I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 6 June 2017

9.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Deputy Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Brendon Crompton

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Hopkins

 

 

Murray Kay

 

 

Niko Kloeten

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Anthea Clarke

Democracy Advisor

 

30 May 2017

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 237 1310

Email: Anthea.Clarke@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Te Puru basketball/netball court proposal (reversible hoops and court dual marking) - Fred Nolan (Pohutakawa Coast Basketball Club)                 5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Franklin Quick Response Grants: Round Five, 2016-2017 grant applications      7

13        Auckland Transport Update – May 2017                                                                   29

14        Adoption of Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan                                                             63

15        Adoption of Franklin Local Board Agreement 2017/2018                                       67

16        Franklin Local Board Arts, Community and Events work programme 2017/2018 85

17        Franklin Local Board Community Facilities work programme 2017/2018            95

18        Franklin Local Board Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme 2017/2018 113

19        Franklin Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme 2017/2018                                                                                                                    119

20        Franklin Local Board local economic development (LED): Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) work programme 2017/2018                          129

21        Franklin Local Board Libraries work programme 2017/2018                               135

22        Local Board recommendations on Easter Sunday trading                                  141

23        Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar                                159

24        Alteration of the business meeting schedule for the Franklin Local Board by the addition of 18 July 2017 and the removal of 25 July 2017                                                    163

25        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                165

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

The chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

That the Franklin Local Board accepts the apology from Member B Crompton for absence.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

That the Franklin Local Board confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 2 May 2017 as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

That the Franklin Local Board approves the request for leave of absence from Member B Crompton.

 

6          Acknowledgements

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Te Puru basketball/netball court proposal (reversible hoops and court dual marking) - Fred Nolan (Pohutakawa Coast Basketball Club)

Purpose

1.       A deputation from Fred Nolan on behalf of the Pohutukawa Coast Basketball Club with respect to the proposal to use reversible basketball/netball hoops and remark the netball courts at Te Puru Park to provide outdoor basketball opportunities on the netball courts.

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chair has approved the request from Fred Nolan on behalf of the Pohutukawa Coast Basketball Club to bring a deputation with respect to the proposal to use reversible basketball/netball hoops and remark the netball courts at Te Puru Park to provide outdoor basketball opportunities on the netball courts.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board thanks Fred Nolen for his attendance on behalf of the Pohutukawa Coast Basketball Club with respect to the proposal to use reversible basketball/netball hoops and remark the netball courts at Te Puru Park to provide outdoor basketball opportunities on the netball courts.

Attachments

a          Te Puru Basketball Club outdoor basketball/netball court proposal.... 181

b          Presentation - Te Puru Basketball Club outdoor basketball/netball court.............................................................................................................. 185

 

 

9          Public Forum

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

There were no notices of motion.

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Quick Response Grants: Round Five, 2016-2017 grant applications

 

File No.: CP2017/06731

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present applications received for Franklin Local Board Quick Response Round Five 2016/2017.  The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $156,000.00 for the 2016/2017 financial year. 

3.       A total of $103,418.00 has been allocated under quick response grant rounds one, two, three and four and local grants round one, leaving a balance of $52,582.00.

4.       Five applications in total were received in quick response grant round five, with a total requested of $6,755.00.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board considers the applications listed in Table One and agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

Table One: Franklin Quick Response Grants: Round Five Applications

App ID

Applicant

Project / activity focus

Project

Requested

Eligibility

QR1703-501

Beachlands and Maraetai Playcentre

Community

Towards Beachlands and Maraetai Playcentre for a contribution towards Matariki Marae koha and food at their Matariki evening celebration.

$300.00

Eligible

QR1703-505

Waiuku Family Support Network

Community

Towards Waiuku Family Support Network for the cost of advertising their services to the community.

$1,524.00

Eligible

QR1703-507

Roderick Wayne and Maxine Hazel Bremner

Environment

Towards material cost of nesting site for dotterel and shoreline nesting sea birds.

$931.00

Eligible

QR1703-506

The Evangelical Alliance Relief Fund trading as Tearfund

Events

Towards Tearfund for the cost of venue hire (Airport Conference Centre, Corsair Lane) for the Tearfund Poverty Cycle relay event.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1703-508

BSG Events

Events

Towards BSG events for the cost of hiring the Pukekohe Raceway Park for the Pukekohe Raceway Kids Obstacle Duathlon.

$2,000.00

Eligible

 

 

 

Total:

$6,755.00

 

 

Comments

5.       The implementation of the new Community Grants Policy commenced on 1 July 2015. The policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme for 2016/2017, see Attachment A.


 

6.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

7.       The new community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the new council grant webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters and Facebook pages, council publications, radio, local newspapers and community networks. Staff have also conducted a series of public workshops in local board areas.

8.       The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $156,000.00 for the 2016/2017 financial year. 

9.       A total of $103,418.00 has been allocated under quick response grant rounds one, two, three and four and local grants round one, leaving a balance of $52,582.00.

10.     Five applications in total were received in quick response grant round five, with a total requested of $6,755.00.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Franklin Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

12.     Section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

Māori impact statement

13.     The provision of community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, and activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori. As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the new community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori. One organisation in these quick response rounds has identified as Maori.

Implementation

14.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

15.     Following the Franklin Local Board allocating funding for quick response grant round five, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board decision.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Grants Programme 2016-2017

9

b

Franklin Quick Response Grants: Round Five 2016/17 application summaries

13

      

Signatories

Authors

Daylyn D'Mello - Environmental and Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Jennifer Rose - Operations Support Manager

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – May 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/10135

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report responds to resolutions and requests on transport-related matters; provides an update on the current status of Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF); requests approval for new LBTCF projects; provides a summary of consultation material sent to the Franklin Local Board; and provides transport-related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Franklin Local Board and its community.

Executive summary

2.       In particular, this report covers:

·        Franklin Local Board transport capital fund update and requested approvals for an existing project (Beachlands town centre gardens) and six new projects (additional pedestrian signage and FlagTrax installation in Pukekohe, remaining town centre pavers upgrade in Waiuku, and a new footpath and two new kerb and channel projects in Beachlands)

·        Pukekohe Station project update

·        Responses to Franklin Local Board resolutions and requests

·        Mana whenua signage unveiling at Patumahoe

·        Road corridor maintenance update following March/April weather events

·        Quarterly report for January–March 2017.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receives the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport update – May 2017’.

b)      approves the following projects for construction, to be funded from the Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund:

i)        Beachlands town centre gardens (project #443), based on the firm estimate of $279,396 for the use of hardwood material

ii)       Additional pedestrian signage at three further locations, King Street Pukekohe, based on the firm estimate of $7,950

iii)      Waiuku pavers upgrade of remaining priority areas 1-4, based on the estimate of $505,000

iv)      Weatherly Drive, Beachlands, new footpath through to Te Puru Park, based on the estimate of $23,712

c)      approves the following projects for detailed design and costing phase, to be funded from the Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund:

i)        First View Avenue, Beachlands, new kerb and channel on both sides from Sunkist Bay Road to Wakelin Road (306m), based on the estimate of $376,000

ii)       Second View Avenue, Beachlands, new kerb and channel on the north side from Puriri Road to Cherrie Road (425m), based on the estimate of $272,000

iii)      Installation of new FlagTrax system in Pukekohe town, of 150 estimated units on existing streetlights, based on the estimate of $147,000.

d)      requests Auckland Transport to upgrade the streetlighting in Hall Street Pukekohe to meet current streetlighting standards.

 

Comments

Strategic alignment

A1. Auckland Transport Statement of Intent

3.       Five strategic themes guide Auckland Transport’s decisions and actions and are aimed at providing an accessible, integrated, efficient and innovative transport system.  They are also critical to the realisation of Auckland Council’s vision for transport as expressed in Chapter 13 of the Auckland Plan.

4.       The five strategic themes endorsed by Auckland Transport’s Board are:

·        Prioritise rapid, high frequency public transport

·        Continually transform and elevate customer experience

·        Build network optimisation and resilience for travel times

·        Enable quality urban growth to meet demand

·        Fast-track creative, innovative and efficient transport services.

5.       Over the last six weeks, public transport improvements have seen construction continue on the Hibiscus Coast busway station and the Manukau bus station.

6.       On Sunday 30 April, timetables changes were implemented across many southern New Network bus services (including the Waiuku to Papakura route) to allow for more punctual and reliable services, and better connections to train services.

7.       The New Network for West Auckland, including Helensville, Huapai and Kumeu will be launched on Sunday 11 June.

8.       Otahuhu Station has been recognised at the 2017 New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects Awards.

9.       Auckland Transport has been recognised for its procurement success at the New Zealand Procurement Excellence Awards.  The City Rail Link won the Sustainability Project of the Year and Auckland Transport’s Procurement Manager for Infrastructure was a finalist in the Procurement Professional of the Year award.

10.     On 4 May, Auckland Transport launched a new phone app which makes catching a bus, train or ferry more intuitive and easier to use.  The AT Mobile app has introduced new features and has been designed from the customers’ point of view.

Local projects and activities

B1. Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) update

11.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport.  Local boards can use this fund to deliver projects that they consider are important but are not otherwise part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.  The limitations are that the projects must be safe, not impede network efficiency, and be located within the road corridor or on land controlled by Auckland Transport.  However, projects running through parks and reserves may also be considered if there is a transport outcome.

12.     The Board’s current LBTCF projects are included in the table below (in which ROC = rough order of costs, and FEC = firm estimate of cost):


 

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

443

Upgrade of Beachlands town centre gardens

·    ROC estimate of $105,000

·    FEC estimates of $221,362 (macrocarpa) or $279,396 (hardwood)

·    The ROC estimate for the upgrade is $105,000.

·    On 24 November 2015 the Board approved the project for detailed design and costing.

·    Updated designs and costings were presented to a Board workshop in February 2017.

·    At a workshop on 16 May 2017, the Board considered the costings provided and decided to proceed to construction using the hardwood option. A resolution confirming this is provided for the Board’s consideration.

458

Second View Avenue, Beachlands – installation of new kerb and channel between Wakelin and Bell Roads (both sides)

·    SW component estimate $42,000

·    LBTCF FEC estimate $355,000

·    Construction completed.

·    Total LBTCF spend to date is $355,936

·    Final costs to be reported but may include additional costs claimed by contractor such as an extra TMP cost due to abnormal weather in September/October. AT is still reviewing the claim.

 

13.     The Franklin Local Board’s transport capital fund to date is summarised below.

Franklin Local Board transport capital fund financial summary:

Funds Available in current political term (NB: includes 2019/2020 FY)

$1,654,863

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$117,302

Remaining budget left that needs to be allocated to new projects by the end of the current political term.

$1,537,561

 

14.     At a workshop on 16 May, and following on from a previous workshop on 21 February, the Franklin Local Board considered a number of potential LBTCF projects in order to select those projects it wished to proceed with in the current political term.

15.     Recommendations formalising the Board’s decisions at that workshop are included for consideration.  The recommendations seek to approve the projects for either construction or detailed design and costing phase as follows:

Selected projects recommended to approve for construction

·        Beachlands town centre gardens (existing project #443) – firm estimate of $279,396 (for hardwood option).  This was an existing project at detailed design stage that was developed with community input.  Firm costings had been provided for two different materials (wood) to utilise in the construction of the project.  The Board chose the hardwood option as is would tie in better with hardwood varieties used in other projects the wider Beachlands area.

·        Additional pedestrian signage (similar to previous project #466) at three locations, King Street, Pukekohe – firm estimate of $7,950.  The Board had previously approved the installation of pedestrian signage at five locations in the Pukekohe main street and wished to implement the same treatment at three remaining well-used pedestrian crossing points.

·        Waiuku pavers, upgrade of remaining priority areas 1 to 4 – rough estimate of $505,000.  The Board had previously approved the upgrade of the pavers in the immediate vicinity of the Waiuku town square as a trial and was happy with the result.  The Board therefore wished to complete the remaining paver upgrades in the other areas identified.

·        Weatherly Drive, Beachlands, new footpath through to Te Puru Park – rough estimate of $23,712.  The Board considered a number of options for providing a path and potentially indented parking bays to provide a pedestrian link from Weatherly Drive into the Te Puru community facility.  The Board supported the path only option as being sufficient for the required purpose.

Selected projects recommended to approve for detailed design and costing phase

·        First View Avenue, Beachlands, new kerb and channel from Sunkist Bay Road to Wakelin Road (306m, both sides) – rough estimate of $376,000.  The wider Beachlands area has a large number of street blocks that were originally developed with no kerb and channel.  The only funding option available for retrofitting the area with this urban infrastructure is the LBTCF, and the Board has selected this and the following site as its highest priority locations.

·        Second View Avenue, Beachlands, new kerb and channel from Puriri Road to Cherrie Road (425m, north side only) – rough estimate of $272,000.  See comment above.

·        New FlagTrax in Pukekohe town centre – rough estimate of $147,000 for a possible 150 units.  The exact number of units required is not clear and will need to be confirmed in consultation with the Pukekohe Business Association.  Pukekohe has a large number of flag brackets affixed to existing lampposts around the town centre and on main routes into town, and erecting flags for local promotional or festive purposes by both Council and the Pukekohe Business Association is an involved exercise requiring specialist equipment (cherry pickers) and manpower, and road corridor access approvals each time.  The Board considers that installation of a FlagTrax system (as is present in Waiuku) would allow the installation of flags without the ongoing need and cost of specialist equipment, manpower and approvals each time.

16.     At the same workshop, while discussing lighting in the Hall Street car park, the Board also requested that the streetlighting in Hall Street be upgraded to meet current lighting standards. A resolution formalising this request is provided for the Board’s consideration.

B2. Pukekohe Station project update

17.     The scope of works for this project is a new bus station catering for six bus bays, an 87-space park and ride, a new over-bridge with lifts linking the rail and bus stations, customer toilets and bus shelters, new ticket machines on the bus side, and improved rail platforms with the removal of timber decks.  Already completed are improvements to the Custom Street, Harris Street and Manukau Road intersections to cater for the new network bus services exiting Custom Street onto Manukau Road.

18.     The project is running behind the overall programme with Stage 2 being delayed.

a.       Stage 1 snagging works are ongoing

b.       Stage 2 main works have been tendered and evaluation is nearing closure.  The awarding of the tender will be in May

c.       The overall programme is planning to open the full station in late 2017 but the successful tenderer’s programme is awaited for confirmation.

19.     Auckland Transport is working with Iwi to design a pattern that will be fused into the glass for the Bus Shelter concourse roof. This is ongoing.

20.     The Bus station project team and AT Communications team are preparing posters and other methods of communication in advance of the closure of KiwiRail land currently used unofficially for car parking at the station.

21.     For more information on the project, visit at.govt.nz/pukekohestation.

B3. Responses to Franklin Local Board resolutions and requests

22.     At its December 2016 business meeting, the Franklin Local Board passed the following resolution:

Resolution number FR/2016/225

b)      requests that Auckland Transport install a reduced temporary speed limit of 70kph and ‘slippery when wet’ warning signs on Capehill Rd between the intersection with Tuhimata Rd and the current 50kph area near Reynolds Rd.  This temporary speed limit and signage to remain until the road resealing is completed.

23.     As previously advised, the ‘slippery when wet’ signage was installed in mid-February and a temporary 70km/h speed limit was implemented on 7 March 2017.

24.     The road resealing work was completed in early May 2017.  The site has since been swept and line marked, and temporary signage removed.

25.     At its April 2017 business meeting, under item 12 ‘Disposals recommendation report’, the Franklin Local Board passed the following resolution:

Resolution number FR/2017/40

That the Franklin Local Board:

d)      requests that Auckland Transport completes the Pukekohe car parking survey it previously commenced, in order to inform decisions on proposed disposals of car parking land.

26.     Auckland Transport carried out the background work to prepare a Comprehensive Parking Management Plan (CPMP) for Pukekohe in 2014.  However, this work was placed on hold until the AT Parking Strategy was adopted in 2015.  Since then, Auckland Transport has been requested to carry out a number of such studies but has a limited budget with which to complete them. Such requests include Panuku Development Auckland ‘Transform’ areas which have required studies to inform their planning processes and as such have been prioritised.

27.     Auckland Transport intends to complete the Pukekohe CPMP but currently does not have the funding to do so.  The funding previously used to initiate the parking study was not ring fenced at that time but the Franklin Local Board will be informed when further funding becomes available.  Alternatively, should the Franklin Local Board wish to expedite the completion of the Pukekohe CPMP, it may wish to allocate funding towards the project.

28.     Masters Road/Waiuku Road intersection safety – At the request of both Franklin Local Board and Waikato District Council elected representatives, Auckland Transport has investigated the following safety concerns on Waiuku Road at its intersection with Masters Road.

A.      Request speed limit reduction from 100km/h to 70km/h on Waiuku Road westbound on approach to Masters Road intersection

Auckland Transport reviews speed limits in accordance with the requirements of the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2003 (the Speed Limits Rule) and also makes assessments under the NZTA’s new Speed Management Guide.

The Speed Limits Rule is a central government regulation which governs how speed limits are set and seeks to achieve a consistent approach across the entire country.  Under the current speed limit rule the dominant factor in determining the speed limits is the level of roadside development.  The standard speed limits under the rule are 100km/h in rural areas, and 50km/h in fully urban areas. The semi-rural speed limits of 80km/h and 70km/h are used for small towns/villages and in semi developed areas around the edge of urban zones. Based on the level of roadside development on Waiuku Road in the vicinity of Masters Road, the current 100 km/h speed limit is in accordance with the Speed Limit Rule.

The new Speed Management Guide is the development of a new approach to speed limit setting and planned changes to the speed limit rule that shift the focus towards the national safe system approach.  The speed management guide places greater emphasis on the function and use of the road, the geometry of the road and the crash risk.  The Speed Limits Rule is expected to be rewritten in the first half of 2017 to incorporate the new approach used by the speed management guide.

The Speed Management Guide allows for a range of rural speed limits 100, 80 and 60. Roads with an arterial function (higher traffic volumes), roads with straight/gently curved geometry, and roads with low crash risk will qualify for the higher rural speed limits, while roads with local access function (lower traffic and proportionately more walkers and cyclists), roads with winding geometry, and roads with higher crash risk will qualify for the lower rural speed limits. An assessment under the Speed Management Guidelines would consider the full length of Waiuku Road. This road carries a relatively high traffic volume and serves an arterial road function. The road geometry consists of generally straight sections, separated by moderate bends. The crash risk varies along the road from medium to high.  Initial indications are that the rural section of Waiuku Road (including the section near Masters Road) could qualify for a speed limit in the 80-100km/h range under the new guide. The roll out of changes under the guide will be gradual and initially targeted to the areas of greatest crash risk.

Auckland Transport is currently developing a speed management plan for the region which will include a prioritised programme of work. This programme will identify the highest priority areas for initial roll out of speed management on approximately 10% of the network. Implementation of the programme will commence in the 2017/2018 financial year.

B.      Visibility at Masters Road/Waiuku Road intersection

Auckland Transport has undertaken an assessment of this intersection. In particular, the following factors were considered: the intersection layout, topography, reported crashes, speed limit and required site distances. Auckland Transport found that the available site distance was sufficient when considering all of these variables.

While not the only consideration, crash statistics (including those with pedestrians involved) are used as an important indicator of the risk for road users. In investigating the Masters Road and Waiuku Road intersection, there have been four reported crashes at this intersection in the last five years, of which two were related to turning movements. One of these crashes resulted in minor injuries and the other was shown has having no resulting injuries.

While this intersection is operating at a safer level than other similar intersections within Franklin, Auckland Transport has identified several signage changes to further improve the level of safety of this intersection. It is therefore proposed to install an advanced intersection warning sign on Masters Road and a chevron sign opposite Masters Road on Waiuku Road. Installing these signs will better highlight this intersection for approaching motorists on Masters Road.

C.      Traffic movements at the driveway for the vegetable/coffee shop on Waiuku Road to the west of the Masters Road intersection

As a result of the concerns raised, safety for vehicles entering and exiting this driveway was also assessed. It was observed that approaching vehicles have good visibility of right turning vehicles and no problems were observed with any of the turning movements at this location.

While Auckland Transport understands the concerns raised, as no significant safety concerns have been identified, it is unable to justify any changes to the road layout at this location at this time.

B4. Mana whenua signage unveiling at Patumahoe

29.     Auckland Transport’s Regional Signage Project team and Maori Policy and Engagement team have been working with the 19 iwi comprising mana whenua for Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland) to develop a template for dedicated signage to tell the story of mana whenua’s connection to and history of the region.  As part of that project, the 19 iwi have also been given the opportunity to choose a site and provide the content for a specific sign.

30.     Arising from that project, at dawn on Tuesday 2 May, a new sign was unveiled and blessed in Patumahoe village, at the entrance of Johns Street, detailing the area’s significance to Ngati Tamaoho.  Franklin Local Board representatives joined with mana whenua, members of the community and Auckland Transport representatives to mark the occasion.

31.     Auckland Transport is also working with Ngati Te Ata Waiohua to develop and install a sign detailing its connections to Pukekohe.

Mana whenua and Franklin Local Board representatives at Ngati Tamaoho sign unveiling, Patumahoe

 

B5. Road corridor maintenance update following March/April weather events

32.     Heavy rainfall was experience during March and April.  The rainfall in March was four times the average monthly rainfall and the rainfall in April was twice the average rainfall.  March rainfall was also the highest on record since records began in 1962.

33.     The individual storm events during the March to mid-April period are summarised below:

·        March 7/8 – widespread rainfall across the region, 1 in 91-year event in Hunua, 1 in 83-year event in Clevedon, 1 in 15-year event in Papakura

·        March 10 to 13 – widespread rainfall across the region, generally < 1 in 10-year event widely across the South

·        March 28/29 – 1in 18-year event in Papakura, 1 in 12-year event in Pakuranga, 1 in 11-year event in Karaka

·        April 4/5 – widespread rainfall across region, 1 in 33-year event in Ararimu, 1 in 13-year event in Pakuranga

·        April 12/13 – widespread rainfall across area, 1 in 22-year event in Papakura.

34.     During these extreme storm events, the southern rural catchments experienced the longer duration higher Average Rainfall Intensity rainfalls, which resulted in larger run-off volumes.  As the soils in the region were saturated due to the heavy rainfall earlier in March, the heavy rainfall events on 28/29 March, 4/5 April and 12/13 April 2017 caused further landslips across the region and further rainfall has caused ongoing slippage of the unstable hill sides.

35.     These storm events caused large amounts of public disruption due to flooding and landslips, and also significant damage to the road network due to road subsidences, pavement failures, blocked culverts, and severe erosion/scour of surface water channels.

36.     The initial clean-up works were carried out by BroadSpectrum, who had 10 crews (excavator and trucks) working on the clean-up during April.

37.     Clean-up costs during the March/April period were $2 million. Approximately 20,000m3 of slip material was cleared from the road in those two months, and work has continued through May.

38.     Permanent reinstatement costs (including walls, drains, pavement etc.) are very roughly estimated at $4-5 million dollars.  An application for additional funding from the NZTA is currently being prepared.

39.     A summary of the major road reinstatement works required based on information to date is included at Attachment A.

40.     A detailed programme of repair works is currently being prepared.  As the storm damage is widespread across the south rural area it is taking some time to inspect all roads and scope the repair works required.  In the interim, the focus has been on maintaining access and inspecting the main roads.

B6. Quarterly report for January–March 2017

41.     The following quarterly report material is attached to this monthly report:

·        Attachment B – report from Auckland Transport departments on their activities in the Franklin Local Board area and regionally over the last quarter

·        Attachment C – report on Travelwise Schools activities in the Franklin Local Board area over the last quarter.

B7. Traffic Control Committee (TCC) report

42.     Decisions of the TCC during the month of April 2017 affecting the Franklin Local Board area are listed below.

Date

Street

Type of Report

Nature Of Restriction

Committee Decision

7 April 2017

Victoria Avenue / Colombo Road (Waiuku)

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Islands, Give-Way Control, Flush Median

Carried

7 April 2017

Bowen Street / Queen Street / Kitchener Road (Waiuku)

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Waiuku Steel and Wheels Festival)

Authorised vehicles Only

Carried

21 April 2017

Great South Road /Ararimu Road / Turner Road / Dunn Road / Gelling Road / Paparimu Road / Steel Road / Sinclair Road / Maher Road / McEldownie Road / Hillview Road / Ramarama Road / Dale Road / Davies Road / Maxted Road (Ararimu)

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Lane Restrictions, No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Islands, Give-Way Control, Stop Control, Flush Median, Edge Lines, Shoulder Marking, No Passing Restriction

Carried

21 April 2017

Huamanu Street / Manaki Street / Raki Street / Tawhiti Street / Koropupu Street / Hemopo Street / Adams Road South / Belmont Road / Factory Road / Kapia Street / Te Manaki Street (Pukekohe)

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Give-Way Control, Traffic Island Control, Road Hump, Flush Median, Edge Line

Carried

21 April 2017

Cemetery Road / Hull Road / Colombo Road / George Street (Waiuku)

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Give-Way Control, Stop Control

Carried

21 April 2017

Papakura-Clevedon Road (Clevedon)

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (ANZAC Day)

No Stopping At Prohibited Times

Carried

 

Regional and sub-regional activities

C1. NZTA Southern Corridor Improvements project update

43.     Motorists are now using the new additional 3rd southbound lane that has opened between Hill Road and the Takanini off-ramp; and the Takanini on-ramp to just north of the Pahurehure Inlet.

44.     An initial assessment of the additional lane opening has shown that traffic flow has substantially improved, including during the peak.  The delay at the SH20 to SH1 link and the need for ramp signals has reduced, though traffic flows will continue to be monitored.

45.     Construction on the project started early 2016, with temporary lane changes and speed restrictions in place since March 2016, which will remain in place while improvements continue. Improvements to come include:

·        Additional 4th lane southbound from SH20 to Hill Road and an additional 3rd lane southbound from Pahurehure Inlet to Papakura Interchange

·        Additional 3rd lane citybound from Hingaia Road to Takanini Interchange

·        Upgrades to the Takanini Interchange including a new citybound on/off-ramps

·        Walking and cycling improvements including 4.5km of shared path along the citybound side of the motorway from Hingaia Road / Beach Road in Papakura to Great South Road at Takanini

46.     To find out more, visit  http://nzta.govt.nz/projects/southern-corridor-improvements

C2. Security and Fare Evasion (SaFE) Project update

47.     This update covers the progress and next steps of the SaFE project – which is a programme of work covering three years to improve customer experience, increase security and safety and reduce vandalism and fare evasion on the rail network. This will underpin the retention of existing customers and support the acquisition of new customers on public transport.

48.     In April 2017, Auckland Transport announced it would be closing six Transdev ticket offices and extending the number of AT Customer Service Representatives.

49.     Auckland Transport also announced it would be recruiting 18 multi-modal Transport Officers, initially planned to be on the Western Line.  The purpose of these positions will be to increase passenger safety and security whilst on the public transport network and associated facilities. This includes ensuring proactive fare evasion management through regular fare enforcement duties such as fare inspections, issuing infringements and providing a high level of customer service and information to customers.

50.     Transport officers will also act as a first point of contact for any incidents on network, station and surrounding areas, and assist in emergency management through a close working relationship with the Police and Transport Operators.

C3. Rail safety campaign

51.     There have recently been several deaths and near-misses at railway crossings around Auckland. Two problems appear to be the root cause of these incidents:

·        people wearing headphones and not taking them off before crossing railway lines

·        people not looking both ways, and forgetting that trains can come from both directions.

52.     Auckland Transport is running a campaign until the end of June to encourage people to take more care when crossing railway tracks, concentrating on two messages of headphone use and looking both ways. A video is being promoted using social media and online advertising and a 15-second radio advertisement has also been produced that is running on a mix of radio stations. A series of street posters is also being used, along with posters on trains.


 

C4. New AT Mobile app provides a simpler public transport journey

53.     As noted previously, Auckland Transport has launched a new app which makes catching a bus, train or ferry around Auckland more intuitive and easier to use.

54.     Auckland Transport spoke extensively to customers throughout the app’s development to design a whole new experience from the customers’ point of view.

55.     One of the big features of the app is the alerts function.  Once customers have entered their journey, the app will send them alerts and tell them how far away their bus or train is, so they know exactly when to leave home.

56.     Alerts can also be received on a wearable device, like an Apple Watch, making it easier to know when to get off the bus or train when making an unfamiliar trip.

57.     The app uses location (GPS) services, tracking the customer’s journey as they go.  This makes it easier to find unfamiliar bus stops, train stations and where to go to make transfers.

58.     Ongoing customer feedback is actively being sought to help design new features, making sure the app keeps improving.  Auckland Transport has built in a feedback loop to hear from customers what they think would improve and what could be added to the app.

59.     To find out more about the app go to: https://at.govt.nz/bus-train-ferry/more-services/mobile-services/

Consideration

Local board views and implications

60.     The Board’s views will be taken into account during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Māori impact statement

61.     No specific issues with regard to impacts on Maori are triggered by this report and any engagement with Maori will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Implementation

62.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of major roading reinstatement works following the March–April 2017 weather events

39

b

Auckland Transport activities in the Franklin Local Board area and regionally for the January-March 2017 quarter

47

c

Travelwise Schools activities in the Franklin Local Board area for the January-March 2017 quarter

61

     

Signatories

Authors

Jenni Wild – Elected Member Relationship Manager (South); Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Adoption of Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan

 

File No.: CP2017/08278

 

  

Purpose

1.       To adopt the Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan.

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board Plan 2014 contains a key initiative to develop plans for walking, cycling and horse riding connections in response to community feedback.

3.       The process to develop plans in specific areas in Franklin commenced in Beachlands/Maraetai, with the formation of the Pohutukawa Coast Trails steering group comprising representatives from local community groups and local board member Malcolm Bell, with board member Angela Fulljames as the independent chair.

4.       The steering group met monthly and develop a list of ten proposed connections for walking, cycling and horse riding in the Beachlands/Maraetai area, including connections to the wider area of Clevedon and Whitford and to regional and national trails.

5.       The proposed connections were consulted on in September 2016, and 66 pieces of written feedback were received supporting the proposals and prioritising the routes.

6.       For proposed routes over private land, tailored written and verbal consultation was undertaken with affected landowners and they were assured that any proposals were aspirational and would only be implemented with the permission and support of the landowner.

7.       A draft Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan was developed incorporating the ten proposals and community feedback, where appropriate.  This was the subject of targeted consultation in the local area, with 13 pieces of written feedback received supporting the plan and offering suggestions for alternative route options, some of which were incorporated on the direction of the steering group as follows:

·        connection 4 - along the coast between Maraetai and Duder Beach (refer page 28), which now continues through Whitford Forest (4d) instead of private land (4e-f) and there is an option along the coastline (4i).

·        connection 2 - Maraetai (Southern Boundary) Trails (refer page 23) has been shortened - 2c not supported by the current landowner at the time of adoption of the plan.

8.       The draft plan is now presented to the local board for adoption (see attachment A).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board adopts the Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan (see attachment A).

 

Comments

9.       Following consultation on the Local Board Plan 2014, a key community priority was to connect local parks, forests, rivers, waterfronts and streams by walking and cycling tracks, and bridleways where appropriate.  The board included an initiative in the local board plan to “develop a greenways plan to identify connections”.

10.     Due to the large size of Franklin, the board directed that development of plans was to be done for individual areas, with Beachlands/Maraetai as the first priority area, due to its level of growth and the local community groups who were already expressing an interest in developing trails.  This would be followed by Waiuku then Pukekohe.

11.     The board also gave direction that a collaborative approach was to be used, working in partnership with the community to develop the plan.

12.     A public meeting was held at Beachlands Hall in November 2015 inviting representatives from local community organisations to work with the board to develop a plan.  A presentation was given by the Walking Access Commission, setting out best practice for developing a plan based on experience in other areas and the support that could be given by the commission to the group.

13.     Interest was expressed by eight groups present to be involved in the project to plan a network of walking, cycling and horse-riding trails. 

14.     A project manager was appointed, and the next meeting of the steering group was held in February 2016, led by the local board.  At the meeting the local board appointed an independent chair (Angela Fulljames) and a board representative on the group (Malcolm Bell).  The organisations that formed the steering group were as follows:

·        Pohutukawa Coast Community Association

·        Pohutukawa Coast Rotary,

·        Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club,

·        Beachlands/Maraetai Pony Club,

·        Beachlands Maraetai & Districts Historical Society

·        Whitford Residents & Ratepayers Association

·        Pohutukawa Coast Sea Rescue

·        Te Puru

Since the initial meeting, Whitford Residents & Ratepayers and Te Puru have not been actively involved in the steering group, and the Coast Sea Rescue has been intermittently involved.

15.     At that time, council engaged an external consultant to develop an identity for greenways across the region, and the recommendation was that the name greenways was replaced by “Auckland Paths”, as people were less confused with that name rather than greenways which was associated with the eco-friendly side of walking and cycling.

16.     A naming convention was also developed and rural paths are to be known as “trails”.  As the steering group in Beachlands/Maraetai had already named themselves “Pohutukawa Coast Trails”, it was decided to call the plan a trails plan rather than a greenways plan.

17.     The Pohutukawa Coast Trails steering group (steering group) has met monthly since then and undertaken visits to existing trails - one through the Whitford Forest and one to the Whitford coastal area.  The group has also met with other community groups involved in similar projects to share learnings (Whitford Residents & Ratepayers and the Clevedon Trails group).

18.     The group developed a list of ten proposals for connections by trails for walking, cycling and horse-riding, separated into three categories as follows:

A – Urban connections: local connections within villages including Beachlands, Pine Harbour and Maraetai e.g. Jack Lachlan subdivision - connect Pine Harbour with Beachlands Rd/Te Puru link.

B – Community connections: between Beachlands/Maraetai and other villages such as Whitford, Clevedon (either coastal or overland) e.g.Omana to Duder beach and park, either coastal and/or overland connection.

C – Regional connections: to other regional trails e.g. Te Araroa, Hauraki Rail Trail.  These are indicative links e.g. connections to Te Araroa national trail from Beachlands/Maraetai to Clevedon.

See attachment A for further details of the routes and categories.


 

Consultation

19.     Consultation was undertaken on the steering group’s ten proposals from 1 to 30 September 2016.  During this time, on-line or written feedback was invited.

20.     In addition, the group undertook consultation at a community open day “Positive Partnering” led by the Beachlands Community Trust at Beachlands Hall on Saturday 11 September, following by an afternoon session in Maraetai. 

21.     A total of 66 pieces of written feedback were received during the consultation period.  These were all supportive of the group’s proposals, with some making helpful suggestions on amendments to proposed routes for options for alternatives.

22.     The ten routes were prioritised as follows:

Proposed route

No of people choosing as priority route

1. Jack Lachlan Rd/Beachlands Rd subdivisions

1

2. Maraetai (southern boundary) trails

2

3. Safe walking connections to key destinations

3

4. Omana Regional Park to Duder Beach/Park

10

5. Omana Regional Park to Pine Harbour

4

6. Pine Harbour to Whitford and forest

12

7. Between Waiho (Maraetai) and Whitford forest areas

8

8. Recreational forest loop aspiration

4

9. Connections to Te Araroa (National Trail) from Beachlands/Maraetai to Clevedon

7

10. Pine Harbour ferry connections

1

11. Other priority route

6

 

Of the 40 responses to the question asking if submitters had a priority route, 12 people responded that route 6 – Pine Harbour to Whitford and forest was a priority for them.  Route 4 – Omana Regional Park to Duder Beach/Park was the second highest priority, followed by route 7- between Waiho (Maraetai) and Whitford forest areas.

23.     Feedback was also received from a private landowner with land adjacent to both sides of the Whitford-Maraetai Road that they would not support the implementation of trails on their land.  On looking at the proposed route, it is not located on any of their land, so assurances were given that their land would not be affected.

24.     The steering group met in November 2016 and discussed the consultation feedback, giving direction on any required amendments from the feedback.

25.     An aspirational draft plan was then developed incorporating the steering group’s direction.  It was made clear in the draft plan that the routes are aspirational and will only be implemented on private land where landowners are supportive.

26.     Targeted and on-line local consultation was undertaken on a summary version of the draft plan during April 2017, and a total of 13 responses were received.  These were all supportive of the draft plan, with a few suggested options for alternative routes.

27.     For proposed routes over private land, consultation was undertaken with affected landowners in the form of letters sent to the 16 private landowners in February 2017, with a follow up letter and phone calls in March.

28.     Five responses were received from private landowners, one of which supported the proposal for the coastal walkway (route 6D – along cost to Whitford (see attachment A)) and asked when it would start.  Others were not supportive, but were assured that as an aspirational plan, no further work would proceed without their permission and support.  However, the proposed routes will be retained in the plan should things change in the future.

29.     A steering group meeting was held on 8 May 2017 to advise the group of consultation feedback and any proposals for amendments/additions to the plan.  The group gave direction to include the following amendments to connections in the final plan:

·        connection 4 - along the coast between Maraetai and Duder Beach (refer page 28), which now continues through Whitford Forest (4d) instead of private land (4e-f) and there is an option along the coastline (4i).

·        connection 2 - Maraetai (Southern Boundary) Trails (refer page 23) has been shortened - 2c not supported by the current landowner at the time of adoption of the plan.

30.     The draft plan is now presented to the local board for adoption.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

31.     The development of a Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan is a Franklin Local Board project funded by the board, working in partnership with the community.

32.     A local board member was included on the steering group developing the plan, and regular progress updates have been given to the board, enabling it to give direction to guide the project when required.

Māori impact statement

33.     Local iwi were contacted at the beginning of the project.  Ngai Tai ki Tamaki, Ngati Whanaunga and Ngati Paoa all asked to be kept informed of the project as it progressed, particularly when a final plan was in place and routes were being implemented.

34.     The board’s representative on the steering group, Malcolm Bell, and chair of the group Angela Fulljames both met with a representative from Ngai Tai ki Tamaki to explain the project to them.  They were generally supportive and asked to the kept informed, but did not wish to participate in the steering group.

Implementation

35.     Following adoption of the Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan, staff will work with the steering group and the local board to identify how best to implement the plan, including the prioritisation of routes and options for funding.

36.     It is anticipated that implementation will continue to involve the community and the local board working in collaboration.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Final Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Jane Cain - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Adoption of Franklin Local Board Agreement 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/09425

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks adoption of local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018, including the Franklin Local Board Agreement 2017/2018, a message from the chair, local board advocacy, local activity budgets and local performance targets, together with adoption of a local fees and charges schedule for 2017/2018.

Executive summary

2.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement between the governing body and the local board, for each local board area.

3.       Every three years a local board plan is developed to inform the long-term plan (and associated local board agreements) which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a 10 year period.

4.       In February and March this year, the council consulted on proposed changes for the Annual Budget 2017/2018.  Local boards then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on regional policy issues, community feedback and key initiatives that local boards are advocating for.

5.       Local boards are now considering local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, local board advocacy, local activity budgets and local performance targets, together with a local fees and charges schedule for 2017/2018.

6.       Local board agreements will include the allocation of locally driven initiative (LDI) funding to projects and services.

7.       On 29 June 2017, the governing body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s Annual Budget 2017/2018 including 21 local board agreements and associated performance targets and budgets.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      adopts local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018 (Attachment A), including:

i.        the Franklin Local Board Agreement 2017/2018

ii.       a message from the Chair;

iii.      local board advocacy;

iv.      local activity budgets;

v.       local performance targets.

b)      adopts local fees and charges schedules for 2017/2018 (Attachment B).

c)      notes:

i.        that the local activity budgets have been updated to reflect final budget decisions made by the governing body on 1 June 2017;

ii.       that if there are outstanding (not yet agreed) matters in the local board agreement, the local board should include an explanation of these matters in the Chair’s message at the front of the local board agreement;

iii.      that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the governing body when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2017/2018 on 29 June 2017.

d)      agrees that the Chair be delegated authority to make any final minor changes to the local content for the Franklin Local Board Agreement 2017/2018.

Comments

8.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement between the governing body and the local board, for each local board area.

9.       Every three years a local board plan is developed to inform the long-term plan (and associated local board agreements) which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a 10 year period.

10.     In February and March this year, the council consulted on proposed content for Annual Budget 2017/2018. Local boards then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on regional policy issues, community feedback and key initiatives that local boards are advocating for.

11.     Local boards are now considering local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018 (Attachment A).

12.     Local boards are also considering the adoption of a local fees and charges schedule for 2017/2018 (Attachment B)

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     This report seeks adoption from the local board on its content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018 and other associated material.  Engagement with the community, including consultation, and a number of workshops and meetings have been held by the local board and with the governing body to finalise their local board agreement.

Māori impact statement

14.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori.  The local board agreement is based on the local board plan and the Annual Budget 2017/2018 which have both been developed through engagement with the community, including Māori. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Implementation

15.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the governing body on 29 June 2017, when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2017/2018 including 21 local board agreements and associated performance targets and budgets.

16.     Decisions on the local board agreement, a message from the chair, local board advocacy, local activity budgets and local performance targets are required in order for staff to finalise local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018.

17.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the annual budget is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes.  Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the Local Board Chair to make final changes if necessary.


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local content to support the Annual Budget 2017/2018:

·      Message from the Chair

·      Local Board Advocacy

·      Local activity budgets

·      Local performance targets

71

b

Local fees and charges schedule 2017/2018

83

     

Signatories

Authors

Faithe Smith - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board

Message from the Chair

I am very pleased to present the Franklin Local Board Agreement for 2017/2018.  Thank you to all those who shared their views with us; your high level of support has shown that we are heading in the right direction.

As Franklin continues to grow quickly, our key challenge remains ensuring that growth is well-planned and infrastructure provided at the right time to support new housing and businesses.  It is important that we keep up with the growth and make sure our communities are provided with the services and facilities they need.  We’re committed to ensuring that this special rural part of Auckland remains a great place to live, work and invest and that our outstanding natural environment and elite soils are protected from development.

Since we adopted our Local Board Plan in 2014, we have worked towards achieving many of the initiatives included in the plan, and we will continue to do so in 2017/2018 by delivering initiatives which will build on the work already under way, as well as seeking to respond to new opportunities. We are comfortable with the progress we’re making and have continued to put emphasis on finishing projects that have already begun, before we start anything new.  We want to do more with what we’ve already got; making effective use of our existing assets so we can create and maintain the best possible service to all our diverse communities.

The board values the contributions made by volunteers to Franklin and supports the council’s ‘Enabling Communities’ philosophy. Through the activities of volunteers and community groups, a sense of belonging, social connection and civic involvement can be achieved.

We look forward to continuing our work with our communities and local businesses to achieve the outcomes in this local board agreement.

Angela Fulljames

Chair of Franklin Local Board

Introduction

Auckland Council’s shared governance model means local boards make decisions on local issues, activities and the use of local facilities within their decision-making allocation responsibilities. Local boards develop a three-year local board plan as the basis of their annual funding agreement with Auckland Council’s governing body (the mayor and councillors). Local boards also advocate to the governing body on larger scale investments, regional programmes and policy issues such as rates proposals, which are outside local board decision-making responsibilities.

This document provides information on local activities that have been agreed for delivery in 2017/2018 between the governing body and the local board.   

It outlines a local board agreement for 2017/2018 including local funding priorities, budgets and performance targets. This document also outlines supporting material to the agreement including a message from the Chair and key advocacy areas.

About this area

The Franklin area is predominantly rural and has three main towns – Pukekohe, Waiuku and Beachlands. There are a number of inland and coastal settlements, such as Āwhitu, Clarks Beach, Karaka, Kingseat, Bombay, Ardmore, Clevedon and Kawakawa Bay. The area encompasses inlets and foreshores of the Manukau Harbour in the west and stretches across to the Hauraki Gulf in the east.

Franklin has a wealth of history; early Europeans settled in Maraetai and Ōrere Point, Māori used the Drury Hills as a viewpoint during the New Zealand Wars and the Kentish Hotel in Waiuku lays claim to being the oldest continuously licensed pub in New Zealand.

Local Board Plan outcomes

The Franklin Local Board Plan sets out the aspirations the local board has for the area and how the board works towards creating the world’s most liveable city (the vision of the Auckland Plan) at a local level.

The Franklin Local Board Plan outcomes are:

·    Cherished natural environment – Franklin’s forest, open countryside and waterways are healthy, and local parks are cared for and well used for a variety of leisure activities.

·    Thriving local economy – Franklin has a strong economy and attracts people to live and work locally and visit its attractions.

·    Excellent transport connections and infrastructure – Franklin is well connected by frequent public transport services, including rail, bus and ferry, and has safe roads that make it easy to get around.

·    Growth in the right place, at the right time – Growth is well planned to protect rural production and activities, contain urban sprawl and provide infrastructure at the right time.

·    Proud, safe and healthy communities – Those who live here are proud of the area, and feel safe and part of the community.

The local board agreement outlined in this document reflects how we plan to support these outcomes through agreed activities in the 2017/2018 financial year. In addition, each local board carries out responsibilities delegated by the governing body in accordance with the delegated power, and with the general priorities and preferences in the local board plan.

Māori transformational shift outcomes

The Franklin Local Board Plan sets the framework for engaging rangatira ki te rangatira, or chief to chief, to share information and work together. We plan to continue to have conversations with mana whenua to explore ways to work together and improve communication. Our local board plan objectives support kaitiakitanga, the guardianship of our environment and special places.

Franklin Local Board Agreement 2017/2017

Priorities by activity area

Auckland Council’s 2017/2018 funding priorities for local activities and which have contributed to key community outcomes in the Franklin local board area are as follows under each local activity.

Local Parks, Sport and Recreation

This group of activities covers management and provision of local parks and open space and recreation activities for both passive and active recreation.

These activities include developing the network of paths and trails; quality improvements to parks and reserves; coastal planting; and events and activities in parks.

Our annual budget to deliver these activities includes operating costs of $6,715,000 and capital investment of $10,779,000.

The key initiatives we have planned for 2017/2018 include:

·    Implementation of actions from Trails Plans

·    Improvements to facilities at Sunkist Bay Reserve

·    Concept plans to improve and develop reserves

·    Upgrades to car parks at Centennial Park in Waiuku, Franklin Road Recreation Centre in Pukekohe, Clarks Beach Recreation Reserve, Karaka Sports Park and Rosa Birch Park

·    Renewals of the seawall at Sandspit Reserve and the wharf at Tamakae Reserve.

Levels of Service

We measure our performance against the following measures for each local priority.

Level of service

Performance measure

Actual 2015/16

LTP

Target 2016/17

AP

Target 2017/18

Provide a range of recreational opportunities catering for community needs on local parks, reserves and beaches

Percentage of residents satisfied with the provision (quality, location and distribution) of local parks and reserves

62%

75%

63%

Percentage of residents who visited a local park or reserve in the last 12 months

85%

90%

86%

Provide sports fields that are fit for purpose and cater for community needs.

Percentage of residents satisfied with the provision (quality, location and distribution) of sports fields

62%

75%

63%

Provide programmes and facilities that ensure more Aucklanders are more active more often

Customers Net Promoter Score for Pool and Leisure Centres

-6%

15%

15%

Local Community Services

This group of activities contributes to improved community outcomes by providing places and spaces for the community to learn and recreate and by integrating arts and culture into the everyday lives of Aucklanders. Key activities include locally delivered Libraries and Information (Libraries) and Arts, Community and Events services.

Locally significant activities in Franklin local board area include a community arts programme; support for youth employment initiatives; community led place-making initiatives; support for local events; and grant funding to community organisations.

Our annual budget to deliver these activities includes operating costs of $4,041,000 and capital investment of $187,000.

The key initiatives we have planned for 2017/2018 include:

·    Continuation of the Community Arts Programme

·    Rural Halls support and advice

·    Movies in Halls

·    Youth employment initiatives

·    Community led heritage and identity projects

Levels of Service

We measure our performance against the following measures for each local priority.

Level of service

Performance measure

Actual 2015/16

LTP

Target 2016/17

AP

Target 2017/18

Provide safe, accessible, welcoming library facilities that support the delivery of quality learning programmes and services relevant to local communities

Use of libraries as digital community hubs: Number of internet sessions per capita (PC & WiFi)

2.0

1

2.0

Number of visits to library facilities per capita

4.7

4.5

4.8

Percentage of customers satisfied with the quality of library service delivery

87%

85%

88%

Percentage of visitors satisfied with the library environment

88%

85%

89%

Enable Aucklanders and communities to express themselves and improve their wellbeing through customer centric advice, funding, facilitation and permitting

Percentage of funding/grant applicants satisfied with information, assistance and advice provided

57%

76%

53%

Deliver a variety of events, programmes and projects that improve safety, connect Aucklanders and engage them in their city and communities

Percentage of participants satisfied with council delivered local arts activities.

No result

85%

85%

Percentage of Aucklanders that feel connected to their neighbourhood and local community 

43%

74%

44%

Percentage of attendees satisfied with council delivered and funded local events

89%

85%

90%

Provide safe, reliable and accessible social infrastructure for Aucklanders that contributes to placemaking and thriving communities

Percentage of Aucklanders that feel their local town centre is safe

Day: 87%
Night: 26%

Day: 79%
Night: 32%

Day: 88%
Night: 27%

Facility Utilisation - utilisation at peak times and off-peak times for council managed community centres and venues for hire

Peak: 18%
Off peak: 5%

Peak: 14%
Off peak: 8%

Peak: 19%
Off peak: 6%

Percentage of community facilities bookings used for health and wellbeing related activity

8%

20%

9%

Number of visitors to community centres and venues for hire

353,582

287,005

326,477

Local Planning and Development

This group of activities covers local business area planning, local street environment and town centres and local environment and heritage protection. 

These activities include structure planning for major growth areas at Pukekohe-Paerata and Drury-Opaheke; support for innovation and the promotion of key local employment sectors; support for youth skills development; and research on employment and tourism opportunities.

Our annual budget to deliver these activities includes operating costs of $694,000 and capital investment of $0.

The key initiatives we have planned for 2017/2018 include:

·    Research on the value of the rural sector in Franklin

·    A refresh of the Franklin Local Economic Development Action Plan

·    Support for the production of the Pukekohe Business Association Prospectus

·    Continued development of the concept for the Hunua Cycle Trail

·    Support for the Youth Enterprise Scheme

Levels of Service

We measure our performance against the following measures for each local priority.

Level of service

Performance measure

Actual 2015/16

LTP

Target 2016/17

AP

Target 2017/18

Develop local business precincts and town centres as great places to do business

Percentage of Business Associations meeting their Business Improvement District (BID) Partnership Programme obligations

50%

100%

100%

Local Environmental Management

Local environmental management activities work in partnership with locally based communities and iwi to deliver enhanced environmental outcomes (with a focus in indigenous biodiversity, healthy waterways and sustainable living) that contribute to Māori, community wellbeing and economy.

These activities include biodiversity management; funding of fencing and planting to improve water quality; planning for river restoration projects; and support for the Manukau Harbour Forum.

Our annual budget to deliver these activities includes operating costs of $74,000 and capital investment of $0.

The key initiatives we have planned for 2017/2018 include:

·    Wairoa River Action Plan coordination

·    Continuation of water quality monitoring at Waiuku

·    Restoration of waterways on Māori land at Awhitu

·    Waterways Protection Fund – Mauku Stream catchment

·    Implementation of actions from Biodiversity Management Plans in selected reserves

Levels of Service

We measure our performance against the following measures for each local priority.

Level of service

Performance measure

Actual 2015/16

LTP

Target 2016/17

AP

Target 2017/18

Provide leadership and support to protect and conserve the region’s natural environment, historic heritage and Māori cultural heritage

Proportion of local programmes that deliver intended environmental actions and/or outcomes

80%

100%

81%

Local Governance

Activities in this group support our 21 local boards to engage with and represent their communities, and make decisions on local activities. This support includes providing strategic advice, leadership of the preparation of local board plans, support in developing Local Board Agreements, community engagement including relationships with mana whenua and Māori communities, and democracy and administrative support.

The measures for this group of activities are covered under the Regional Governance group of activities in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 where the survey measures determine participation with Auckland Council decision-making in general. This includes local decision-making. There are no significant changes to the measures or targets for 2017/2018.

Our annual budget to deliver these activities includes operating costs of $1,166,000 and capital investment of $0.

Local Funding

Auckland Council has a shared governance model for making decisions on local activities.  Under the Local Board Funding Policy adopted in August 2014, funding is allocated to local boards to deliver local services, through the following methods:

1.   Asset based services - the governing body allocates funds to deliver local activities based on decisions about region-wide service levels. This includes allocation of funds for local asset based services, such as building a new swimming pool or library. 

2.   Locally driven initiatives – an allocation is based on a formula applied to each local board, with the exception of Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards who agree funding requirements with the governing body on an annual basis.

3.   Governance services – an allocation is based on the number of elected members and associated administrative costs for each local board.

As part of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the governing body approved a new discretionary capital expenditure fund for local boards.  This incorporates a total fund of $10 million per annum across all 21 local boards, to be managed in three-year periods. 

The total planned expenditure for local activities across all 21 local boards over the 2017/2018 financial year is shown in the table below. The budgets for each local board are listed within the individual local board agreements in this volume.


 

Funding priorities for local activities

Capital spend

 

By activity area

By category

Key projects

 

 

 

Operating spend

 

By activity area

 

 

Funding Impact Statement

This prospective funding impact statement has been prepared to meet the requirements of Section 21 (5) of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009. It covers the year from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018 and outlines the council's sources of funding for local activities in this local board area and our plan to apply them.

$000


2017/2018

Financial year ending 30 June

Sources of operating funding:

 

General rates, UAGCs, rates penalties

13,801

Targeted rates

563

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

7

Fees and charges

265

Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees and other receipts

108

Total operating funding

14,744

 

Applications of operating funding:

 

Payment to staff and suppliers

11,494

Finance costs

1,344

Internal charges and overheads applied

1,900

Other operating funding applications

0

Total applications of operating funding

14,738

 

Surplus (deficit) of operating funding

6

 

Sources of capital funding:

 

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

0

Development and financial contributions*

0

Increase (decrease) in debt

10,959

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

0

Lump sum contributions

0

Other dedicated capital funding

0

Total sources of capital funding

10,959

 

Application of capital funding:

 

Capital expenditure:

 

- to meet additional demand

1,381

- to improve the level of service

383

- to replace existing assets

9,201

Increase (decrease) in reserves

0

Increase (decrease) in investments

0

Total applications of capital funding

10,966

 

Surplus (deficit) of capital funding

(6)

 

Funding balance

0

Appendix A: Advocacy initiatives

A key role of the local board is to advocate for initiatives that the local board may not have decision-making responsibilities or funding for this annual plan, but recognise the value it will add to the local community.  Key advocacy areas for this local board include:      

Initiative

Description

Advocating to

Funding growth

It is important that growth in Franklin is well-planned and funding is provided for the necessary infrastructure.  A regional planning programme is required to enable growth to be well-planned across Franklin.  There is currently a perception that the benefits of development contributions are not directly seen in areas they are collected.

To fund future transport infrastructure, user-pays funding methods are supported.  They are more equitable for rural residents and businesses, ensuring that the burden of funding the transport programme falls more with frequent users of major roads.

The retention of the regional transport levy is supported.  A review of the levy would be timely, and should include the consideration of central government match funding.  The levy is more equitable than a regional fuel tax, which places an unfair burden on members of rural communities who are infrequent users.

The introduction of tolls for major road users in the Auckland region is also supported.  Tolling encourages car-pooling, fuel saving and travelling at off peak times which helps ease congestion.

Governing Body

 

Auckland Transport

Coastal erosion

Management of coastal erosion should be dealt with on a regional basis, rather than individually by local boards. This would provide a consistent regional approach and cost savings.

Implementation of the regional Coastal Management Strategic Plan with associated regional funding should be a priority to ensure erosion issues are dealt with in a consistent and timely way across the region.

Governing Body

Fit for purpose and safe roads

Increased levels of traffic caused by growth and projected future growth require some rural roads to deal with higher volumes of traffic than originally intended.  Routes used by heavy industry, particularly quarry trucks, need to be improved and made safer for all users.

Implementation of recommendations in the Self Explaining Rural Roads (SERR) project across Franklin should be given priority by Auckland Transport to ensure safety issues are addressed and roads are safe for all forms of transport.

Auckland Transport

Local paths and trails

More investment is required to implement the paths and trails across the region.  Paths are not solely for the use of those living in a particular local board area; they are a regional network and need to be considered as such.

Regional partnerships with external organisations, such as the Walking Access Commission, local businesses and service clubs would help facilitate the development of the paths network.  It would also help to ensure that links to national initiatives, such as the Te Araroa Walkway, are made.

Governing Body

Appendix B: How to contact your Local Board

Local boards have been established to enable local representation and decision-making on behalf of local communities. You are encouraged to contact your elected members to have your say on matters that are important to your community.

Angela Fulljames - Chairperson

Phone: 021 923 278

angela.fulljames@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Andy Baker – Deputy Chairperson

Phone: 021 283 2222

andrew.baker@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Malcolm Bell

Phone: 021 916 381

malcolm.bell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Alan Cole

Phone: 021 923 719

alan.cole@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Brendon Crompton

Phone: 021 224 9708

brendon.crompton@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Sharlene Druyven

Phone: 021 536 177

sharlene.druyven@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Amanda Hopkins

Phone: 021 713 853

amanda.j.hopkins@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Murray Kay

Phone: 021 286 4222

murray.kay@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Niko Kloeten

Phone: 021 715 139

niko.kloeten@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

The board can be contacted at the address below:

Private Bag 92300

Victoria Street West

Auckland 1142

 

For general enquiries, assistance and information, phone 09 301 0101 any time or visit www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz. Local board meetings, agendas and minutes are available on the Auckland Council website: http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/en/aboutcouncil/meetings_agendas/


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Attachment B - Fees and charges schedules 2017/2018

 

The following are fees and charges for local activities to be considered by the Franklin Local Board for approval.

 

LOCAL COMMUNITY AND ARTS FACILITIES

 

 

 

 

Hourly rate

as of 1 July 2017

Facility Category

Facility Name

Room

Peak Standard

Off-Peak Standard

Art facility

Franklin Arts & Cultural Centre

Weta Workshop

$39.00

$19.50

Venues for hire

Alfriston Hall

 

$39.00

$19.50

 

Ardmore Hall

 

$39.00

$19.50

 

Clevedon District Centre

 

$24.00

$12.00

 

Clevedon Community Hall

 

$49.00

$24.50

 

Kawakawa Bay Community Hall

 

$44.00

$22.00

 

Whitford Community Hall

 

$44.00

$22.00

 

Waiuku Community Hall

 

$34.00

$17.00

 

Franklin The Centre

Allan Wilson Room

$24.00

$12.00

 

 

Douglas Wright Room

$34.00

$17.00

 

 

Edmund Hillary Room

$24.00

$12.00

 

 

Franklin Room

$49.00

$24.50

 

 

Growers Kitchen

$34.00

$17.00

 

 

Leslie Comrie Room

$34.00

$17.00

 

 

Stevenson Room

$59.00

$29.50

 

Pukekohe Old Borough Building

Function Room

$24.00

$12.00

 

Pukekohe War Memorial Town Hall

Concert Chamber

$49.00

$24.50

 

 

Main Hall

$89.00

$44.50

 

*Council staff recommends keeping the hire fees and charges uninflated for the 2017/18 year.

*Up to 50% discount may be applied for local board priority activities and core business hire of arts facilities. This is to retain a high level of use by arts stakeholders and local community organisations; and to meet the objectives of the facility’s business plan (where applicable).


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board Arts, Community and Events work programme 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/05921

 

  

Purpose

1.       To approve the Arts, Community and Events (ACE) 2017/2018 Franklin Local Board work programme.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides information to support the local board to make decisions required to approve the Arts, Community and Events 2017/2018 work programme.

3.       The proposed ACE work programme provides a defined work programme for the 2017/2018 financial year. The work programme covers the following areas:

·        Community Empowerment

·        Arts and Culture

·        Events

·        Community Places.

4.       The ACE work programme for the Franklin Local Board aligns with the following 2014-2017 Franklin Local Board Plan priorities:

5.       proud, safe and healthy communities.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board approves the 2017/2018 Arts, Community and Events work programme (Attachment A).

 

Comments

6.       The ACE work programme for 2017/2018 aligns to the following 2014-2017 Franklin Local Board Plan priorities:

·        proud, safe and healthy communities.

7.       The ACE work programme 2017/2018 for the Franklin Local Board includes the following areas of activity:

·        Community Empowerment: These projects and programmes aim to deliver a range of social outcomes for local residents. This includes capacity building activities with local community groups, as well as community-led placemaking work such as community gardens and working with Franklin youth.

·        Arts and Culture: This includes community arts initiatives through the arts broker, as well as operational funding for the Franklin Arts Centre.

·        Events: This work programme includes citizenship ceremonies, local civic events and local events under the Even Partnership Fund.

·        Community Places: This includes providing ongoing support and advice for rural hall committees, as well as providing a venue hire service.

8.       The work programme includes scoped initiatives that align with local board priorities, as well as budget allocation and established timelines.

9.       The local board considered the draft work programme at a workshop with ACE staff on 4 April 2017. Staff incorporated the local board’s feedback into the work programme.

10.     The local boards is requested to approve the ACE work programme for 2017/2018. ACE staff will continue to work with the local board to ensure these projects are delivered.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     The local board considered the draft 2017/2018 work programme at a workshop on 4 April 2017. Staff considered the local board’s feedback and incorporated it into the local board work programme (Attachment A).

Māori impact statement

12.     One of the Auckland Plan targets is to increase targeted support to Māori community development projects. A key objective of ACE is to deepen and integrate relationships with mana whenua, mataawaka and marae, in our everyday work.

13.     The 2017/2018 work programme includes a new line entitled ‘Māori Responsiveness Action Plan’.  This item emerged from a review of local board work programmes, which found that overall, local board plans make strong commitments to Māori. However these commitments are not often carried through to detailed action in work programmes (for example benefits to Māori may be included as a by-product of general outcomes, or categorised with ethnic and diverse communities).

14.     The benefits of this activity are expected to include:

·        collaborating with Māori and forming stronger relationships, decision-making and partnerships

·        moving from high level commitments to outcomes

·        eliminating the transactional approach to working with Māori

·        setting up monitoring through quarterly reporting.

Implementation

15.     Once the work programme is approved, ACE staff will monitor progress throughout 2017/2018. The ACE work programme will be implemented within the annual plan 2017/2018 budget and updates on progress will be available at the end of each quarter.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Arts, Community and Events work programme 2017/2018

87

     

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Zimmerman - Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board Community Facilities work programme 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/09083

 

  

Purpose

1.       To approve the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme for the Franklin Local Board including all capital works, leasing and operational maintenance projects delivered by Community Facilities.

2.       To approve in principle the 2017-2020 Community Facilities Capital Works Programme for the Franklin Local Board.

Executive summary

3.       The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

4.       The Franklin Local Board 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme was developed using a combination of local board feedback, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input. Once this programme of work is approved, it will efficiently manage the creation and renewal of all Community Facilities assets and community leases.

5.       In the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme, the following indicative costs have been identified in the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme:

·        $$8,899,012 of asset-based services capital funding

6.       The 2017-2020 Community Facilities Capital Works Programme was developed to enable greater visibility, an improved level of project planning, and the ability to integrate projects within a strategically aligned programme. Once this programme is approved in principle, staff will continue to seek local board feedback through regular engagement and this will be adopted into the future years’ programmes.

7.       The local board were given the opportunity to discuss the draft work programmes for capital works, leasing and operational maintenance at a workshop on 4 April 2017. Following this feedback, an updated work programme was developed by staff and is provided in Attachment A. This report recommends that the board approves the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme and associated budget. This report also seeks approval for the 2017-2020 Community Facilities Capital Works Programme.

8.       Once approved by the Franklin Local Board, new work will commence from July 2017. Regular updates on the line items will be provided by the Community Facilities Stakeholder Advisors.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the Franklin Local Board 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme as detailed in Attachment A

b)      approves in principle the Franklin Local Board 2017-2020 Community Facilities Capital Works Programme as detailed in Attachment B

c)      delegates approval to the Franklin Local Board Chair for any variances in the scope of the projects identified within the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme.

d)      notes that the 2017/2018 asset-based services capital works funding envelope, identified for the work programme, is indicative to deliver the work and any budget variances will be managed within the total region-wide asset-based services funding envelope

 

Comments

9.       Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of Auckland. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art, and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

10.     The 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme detailed in Attachment A contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance. The 2017-2020 Community Facilities Capital Works Programme detailed in Attachment B contains the three year proposed capital works programme for renewals and growth projects.

Community Facilities Department

11.     The purpose of the Community Facilities department is to build, renew, and maintain community assets including but not limited to: buildings, furniture and fit-out, structures, land, trees, and green space. Community Facilities is responsible for maintaining and renewing local and sports parks, regional and specialist parks, cemeteries, pools and leisure centres, libraries, community centres, venues for hire, arts facilities, public toilets, holiday parks and council owned community lease assets.

Capital works programme

12.     Investment in the capital programme will ensure that council facilities and parks open spaces in Franklin Local Board remain valuable and well-maintained community assets that continue to meet the agreed levels of service. Asset-based services capital works includes both growth and renewals projects.

13.     The renewals programme is prioritised against three main drivers: asset condition, level of provision and identified risk. Not undertaking timely renewals will have a negative impact on the customer experience and put asset performance at risk, and ultimately increase the cost to maintain the facility.

14.     Growth projects are prioritised to align with parks strategies, community benefit, and the proportion of population growth in the area.

15.     At a workshop on the 4 April 2017, Community Facilities staff presented a draft three year forward work programme for elected member feedback. A three-year rolling programme promotes well-developed planning and optimal use of resources. By building a programme that is strategically focused, staff can ensure funding allocation for scoped projects, and therefore maximise chances of project delivery on time and on budget. The work included in each year will be comprised of a sustainable balance between the three delivery components of planning, design, and construction. The three-year rolling programme will be a live agreement between local boards and Community Facilities, and will be aligned with strategic goals. A three-year rolling work programme also ensures that the highest priority works are implemented without delay should a delivery opening emerge within the current year’s programme.

16.     The 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme contains the first year of the three year rolling programme and was updated following the workshop on the 4 April 2017:

·        Number of projects: 78

·        Estimated cost for proposed projects: $8,899,012

17.     The 2017-2020 Community Facilities Capital Works Programme contains the follow projects:

·        Number of projects: 73


 

Leasing work programme

18.     Community leases are a valuable way in which the council provides support to local community organisations to provide the activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities.

19.     Attachment A provides a detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2017/2018 financial year, in addition to those from previous years’ work programmes which have yet to be completed.

20.     Once the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme is approved, staff will be able to  bundle reporting on routine or non-controversial matters whilst focusing attention on those community leases that are more complex.

Operational maintenance work programme

21.     The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

·        increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets

·        improving the safety of Community Facilities assets

·        ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users

22.     Community Facilities will launch ‘Project 17’ in July 2017 which creates new bundled maintenance contracts across the Auckland region for full facility, ecological restoration and arboriculture maintenance contracts.  The Finance and Performance Committee approved these contracts on 30 March 2017.

23.     In the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme, there is one line item dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area. This includes all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, tree management and maintenance, ecological restoration, pest management, riparian planting, coastal management and storm damage. Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly report.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

25.     The Community Facilities Work Programme has been created through a combination of local board feedback, asset condition assessments and agreed levels of service.

26.     The draft 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme and the 2017-2020 Community Facilities Capital Works Programme were considered by the local board at a workshop on 4 April 2017. The views expressed by local board members during the workshop have been adopted in Attachment A and Attachment B.

27.     The Community Facilities work programme supports the achievement of the following 2014-2017 Franklin Local Board Plan priorities:

·           Cherished natural environment

·           Proud, safe and healthy communities

Māori impact statement

28.     The 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. All community assets contribute significantly to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions. Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

29.     Staff are also attending mana whenua fora on a monthly basis to receive feedback on the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme.

Implementation

30.     This work programme will be implemented as part of Community Facilities’ usual business practice.

31.     Work programme implementation will be reported regularly by stakeholder advisors and quarterly through the performance report to the local board.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Community Facilities work programme 2017/2018

99

b

Franklin Local Board Community Facilities Capital Works Programme 2017-2020

107

     

Signatories

Authors

Chantelle Subritzky - Manager, Stakeholder Advisory

Hannah Alleyne - Senior Programme Planner

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 



Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/08289

 

  

Purpose

1.      The purpose of this report is to present the 2017/2018 Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) Annual work programme (AWP) for the consideration and approval of the Franklin Local Board.

Executive summary

2.      This report presents the Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme for the 2017/2018 financial year (FY18).

3.      The work programme includes the Local Board expenditure and Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) programme of works but excludes any works associated with external agency projects.

4.      Should unforeseen works arise or work priorities change from those attached and approved, the Parks Sport and Recreation, Portfolio managers, will discuss this with the delegated local board members. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the Franklin Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017/2018 financial year as detailed in Attachment A to this report;

b)      delegates the approval for any changes to the Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017/2018 to the appropriate Parks, Sport and Recreation Portfolio Manager and delegated local board members. 

 

Comments

5.      This report presents Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) Annual work programme for the 2017-2018 financial year.  The PSR Annual work programme is sorted by Active Recreation and Parks Services.

6.      Staff discussed the scope of the Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017/2018 at a workshop with the local board on 4 April and 23 May 2017.

7.       The Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017/2018 has been developed with a strategic focus, in that many projects will be delivered over two or more financial years.

8.       The Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017/2018, presented as Attachment A, needs to include some flexibility to account for any unforeseen factors beyond Parks, Sport and Recreations control that may arise.

9.       Staff may need to adjust priorities as unforeseen complexities in delivering planned projects arise.  Any changes to the Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017/2018 will be consulted with the local board delegated member/s for the activity, for agreement on the proposed changes or refer the matter for a decision by the local board.

Budget types contributing to the Parks Sport and Recreation work programme

10.     Activities may be funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: Asset Based Services (ABS) capital or operational expenditure; Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) capital or operational expenditure; Growth funding; targeted rates; external funding or sponsorship. 

11.     The Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) programme is part of this annual work programme. PSR activity resulting from external agency partnerships is not included unless they have an element of local board funding attached to them. 

12.     Some Active Recreation or Park Services activity programmes do not show a budget amount but have been included in the work programme for the local boards’ information and future quarterly reporting.

13.     Capital development programmes and asset based activities including renewals will be reported separately and led by Community Facilities.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     The Franklin local board provided feedback on the proposed Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017/2018 at a workshop on 4 April and 23 May 2017. Feedback from this workshop has informed the work programme included as Attachment A.

Māori impact statement

15.     Parks and open spaces, as well as leisure, sport and recreation activities contribute significantly to Maori well-being, values, culture and traditions. Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to Tangata Whenua, appropriate engagement and consultation will follow.

16.     Section 81 of the Local Government Act 2002  set out Contributions to decision-making processes by Māori:

“(1) A local authority must—

(a) establish and maintain processes to provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to the decision-making processes of the local authority; and

(b) consider ways in which it may foster the development of Māori capacity to contribute to the decision-making processes of the local authority”. 

17.     The Auckland Council Māori Language Policy, 2016, provides a practical means for Council to fulfil its commitments and legal obligations to Māori. It notes that Auckland Council aims to:

‘Ensure that everyone who receives or uses Auckland Council’s services or contributes to the democratic process has the choice to do so in Māori or English’.

18.     PSR presented an opportunity for local boards to support ‘Creating a Māori Identity’. This is intended to be a three year programme of activity. Year one is intended to: discuss the approach with mana whenua; review the current state of park and facility naming; identify opportunities for Māori naming (new names, renaming or dual naming) of parks and facilities; and engage with Mana Whenua to adopt new Māori place and recreation facility names.

19.     Franklin local board has not allocated funding for PSR ‘Creating a Māori Identity’ in 2017/2018.

Implementation

20.     Once approved the delivery of activities identified in the Franklin Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017/2018 will take place from 1 July 2017.

21.     Capital and asset based activities will be delivered and reported on by Community Facilities as they move into investigation and design, or project delivery phase. 

22.     The progress of the Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017/2018 projects will be reported to the local board quarterly.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme 2017/2018

117

     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Lucas - Programme Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 



Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/08585

 

  

Purpose

1.       To approve the 2017/2018 local environment work programme (totalling $74,000) for the Franklin Local Board.

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board (the board) has identified an aspiration in their local board plan that ‘our natural heritage and resources are preserved and nurtured for future generations’.

3.       To give effect to this aspiration, the board has committed $38,000 in total to local environmental development projects in their Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget for 2016/2017. This funding includes:

·   $8,000 for Manukau Harbour – improvement projects,

·   $15,000 for Wairoa River Action Plan implementation;

·   $20,000 for a waterways protection fund in the Mauku stream catchment;

·   $15,000 for implementation of biodiversity management plans

·   $10,000 for weed control at Mayhead Esplanade Reserve, Awakura stream; and 

·   $6,000 for Waiuku town basin water quality monitoring.

4.       To deliver on this budget, a draft work programme was discussed at a workshop with the board on 4 April 2017. An updated work programme is appended to this report at attachment A. This report recommends that the board approve this environment work programme and associated budgets for 2017/2018.

 

Recommendations

That the Franklin Local Board approves the allocation of $74,000 for environmental projects to be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate in 2017/2018 as detailed in this report and summarised in the table below:

Project

Budget

Manukau Harbour Forum

$8,000

Wairoa River Action Plan

$15,000

Waterways Protection Fund (Mauku stream)

$20,000

Implementation of biodiversity management plans

$15,000

Weed control at Mayhead Esplanade Reserve, Awakura stream

$10,000

Waiuku town basin water quality monitoring

$6,000

Total

$74,000

 

Comments

5.       The board has allocated $74,000 of its 2017/2018 LDI budget to support the delivery of a local environment work programme in line with the local board plan outcome of ‘cherished natural environment’.

6.       Options for the allocation of this budget were discussed at a workshop on 4 April 2017. Based on that discussion, six projects will be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate (I&ES) as part of the board’s 2017/2018 local environment work programme. A brief description of each of these projects is provided below.

Manukau Harbour Forum ($8,000)

7.       The board agreed to reform the Manukau Harbour Forum at its March 2017 meeting (resolution number FR/2017/32). Membership of the forum aligns with the board’s commitment to work to improve the health of the Manukau Harbour.

8.       The 2016/2017 financial year was the final year of a three year work programme for the forum agreed by the previous forum and member boards. 2017/2018 funding will enable the development of a new three year work programme for the forum, better aligning it to local strategic objectives and the development of the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management.

9.       A Manukau Harbour Forum symposium has been held in the past two years. Some funding will support the delivery of this event in. 2017/2018. This event provides an opportunity for the forum and the community to share information, and learn about the pressures on the harbour and freshwater environments.

Wairoa River Action Plan implementation ($15,000)

10.     The Wairoa River Action Plan responds to community interest in working together to improve the water quality and biodiversity values in the Wairoa river catchment. The development of the action plan is led by a community steering group with support from a paid coordinator.

11.     Funding of $15,000 is requested to ensure implementation of the action plan. The board expressed preference that this funding be used to retain the coordinator role. While the steering group can apply for external funding if it becomes a trust, this does not guarantee funding (particularly contestable funding) will be available for implementation of any actions. If the board does not increase funding for this project, it is recommended funding support a limited coordinator role, and some initial key actions.  Funding of $30,000 will enable full funding of the coordinator role, and priority actions.

12.     Prioritisation of actions with the board will take place upon completion of the plan.

Waterways Protection Fund (Mauku stream catchment) ($20,000)

13.     Since the development of the Wairoa River Action Plan, the regional waterways protection fund has been made available to landowners in both the Papakura and Wairoa catchments. A similar local fund available to landowners wanting to fence and plant their streams from stock in the Mauku stream will further support water quality improvements in the board area.

14.     Waterway protection funds support farmers and growers to fence and plant their streams from stock through meeting 50 per cent of the costs of the work. Exclusion of stock from waterways has a positive impact on water quality in local streams, and is the first step in undertaking longer-term riparian restoration projects.

15.     The 2016/2017 fund was positively received with $19,974.55 granted to six landowners in the Mauku stream catchment. Due to this interest, it is recommended that the fund be offered in the same catchment in 2017/2018. Recommendations on applications will be put to the board for decision in late 2017 or early 2018.

16.     Supporting water quality improvements also aligns with the objectives and policies of the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management, specifically the compulsory values of ecosystem health and human health recreation. Both these values will be improved as water quality is enhanced in these catchments.


 

Implementation of biodiversity management plans ($15,000)

17.     In 2016/2017 the board funded development of biodiversity management plans for Henry’s Bush, Hunua Domain and Matakawau Reserve. These reserves were identified as being of high ecological value in the 2015 Franklin ecological prioritisation report. 2017/2018. Investment in the actions identified in the management plans will help improve the biodiversity and long-term health and viability of the sites, and will encourage increased council and community co-management.

18.     Investment in the actions arising in the management plans will improve the biodiversity of the sites, and encourage increased council and community co-management.

19.     Prioritisation of actions with the board will take place upon completion of the plan. The board may elect to focus on a particular reserve.

Mayhead Esplanade Reserve- restoration of Awakura stream, Waiuku ($10,000)

20.     Following an approach from Ngāti te Ata, staff investigated opportunities for restoration projects along waterways in Waiuku. Mayhead Esplanade Reserve along the Awakura is a high priority for initial restoration work due to the extensive gorse and woolly nightshade infestation. A map of this area is appended at attachment B. Control of pest plants on council land is a key initiative in the local board plan.

21.     This project will support Ngāti te Ata in their role as kaitiaki. In addition, Ngāti te Ata see clean waterways as supporting manaakitanga, particularly harvesting of watercress for marae gatherings, as well as providing access to materials to support their weavers.

22.     Other immediate priorities for restoration in this area include fencing of a wetland on Kaihau Road. Staff and iwi representatives are exploring options for external funding of this work. The long-term goal is for landowners and leasees to be engaged in actions to improve local biodiversity as well as the water quality of local streams and the Manukau Harbour.

Waiuku town basin water quality monitoring ($6,000)

23.     Budget of $6,000 funds monthly monitoring of a site in the Waiuku town basin. Local funding for this monitoring ensures a more comprehensive assessment of water quality around the Manukau Harbour, and the Franklin board area.

24.     A regional water quality state and trends report is due in late 2017. This report will include data from the monitoring of this site.

Assessment of options considered

25.     As part of the development of the board’s draft work programme, eight options totaling $88,000 were developed for consideration by the board. The six recommended projects align most strongly to the board’s objectives.

26.     Table one below outlines those options and the criteria used to determine why the project would not be included in the work programme.

Table one: Assessment of options considered

Project

Reason

Pest animal brochure

A regional pest animal brochure is in development. This brochure can be made available to Franklin residents.

Feral goat control at Kawakawa Bay

The board’s preference is to not use their LDI to top up regionally funded projects. Since the April 2017 workshops, regional funding has been made available to undertake this work.

 


 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

27.     The recommended options align to the local board aspirations as detailed in key documents. In particular, the Wairoa River Action Plan aligns with the key initiative of working to better manage the Wairoa River. Funding for the Manukau Harbour Forum and the waterways protection fund supports the key initiative to support the forum and improve the water quality of the Manukau Harbour.

28.     The draft work programme was discussed at a board workshop in April 2017. Feedback from that workshop is reflected in the detailed text above, in particular paragraphs 25 and 26.

Māori impact statement

29.     It is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

30.     Table two below outlines how projects contribute to Māori outcomes.

Table two: Māori impact assessments

Project

Māori impact assessment

Manukau Harbour Forum

In the previous term, the forum agreed to host up to three hui per year with mana whenua.

The current forum will need to develop a new work programme. There is an opportunity to involve mana whenua in the development of that work programme.

Mana whenua have consistently raised the issue of Manukau Harbour water quality through previous council consultations.

Wairoa River Action Plan

Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki representatives have expressed support for the development of an action plan. A copy of the draft plan will be provided for review and comment.

Waterways Protection Fund (Mauku stream catchment)

No consultation with Māori on this project was undertaken, However, mana whenua have consistently raised the issue of Manukau Harbour water quality through previous council consultations.

Implementation of biodiversity management plans

No consultation with Māori was undertaken during the development of the plans. Opportunities for Māori to lead or participate in the implementation of specific initiatives will be explored as actions are prioritised.

Weed control at Mayhead Esplanade Reserve, Awakura stream

Ngāti te Ata representatives approached council staff in 2016 to discuss options for restoration of waterways in Waiuku. Following several hui, the Awakura stream was prioritised for initial restoration work, in particular weed control on Mayhead esplanade reserve.

This project will support Ngāti te Ata in their role as kaitiaki. In addition, Ngāti te Ata see clean waterways as supporting manaakitanga, particularly harvesting of puha for marae gatherings, as well as providing access to materials to support their weavers.

At the April board workshop, a request was made for an agreement with Ngāti te Ata to seek additional funding for this work from non-council sources.

Waiuku town basin water quality monitoring.

No consultation with Māori on this project was undertaken, However, mana whenua have consistently raised the issue of Manukau Harbour water quality through previous council consultations.

Implementation

31.     A workshop with the board is planned for June 2017 to prioritise actions arising from the Wairoa River Action Plan and the biodiversity management plans.

32.     Weed control and planting projects often require ongoing funding in future years. Council’s local and sports parks department has advised that there is limited funding in future years for maintenance of new planting. Future work programmes may include a recommendation to fund this maintenance from the board’s LDI.

33.     Subject to approval, this work programme will commence in the new financial year (1 July 2017). Regular reporting on project delivery will be through the Infrastructure and Environmental Services’ contribution to the board’s quarterly performance report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme 2017/2018

125

b

Mayhead Esplanade Reserve - Awakura stream

127

     

Signatories

Authors

Emma Joyce - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 



Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 



Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board local economic development (LED): Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) work programme 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/09903

 

  

Purpose

1.       To approve the Franklin local economic development (LED) work programme for the 2017/2018 financial year.

Executive summary

2.       This report introduces the proposed 2017/18 financial year Local Economic Development Work Programme for the Franklin Local Board.

3.       The proposed work programme (Attachment A) comprises a rural sector research project, a refresh of the Franklin LED Action Plan, support for the Pukekohe Prospectus and support for the Young Enterprise Scheme.

4.       The total value of the Local Economic Development programme is $32,000

5.       The local board is being asked to approve 2017/2018 local economic development programme.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board approves the 2017/2018 local economic development programme as follows:

i)        Franklin Rural Sector ($15,000)

ii)       Local Economic Development Action Plan refresh ($12,000)

iii)      Develop a Pukekohe prospectus ($2,000)

iv)      Young Enterprise Scheme ($2,000)

 

Comments

Background

6.       The 2017/2018 local economic development programme has been developed having regard to the Local Board’s priorities for local economic development set out in the draft Local Board Plan (2017) and the Franklin Local Economic Development Action Plan.

7.       The draft Plan retains a focus on attracting business investment, increasing job opportunities, particularly for young people, and realising the full potential of Franklin’s rural economy, including land-based enterprise and tourism.

8.       The proposed Local Economic Development work programme comprises the following activities:

·        Commission research into the Franklin Rural Sector

·        A refresh of the Franklin Local Economic Development Action Plan and identify priorities

·        The development of a Pukekohe Prospectus

·        Support for the Young Enterprise Scheme E-Days


 

Franklin Rural Sector Research ($15,000)

9.       The rural sector is an important and unique component of the Franklin local economy, providing a significant share of local employment. The area not only provides fruit, vegetables and meat to the Auckland market but also has a significant export component.

10.     Agriculture, forestry and fishing sectors contribute four percent of Franklin’s gross domestic product while they make up 13 percent of the area’s total employment. Horticulture is the largest sub-sector within this group. Food manufacturing provided a further 775 jobs in 2016 with employment in the sector doubling over the last 10 years (source: Infometrics).

11.     The sector has the potential to be a driver of the local economy beyond its current contribution. Building on the area’s food heritage, an initiative is underway to develop a food and beverage facility that supports education, emerging food producers, and food retailers and identifies strongly with Pukekohe’s position as an important food producing area on the outskirts of New Zealand’s largest city.

12.     Critical to this development is an understanding of what the sector currently contributes, what it could contribute in the future and what resources need to be in place (land and water, skilled labour, exploitation of new value added markets, innovation, collaboration) to enable that growth.

13.     It is considered that research is needed to bring into focus the value of Franklin’s food growing sectors to Auckland (and possibly New Zealand, more widely). The research could consider the direct economic benefits, including in terms of employment, but also, potentially, Franklin’s contribution to national food security and related issues.

14.     In addition, the research could also examine the sectors’ future growth potential based on market trends, particularly in new and emerging high-value segments and gaps in sector capability that may hinder realisation of identified growth opportunities. The findings from this strand of work especially could inform any future industry action programme.

15.     The research findings may also be used to help tell the Franklin Food story and help promote the area as a food tourism destination, possibly as part of a wider visitor strategy.

16.     It is proposed to commission this research, potentially in collaboration with Horticulture New Zealand and Land Care. Work will be undertaken to identify other potential contributors, in addition to a lead researcher.

17.     A proposed, refined scope for the research will be brought to the Local Board in July 2017 for consideration.

Refresh Local Economic Development Action Plan and identify priorities ($12,000)

18.     The Franklin Local Economic Development Action Plan was produced in 2013 and has been implemented in part over the last 4 years.

19.     This project will review of the Franklin Local Economic Development Action Plan to ensure actions are aligned with the direction of the new Local Board Plan, once adopted, and is more focused on deliverable activities that the local board can focus on over the next three years.

20.     The timing of the Action Plan refresh will be mindful of the other relevant local board activities to ensure it can take account of public consultation on the local board plan and the direction that the local board is heading.

21.     The Action Plan will be informed by the findings of current and intended research, specifically the motor caravan accommodation project and the rural sector research outlined above. In addition, the Plan should take account of any potential bid for funds from the Tourism Infrastructure Grant Fund in 2018 and out-years.


 

Pukekohe Prospectus ($2,000)

22.     The Pukekohe Business Association has recently engaged a consultant to develop an investment prospectus for Pukekohe. The aim of the prospectus is to show potential investors the existing and emerging opportunities in Pukekohe.

23.     The Business Association has sought a contribution from the Franklin Local Board toward the costs of printing and distributing the prospectus and holding a small launch event.

24.     The Business Association has indicated a combined cost for these activities of $3,000.

Support the Young Enterprise Scheme E-Days ($2,000)

25.     Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED), on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and experience real profit and loss.

26.     The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the Young Enterprise Scheme Enterprise-Days in February 2018. The e-days are held in sub-regions (north, south, east, central/west) and provide a first opportunity for students to meet the Young Enterprise team and familiarise themselves with the programme.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

27.     The proposed LED programme was presented to the Local Board at the 11 April 2017 workshop with agreement to provide further detail on the above proposed projects.

28.     The Franklin Local Board (draft) Plan has a focus on attracting business investment, increasing job opportunities, particularly for young people, and realising the full potential of Franklin’s rural economy, including land-based enterprise and tourism.

29.     The Franklin Local Economic Development Action Plan includes actions in support of the horticulture sector:

1.8 Advocacy for management of impacts from residential and other uses’ growth on land used for high-value horticulture.

3.1 Develop a private/public sector action plan to grow Franklin’s/north Waikato “Centre of Excellence” in horticulture production, including promoting innovation, exports and food and beverage production supply chains.

30.     An opportunity exists for the local board to support the growth of the horticulture sector especially through research and a proposed ‘Franklin Food Junction’. These initiatives aim to position the sector in higher-value segments of the value chain. 

31.     The Franklin Local Economic Development Action Plan also includes an action.

1.13 Support for BID partnership programmes and activities in Pukekohe including:

·   Advocacy and activities to strengthen and protect Pukekohe’s boutique retail and cafe offering and facilities to strengthen the evening economy

32.     A contribution to the business association’s prospectus would help them in achieving this objective by improving the town centre and supporting economic growth.

33.     Looking ahead there is opportunity to outline where the local board wishes to focus its economic development activities by undertaking a review of the LED Action Plan. Scheduling this activity to take account of local board plan consultations and completed or intended research ought to increase the value of this exercise.

Māori impact statement

34.     Iwi and urban Māori will be engaged in the development of the local economic development action plan on areas that are related to their interests.  Any actions that require involvement of Iwi or urban Māori will be developed in partnership and require their sign off before inclusion in the plan.

Implementation

35.     Following approval by the local board the Local Economic Development team at ATEED will begin to implement the programme as approved by the local board. Where there is a need further scoping of activities will be undertaken and presented back to the local Board as required.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board local economic development (LED): ATEED work programme 2017/2018

133

     

Signatories

Authors

Anthony Gibbons - Principal Advisor - Economic Growth

Authorisers

Paul Robinson - Manager Local Economic Growth – ATEED

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 



Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board Libraries work programme 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/09319

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report presents the Libraries 2017/2018 Franklin Local Board work programme for approval.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides information to support Franklin Local Board to make decisions required to approve the Libraries 2017/2018 work programme.

3.       The proposed Libraries work programme aims to provide a defined work programme for the 2017/2018 financial year.

4.       The Libraries work programme for Franklin Local Board aligns with the following 2014-2017 Franklin Local Board Plan priorities:

·        Proud, safe and healthy communities

5.       The Franklin Local Board is being requested to approve the Libraries work programme for financial year 2017/2018.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board approves the 2017/2018 Libraries work programme (Attachment A)

 

Comments

6.       The libraries work programme for 2017/2018 aligns to the Franklin Local Board plan 2014-2017 and Te Kauroa – Auckland Libraries Future Directions 2013-2023.

7.       The Libraries work programme aligns to the following 2014-2017 Franklin Local Board Plan priorities:

·        Proud, safe and healthy communities

8.       The work programme includes library activities that align with the local board priorities and meet the needs of the Franklin community. The cost of running the local libraries largely appears in one activity line – “Library hours of service”. Activities that respond to local community priorities have been included in the work programme but they do not have specific ABS opex budget attached as the cost is included in running the local libraries. The work programme also includes activities funded with LDI opex; Rural library review, Mobile Library Outreach and Wriggle and Rhyme Outreach.

9.       A workshop was held with the local board and Libraries staff on Tuesday, 4 April 2017 where the draft work programme was considered. After the workshop, feedback from the local board was incorporated into the work programme.

10.     The Franklin Local Board is requested to approve the Libraries work programme for 2017/2018. Libraries’ staff will continue to work with the local board to ensure activities align with the local board priorities and meet the needs of the Franklin community.


 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     The draft 2017/2018 work programme was considered by the local board at a workshop on Tuesday, 4 April 2017. Feedback form the local board was considered and incorporated into the local board work programme (Attachment A).

Māori impact statement

12.     Improving Maori outcomes is core to library services and is defined in Te kauhanganui. The libraries work programme supports Maori initiatives in both programme and service delivery at local libraries.

Implementation

13.     Libraries staff will continue to meet with the board to provide updates on the work programme and ensure it is progressed. The libraries work programme will be implemented within the annual plan 2017/2018 budget and reported on through the quarterly reporting process.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Libraries work programme 2017/2018

137

     

Signatories

Authors

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 



Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Local Board recommendations on Easter Sunday trading

 

File No.: CP2017/07907

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek a local board recommendation to the Governing Body on whether or not to expand Easter Sunday trading in Auckland.

Executive summary

2.       Councils were given the power to adopt a policy to expand Easter Sunday trading through a law change in August 2016.

3.       In August 2017, the Governing Body will decide whether or not to propose a policy to expand Easter Sunday trading in all or parts of Auckland for public consultation.

4.       Any decision on Easter Sunday trading will impact on Auckland Council’s economic, social, recreational and cultural objectives, for example through increased wages and revenue, or the ability to retain an additional day’s holiday for family, leisure time or religious observance.

5.       This report enables the local board to advocate a position to the governing body on whether or not to expand Easter Sunday trading in Auckland. This is consistent with the local board’s community advocacy role under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

6.       In February 2017, the Governing Body approved community engagement to inform its August 2017 decision on whether to retain the status quo or to expand Easter Sunday trading (Resolution GB/2017/22). A copy of the Governing Body report is contained in Attachment A.

7.       The Governing Body report (Attachment A) provides information to assist to make a recommendation on Easter Sunday trading, including:

·        background on the Easter Sunday trading legislative change, rationale, current regulations

·        options for responding to the legislative change, including:

o   issues and options analysis

o   pros and cons.

8.       Planned engagement initiatives in May and June 2017, include:

·        a survey of a representative group of 1600 Aucklanders

·        an online feedback form promoted through online, media and external networks

·        engagement with key stakeholders.

9.       Staff will circulate preliminary findings of overall engagement to local board members in an information memo in mid-June 2017.These preliminary findings will show regional views as well key views of Māori, Pacific, diverse and hard to reach Aucklanders with whom engagement will be prioritised.

10.     The local board can either:

·        make its recommendation at a business meeting before 30 June 2017 with or without the preliminary findings of engagement

·        delegate this responsibility to the Chair, or appropriate board member, if it wishes to delay its recommendation until after members have received the preliminary findings of engagement in mid-June, and the local board is unable to meet before 30 June 2017.

11.     Local boards’ recommendations are required by 30 June 2017 in order for them to be included in the report to the Governing Body in August.

12.     Local boards’ views will be summarised within the report to the Governing Body and the resolutions attached verbatim.

13.     In making its August 2017 decision, the Governing Body will consider the findings of engagement as well as local boards’ recommendations.

14.     If the Governing Body decides to adopt a policy to expand Easter Sunday trading, it must use the special consultative procedure. This allows for public consultation prior to a final decision being made by Easter 2018.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      notes the attached Governing Body report (Attachment A) provides information to assist to make a recommendation on Easter Sunday trading, including:

i.        background on the Easter Sunday trading legislative change, rationale, current regulations

ii.       options for responding to the legislative change, including:

iii.      issues and options analysis

iv.      pros and cons.

AND EITHER

b)      recommends that the Governing Body retain the status quo, so that only shops that can currently open for trade on Easter Sunday can continue to do so.

OR

c)      recommends that the Governing Body adopt a policy to allow shops in all of Auckland to trade on Easter Sunday.

OR

d)      recommends the Governing Body adopt a policy to allow shops in the following parts of Auckland to trade on Easter Sunday: [local board to insert parts in list format]

OR

e)      delegates the Local Board Chair to recommend to the Governing Body by email via the Manager Social Policy and Bylaws by 30 June on whether to retain the status quo, or to allow shops in all or parts of Auckland to trade on Easter Sunday.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governing Body Report: Response to Easter Sunday trading legislation

143

     

Signatories

Authors

Pania   Elliot - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Michael Sinclair - Manager Social Policy and Bylaws

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2017/09557

 

  

Purpose

1.       To consider the approach to public reporting on the governance forward work calendar for Franklin Local Board.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an overview of the purpose of the governance forward work calendar and includes, for information, a schedule of key decisions that will come before the board at business meetings over the next year (refer Attachment A).

3.       The calendar aims to support the local board’s governance role by:

i)        ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)       clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)      clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be regularly updated, to ensure that formal reporting milestones for new projects are added to the schedule.  Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar is a less formal but more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.

5.       At the business meeting on 22 November 2016 the Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar item was not required for future business meeting agendas and that it could be dealt with in a less formal manner (resolution number FR/2016/209).

6.       It is now recommended that a forward view of key decision making timescales for the local board should be regularly included on a public agenda.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board approves monthly reporting of the governance forward work calendar to enable greater public transparency on forthcoming local board key decision timescales.

 

Comments

7.       Council’s Quality Advice Programme aims to improve the focus, analysis, presentation and timeliness of staff advice to elected representatives. An initiative under this programme has been to develop forward work calendars for governing body committees and local boards.  Structured governance calendars are designed to help the elected members receive quality advice in a planned and logical way, ensuring decisions are made within context.

8.       The governance forward work calendar brings together, in one schedule, reporting on all of Franklin local board’s projects and activities previously approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes governing body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response.  Inclusion on a formal business meeting agenda will allow greater transparency for the public.

9.       Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar will be a more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.


 

10.     The forward work calendar is arranged in three columns, “Topic”, “Purpose” and “Governance Role”:

i)        Topic describes the items and may indicate how they fit in with broader processes such as the annual plan

ii)       Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates

iii)      Governance role is a high-level categorisation of the work local boards do. Examples of the seven governance categories are as follows.

Governance role

Examples

Setting direction/priorities/budget

Capex projects, work programmes, annual plan

Local initiatives/specific decisions

Grants, road names, alcohol bans

Input into regional decision-making

Comments on regional bylaws, policies, plans

Oversight and monitoring

Local board agreement, quarterly performance reports, review projects

Accountability to the public

Annual report

Engagement

Community hui, submissions processes

Keeping informed

Briefings, cluster workshops

 

11.     At the business meeting on 22 November 2016, Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar item was not required for future business meeting agendas and that it could be dealt with in a less formal manner (resolution number FR/2016/209).  However, it is now recommended that the Franklin local board governance forward work calendar is included on monthly business meeting agendas, to enable greater public transparency of forthcoming local board key decision timescales.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     All local boards have been receiving governance forward work calendars on their business meeting agendas.

Māori impact statement

13.     The projects and processes referred to in the governance forward work calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Implementation

14.     Staff will review the calendar each month and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar: June 2017

161

     

Signatories

Authors

Karen Gadomski - Senior Local Board Advisor -  Franklin Local Board

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Governance Forward Work Calendar 2017

Month

Topic

Purpose

Governance Role

June

Annual Plan/LBA – adopt LBA, fees and charges, work programmes

Formal adoption

Accountability to the public

 

Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan

Formal adoption

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

Local community grants round 2

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

Quick response grants round 5

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

Coastal rescue services grants

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

Auckland Plan refresh – key challenges and opportunities

Define board position and feedback

Input to regional decision making

 

Tākaro investing in play – issues and opportunities

Define board position and feedback

Input to regional decision making

 

 

 

 

July

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

Sports Investment Plan and Golf Investment Plan

Define board position and feedback

Input to regional decision making

 

Governance Framework Review

Define board position and feedback

Input to regional decision making

 

CDEM: Public Alerting Framework for Auckland

Define board position and feedback

Input to regional decision making

 

 

 

 

August

Quarterly report – quarter 4 of 2016/2017

Check in on performance/inform future direction

Oversight and monitoring

 

Annual Report – approve local board input

Formal approval

Accountability to the public

 

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

Quick response grants round 1

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

School swimming pools grants

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

 

 

 

September

Local Board Plan – adopt Franklin Local Board Plan 2017

Formal adoption

Setting direction, priorities, budget

 

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

Local community grants round 1

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

Waterways protection fund grants

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

 

 

 

October

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

Quarterly report – quarter 1 of 2017/2018

Check in on performance/inform future direction

Oversight and monitoring

 

 

 

 

November

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

Quick response grants round 2

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

 

 

 

December

Long-term plan 2018/2028 – consultation content for local board agreement

Agree priorities for consultation

Setting direction, priorities, budget

 

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

Regional Pest Management Plan

Confirm board position and feedback

Input to regional decision making

February

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

Quarterly report – quarter 2 of 2017/2018

Check in on performance/inform future direction

Oversight and monitoring

 

Auckland Plan – consultation on draft

Define board position and feedback

Input to regional decision making

 

 

 

 

March

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

 

 

 

April

Long-term plan – local board advocacy

Confirm advocacy priorities

Setting direction, priorities, budget

 

Quick response grants round 3

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

 

 

 

May

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

Quarterly report – quarter 3 of 2017/2018

Check in on performance/inform future direction

Oversight and monitoring

 

 

 

 

June

Long-term plan – local board agreement

Formal adoption

Setting direction, priorities, budget

 

Local community grants round 2

Determine allocation of funding

Local initiatives/specific decisions

 

Transport monthly report

Review progress with projects

Oversight and monitoring

 

 

Dates to be confirmed for 2017/2018:

 

Topic:

Expected timeframe

Gambling Venues Policy/Bylaw

July to December

Smoke Free Bylaw

July to December

Freedom camping bylaw

July to December

Dog Management Bylaw and Policy on Dogs

October to December

Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw

October to March

Solid Waste Bylaw

October to December

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Alteration of the business meeting schedule for the Franklin Local Board by the addition of 18 July 2017 and the removal of 25 July 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/09693

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek approval to alter the business meeting schedule for the Franklin Local Board by the addition of 18 July 2017 and the removal of 25 July 2017. This is due to the possibility that, with up to four members attending the Local Government New Zealand conference and a further leave of absence, the meeting scheduled on 25 July 2017 would fail to reach a quorum.

Executive summary

2.       On 13 December 2016 the Franklin Local Board resolved the adoption of a business meeting schedule for the 2016-2019 electoral term (resolution number FR/2016/222).

3.       On 28 February 2017 Franklin Local Board resolved an additional business meeting on 18 April 2017 (resolution number FR/2017/1).

4.       On 28 March 2017 Franklin Local Board resolved the alteration of the business meeting schedule by the addition of 6 June 2017 and the removal of 30 May 2017 (resolution number FR/2017/2).

5.       There is the possibility that up to four members could be attending the Local Government New Zealand conference on 24 July 2017 and 25 July 2017. A further member has a leave of absence at this time. Should this occour the result will be that the meeting scheduled on 25 July 2017 will fail to reach a quorum. Therefore, it is proposed to alter the business meeting schedule by adding a meeting on 18 July 2017 and removing the previously scheduled meeting on 25 July 2017.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board approves an alteration to the business meeting schedule for the Franklin Local Board by the addition of 18 July 2017 and the removal of 25 July 2017.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Anthea Clarke  - Democracy Advisor

Karen Gadomski - Senior Local Board Advisor -  Franklin Local Board

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

 

File No.: CP2017/05780

 

  

Purpose

1.       To receive the workshop records for local board workshops held in May 2017.

Executive Summary

2.       Workshop records are attached for 2 May 2017, 9 May 2017, 16 May 2017 and 23 May 2017.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board receives the workshop records for 2 May 2017, 9 May 2017, 16 May 2017 and 23 May 2017.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board workshop record: 2 May 2017

167

b

Franklin Local Board workshop record: 9 May 2017

169

c

Franklin Local Board workshop record: 16 May 2017

173

d

Franklin Local Board workshop record: 23 May 2017

177

     

Signatories

Authors

Anthea Clarke  - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

    

  


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Te Puru Basketball Club outdoor basketball/netball court proposal                                                         Page 181

Item 8.1      Attachment b    Presentation - Te Puru Basketball Club outdoor basketball/netball court                                  Page 185


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

06 June 2017

 

 

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