects to occur after

Decision made

Local grants round one

19 June 2017

28 July 2017

1 October 2017

19 September 2017

 

 

 

Comments

7.       The implementation of the new Community Grants Policy commenced on 1 July 2015. The policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme for 2015/2016 and review their programme each financial year. The Waitematā Local Board adopted its 2016/2017 grants programme on 10 May 2016 (see Attachment A).

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Waitematā Local Board will operate two local grants and four quick response rounds for this financial year.

10.     The Waitematā Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $125,000 for the 2016/2017 financial year. A total of $56,948.00 remains to be allocated for a further two quick response and one local grant rounds for 2016/2017.

11.     Ten applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $22,248.00 (Attachment B).

12.     Furthermore, The Lifewise Trust has requested the grant received in the accommodation support round 2015/2016 for rental at 385 Queen Street location be transferred to the 453 Karangahape Road rental location (WTM/2016/18). The Queen Street address is the head office of the trust, and the Karangahape Road address is the location of their programme delivery. It is more appropriate that the grant be allocated for rental costs at the location where their programmes are being delivered.

13.     The Waitematā local grants programme for 2017/2018, includes local grants and quick response round one both opening on 24 April 2017 and closing on 5 June 2017. Staff recommendation is that the local grants round one opens on a different date to the quick response round. This will enable more opportunities for applicants to apply for a grant. Staff are recommending that the revised dates for local grant round one 2017/2018 are as follows:

2017/2018 funding rounds

Opening

Closing

Projects to occur after

Decision made

Local grants round one

19 June 2017

28 July 2017

1 October 2017

19 September 2017

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waitematā Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

15.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

Māori impact statement

16.     The provision of community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori. As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the new community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

17.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

18.     Following the Waitematā Local Board allocating funding for this round Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Grant Programme 2016/2017

15

b

Waitemata Quick Response Round Three application summaries

23

     

Signatories

Authors

Jaimee Wieland - Community Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Jennifer Rose - Operations Support Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

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21 March 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

City fringe local economic development action plan refresh

 

File No.: CP2017/03177

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To allocate funding to enable a review/refresh of the City Fringe Economic Development Action Plan to be commissioned and undertaken.

Executive summary

2.       The Waitematā Local Board approved a Local Economic Development Action Plan for the City Fringe in March 2014. The intention was that the plan would be a living document that provided a framework to guide local economic development actions for 3-5 years, within the city fringe area.

3.       As the current Action Plan is coming up to three years old it is considered that it would be appropriate for the Waitematā Local Board to undertake a refresh/review of the plan to ensure that it remains up to date and continues to assist the local board in working with partners to continue to develop and grow the City Fringe economy.

4.       The Local Board has $22,500 within its Local economic Development budget line for 2016/2017 which is currently unallocated. The Local Board is being asked to approve an allocation of $20,000 to undertake a refresh of the current City Fringe Economic development Action Plan.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of $20,000 from the Local Economic Development budget line for the refresh of the City Fringe Local Economic Development Action plan

b)      agree the scope of the City Fringe Local Economic Development Action plan refresh as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Comments

Background

5.   The Waitematā Local Board approved a Local Economic Development Action Plan for the City Fringe in March 2014. The Action Plan built on work commissioned by Auckland Council from Hill Young Cooper in September 2013. The intention was that the plan would be a living document that:

·    Provides a framework to guide local economic development actions for 3-5 years

·    Facilitates effective engagement between deliverers of economic development initiatives in the City Fringe area

·    Provides a key mechanism for the Waitematā Local Board to communicate with city fringe businesses and to advocate for maintaining communications and connections between the city fringe and the CBD.

·    Identifies a set of actions and initiatives for inclusion within the Local Board plan and future local board agreements.

6.   As the current Action Plan is coming up to three years since adoption it is considered that it would be appropriate for the Waitematā Local Board to undertake a review of the plan. This will help to ensure that it takes into account the actions that have been delivered and changes in the strategic policy framework, such as the Unitary Plan, and remains up to date and assists the local board in working with partners to continue to grow the City Fringe economy.

Proposed Scope of the refresh

7.   A draft scope of the proposed refresh/review is attached to this report as Attachment A. In summary this outlines the following tasks to be completed in undertaking the review / refresh:

a.   A review of the parties delivering economic development outcomes in the local board

b.   A review of the current activity affecting the City Fringe Economy

c.   Provide an update on progress with delivering current identified actions

d.   A review of the relevant key strategies and plans affecting the City Fringe economy

e.   A refreshed action plan for the City Fringe area over the next three years.

8.   It is recommended that the Local Board allocates a budget of $20,000 to undertake the refresh from the $22,500 currently unallocated in the Local Board Local economic development Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget line.

9.   Other options that have been considered in making the recommendation to the Local Board are as follows:

·    Do nothing and keep the current City Fringe ED Action Plan as is. This would mean the Local Board would not revisit the actions and determine if they are still relevant given any changes to the strategic framework and any changes in the way actions are to be delivered by stakeholders / partners.

·    Reduced scope, any reduce in the scope could reduce the potential cost of undertaking the refresh. A reduced scope could include less engagement with stakeholders and a desktop review of the actions identified in the current plan to determine any progress. Without the development of new actions.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

10.     The draft scope was presented to the Local Board at the 7 March 2017 local board workshop.

Māori impact statement

11.     There are no direct impacts on Maori as a result of this report. However, any actions identified within a revised action plan that have a potential to impact on Māori, and the Māori economy will be identified and reported back to the Local Board.

Implementation

12.     Once the funding is approved by the Board, ATEED staff will seek to appoint a consultant to undertake the Action Plan refresh to the value of $20,000. With a view to completing the refresh by the end of the financial year.

13.     In progressing with the refresh potential risks to delivery within the current financial year include:   

·      Delays in appointing a suitable consultant to undertake the work,

·      Inability for the consultant to complete engagement with stakeholders and partners  to enable progress and other actions to be identified in a timely manner,

·      Not being able to identify a suitable consultant with capacity to deliver the refresh by the 30 June 2017.

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Signatories

Authors

John Norman – Strategic Planner Local Economic Development

Authorisers

Paul Robinson – Local Economic Growth Manager

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Scope for the City Fringe Economic Development Action Plan refresh / review

53

     

Signatories

Authors

John Norman - Strategic Planner Local Economic Development

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

ATEED six-monthly report to the Waitematā Local Board

 

File No.: CP2017/03823

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide the six-monthly report from Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) on their activities in the Waitematā local board area.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides the Waitematā Local Board with highlights of ATEED’s activities in the local board area for the six months from 1 July to 31 December 2016. The report is designed to be read in conjunction with ATEED’s Quarter 1 report to Auckland Council, and the forthcoming Quarter 2 report (21 March) to Auckland Council’s Finance and Performance Committee.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development six-monthly report for the period 1 July to 31 December 2016.

 

 

Comments

3.       Section 2 of the report notes that during the reporting period, ATEED and the Waitematā Local Board have worked closely to activate the Uptown Innovation Hub in conjunction with the Uptown Business Association. It also summarises ATEED’s engagement with the Waitematā Local Board.

4.       Section 3 of the report summarises the impact of ATEED’s regional programmes and initiatives that are delivered in the Waitematā Local Board area. These activities are set out under ATEED’s strategic priorities, as per the Statement of Intent (2016-19), as follows:

§ Building a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship (supporting business growth through research and development and capability building funding and advice; connecting businesses to opportunities and organisations that can assist their growth; running business networking events to support business growth).

§ Attracting business and investment (focusing on filming activity conducted in the Waitematā Local Board area).

§ Growing a skilled workforce (summarising ATEED’s delivery of the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme to four schools in the Waitematā Local Board area; ATEED’s Youth Employer Pledge and JobFest activity).

§ Growing the visitor economy (summarising ATEED’s delivery of Tourism, Major Events, Auckland Convention Bureau and Study Auckland’s activities, all of which contribute to the growth of Auckland’s visitor economy).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

5.       The report is for information only.

Māori impact statement

6.       Māori, as stakeholders in Council, are affected and have an interest in any report on local activities. However, this performance report does not impact specific outcomes or activities. As such, the content of this report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on Māori.

Implementation

7.       This report is for information only at this time. ATEED does not see any risk to the delivery of programmes related to the Waitematā area at this time.

 

Signatories

Authors

Chris Lock, Senior Strategic Advisor – Local Boards (ATEED)

Richard Court, Manager, Operational Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

Samantha-Jane Miranda, Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

Susan Sawbridge, Manager Stakeholder Relations (ATEED)

Kathryn Martin – Relationship Manager

8.      

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ATEED six-monthly report to the Waitematā Local Board

57

     

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - March 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/03828

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to respond to resolutions and requests on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), provide a summary of consultation material sent to the Board and provide transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Waitemata Local Board and its community.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides information on:

a)      The Local Board Transport Capital Fund

b)      Overview of workshops from Auckland Transport to the Waitemata Local Board

c)      Requests for comment from Auckland Transport

d)      Responses from Auckland Transport

e)      A summary of items sent to the Board for their information

f)       General information items from Auckland Transport relevant to Waitemata Local Board.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive this report Auckland Transport Update - March 2017 Auckland Transport Update - March 20177.

 

 

Discussion

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

3.       The Local Board has $1,605,522 unallocated in their Local Board Transport Capital Fund, as of the new electoral term these funds are now available.

Workshop overview

4.       Auckland Transport attended three workshops on the 7th of March on the following subjects; a discussion on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, a presentation on the final design for Franklin Road, and an update on planning with regards to the University Quarter.

Summary of requests for comment

Broken Yellow Lines on Sarawia Street in Newmarket

5.       Auckland Transport is responding to public concerns with regard to restricted vehicle accessibility and visibility issues caused by vehicles parking over the painted white triangle, and overhanging onto neighbouring vehicle crossings on Sarawia Street. Site visits have been carried out that have confirmed this issue. To help improve the vehicle accessibility and visibility we are proposing No Stopping At All Times restrictions.

6.       Information of the proposal has been provided for the Board’s information and comment. Auckland Transport will consider all feedback received and make a decision on the final outcome.

85 Customs Street East

7.       Traffic Design Group Limited is consulting on the proposed temporary changes to the road in the vicinity of a construction site at 85 Customs Street East.

8.       Resource Consent has been granted by Auckland Council for the development of the 85 Customs Street East tower. As part of the development, it is proposed to temporarily reassign bus parking capacity on Customs Street East for loading operations and to reverse the traffic direction of Gore Street Lane. All changes are temporary and existing operations will resume once the development is complete in 2020.

9.       The following changes to the road network are proposed:

·    Divide the existing bus stop/ bus parking area on Customs Street East into three sections. The western section (closest to Gore Street) would be 35m in length and retain its existing usage. The central section, 40m in length would be used as a loading bay for the 85 Customs Street East site. The eastern section (closest to Fort Street) would be used for bus parking/ stopping during the afternoon peak period (3pm-7pm) but would be available for site loading outside of these times.

·    Reverse the traffic flow of Gore Street Lane so traffic runs from east to west (Fort Street to Gore Street). Currently Gore Street Lane runs west to east (Gore Street to Fort Street). New signage will be installed to mark the change in road operation.

·    The changes to the bus parking area are intended to provide a loading area which is efficient and safe to access during construction. The wider benefit of this efficiency is a reduced need for truck manoeuvring over the footpath. Additionally the loading area allows a greater efficiency in construction, hence a reduced construction time and a lesser length of disruption time due to construction activities.

10.     Currently Gore Street Lane runs west to east (from Gore Street to Fort Street). With no exit from Fort Street into Customs Street being permitted, vehicles exiting Gore Street Lane are thus currently required to turn right and continue along Fort Street (through a shared space/ pedestrian area) to at least the Fort Street / Gore Street intersection. The proposed reversal would mean the traffic exiting the development site onto Gore Street lane could continue westwards to Gore Street, thus avoiding/minimising the use of the pedestrian area

11.     The proposed changes would not result in the reduction of any existing car parking resources in the area surrounding the subject site.

12.     These changes are expected to be implemented in April 2017 and remain in place until late 2020.

13.     Information of the proposal has been provided for the Board’s information and comment.

Bus Stops and Bus Stop Upgrades – Waitemata Local Board Area

14.     Auckland Transport is consulting on proposed bus stops relocations and/or upgrades around the Waitemata Local Board area. Specifically:

·    145 Wellesley Street West. This street has high volumes of bus patrons who utilise the existing bus stops. Auckland Transport believes that the proposed bus shelter will attract new passengers and may encourage existing passengers to use public transport more often. The existing bus stop location has insufficient room for installing a bus stop shelter. It is proposed to upgrade the bus stop to include a new bus stop shelter, bus stop sign, road markings to indicate the location of the bus stop, and new no stopping yellow lines at both ends of the bus stop.

·    2 Jervois Road. The existing seat at the bus stop is too close to the road. There are safety and accessibility issues associated with passengers waiting at the bus stop to board a bus. The current bus stop is longer than 15m and without no stopping yellow lines at the exiting end. It is proposed to shorten the existing bus stop road markings and install no stopping yellow lines at both ends of the bus stop.

·    79-88 Jervois Road. It is proposed to shorten the existing bus stop road markings and install no stopping yellow lines at both ends of the bus stop. The proposed upgrade at 88 Jervois Road includes a new bus shelter.

15.     Information of the proposal has been provided for the Board’s information and comment. Auckland Transport will consider all feedback received and make a decision on the final outcome.

Carlton Gore Rd, in Newmarket

16.     AT is responding to public concerns with regard to the visibility and maneuverability of vehicles exiting property number 73 Carlton Gore Road. Site visits have confirmed this issue. To help improve the vehicle accessibility and visibility it is proposed to install No Stopping At All Times restrictions.

17.     In addition to this Auckland Transport is proposing to upgrade two existing zebra crossings in Newmarket. These pedestrian crossings are located outside number 103 and number 108 on Carlton Gore Road. This includes:

·    Upgrading the existing zebra crossing platforms to raised speed tables.

·    Installing speed table approach warning signs.

·    Installing “20 km” speed advisory signs.

·    Reconstructing the footpath the outside 103 Carlton Gore Road.

·    Reconstructing the pram crossings.

·    Installing new cesspits.

18.     Information of the proposal has been provided for the Board’s information and comment. Auckland Transport will consider all feedback received and make a decision on the final outcome.

Westhaven to CBD Cycleway – Outcome of Public consultation

19.     In November last year, Auckland Transport asked for feedback on a proposed design of an on-road cycling route between Westhaven and the City. This covered the first section of the project from Westhaven Drive to Custom Street West/Market Place.

20.     The proposed route is intended to supplement both existing and proposed shared paths through Wynyard Quarter which provide safe access for people on bikes to playgrounds, restaurants, cafés, markets and events around North Wharf and the Viaduct Basin.

21.     The proposal and the public response have been provided for the Board’s information and comment. Following Local Board feedback Auckland Transport will make its final determinations on the project.

Bus Stop Relocation 29-31 Anzac Avenue

22.     Opus International Consultants is seeking feedback on temporarily relocating an existing bus stop located directly outside 25 and 29-31 Anzac Avenue. It is proposed to be relocated temporarily to outside 37-39 and 43 Anzac Avenue in March 2017 until 13th May 2019.

23.     This is to facilitate construction of a new 16 story high residential apartment building called “The Maritime Apartments.” The existing bus stop outside 25 and 29-31 Anzac Avenue will be converted into a loading bay at all times during the construction period. At the completion of the construction works for “The Maritime Apartments” the bus stop will be reinstated.

24.     Information of the proposal has been provided for the Board’s information and comment.

Proposed No Stopping At All Times Restriction on New Street, Ponsonby

25.     Auckland Transport is responding to public concerns that buses are having difficulty tracking around the corner from St Francis De Sales Street on to New Street due to vehicles parking opposite the intersection. Site visits have been carried out that have confirmed this issue.

26.     To help improve the vehicle accessibility we are proposing No Stopping At All Times restrictions.

27.     Information of the proposal has been provided for the Board’s information and comment. Auckland Transport will consider all feedback received and make a decision on the final outcome.

Responses from Auckland Transport

No Stopping At All Times restrictions on Tweed Street, Herne Bay

28.     Auckland Transport requested feedback on a proposal to install new ‘No Stopping at All Times’ restrictions on Tweed Street in Herne Bay. 

29.     The proposal received positive feedback with some concerns raised by respondents. The main points of feedback:

·    “Can the lines be extended further around the corner?” The proposed length of the restrictions is suitable for the bend on Tweed Street as it will increase visibility sufficiently enabling motorists to manoeuvre around the bend safely. Any extension of this is not justifiable and would further reduce parking spaces.

·    “Can lines be placed over road crossings to indicate cars cannot park right up to these?” If this issue arises and vehicles are parked right up to driveways, please call Auckland Transport on 09-3553553 with the details of the vehicle.

·    “Request for additional works/changes including the problem of vehicles parking long-term on the road.” If you would like your request to be considered by Auckland Transport for future development works, go to https://at.govt.nz/about-us/contact-us/ to provide feedback or report a problem.

30.     After reviewing this feedback and all other supporting evidence, the proposal will proceed without changes to the next stage of detailed planning.

31.     We expect to introduce this work by June 2017, subject to any further changes in design or funding issues. Contractors will issue 48-hour notice to all affected residents prior to construction work.

Summary of other items provided for the Boards information

32.     For the Board’s information:

·        Herne Bay and Parnell - Consultation Information

·        Update: Pink Path

·        Disruption around Fanshaw and Cook Street

·        Update: Ponsonby Road

·        Cityhop CarShare Spaces in Auckland Central

·        Train timetable change - 12 March

·        Final design Quay Street

·        Update: Britomart Clock

·        AT Park information for Elected Members

·        Update: Hobson Street

General Information Items

Walk around the country from Auckland this March

33.     Registrations for the Auckland Walk Challenge are filling up fast. More than 2200 people have already registered including more than 700 teams. The Auckland Walk Challenge aims to encourage Aucklanders to leave their car at home and use their feet for some of their shorter journeys. Individuals and teams register online and compete against each other as they virtually walk around New Zealand from Cape Reinga to Bluff during the month of March.

34.     The Auckland Walk Challenge entrants set walking goals, log daily walks, chart their progress online and compete against other individuals and teams for a range of prizes. For further information please see https://auckland.walkertracker.com.

Auckland Transport opens the books

35.     Auckland Transport will be releasing details of all its contracts publicly. Since it was established in 2010, Auckland Transport has routinely published on its website the details of all contracts valued over $50,000. That threshold has now been dropped to zero.

36.     For further information see https://at.govt.nz/about-us/procurement/awarded-contracts/

 

Signatories

Author

Ben Halliwell – Elected Member Relationship Manager , Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

January Traffic Control Committee Decisions

75

b

February Traffic Control Committee Decisions

77

     

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

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21 March 2017

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Landowner approval for temporary use of Ayr Reserve for construction vehicle parking

 

File No.: CP2017/03436

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Waitemata Local Board to undertake public notification and iwi consultation for temporary use of Ayr Reserve at 30-32 Ayr Street, Parnell, Auckland 1052, legally described as ALT16,PT11 SEC4 AKSUBS LTS1,2 DP26703 PTLT2 DRO143 LTS2-9 DP36450 LOT 1-4 DP 36, for construction vehicle parking by way of a license to occupy.

Executive summary

2.       The applicant seeks a license to occupy for the closure of 400m² of Ayr Reserve at: 30-32 Ayr Street, Parnell, Auckland 1052, legally described as ALT16,PT11 SEC4 AKSUBS LTS1,2 DP26703 PTLT2 DRO143 LTS2-9 DP36450 LOT 1-4 DP 36, for construction vehicle parking by way of a license to occupy. They propose to occupy for 19 months, from May 2017 until December 2018, to establish a construction vehicle parking area.

3.       The proposal needs to be publically notified under the Local Government Act 2002, which needs approval from the Local Board.

4.       If the local board approve the notification then a 30 days notification period will be undertaken. If any submissions are received then the Local Board will need to hear the submissions either through a hearing panel or the Local Board’s monthly business meeting, and then make a decision.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the public notification and consultation with iwi for the temporary occupation of Ayr Reserve at 30-32 Ayr Street, Parnell, Auckland, 1052 regarding council’s intention to grant a License to Occupy for construction vehicle parking in the area shown in the plan at attachment A to the report, for 19 months, under section 138(2) of the Local Government Act 2002.

b)      nominate the full Local Board to, following the public notification process for the proposed License to Occupy for the temporary occupation of Ayr Reserve, consider and decide on any submissions or objections received either through a hearings process or the Local Board’s monthly business meeting. 

c)      delegate the approval to sign off the license back to the Manager of Land Advisory Services, Stakeholder and Land Advisory, Community Facilities, Auckland Council should no submissions or objections be received.

 

 

Comments

5.       The applicant is undertaking a $7 million dollar apartment build at 17 Laurie Avenue in Parnell. Laurie Avenue is a narrow street that is very busy and there is inadequate public on-street parking available for the required construction vehicles. The applicant requests forming a car park in Ayr Reserve at the end of the street to accommodate construction vehicles and avoid problems for the neighbours.

6.       Up to 20 trade vehicles may need parking at any given time.

7.       The applicant has proposed to lay metal, install temporary fences, locked gates, pay a rental and then reinstate the grass/ ground at the end of the project.

8.       The location of the proposed compound will be in land legally described as Allotment 16, Section 4 Suburbs of Auckland comprising 1.0661 hectares and contained in Part NA977/57, (Part-Cancelled). Allotment 16 is currently held in fee simple by Auckland Council and subject to the Local Government Act 2002 (refer to attachment A).

9.       Section 138(2) of the Local Government Act includes the granting of a lease for more than six months that has the effect of excluding or substantially interfering with the public’s access to the park. As the proposal is for 19 months, public notification is required in accordance with section 82.

10.     The parking area will only be approximately 400m² of a park that is approximately 62,000m² in area.

11.     The park is used for walking and passive recreation and is not a sports field, as the park is too steep. The public will still be able to walk through the area and enjoy the park and there will still be lots of open grass sloped areas that are still available to the public. 

12.     The proposed parking area will be clear of any park trees or tree roots.

13.     The proposed parking area will be laid with metal and securely fenced off for health and safety; it will only be used for parking vehicles and not for storage of building materials or a work site.

14.     It is suggested that the any parking area should be located next to number 44 Laurie Avenue and clear of the park entrance.

15.     The small inconvenience of using part of the reserve will avoid parking problems for the residents otherwise created by construction vehicles blocking the street.

16.     The site is noted as a closed landfill, but no excavations are proposed so this will not be affected.

17.     There is no reserve management plan for Ayr Reserve.

18.     Due to housing intensification in the Auckland area, provided for by the Unitary Plan, there is a need to consider providing offsite parking / site compounds because the sites are being completely built on.  Nearby parks and car parks can provide a suitable options if it does not interfere with their operation. 

19.     Should this request be publically notified and the neighbours allowed to have input then a license to occupy could be granted with a bond and monthly rental taken. The bond can ensure the grass and ground is correctly reinstated once the parking area is removed.

20.     If submissions are received as a result of the consultation then a local board will need to hear the submissions through a hearing or through the monthly business meeting and make a decision.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

21.     The Local Board have not expressed any views on the proposal.

Māori impact statement

22.     No iwi consultation has been undertaken by the applicant. Should the board approve the public notification then iwi consultation will be undertaken as part of this process.

Implementation

23.     Should the board approve, then a 30 day public notification process will be undertaken with an advert in the local newspaper and the Auckland Herald, along with a letter drop to all the residents of Laurie Avenue. Iwi consultation will also be undertaken at the same time.

24.     Should any submissions be received then a local board hearing will need to be held to hear the submissions and make a decision.

NOTE: Change author to Simon Roche – Senior Land Use Advisor

Signatories

Authors

Simon Roche – Senior Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Remy De La Peza - Manager Land Advisory Services
Community Facilities

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan of proposed carpark in Ayr Reserve

83

     

Signatories

Authors

Simon Roche - Parks and Open Space Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Draft air quality bylaw and statement of proposal

 

File No.: CP2017/03923

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To invite local boards to provide feedback on the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires.

Executive summary

2.       At its 23 February meeting, the Governing Body resolved:

Resolution number GB/2017/15

 

MOVED by Mayor P Goff, seconded by Cr L Cooper:

That the Governing Body:

a)    adopt the statement of proposal (Attachment B of the agenda report), which includes the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires, for public consultation under section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002.

b)    forward the statement of proposal (Attachment B of the agenda report) to local boards for their views.

3.       The council publicly notified the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires on 27 February 2017.  The public can make written submissions until 27 March 2017.

4.       Local boards are invited to provide feedback on the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires as follows:

·          in writing by 3 April 2017, and/or

·          orally at the local board hearings session scheduled for 19 April 2017. Staff request that local boards wishing to attend the hearing please notify the hearings team by 3 April 2017.

5.       The original report to the Regulatory Committee is provided in Attachment A.

6.       The Statement of Proposal: Draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires is provided in Attachment B.

7.       More information, such as the summary proposal and the submission form is also available, on the Shape Auckland website.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      agree to provide feedback on the draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires Bylaw in writing and/or by attending the local board hearings session on 19 April 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Report to regulatory Committee - Statement of Proposal: Draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires

89

b

Statement of Proposal: Draft Air Quality Bylaw for Indoor Domestic Fires

103

     

Signatories

Authors

Jasmin Kaur - Policy Analyst

Belinda Hansen - Team Leader Social Policy and Bylaws

Authorisers

Michael Sinclair - Manager Social Policy and Bylaws

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

2016 Elections - Highlights and Issues

 

File No.: CP2017/03832

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek local board input into submissions to the Justice and Electoral Select Committee’s “Inquiry into the 2016 local authority elections”.

Executive summary

2.       This report has been presented to the Governing Body which has agreed that the report will be presented to all local boards for their feedback on submissions to the Justice and Electoral Select Committee’s “Inquiry into the 2016 local authority elections”.

3.       The issues on which submissions might be based are outlined under the heading later in the report “Submission to Justice and Electoral Select Committee on legislative change”. 

4.       Local board comments will be reported back to the Governing Body, to decide the final form of the submission.

5.       Planning for the 2016 elections commenced at the end of 2014.  Staff presented a report to the Governing Body in March 2015, which set out the areas of focus for achieving outcomes in terms of voter and candidate experiences and turnout.

6.       This report:

(i)         describes initiatives taken in the areas of focus

(ii)        evaluates the achievement of the outcomes

(iii)       notes other activities associated with the election, such as inaugural meetings

(iv)       summarises the budget and forecast expenditure 

(v)        identifies issues for the council to follow up 

(vi)    proposes submissions to make to Parliament’s Justice and Electoral Select Committee’s “Inquiry into the 2016 local authority elections”

(vii)    outlines the timetable for the review of representation arrangements leading up to the 2019 elections.

7.       The 2016 elections were successful. Particular highlights were:

(i)     a successful marketing campaign based on the ‘showyourlove’ brand

(ii)     innovative approaches to engaging with the community, including through social media, websites and the Love Bus

(iii)    increased participation in Kids Voting

(iv)   personal assistance provided to the visually impaired

(v)    increased turnout over 2013

(vi)   the elections came within budget.

8.       This report is presented to local boards to provide input to a submission to the Select Committee, with the final submission presented back to the Governing Body in May 2017. The submission needs to be lodged by December 2017.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      agree its comments to be reported back to the Governing Body for inclusion in the Auckland Council’s submission to the Justice and Electoral Select Committee’s “Inquiry into the 2016 local authority elections”.

 

 

Comments

Strategic approach

9.       A report to the Governing Body in March 2015 set out the strategic approach to the 2016 elections.  It identified the following areas of focus:

·   communications and community engagement

·   candidate awareness

·   on-line voting

·   optimum use of council resources.

Those areas of focus were to deliver the following outcomes:

·   an excellent experience for candidates and voters

·   a voter turnout of at least 40 per cent

·   a candidate-to-member ratio of three

·   user-centric, innovative and transparent local body elections.

10.     The following sections describe initiatives taken in these areas of focus and the achievement of the outcomes.

Actions taken in areas of focus

Communications and community engagement

11.     Voter participation statistics showed that previous participation rates were low among 18 - 39 year olds and this age group was a key focus for the Election Planning Team. 

12.     Initiatives included:

·   a comprehensive marketing campaign based on the “showyourlove” brand

·   advertising – billboards, adshells, bus backs, press, magazine, radio, digital, ethnic radio and newspapers

·   heart ballot boxes

·   digital bus shelter voting tallies

·   targeted social media: videos and articles via VoteAkl social media sites, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube

·   “Our Auckland” council’s news channel

·   Auckland Council channels for posters, such as libraries and service centres

·   the Love Bus and community presentations

·   showyourlove.co.nz web pages for information about candidates

·   Kids Voting programme in schools.

13.     The Election Team tested the “showyourlove” brand with audiences.  Feedback, particularly from young people, has been very positive.  Wellington City Council also developed its own brand, using our ‘love’ concept.  Auckland Council and Wellington City Council experienced greater increases over 2013 turnouts than other metropolitan councils.

14.     The Love Bus provided a visual reminder of the elections.  It stopped at various locations where people gathered, such as at malls, and staff engaged with passers-by.

15.     An engagement programme included making presentations to community groups:

·   80 events including: 22 Love Bus events, 11 English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) events, 22 community presentations (total attendance at these presentations was approximately 800), three meetings or informal chats, five5 information stalls

·   10 of these events were run in conjunction with the Electoral Commission

·   sessions were facilitated by the deaf community, Disability Network NZ, Tongan and Samoan churches and Korean Youth Leadership Institute independent of council support

·   24 engagement sessions included an interpreter for at least one language; interpreters for eight different languages, including New Zealand sign language, were used

·   groups reached included faith communities (Jewish, Muslim), Rainbow communities, Youth, Korean, Chinese, African, Indian, Tongan, Samoan, Sri Lankan, Somalian, Ethiopian, Rwandan, Filipino, West Indian, Burmese, Cambodian and Japanese

·   all advisory panels contributed to the elections programme

·   engagement activities and events were run in 15 of the 21 local board areas

·   approximately 24,000 Aucklanders were reached by engagement activities.

16.     The showyourlove.co.nz website provided information about candidates for voters.  People often state, when asked in surveys, the reason they do not vote is they lack information about candidates.  This website was planned very carefully to ensure that council did not provide any candidate with an electoral advantage.  All candidates were given the same opportunity to provide information in addition to the information in their candidate profile statements.

17.     A survey conducted after the 2016 elections gauged the effectiveness of these initiatives.  The sample size was 1,259 people.

18.     Awareness and likelihood of voting:

·   awareness of the elections rose from 83 per cent before the campaign to 93 per cent following the campaign

·   before the election, 75 per cent intended to vote but after the election only 63 per cent (of the survey sample) actually voted

·   of the 35 per cent who did not vote, 56 per cent intended to vote but did not

·   reasons given for not voting by the 35 per cent who did not vote include:

o don’t know anything about the candidates (25 per cent)

o don't know enough about the policies (22 per cent)

o did not know when voting finished, missed deadline (18 per cent)

o forgot to vote (18 per cent)

o can't work out who to vote for (16 per cent)

o not interested in politics or politicians (14 per cent)

o didn’t think vote would make a difference (11 per cent)

o couldn’t be bothered voting (11 per cent)

o too much effort to select the candidate (10 per cent)

o had other commitments during that time (10 per cent).

19.     Effectiveness of messaging:

·   53 per cent said the ads made them think of their community

·   44 per cent said the ads reminded them of what they love about their city

·   46 per cent said the ads made them more likely to vote.

20.     21 per cent used the web and social media for information about the elections – mostly the Auckland Council website.

21.     Of those who intended to vote but did not vote, 25 per cent said on-line or app based voting would encourage them to vote.

22.     74 per cent said they would prefer on-line voting over postal voting with 18 per cent preferring postal voting; those who preferred on-line voting were spread amongst all age groups but were mainly in the younger age groups.

23.     The Kids Voting programme was an on-line voting experience for students.  Students cannot legally take part in the actual election, but Kids Voting creates awareness of the elections which often flows from the participating students to their families. The Election Team prepared teaching kits class teachers could use to explain how council works.  There was a hypothetical referendum question that students voted on using the STV voting system.  11,730 students and 56 schools registered to take part, compared with 8,319 students and 44 schools in 2013.  4,748 students from 41 schools actually voted.  The lessons provided to the schools by the Election Team were:

·   an introduction to Auckland Council

·   an introduction to elections and voting

·   a real world on-line referendum case study

·   Local boards, wards and local issues

·   researching candidates.

Candidate awareness of election information

24.     The council’s website provided information for candidates.  This included:

·   candidate information handbook

·   candidate audio booklet

·   FAQs

·   research material

·   how to be nominated

·   election timetable

·   video explaining Auckland Council

·   posters on all Auckland Council channels

·   ads in newspapers

·   radio

·   digital ads.

25.     The Election Team focused on on-line content over hard copy booklets.  It did not hold candidate information evenings following the experience in 2013 of twenty-eight information evenings gathering only small attendance.

26.     Wellington City Council publicised community-based candidate meetings on its website which people apparently found useful.  The council could consider this for 2019.

On-line voting

27.     Prior to the elections, the Associate Minister of Local Government announced that trials for on-line voting would not take place for the 2016 elections. 

28.     The community expects to have an on-line option, provided concerns about the security of on-line voting are addressed.  In the post-election awareness survey, 74 per cent said they would prefer on-line voting over postal voting.

29.     The Finance and Performance Committee resolved in December 2016 to request the Minister of Local Government to explore a pilot trial of an electronic voting system including for by-elections.

Optimum use of council resources

30.     Key areas of the council involved in the elections were:

·   Democracy Services and Communications and Engagement

·   libraries and service centres held election information, received nominations and issued special votes

·   communications staff undertook advertising, branding, web content, social media with assistance from the design studio

·   bylaws compliance staff enforced the Auckland Transport Elections Signs Bylaw

·   Legal Services provided legal advice when required

·   Research and Evaluation (RIMU) staff provided advice on demographic data and undertook research for the report on the order of names.

31.     Elections planning staff worked closely with the Electoral Commission, Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) and the Society of Local Government Managers (SOLGM).

32.     Council’s election services provider (Independent Election Services Ltd) was based in the central business area, in Anzac Avenue, and was the main central city office.  Staff later provided limited services at the Bledisloe service centre in response to demand.

Achievement of outcomes

33.     The desired outcomes were:

·   an excellent experience for candidates and voters

·   a voter turnout of at least 40 per cent

·   a candidate-to-member ratio of three

·   user-centric, innovative and transparent local body elections.

Candidate experience

34.     For the first time, the council conducted an on-line survey of candidates. 150 candidates took part.  This feedback shows a positive candidate experience. 

35.     Key findings were:

·   76 per cent said it was easy, or very easy, to find information

·   88 per cent said that overall they could access the information they needed

·   87 per cent said they used resources on the Auckland Council website

·   83 per cent were aware of the “Love your Auckland – stand for council” campaign

·   80 per cent contributed to their information on the showyourlove.co.nz website

·   50 per cent said this was their first time standing for elected office with Auckland Council and 50 per cent said it was not their first time.

36.     The Election Team has noted some candidate issues for following up or improvement:

(i)    a couple of candidates were nominated for positions for which they did not intend to stand.  In one case a number of candidates on the one ticket arrived at a service centre together, creating increased demand on staff at the last minute.  In the future, the Election Team will co-ordinate with ticket campaign managers to help manage the processing of nominations and will provide additional briefings to staff helping at service centres.  Legislative change to allow electronic submission of nominations to improve these processes will be sought.

(ii)   there was a question whether a Samoan matai title could be used on the nomination form.  The legislation prohibits “titles” but does not define “title”.  The Electoral Officer, after receiving legal and cultural advice, allowed matai “titles” on the basis they were used more like names than titles.  It would be helpful to have legislative guidance on this.

(iii)  some candidates expressed concern about the requirement to state in the profile statement whether they lived in the area for which they were standing.  The council previously submitted in opposition to this requirement.

Voter experience

37.     The awareness survey showed that voters used on-line tools to find out about voting and about candidates.

38.     Issues which negatively affected the experience of voters (some outside the control of council):

(i)    a small number of voters in one area did not receive voting documents.  The Electoral Officer received about 90 applications for special votes from voters in that area.

(ii)   voters outside the area during the voting period either could not vote or had to apply for a special vote. An example was a voter who was overseas and who had arranged for a special vote to be posted to them but who could not meet the deadline for posting it back from overseas.  An ability to supply the voting documents electronically would assist

(iii)  an issue which continues to affect the voter experience is the mixture of different voting systems on the one voting document and different orders of candidate names.

39.     Ten staff volunteered to assist blind people with their voting.  This was arranged in partnership with the Blind Foundation and the volunteers were trained and made declarations as electoral officials.  The volunteers visited voters at their residences and help them mark their voting documents.  The Auckland Branch of Blind Citizens NZ wrote an appreciative letter to the mayor and chief executive.

Voter turnout

40.     The council aimed for a 40 per cent turnout.  The turnout was 38.5 per cent, an increase of 3.7 per cent over the 2013 turnout.

41.     Across all of New Zealand, there was a slight increase over 2013:

2010

2013

2016

Change

%

National voter turnout %

49.0

41.3

42.0

+0.7

 

 

 

 

42.     Across metropolitan councils, Auckland and Wellington achieved the two highest increases:

Voter turnout % - Metro

2010

2013

2016

Change

%

Auckland

 51.0

 34.9

 38.5

+3.7

Christchurch City

52.2

42.9

38.3

-4.6

Dunedin City

 53.0

 43.1

45.2

 +2.1

Hamilton City

 37.8

 38.3

33.6

-4.7

Hutt City Council

 40.4

 36.6

37.8

 +1.2

Nelson City

 52.2

 52.2

52.1

-0.1

Palmerston North City     

 43.2

 38.7

39.1

0.4

Porirua City

 39.1

 36.6

38.0

+1.5

Tauranga City

 43.8

 37.8

38.0

+0.2

Upper Hutt City

44.3

40.8

41.0

+0.2

Wellington City

 40.0

 41.5

45.6

+4.1

Total

 45.0

 38.0

39.3

+1.3

Candidate to member ratio

43.     The target was three candidates per position.

44.     There were 19 candidates for mayor.  In 10 out of 13 electoral ward issues for councillors, the ratio of candidates to positions was 3 to 1, or greater.

45.     There were 32 local board electoral issues (there are 21 local boards but elections in some local board areas are on a subdivision basis).  In 9, the ratio of candidates to positions was 3 to 1 or greater.  For a local board that is not divided into subdivisions, it is harder to achieve the ratio because the number of positions is greater.

46.     Overall, there were 468 candidates for 170 positions, which is a ratio of 2.8 to 1.

User-centric, innovative and transparent local body elections

47.     The key ‘users’ in an election are the candidates and the voters.  Feedback shows:

·   candidates got the information they needed

·   compared to previous elections voters could find out more about candidates, through the “showyourlove” website

48.     Assistance was provided to voters who were blind. Blind Citizens NZ communicated its appreciation back to the council.

49.     The report details above a number of innovative activities such as the Love Bus and Heart Ballot Boxes.

50.     Aspirations to have on-line voting were not met.  There is a need to provide a user-friendly option for voters who do not use postal services.  Voters who are not in the area during the voting period also have issues. If a voter is overseas, by the time voting documents have been posted to them (if they have a reliable postal address) there is not sufficient time to post them back.  The ability to download blank forms, and to scan and email completed forms, should be investigated.

51.     For candidates, there is only the one option of paper-based nomination forms.  Submitting nominations electronically needs to be investigated.

52.     The communications and community awareness programmes were innovative and received positive feedback, as noted above under “Communications and Community Engagement”.

53.     Ensuring candidates and voters had sufficient information assisted the transparency of the elections.

Other activities relating to the elections

54.     The Executive Leadership Team adopted a staff policy around political neutrality and involvement in the election process outside of work hours.  The Governing Body adopted an elected members’ policy dealing with issues such as the use of council resources by incumbent members.  The policy required close management of council communications during the sensitive period and a panel met weekly to monitor this.

55.     Council staff enforced the Auckland Transport Election Sign Bylaw and dealt with 162 complaints.  Earlier in the year there was media coverage about the use of commercial billboards.  This will be addressed in a review of the Auckland Transport bylaw.

56.     Following each election there are a number of activities arranged for elected members:

(i)      induction sessions for members

(ii)      refreshing the technology provided to members

(iii)     powhiri for all members

(iv)    inaugural meetings of the governing body and the local boards at which members make their statutory declarations.

Cost of the election

57.     Summary of budget and expenditure:

Budget

Planned

Actual

(at 31/01/17)

Forecast

Comments

Election Services - IES

$4,893,000

$4,515,500

$4,653,490

Amount payable to IES as per contract plus a 10 per cent buffer for variable costs to be determined at wash-up in Feb ’17, Whilst costs are currently forecast to arrive over contract amount, these are expected to be within budget (including buffer).

Communications & Engagement (internal charge)

$1,221,000

$1,160,960

$1,221,498

Expected to meet budget once final costs are confirmed.

Staff

$620,000

$659,637

$669,637

Slight over-spend in staff due to increased programme scope and staff turnover.

Kids Voting

$50,000

$49,424

$49,424

Steering Group approved exceeding budget for increased number of participating schools and students. This includes $30,000 for IES for on-line voting capability.

Community Engagement

$40,000

$27,441

$27,441

Initial Elections budget had no allocation for Community Engagement hence in 2016 $40k was reallocated from other items. Under-spend here due to final budget being confirmed after a lower cost engagement schedule was already planned. $10k for translations and accessibility was covered by C&E budget.

Governing Body Inaugural Meeting

$57,000

$49,661

$52,697

Initial budget had allocated $81,000 for post-election costs of which specifics were not known to Elections team. This was reduced to cover Inaugural Meeting only and then further to fund Community Engagement. In 2013, Inaugural Meeting cost was $57,000.

Local board inaugural meetings

$129,300

$97,921

$129,300

The budgets for travel and equipment hireage were not fully utilised.

Research

$20,000

$6,404

$8,700

This amount was reduced from $30,000 to fund Community Engagement.

Pre-election IES, DDB & Buzz

$0

$48,980

$48,980

Unplanned costs for development of elections strategy were funded by Democracy Services in 2015.

Miscellaneous

$0

$9,244

$9,244

Includes judicial recount, costs associated with services at libraries and service centres, other programme-wide costs and office expenses.

Recoveries - DHBs & LTs

-$1,500,000

-$622,500

-$1,517,964

Full recoverable amount will be determined at wash-up in February 2017. Current estimates expect to meet planned amount.

Total

$5,530,300

$6,002,672

$5,352,447

Overall budget under-spend expected once wash-up is confirmed in February 2017.

58.     The costs of the Howick by-election ($104,000) will be absorbed in the budget if possible.

Issues to progress further

Howick by-election

59.     A member of the Howick Local Board resigned at the inaugural meeting of the board.  The council held a by-election at a cost of $104,000, which the Finance and Performance Committee has approved as unbudgeted expenditure.  The committee considered the council should have the option of appointing to a vacancy that occurs within six months of an election and that the council should have the option of conducting a by-election on-line. The committee resolved:

“That the Finance and Performance Committee:

c)    agree that the Mayor will write to the Minister of Local Government requesting, among other amendments to the Local Electoral Act 2001 necessary to improve the conduct of local elections, an amendment to section 117 to allow a local authority using the first past the post electoral system to determine by resolution whether to fill an extraordinary vacancy which occurs up to six months after the previous triennial local government election either by appointing the highest polling unsuccessful candidate from the previous triennial local government election, or by holding a by-election.

d)    request the Minister of Local Government to explore a pilot-trial of an electronic voting system including by-elections.”

(Resolution number FIN/2016/1)

60.     Both of these issues are discussed further in this report.

On-line voting

61.     Survey results show the community prefers on-line voting.  The government previously established a working party which made recommendations for a staged approach with trials in 2016.  The government supported this and set out the requirements to be met for a council to establish a trial. Auckland Council was considered to be too large for a trial and was not eligible.  In April 2016 the Associate Minister of Local Government announced the trial would not proceed as requirements had not been met.

62.     The government wants local government to lead on-line voting, subject to its requirements being met.  LGNZ should co-ordinate the local government sector’s development of on-line voting and Mayor Goff and Councillor Hulse will be pursuing this with the Local Government New Zealand National Council.

Voter participation

63.     In order to prepare for the 2019 elections a voter participation project has been established.  The main aims of the project are to reduce barriers to participation, encourage diversity and increase awareness and understanding of council and local elections. 

64.     The planning team for the 2016 elections has now completed its task and has been disbanded, however a position of Senior Advisor, Voter Participation, has been established within Democracy Services to provide continuity between the work that was carried out for the 2016 elections and the engagement that needs to occur for the 2019 elections. 

Research on order of names

65.     An analysis of the 2010 and 2013 election results was undertaken so that the council could decide whether the order of names on voting documents should be alphabetical or random.  Further research will be undertaken and provided to the council when it next makes a decision on the order of names.

Review of Auckland Transport Election Signs Bylaw

66.     Auckland Transport has undertaken to review the bylaw.  The review will take place in time for implementation for the 2017 parliamentary election.

Submission to Justice and Electoral Select Committee on legislative change

67.     The Justice and Electoral Select Committee conduct an enquiry following each election.  Submissions on the inquiry into the 2016 elections will close in December 2017.

68.     This report seeks input from local boards for the submission, particularly on the following issues. A proposed submission will be reported to the governing body later in 2017.

(i)      Matai names

The Local Electoral Act 2001 prohibits the use of official titles when listing candidate names on the voting document.  Names that can be used include a registered name or a name by which the candidate has been commonly known for the six months prior to an election.  Although sometimes referred to as ‘matai titles’, legal advice provided to staff is that these are more in the nature of names than of a title denoting the holding of some sort of office.  To avoid doubt, the legislation should give guidance.

(ii)      Vacancies occurring within six months of an election

Since the 2016 elections were held, three vacancies have occurred – Auckland (resignation of local board member), Bay of Plenty Regional Council (death) and Waikato Regional Council (death).  When considering the budget for the Howick by-election, the governing body resolved to seek a law change allowing a local authority using the first past the post electoral system to appoint the highest polling unsuccessful candidate to a vacancy occurring within six months of an election.

(iii)       Legal requirement for candidate to state whether residing in area

Some candidates complained about this requirement.  The council has previously submitted in opposition to it and may consider doing so again. Following the 2013 elections, the select committee recommended that the requirement be removed and noted that candidates for parliamentary elections did not have to make a similar statement.  However, it has not yet been removed.

(iv)       Timing of school holidays

The school holidays overlap with the postal voting period.  Many people go out of the area during school holidays and do not vote.  Currently local government elections are on the second Saturday in October. Moving election day to the first Saturday in October would provide one week before election day that would not overlap with school holidays. This still gives time to adopt the annual report and it provides an additional week between the elections and the end of the year for the new council to attend to business, such as a draft annual plan.

(v)          Electronic transmission of voting documents to and from voters overseas

Voters who are overseas during the postal voting period often do not have enough time to post back voting documents prior to election day, after receiving their voting documents in the post.  The select committee has previously recommended electronic transmission.  The government has supported sending blank voting documents electronically but has opposed the return of completed votes electronically.  On-line voting would also solve this issue.

(vi)       Electoral Officer to have access to the supplementary roll

The processing of special votes relies on the Electoral Commission checking that voters are on the electoral roll.  If the EO had access to the supplementary roll, the EO could do this, with the potential to speed up the counting of special votes. This has previously been supported by the select committee and the government.

(vii)      Access to data associated with electoral roll

It is a concern that local government election turnouts are low. Having access to statistical data associated with the electoral roll, such as age groups of electors, would be helpful when planning election awareness campaigns. Currently the Electoral Act only allows this information to be supplied for research into scientific or health matters.

(viii)     Electronic nominations and candidate profile statements. 

The option to submit nominations electronically would benefit the candidate experience and it would lead to more accurate representation of candidate profile statements.  Currently there are over 600 profile statements to be typed, from copy supplied by candidates, and then proof-read.  Occasionally this leads to mistakes. 

(ix)    Legislative confirmation that local authorities may promote elections

Legislation should give a clear mandate to local authorities to promote elections. This is to avoid any uncertainty about public funds being used for election promotion purposes.

(x)     Time period for printing electoral rolls

Electoral rolls were not printed in time for the start of candidate nominations because the legislated time period is too short.  Extend time period for printing. This corrects a previous change to timeframes which shortened the time for printing the rolls.

(xi)    Electronic access to electoral rolls for election staff

When processing candidate nominations, staff at service centres need to check whether nominators are on the electoral roll for the specified area.  They may only have one hard-copy version to share between staff processing nominations for different candidates.  It would be more efficient to access the current roll electronically.

(xii)    Close of voting time

Extend voting later into the last day and create one full 'voting day'. The Electoral Officer received 18,000 votes on the Saturday morning via our ballot boxes. Extra time on the final Saturday would give voters more time to vote and could help turn the final Saturday into a voting day celebration.

(xiii)   Discourage inappropriate use of elections

There were 19 candidates for mayor.  Clearly some of these had no chance of being elected but presumably used the opportunity to promote their cause. Consideration could be given as whether this is an issue that needs to be addressed.

(xiv)  Separation of DHB elections.

A variety of election issues on the one voting document together with different voting systems and ordering of names confuses voters.  It would be better to hold DHB elections on a separate time, for example a separate year, or with the parliamentary elections.  However, this would increase the cost of an election to Auckland Council, which currently receives $1.5 million in recoveries from DHBs and Licensing Trusts.

(xv)   Candidate information in different languages

Candidate profile statements are limited to 150 words.  If a candidate profile statement is provided in English and Māori, then each version may have 150 words as Māori is an official language.  If a candidate profile statement includes English and a language other than Māori it is limited to 150 words in total. Consideration could be given to other options for candidates to provide information in languages relevant to their constituents.

(xvi)  Consistency between Electoral Regulations and Local Electoral Regulations

The Electoral Regulations include provisions that would be helpful to local elections such as:

·    Telephone dictation for voters with disabilities

·    Receipt of special votes electronically.

(xvii)  Relationship with Electoral Commission

Some voters, confused about who was responsible for running the council elections, contacted the Electoral Commission.  The Electoral Commission typically referred callers to the council and enquirers ended up calling the council call centre only to be referred on to Independent Election Services. There should be consideration to jointly promoting awareness about who enquirers should contact with queries about local elections. This does not require a legislative change but could be implemented through Local Government New Zealand.

Timetable for 2019 elections

Electoral system

69.     If the council wishes to change the electoral system from First Past the Post to Single Transferable Vote, a resolution is required by 12 September 2017. Such a resolution might then be subject to a petition for a poll. Alternatively the council could conduct a poll.

Māori wards

70.     If the council wishes to establish Māori wards, a resolution is required by 23 November 2017. Such a resolution might then be subject to a petition for a poll.  Alternatively the council could conduct a poll.

Review of representation arrangements

71.     The council is required to review:

·   whether the election of councillors is on a ward basis or at large and, for each local board, whether election of board members is on a subdivision basis or at large

·   the number of members in each local board within a minimum of five and a maximum of twelve

·   if there are wards or subdivisions, what the boundaries are and how many members there are in each

·   the names of wards, subdivisions and local boards.

72.     Unlike other councils, the council cannot review the number of members of the Governing Body because the legislation sets this at 20 members.

73.     The statutory timetable for the review is:

Due dates

Requirement

No earlier than 1 March 2018 

A council resolution setting out the council’s initial proposal

Within 14 days of resolution but no later than 8 September 2018

Public notice of the resolution, providing at least one month for submissions

Within 6 weeks of close of submissions

The initial proposal may be amended after considering submissions.

Public notice of the final proposal

20 December 2018

Appeals from those who submitted on the initial proposal and fresh objections to any amendments are received

http://acsapcrm-sap.aucklandcity.govt.nz:8003/SAP/BC/BSP/SAP/thtmlb_styles/sap_skins/default/images/1x1.gif?sap-client=310&sap-language=EN&sap-domainRelax=min15 January 2019

Appeals and objections are forwarded to the Local Government Commission

11 April 2019

Appeals and objections are determined by the Local Government Commission, which may conduct hearings in order to do this

74.     The review will be conducted as one component of the wider governance framework review reported to the Governing Body last December.   The Governing Body established a political working party comprising 7 governing body members and 7 local board members.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

75.     The report is being presented to all local boards for their views, before being presented back to the Governing Body to finalise a submission to the select committee. 

Māori impact statement

76.     Initiatives that encourage the community to engage with elections will have a positive impact on Māori.  There are activities associated with elections that are particularly significant to mana whenua, such as the pōwhiri to welcome all elected members following the elections.

77.     The survey of candidates asked candidates to identify their ethnicities. Ten per cent of candidates were Māori, compared to 9 per cent of the total Auckland population.   As a result of the election, 7 per cent of elected members are Māori (115 of 170 elected members replied to the survey).

78.     There will be an opportunity to consider the establishment of Māori wards for the 2019 elections.

Implementation

79.     This report will be presented to local boards for their comments, to be included in a report back to the Governing Body so that the Governing Body can finalise its submission to the select committee.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts

 

File No.: CP2017/03461

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek feedback from local boards on maintenance contracts for parks, buildings and open space, prior to Finance & Performance Committee approval on 28 March 2017.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council manages over 5,000 sites across the region including parks, buildings and open space. Existing Auckland Council maintenance contracts for these sites expire on 30 June 2017. 

3.       Project 17 was setup to procure and implement new maintenance contracts due to take effect on 1 July 2017.  This includes Full Facilities, Arboriculture and Ecological services across the Auckland Council region.

4.       Over the last twelve months, Community Facilities has engaged with elected members through both formal and informal processes, to shape up the direction of this project and seek feedback on maintenance requirements and service levels.  Refer to Attachment A for the Political Engagement Timeline.

5.       Elected member feedback, including local priorities, informed the Request for Proposal document which was the basis of negotiation with suppliers.  Refer to Attachment B for this local board’s resolutions dated September 2016.

6.       This report outlines the following documents which will form part of final maintenance contracts and standard service levels:

·         Attachment C        Standard and Enhanced Assets

·         Attachment D        Full Facilities Contract Service Specifications

·         Attachment E        Supplier Specific Information (CONFIDENTIAL)

·         Attachment F        Contractor Performance Balanced Scorecard

·         Attachment G       Tupuna Maunga Values Specifications

·         Attachment H        Contract Information (CONFIDENTIAL)

7.       Community Facilities seek feedback from local boards on Attachments C, D and E, prior to Finance and Performance Committee approval on 28 March 2017.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on:

·      Standard and Enhanced Assets (Attachment C)

·      Full Facilities Contract Service Specifications (Attachment D)

·      Supplier Specific Information (Attachment E) (CONFIDENTIAL)

b)      note that the local board will have the opportunity to meet successful suppliers in April and May to discuss and refine local service level variations.

 

 

Comments

Process

8.       Over the last twelve months, Community Facilities has engaged with elected members through both formal and informal processes, to shape up the direction of this project and seek feedback on maintenance requirements and service levels.  Refer to Attachment A for the Political Engagement Timeline. 

9.       An open, competitive tender process seeking proposals for the supply of full facilities, arboriculture and ecological maintenance services of council assets was conducted as follows:

·         On 10 August 2016, an Expression of Interest was published to identify market interest in providing maintenance services for buildings, parks and open spaces to Auckland Council.  36 Expressions of Interest were received.

·         Formal feedback from local boards on the project approach and proposed service specifications was received in September 2016.  

·         Feedback was also sought from local boards on the list of assets in their area, used as the basis of asset data in the Request for Proposal. 

·         Refer to Attachment B for this local board’s resolutions.

·         Feedback was used to inform the Request for Proposal document which was released on 28 October 2016 and submissions closed 9 January 2017.

·         Submissions were assessed and scored by an evaluation team against weighted criteria including methodology, resources and capability, innovation and SMART procurement, and price.

·         Negotiations are now underway with shortlisted suppliers, due for completion 10 March.

·         Recommended contracts for five areas across the region, including pricing and baseline service levels, will be presented to the Finance & Performance Committee on 28 March 2017 for final approval.

10.     Community Facilities seek feedback from local boards on Attachments C D and E, prior to Finance and Performance Committee approval on 28 March 2017.

Approach

11.     Following a review last year of management and maintenance processes of council’s assets, this project has adopted an improved approach to maintenance services, to:

·      focus on the whole-of-life cycle of assets;

·      deliver more services without compromising quality;

·      encourage and incentivise contractors to be accountable for the assets and develop ownership at all levels of their service delivery;

·         provide a contractual framework that enables contractors to employ innovate ideas and methods without compromising on quality delivery; and

·         implement five new contract areas (called Tahi, Rua, Toru, Whā, Rima) to allow for better economies of scale.  The local boards represented within each area are:

Contract Area

Tahi

Rua

Toru

Whā

Rima

Devonport-Takapuna

Hibiscus & Bays

Kaipātiki

Upper Harbour

Albert-Eden

Great Barrier

Puketāpapa

Waiheke

Whau

Henderson-Massey

Rodney

Waitākere Ranges

Howick

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Orākei

Waitematā

Franklin

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Manurewa

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

Papakura

12.     A key change is that contracts will have a more outcome-based focus on service levels, as opposed to predictive or frequency based maintenance schedules (unless where necessary).  This ensures service standards are consistently maintained and managed by suppliers.

13.     A standard maintenance service level is applied to every asset to ensure it is fit for purpose, in good condition and achieves community outcomes.

14.     Where an asset may have specific known demands such as high frequency use, high reputational risk, requires attendance due to its nature (e.g. old, troublesome asset) or is a heritage site, an enhanced level of service may be applied to the asset. 

15.     An enhanced service level should not be confused with poor performance from a supplier to provide the agreed standard service level.

16.     Refer to Attachment C outlining the updated asset list (including those requiring an enhanced service level) for the Waitematā Local Board area as at March 2017.  Please note that this asset list is continually reviewed to ensure up to date data in alignment to council decisions and asset assessments.

17.     Maintenance contracts have been negotiated to cover three core functions across the five areas:

·         Full Facilities

·         Specialist Arboriculture

·         Specialist Ecological

18.     Council may immediately terminate (or suspend the supplier’s performance of) the contract in whole or in part, by written notice to the supplier, if a persistent performance breach occurs.   Please refer to the Contractor Management section in this report for further details.

19.     Refer to Attachment H (confidential) for further information about contract terms and Attachment E (confidential) for supplier specific information.

Standard Service Levels

Full Facilities Contract (FFC)

20.     Service specifications determine the criteria and outcomes associated with maintaining an asset or facility, which then sets the foundation of a contract agreement.

21.     Refer to Attachment D for the Service Specifications expected across the Auckland region for Full Facilities maintenance work.  In summary, these are service level output statements by category:

Full Facilities Category

Output Statement

Open Space

Parks, reserves and roadsides within Auckland are maintained and developed to provide a sustainable, safe, clean and healthy environment while assets are maintained and enhanced to meet the amenity and use needs of council, Auckland residents and visitors.

Arboriculture

 

Trees (under three metres in height) are maintained to an aesthetically pleasing state which promotes healthy growth with the tree adding to the resident or visitors experience with targeted maintenance activities to achieve healthy and safe trees.

Locking and Unlocking

Assets are actively managed to minimise vandalism and anti-social behavior

Buildings - Maintenance

All Auckland Council owned and/or operated facilities require on-going Planned and Response Maintenance (compliance and non-compliance) to ensure that all facilities provided for public and Auckland Council staff use are functional, fit-for-purpose, safe and where possible ensure that the building services are optimised to reduce disruption to the facilities operation.

Buildings –
Cleaning

All Auckland Council owned and/or operated buildings that require planned and response cleaning shall be cleaned to a standard that allows all buildings users to utilise a sanitary, hygienic, safe, functional and fit for purpose space for their operation. All litter and debris shall be removed from site and done so in a sustainable manner.

22.     Standard Operating Procedures have been developed to agree minimal functional requirements such as height of grass mowing, mulching thickness, goal post painting etc.  These procedures have been developed through expertise knowledge and are operational in nature. 

23.     Minor Capital Works (low value, low risk) is included in these contracts to ensure appropriate mitigation measures are incorporated when maintaining assets.

24.     The baseline service level for specialist sportsfield maintenance ensures sports playing surfaces are managed to provide surfaces and assets that are ‘fit for use’ for the type and level of sport being played and which maximise usage and support organised sporting activities.

25.     Specialist sportsfield renovation work includes:

·         Fertilisation, application, fertilisers

·         Winter Treatment - cambridge rolling, slicing and spiking, solid tine vertidraining, ground breaking , vibramoling

·         Summer - vertimowing, dethatching, organic matter removal, leaf collection, scarifying/ dethatching, coring/hollow tine, core harvesting, undersowing/oversowing, sand topdressing, soil topdressing, vibramoling, mole plough, verti-draining, ground probe aeration, weed control, weed control (couch), agrichemical controls on sportsfields, top planning

·         Turfing – turf replacement (minor)

·         Artificial - cleaning, rubber top-ups, grooming, repair, hygiene

·         Supply bulk supply materials - eg sand, soil, seed, agrichemicals, turf (winter and summer species), fertilizer

·         Renovation works programme development

·         Note that the Full Facilities contract incorporates sports mowing, line marking, goal posts/furniture, soil and/or tissue sample analysis, grass selection, pest and disease detection, minor turf repairs, renovation works programme report, cricket.

26.     Sportsfield renovations seasonally renovate surfaces back into condition for subsequent sporting code use, including renewal of surfaces that have reached their life span, or reinstating an asset that has been damaged through excessive overuse.

27.     Sportsfield renovations are collaboratively implemented to complement maintenance activities in the contract.

28.     When asset components are replaced (e.g. turf type), the same style and material type is supplied, unless otherwise directed by Auckland Council.

Arboriculture Specialist Contract

29.     The scope of the arboriculture contract covers the management of council owned trees i.e. it’s ‘urban forest and rural surrounds.’

30.     The arboriculture contract includes, but is not limited to, the following services:

·         General administration and communication

·         Inspections and programmes

·         Pruning

·         Reactive works

·         Clean-up

·         Tree removal

·         Planting

·         Aftercare maintenance

·         Tree asset inventory

31.     The arboriculture contract will be managed as a prescriptive measure and value contract, but may shift to output basis through the term of the contract. Work will be managed on both a scheduled and reactive basis.

32.     Auckland Council will retain ownership of all chipped bio-mass (foliage, brushwood and wood) resulting from Arboriculture Specialist contracts. 

33.     It will be expected that the supplier takes a proactive approach in relation to Council’s assets, including those not directly related to the contract’s scope. This will involve reporting any faults or issues, regardless of asset ownership in a timely manner e.g. reporting a vandalised bus shelter (Auckland Transport) next to a street garden.

34.     The management of Kauri Dieback and weeds are incorporated into Standard Operating Procedures included in the Arboriculture Specialist contract.

Ecological Specialist Contract

35.     The ecological contract provides for the maintenance of Auckland Council’s high value ecology sites, and significant bush and natural areas. The prioritised targeted removal of animal and plant pests from council’s open spaces is a core service within this contract. The overarching objective is to restore and rehabilitate native biodiversity in a sustainable and long term approach.

36.     The scope of the ecological contract includes:

·         preparing ecological restoration plans that take a long term perspective and provide the optimum cost effective management to reinstate the ecological processes, so the site environmental values are conserved and enhanced.

·         assessing, monitoring and controlling pests impacting the ecological processes and or values at each site. This includes but is not limited to plant, animal and invertebrate pests.

·         restorative planting of sites.

37.     The supplier is required to have all vehicles to carry a web based GPS tracking system.  This enables reports to be produced on journey length and stay.

38.     The ecological contract is supplemented by an Ecological and Environmental Pest Control Standard Operating Procedure which provides guidance to methodologies and site-specific requirements.

39.     The supplier is required to report any hazardous dumping to Auckland Council’s Pollution Hot Line immediately.

Other Maintenance Priorities

SMART Procurement

40.     The following SMART procurement outcomes are requirements outlined in maintenance contracts:

·         Increase capability and capacity – suppliers are required to create sustainable businesses that provide training and development to ensure continued quality delivery of services over the term of the contract.

·         Youth employment - contracts should facilitate connecting work-ready youth to local employment by creating local jobs with training and development opportunities.

·         Diversity and inclusion - contracts should promote inclusion, reduce discrimination and remove barriers to opportunity and participation, particularly for disadvantaged groups who face barriers to employment e.g. long term unemployed, and people with disabilities.

·         Valuing Māori - suppliers are required to work collaboratively with council to achieve better outcomes with Māori, by supporting skill development and labour market participation, and engagement with Māori owned businesses.

·         Pacific Auckland - contracts should support further training, development and labour market participation for Pacific youth and communities.

·         Local community and economy - contracts should support local business where reasonable/practical, and should meet the social needs of the delivery area.

41.     Contracts have retained flexibility to remove assets (by contract variation) to facilitate active participation by the third sector/volunteers to deliver maintenance outcomes.

42.     Suppliers (and subcontractors) are required to establish, document, implement, maintain and continually improve an environmental management system. This will capture practices such as an environmental policy, environmental impacts of significance, legal requirements, environmental objectives and targets.  At a minimum the management system will monitor and measure energy conservation, water conservation, waste management and recycling, chemical use, Scope 1 and Scope 2 Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

43.     Suppliers are proposed to annually reduce the carbon footprint from year two onwards.

44.     The environmental management system must be certified by an accredited third party to the standard of ISO14001, EcoWarranty, Enviro-Mark or an agreed-upon alternative programme. Where the supplier has certified to the Enviro-Mark programme they will commit to attaining the highest level of certification, Enviro-Mark Diamond.

45.     Please refer to Attachment E for further supplier specific information.

Weed Management

46.     A memorandum from Barry Potter, Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services, was circulated to local board members on 15 November 2016 regarding weed management.  A second memorandum was circulated to all elected members on 16 December 2016 providing an update on the implementation of Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy, particularly with regards to this project. 

47.     New maintenance contracts have been designed to reflect the objectives of Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy which includes implementing the following changes:

48.     What will change?

o   Minimise agrichemical use

§  The new contracts require a reduction in agrichemical usage and this will be closely monitored - a 10% penalty of the monthly invoice to the supplier will be applied if the ‘annual reduction in use of agrichemicals’ KPI is not met. 

§  Chemical usage will be reported monthly by suppliers and tracked on a local park by local park basis.  Please refer to the Contract Management section in this report for further information on reporting, auditing and KPI’s. 

§  Contracts will standardise which type of glysophate will be used across the region by all suppliers.

§  Manual and mechanical weed control methods are currently used in and around children’s playgrounds across the region.  Agrichemicals are not used within these spaces. This will continue under new contracts.

§  Mechanical edging will be applied along paving and other hard edges.

o   Integrated weed management, ensure best practice and value for money

§  The volume of mulch in gardens and garden beds will be increased to reduce other methods of weed control

§  Change from frequency based maintenance contracts to a focus on environmental outcomes, to encourage suppliers to be more innovative in their approach to weed management and edge control

§  Learnings from innovations will be socialized across all suppliers to promote continuous improvement and best practice methodology

§  Suppliers will be encouraged and rewarded for innovation in weed management at quarterly supplier forums

§  Development of a weed management manual which is currently being reviewed by the Best Practice Reference Group.

§  Establishment of the Best Practice Reference Group made up of external technical experts and community representatives as per the policy action plan.

§  A No-Spray Register will be used by suppliers to ensure consistency in practice and process.

o   Empower the community to manage weeds in accordance with the policy

§  Weed control programmes in ecological restoration contracts will be planned and agreed in advance of the works. 

§  Targeted weed control, including the use of volunteers, will be enabled to ensure that agrichemical usage is minimized and integrated with other sustainable practices such as replanting with eco-sourced species to prevent weed re-infestation.

§  Contracts include supplier inductions and training on public awareness of vegetation controls, including herbicides and the importance of public education, including signage when spraying.

§  Improved information on council’s website outlining how and why council controls weeds.

49.     At the 13 December 2016 Finance and Performance Committee meeting, the following resolutions relating to weed management were approved:

o   An addition to recommend to the Environment and Community Committee as follows:

a)      Note that significant funding reallocations are not within the scope of the Annual Plan process

b)      Endorse glysophate reduction targets within the current budget

c)      Express support for the continued implementation of the Weed Management Policy

d)      Agree that a political group be appointed by the Mayor, monitors and reviews the implementation of Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy and practice

e)      Recommend that a review and consultation of allocated funding take place through the upcoming Long-term Plan process

o   Resolution d) reshapes the weed management political advisory group

Co-Governance

50.     As pre-agreed with co-governance partners, suppliers submitted a detailed report and costings on how they would manage and provide specific services to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority and / or Parakai Recreation Reserve in their preferred areas. 

51.     This report is being socialised with leaders and representatives from co-governance entities with the outcome being determined at the end of March 2017 with either of the following options being the preferred solution:

·           Maintain the status quo

·           Offer maintenance services to the supplier in the specific area

·           Offer maintenance services to only one supplier who would be accountable for all outcomes.

52.     Whenua Rangatira (Bastion Point) – no change proposed to current maintenance agreements where iwi are responsible for managing this site.

Community Empowerment

53.     Local boards expressed strong support to enable community empowerment including volunteers, through these contracts.

54.     Contracts have the flexibility to accommodate contract variations such as community empowerment initiatives, however compliance with Health and Safety, legislative obligations, agreed service levels and operating procedures are critical in these cases.

55.     Local boards should work with their strategic brokers (within the Arts, Community and Events team) to identify requirements and opportunities, who will then liaise with Community Facilities to agree and implement suitable solutions.

Contract Management

Contractor performance

56.     Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) measure how well the Supplier is doing to meet specifications and outcomes. KPI’s cover five categories:

quality

innovation

management

smart procurement and environmental management

stakeholder, customer and community impact.

57.     Health and Safety (H&S) is a contractual obligation.

58.     KPI’s are measured monthly, bi-monthly, quarterly or annually.

59.     Suppliers are required to meet Full Facilities Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) and Minor Capital Work KPI’s to have their level of direct award for Minor Capital Works increased, as an incentive for good performance.

60.     For each category component failed, suppliers must provide an improvement plan to resolve the performance issue.

61.     If a supplier continues to fail on a category component beyond the performance resolution improvement plan deadline, council will be entitled to withhold payment of 10% of each month's invoices (excluding minor capex) until the supplier starts meeting the category component target.

62.     Suppliers have the right to earn back withheld payments relating to category components if they start meeting required target levels by a timeframe set by council.

63.     Attachment F outlines the Contractor Performance Balanced Scorecard that will be monitored and applied across the region.

Auditing

64.     Auditing of contractor performance was previously conducted by external parties.  However, this function is now being conducted internally by Community Facilities.  A team of auditors conduct spot checks onsite targeting 10% of all maintenance work conducted by each supplier.

Response maintenance

65.     Response maintenance work will be categorised by urgency and a maximum response time determined.  Criteria is still under negotiation and agreement for some suppliers.

66.     The supplier will undertake programmed maintenance, responsive maintenance and all other minor contract works (including emergency works on an as needs basis only) on Monday to Sunday, restricting noisy and any activities that may cause a nuisance to between the hours of:

o    7:00am and  6:00pm (52 weeks of the year); and

o    10:00am and 6:00pm (Saturdays and Sundays and statutory holidays).

67.     The supplier will provide a call out service 24 hours, 7 days a week, carried out as part of normal duties.

68.     Following completion of response maintenance work, the supplier will call the customer (between 8:00am and 6:00pm unless otherwise stated), to inform them that works have been undertaken and check that the customer is satisfied.

69.     It is expected that suppliers assist with ‘whole of life’ asset management which requires the supplier to assess and make recommendations on the optimal most cost effective balance of programmed maintenance, responsive maintenance, and renewal of assets across their whole life.

70.     Suppliers are required to update a condition assessment grading once a maintenance service has been undertaken, to be included in council’s asset management system, and to notify council of any significant degradation.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

71.     Project 17 has engaged with local boards through various channels including:

Local Board Chairs Procurement Working Group;

Local Board Chairs Forum presentations;

memorandums;

cluster workshops;

individual local board workshops; and

business meeting reports.

72.     Refer to Attachment A outlining the political engagement timeline.

73.     Community Facilities is now seeking feedback from local boards during the final stage of this procurement process, prior to Finance and Performance Committee approval of contracts.

Māori impact statement

74.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori.

75.     Māori responsiveness requires the collective effort of everyone. Under the new contracts, suppliers will work collaboratively with council to achieve better outcomes with Māori and for Auckland. This will include:

Building positive relationships with Māori – effective communication and engagement with Māori, developing resilient relationships with mana whenua;

Significantly lift Māori social and economic well-being; and

Building Māori capability and capacity.

76.     Through these contracts, opportunities to support local community outcomes and economic development include (but are not limited to):

Providing employment opportunities, in particular for local people and for youth;

Increasing capability and capacity (apprenticeships, cadetships or equivalent) in particular for youth;

o   Building on community and volunteer networks.

77.     The Request for Proposal outlined Tūpuna Maunga Value Specifications as outlined in Attachment G, which suppliers are required to support as part of new maintenance contracts. 

Implementation

78.     The transition into new contracts will commence once formal approval is agreed by the Finance & Performance Committee.

79.     Local boards will have the opportunity to meet new suppliers in April and May 2017 to discuss specific local priorities. Any local service level variations may need to be reflected in contract variations and implementation timelines agreed with the supplier.

80.     New maintenance contracts take effect on 1July 2017. Note that there will be approximately six to twelve months to bed in changes, in particularly systems and reporting.

 

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh – Principal Business Analyst

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Karen Lyons – General Manager Local Board Services

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Political Engagement Timeline

181

b

Local Board Resolutions (September 2016)

183

c

Standard and Enhanced Assets

187

d

Full Facilities Service Specifications

191

e

Supplier Specific Information (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

f

Contractor Performance Balanced Scorecard

243

g

Tupuna Maunga Values Specifications

247

h

Contract Information (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh - Financial Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


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Chair's Report

File No.: CP2017/03869

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       The chair will update the board on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the board’s interests.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitemata Local Board:

a)         receive the chairperson’s report for the period March 2017.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair's report - March 2017

253

    

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


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Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2017/03917

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for board members to update the board on projects/issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitemata Local Board:

a)         receive the written report from member Northey and the verbal members reports for        March 2017.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member Richard Northey Report

271

    

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


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Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2017/03878

 

  

 

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Executive Summary

1.       Attached is a copy of the governance forward work calendar for the Waitematā Local Board which is a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings. 

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar as at March 2017 attached to the agenda.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar - March 2017

277

     

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


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Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2017/03910

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present the Waitematā Local Board workshop records to the board. Attached are copies of the proceeding records taken from the workshops held on:

·     28 February 2017

·     1 March 2017

·     7 March 2017

·     14 March 2017

 

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop proceeding records for the meetings held on 28 February 2017, 1 March 2017, 7 March 2017 and 14 March 2017.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Record for 28 February 2017

281

b

Workshop Record for 1 March 2017

283

c

Workshop Record for 7 March 2017

285

d

Workshop Record for 14 March 2017

287

     

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 March 2017

 

 

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Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

20        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts - Attachment e - Supplier Specific Information

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the tender process, including negotiations are ongoing. The commercial details were received in a closed tender and are subject to an obligation of confidence until a decision has been made on the successful operator. Council intends to negotiate the exact terms and conditions of the contract until the contract is entered into..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

20        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts - Attachment h - Contract Information

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the tender process, including negotiations are ongoing. The commercial details were received in a closed tender and are subject to an obligation of confidence until a decision has been made on the successful operator. Council intends to negotiate the exact terms and conditions of the contract until the contract is entered into..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.