I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 27 June 2017

9.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Deputy Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Brendon Crompton

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Hopkins

 

 

Murray Kay

 

 

Niko Kloeten

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Anthea Clarke

Democracy Advisor

 

19 June 2017

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 237 1310

Email: Anthea.Clarke@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

6.1     Acknowledgement - Dame Nganeko Minhinnick                                             5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - New Zealand Mounted Games Association - Debbie Hope      6

8.2     Deputation - The Rising Foundation Trust - Donna Rogers                          6

8.3     Deputation - Coastguard Maraetai - Christine Maslowski                              6

8.4     Deputation - Clevedon Protection Society - Tristan Ilich                                7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          8

12        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts                                             9

13        Auckland Plan refresh 2018: early feedback to inform draft plan                         17

14        Relationship Agreements with Mana Whenua                                                         31

15        Reallocation of budget in Arts, Community and Events Work Programme 2016/17 for public safety camera system management in Pukekohe                                        47

16        Franklin Local Grants Round Two 2016-2017 grant applications                         49

17        Franklin Local Board Coastal Sea Rescue Services Fund 2016-2017 grant applications                                                                                                                                       55

18        Approval to name two Private Ways with access off 9A-C Bush Road, Runciman     57

19        Approval to name two Roads and One Private Way with access off 9D Bush Road, Runciman.                                                                                                                     61

20        Request for locally driven initiatives capital funding towards upgrade works at Waiuku Community Recycling Centre                                                                                    65

21        Removal of alternate Franklin Local Board member appointment to the Franklin Localities Leadership Group                                                                                                        67  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                                 69

C1       Acquisition of land for open space - Clarks Beach                                                 69  

 


1          Welcome

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

That the Franklin Local Board confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 6 June 2017, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

That the Franklin Local Board approves the request for leave of absence from Member A Hopkins.

 

6          Acknowledgements

6.1       Acknowledgement - Dame Nganeko Minhinnick

Purpose

1.       To acknowledge the passing of Dame Nganeko Minhinnick of Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua from Tahuna Marae in Waiuku and recognise her leadership in environmental and Māori issues.

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board acknowledges the passing of Dame Nganeko Minhinnick of Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua from Tahuna Marae in Waiuku and recognises her leadership in environmental and Māori issues.

 

7          Petitions

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - New Zealand Mounted Games Association - Debbie Hope

Purpose

1.       A deputation from Debbie Hope on behalf of the New Zealand Mounted Games Association with respect to its grant application for support with hosting the World Team Championships Under 17s horse riding event.

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chair has approved the request from Debbie Hope, on behalf of the New Zealand Mounted Games Association, to bring a deputation with respect to its grant application for support with hosting the World Team Championships Under 17s horse riding event.

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board thanks Debbie Hope for her attendance on behalf of the New Zealand Mounted Games Association with respect to its grant application for support with hosting the World Team Championships Under 17s horse riding event.

 

8.2       Deputation - The Rising Foundation Trust - Donna Rogers

Purpose

1.       A deputation from Donna Rogers on behalf of the Rising Foundation Trust with respect to their activities in the Pukekohe community.

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chair has approved the request from Donna Rogers, on behalf of the Rising Foundation Trust, to bring a deputation with respect to their activities in the Pukekohe community.

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board thanks Donna Rogers (administrator) for her attendance on behalf of the Rising Foundation Trust with respect to their activities in the Pukekohe community.

Attachments

a          Term one newsletter - The Rising Foundation Trust.............................. 73

 

8.3       Deputation - Coastguard Maraetai - Christine Maslowski

Purpose

1.       A deputation from Christine Maslowski, from Coastguard Maraetai, with respect to their activities on the Franklin east coast and in support of their application to the Franklin Local Board Coastal Sea Rescue Services Fund.

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chair has approved the request from Christine Maslowski, from Coastguard Maraetai to bring a deputation with respect to their activities on the Franklin east coast and in support of their application to the Franklin Local Board Coastal Sea Rescue Services Fund.

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board thanks Christine Maslowski, from Coastguard Maraetai, for her attendance with respect to their activities on the Franklin east coast and in support of their application to the Franklin Local Board Coastal Sea Rescue Services Fund.

 

8.4       Deputation - Clevedon Protection Society - Tristan Ilich

Purpose

1.       A deputation from Tristan Ilich on behalf of the Clevedon Protection Society with respect to their concerns about the proposed Fulton Hogan quarry expansion at McNicol Road, Clevedon.

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chair has approved the request from Tristan Ilich, on behalf of the Clevedon Protection Society, to bring a deputation with respect to their concerns about the proposed Fulton Hogan quarry expansion at McNicol Road, Clevedon.

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board thanks Tristan Ilich for his attendance on behalf of the Clevedon Protection Society with respect to their concerns about the proposed Fulton Hogan quarry expansion at McNicol Road, Clevedon.

9          Public Forum

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

There were no notices of motion.

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts

 

File No.: CP2017/11397

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek agreement from the local board on:

·                community and workforce priorities for this local board area (smart procurement); and

·                site specific issues (if any) that are unique to the local board and may require particular attention over and above standard maintenance service specifications

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s maintenance contracts for parks, buildings and open space expire on 30 June 2017.  This has presented a unique opportunity to reconsider and reshape how council approaches the maintenance of Auckland Council’s assets and open spaces in the future.

3.       At the end of March 2017, a new contract structure was approved by the Strategic Procurement Committee and Finance and Performance Committee, with contracts due to commence 1 July 2017.

4.       One of the key performance indicators for each supplier is a Community Outcomes and Workforce Development Plan, which includes smart procurement measures and targets.

5.       This report seeks formal feedback from the local board on community and workforce measures (smart procurement) that are a priority to this local board, noting that targets may be developed over the next six to twelve months as a baseline is established.

6.       This report seeks formal feedback from the local board on site specific issues (if any) that are unique to the local board area and may require particular attention for 2017/2018, and is over and above standard service specifications.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      agrees the following local priorities for year one (2017/2018) of new maintenance contracts:

          i)             community and workforce priorities for this local board area (smart procurement) (Attachment A of the report entitled ‘Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts’);

         ii)             site specific issues (if any) that are unique to the local board and may require particular attention over and above standard maintenance service specifications.

b)      notes that community and workforce (smart procurement) targets may be developed over the next six to twelve months to establish a baseline.

c)      notes that Auckland Council will continue to encourage, support and work with volunteer and community groups across the region in alignment to the new maintenance contracts.

 

Comments

Background

7.       Auckland Council’s maintenance contracts for parks, buildings and open space expire on 30 June 2017. This presented a unique opportunity to reconsider and reshape how we approach maintenance of Auckland Council’s assets and open spaces in the future.

8.       Over the last twelve months, Community Facilities has engaged with local boards and the governing body to provide direction and shape up the procurement of a new contract structure. This included receiving formal feedback from all local boards in March 2017, prior to a decision being made.

9.       At the end of March 2017, the new contract structure was approved by the Strategic Procurement Committee and Finance and Performance Committee, with contracts due to commence on 1 July 2017.

10.     The new maintenance contracts incorporate three main service types for the Auckland region:

·        Full Facilities – maintenance of parks, open spaces, sports fields, buildings, public toilets, cleaning (including toilets in town centres), locking and unlocking services of park gates and public toilets, rubbish bin emptying, weed control, mowing and maintenance of streetscape gardens

·        Arboriculture - street tree pruning, park tree pruning, street tree and powerline clearance, species specific pruning, tree inspections and removals and planting/aftercare maintenance

·        Ecological - pest animal and pest plant monitoring and control, ecological restoration, revegetation and enrichment planting and reactive pest control/monitoring

11.     A key change to maintenance contracts is that the majority of service levels will now be outcome based (e.g. ‘rubbish bins shall not exceed the bin’s capacity and items shall not overflow’), as opposed to services that were previously prescriptive or frequency based (e.g. ‘rubbish bins are emptied once a day’).

12.     Refer to Attachment B for the final version of the Full Facilities Service Specifications which outline agreed outcome statements that will apply across the Auckland region from 1 July 2017.

13.     Arboriculture and ecological services are specialist contracts, largely based on compliance with legislation and policies.  Specifications are detailed, technical and more prescriptive in nature.

Smart Procurement

14.     Key performance indicators measure how well the supplier is doing to meet their contractual agreement with Auckland Council.

15.     One of the key performance indicators for each supplier is a Community Outcomes and Workforce Development Plan.  This outlines community and workforce measures and targets to be agreed with each supplier.

Community and Workforce

16.     These key performance indicators include setting smart procurement targets that reflect the local character of each area, of which local boards play a key role in identifying.

17.     Attachment A outlines a minimum set of community and workforce measures (smart procurement), noting that specific targets will be determined over the next six to twelve months as a baseline is established.

18.     This report seeks agreement from the local board on identifying key community and workforce measures (smart procurement) to focus on for year one (2017/2018).

Environmental

19.     Each supplier is also required to develop an environmental management system that monitors, measures and sets goals.  At a minimum the following will be measured – local boards will have the opportunity to identify (at a later date) what measures they seek regular reporting on:

·     energy conservation

·     water conservation

·     waste management and recycling

·     chemical use

·     Scope 1 and Scope 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

20.     Environmental key performance indicators will track progress of these goals, noting that this specifically includes targets for suppliers to annually reduce their carbon footprint and annually reduce use of agri-chemicals (as outlined in Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy).

Local Service Level Variations

21.     Feedback received from local boards indicates the following most common and typical maintenance issues experienced in their area, which is largely due to the prescriptive nature of the previous contract model:

·     Toilets not being clean

·     Rubbish bins overflowing

·     Grass in parks getting too long

22.     New maintenance contracts intend to address these common issues through an outcome based model, as outlined in the background section above.

23.     In some cases, there may be some site specific issues, or a common maintenance problem, that is unique to the local board area and requires particular attention.  For example a 100% spray free reserve, overflowing bins near tourist beaches, litter caused from freedom campers in a particular location.

24.     This report seeks agreement from the local board on site specific issues (if any) that are unique to the local board area and may require particular attention for 2017/2018, and is over and above standard service specifications.

Asset Data

25.     Over the last six months, Auckland Council’s asset data team conducted a full system review of asset information to support the development of new maintenance contracts. 

26.     Attachment C outlines an updated asset list for this local board area as at 2 June 2017.

27.     Note that asset data is continually updated to reflect council decisions and asset assessments, and that new maintenance contracts have flexibility to accommodate changes.

Volunteers and Community Groups

28.     Auckland Council values the huge number of volunteer and community groups across the region, who undertake a significant amount of work over many years to shape and maintain the beauty of Auckland.

29.     Council will continue to encourage and support volunteers, community empowerment initiatives and local community groups where they align to council’s objectives and enhance our community.

30.     Under the new maintenance contract model, council does not expect volunteers to have to undertake work to address poor performance in contract delivery, such as cleaning up litter where the supplier has a responsibility to do so.

31.     It is acknowledged that many volunteer and community groups achieve a sense of pride, value and enjoyment in supporting maintenance work, such as restoration, garden maintenance and pest control.  Council will continue to work with these groups and with suppliers to support them as best as possible in these activities.

32.     Over the next few months council staff will be in contact with key volunteer and community groups where maintenance related work is undertaken, to ensure alignment of objectives and determine how council and suppliers can best support this work.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

33.     Project 17 has engaged with local boards through various channels including:

o   Local Board Chairs Procurement Working Group;

o   Local Board Chairs Forum presentations;

o   memorandums;

o   cluster workshops;

o   individual local board workshops; and

o   business meeting reports.

34.     Community Facilities is now seeking agreement from local boards on smart procurement priorities and local service level variations (if any) for 2017/2018, prior to new contracts commencing on 1 July.

35.     This information will be provided to suppliers and Community Facilities before new contracts commence.

Māori impact statement

36.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori.

37.     Māori responsiveness requires the collective effort of everyone. Under the new contracts, suppliers will work collaboratively with council to achieve better outcomes with Māori and for Auckland. This will include:

o   Building positive relationships with Māori – effective communication and engagement with Māori, developing resilient relationships with mana whenua;

o   Significantly lift Māori social and economic well-being; and

o   Building Māori capability and capacity.

38.     Through these contracts, opportunities to support local community outcomes and economic development include (but are not limited to):

o   Providing employment opportunities, in particular for local people and for youth;

o   Increasing capability and capacity (apprenticeships, cadetships or equivalent) in particular for youth;

o    Building on community and volunteer networks;

o   Focusing on smart procurement initiatives that support Maori outcomes.

Implementation

39.     Mobilisation is currently underway with suppliers to prepare for 1 July 2017 (day one). This includes finalising processes, implementing systems, recruiting staff, purchasing equipment, creating health and safety plans and developing work schedules. 

40.     Local boards are meeting new suppliers in June 2017 and will have the opportunity to present and discuss local priorities with the supplier.

41.     Reporting requirements for local boards on local service levels and contractor performance is currently underway.

42.     New maintenance contracts take effect on 1July 2017, noting that there may be up to twelve months to bed in changes, particularly with regards to systems and reporting.

 


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community and workforce measures (smart procurement)

15

b

Full facilities service specifications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Asset list - Franklin (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh - Financial Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Auckland Plan refresh 2018: early feedback to inform draft plan

 

File No.: CP2017/11836

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report invites formal feedback from local boards on high-level, strategic themes and focus areas to guide development of the draft refreshed Auckland Plan.

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Plan sets out a bold and ambitious 30-year vision to guide the growth and development of Auckland. The plan is our key strategic document that informs regional priorities that will be funded through the Long Term Plan (LTP) 2018-28. The current Auckland Plan was adopted in 2012 and provided strategic direction in a number of significant areas. The refresh provides an opportunity to revisit Auckland’s most challenging issues in light of changes since the plan was adopted to ensure it continues to be a useful guiding document for Auckland.

3.       The refreshed plan will be more focused on a small number of inter-linked strategic themes that address Auckland’s biggest challenges. These themes are:

·        Access and Connectivity

·        Protect and Enhance

·        Homes and Places

·        Belonging

·        Skills and Jobs

4.       The plan is also intended to have a greater focus on the development strategy, which must achieve the social, economic, environmental and cultural objectives of the plan.

5.       Over the last five months, local boards have been involved in Planning Committee workshops and local board cluster briefings on the Auckland Plan refresh as part of their shared governance role.

6.       Local boards are now invited to consider their formal position on the themes and focus areas and provide further feedback.  The formal feedback will be considered by the Planning Committee at its meeting on 1 August 2017.

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provides feedback, including any specific feedback on the challenges, opportunities, strategic themes and focus areas.

b)      notes that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Planning Committee when it meets to decide on direction to inform the draft Auckland Plan on 1 August 2017

c)      notes that there will be further opportunities to provide feedback on the draft plan as council continues through the refresh process during 2017.

 

Comments

7.       Auckland Council is required under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 to develop and review a spatial plan for Auckland. The Auckland Plan sets out a bold and ambitious 30-year vision to guide the growth and development of Auckland. The plan is our key strategic document that informs regional priorities that will be funded through the LTP 2018-28. The current Auckland Plan was adopted in 2012 and provided strategic direction in a number of significant areas. The refresh provides an opportunity to revisit Auckland’s most challenging issues in light of changes since the plan was adopted to ensure it continues to be a useful guiding document for Auckland.

8.       On 28 March 2017, the Planning Committee endorsed a streamlined spatial approach for the refresh of the Auckland Plan. The refreshed plan will be more focused and structured around a small number of inter-linked strategic themes that address Auckland’s biggest challenges. The key challenges for Auckland are identified as:

·        scale and rate of population growth

·        greater environmental pressures resulting from that growth

·        uneven distribution of growth benefits.

9.       The plan is also intended to have a greater focus on the development strategy, which must achieve the social, economic, environmental and cultural objectives of the plan.

10.     Over the last five months, local boards have been involved in Planning Committee workshops and local board cluster briefings on the Auckland Plan refresh as part of their shared governance role. All local board chairs were invited to the February, March and April 2017 Planning Committee workshops on the Auckland Plan. In the March 2017 workshops, local board chairs generally indicated support for a refresh of the plan. Chairs (or their representatives) provided theme by theme feedback, noting that this expresses the views of local board chair(s) only.

11.     Local board cluster briefings for local board members were held in February and April 2017. The February briefing provided an initial introduction to the refresh. In April, a high-level summary of the Planning Committee workshop content was presented. Early information and feedback from local boards was used to refine the scope of strategic themes and focus areas. Key themes emerging from local board feedback are included in Attachment B. The results of these workshop discussions fed into an information report distributed to elected members on 1 May 2017.

12.     Local boards are invited to consider the strategic themes and focus areas and provide further, formal feedback, including any specific feedback on the challenges and opportunities.

Strategic themes and focus areas

13.     The high-level, strategic themes and focus areas are outlined in Table 1. These provide the basis for early. The key strategic themes include:

·        Skills and Jobs: recognizing the importance of skills and jobs in enabling prosperity and individual and community well-being.

·        Belonging: Enabling participation in society to underpin a sense of belonging.  Aucklanders’ willingness to live and work together and invest in Auckland’s future is based on trust, tolerance and mutual respect.

·        Homes and places: Enabling successful urban environments.  Homes and places influence Aucklanders’ health, safety and well-being, living standards and financial position.

·        Protect and enhance: Acknowledging the impacts of growth and development on Auckland’s natural environment, cultural and built heritage, and their contribution to broader outcomes for Auckland.

·        Access and connectivity: Enabling Aucklanders to get to where they want to go through connections between Auckland, other parts of New Zealand and the world, both in the physical sense and by digital means.

14.     These strategic themes are intended to provide direction to the high-level development strategy, which guides how Auckland will grow and develop and our investment priorities. Further supporting material is provided in Attachment A.


 

Table 1: Strategic framework

Strategic themes

Focus areas

Skills and jobs

Enterprise and innovation

Education pathways and life-long learning

Retain and attract talent and investment

Belonging

The importance of Māori and Māori values

Equitable opportunities for all to achieve their full potential

Inclusive, resilient and thriving communities

Value and celebrate Auckland’s diversity

Homes and Places

More homes (supply, choice and infrastructure)

Affordable, safe, stable homes

Urban areas that work

Protect and Enhance

Sustainability and resilience embedded in how we grow and develop

Environment and cultural heritage are critical to broader outcomes

Recognise and provide for role of Māori

Access and Connectivity

Easy to get to where you want to go

Enabling and supporting growth

Implement Auckland Transport Alignment Project

Minimise harm (road accidents and deaths, environmental and cultural impacts)

 

15.     The following questions may be useful in structuring feedback:

·        What are the key challenges and opportunities facing Auckland in the future?

·        What are the regional priorities for Auckland over the next 30 years from your local communities’ perspectives?

·        Do the strategic themes and focus areas capture your communities’ regional priorities?

·        Are we focusing on the right things? 

·        Are there any gaps?

Relationship to local board plans

16.     In April/May 2017, local boards adopted their draft local board plans. Many local boards used direction provided by the Auckland Plan when preparing their draft local board plans to support better alignment between local and regional investment and activities. It is anticipated that the draft plans and ongoing discussion with communities will continue to inform local boards’ input to the Auckland Plan.

17.     Local board plans will help inform the draft LTP 2018-28 budget decisions. This includes the identification of locally driven initiatives and advocacy initiatives, which will deliver on local board outcomes.  Based on an analysis of the draft local board plans 2017, there is strong alignment between draft local board plan and the Auckland Plan outcomes.

Next steps

18.     Local boards are well-placed to provide input on regional priorities following public engagement on their draft local board plans.

19.     Further engagement with local boards on development of the draft plan will take place as part of the local board cluster workshops in July 2017.

20.     On 1 August 2017, the Planning Committee will meet to agree direction to guide the draft Auckland Plan. Local boards’ formal feedback will be considered by the Planning Committee at its meeting on 1 August 2017.

21.     There will be further opportunities to provide feedback on the draft plan as council continues through the refresh process.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

22.     Local board feedback is being sought in this report.

23.     A summary of feedback received from local board members to date is provided in Attachment B.

24.     Local boards play an important role in relation to the content of the Auckland Plan through communicating local views to the governing body and providing input to regional strategies, policies and plans.

25.     The refreshed plan will inform regional priorities that will be funded through the
LTP 2018-28.

Māori impact statement

26.     The council is required to provide opportunities for Māori engagement and to support Māori capacity to participate in decision-making. When making significant decisions in relation to land or a body of water, the council must take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water, sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

27.     Staff from the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) provided guidance on the strategic themes. The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the strategic themes and focus areas.

28.     The strategic themes acknowledge and celebrate Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and mana whenua as Treaty partners in a multicultural Auckland.

29.     An additional Māori theme is in development following a request from the Planning Committee. Further engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is planned in developing the draft plan.

Implementation

30.     Feedback from the local boards will be summarised and provided in full to the Planning Committee for consideration in decision-making to guide development of the draft plan.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Plan Refresh: Theme Summary

21

b

Auckland Plan Refresh:  key themes emerging from local board feedback

29

     

Signatories

Authors

Karryn Kirk - Principal Strategic Adviser Auckland Plan Implementation

Denise O’Shaughnessy - Manager Strategic Advice

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Attachment B – Auckland Plan Refresh: key themes emerging from local board feedback

·        Development Strategy: regional disparities in providing access to employment, and that to support and enable growth there needs to be a focus on the south and northwest.  The definition of “rural” was discussed given the “lifestyle” factor is seen to be more of an urban consideration than rural production.

·        Access and Connectivity: The importance of “age-friendly” infrastructure was discussed and the real and perceived safety of the transport network. Walking and the quality of the walking infrastructure (e.g. good footpaths) were considered to need greater emphasis within the broader active transport category. A key challenge was thought to be the lack of employment close to where people live, necessitating time consuming travel across the region.

·        Protect and Enhance: Views included that resource management processes do not encourage strategic thinking or planning which should be sub-regional and go beyond local board boundaries. Relationships and robust processes across governing body, local boards and CCOs can drive better decision making. Any change of values in the environmental space since 2012 is more intangible and can be harder to predict in the future. 

·        Homes and Places: The complexity in the role of the financing/banking sector was considered to be a factor in the supply challenge. There was discussion of the New Zealand culture of home ownership which, in contrast to European models for example, reduces investment into other priorities such as education or business. It was noted that there has been huge growth in the number of people living in the city centre.

·        Belonging: Determining the role that Auckland Council should play and that of government was highlighted within this theme.  Belonging is formed by people’s daily experience and there are also cultural differences in what people value about the place they live.  There was discussion that this theme should focus on vulnerable populations and the challenge of increasing inequality. It was also suggested that there should be encouragement and support so that everyone can get involved, as under the empowered communities model. Environmental restoration projects were identified as successful examples of bringing diverse groups together and developing a shared sense of belonging.

·        Skills and Jobs: There was general discussion on enabling infrastructure and the need to be a council that delivers.

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Relationship Agreements with Mana Whenua

 

File No.: CP2017/09883

 

  

Purpose

To obtain the Franklin Local Board’s approval to enter into formal governance relationship agreements with mana whenua groups in the greater Auckland area.

Executive summary

1.       This report recommends that the Franklin Local Board approves a relationship agreement template as the basis for discussions with mana whenua. 

2.       It further recommends that where the agreement remains substantively the same as the template, albeit with the inclusion of information describing the mana whenua party, that it proceed to a formal signing without a further approval process.

3.       The Governing Body is also being asked to approve the relationship template to support the expeditious completion of relationship agreements with mana whenua.

4.       Auckland Council has an existing range of instruments and mechanisms to recognise and provide for its relationships with mana whenua. There is a strong desire from all parties to formalise the foundational governance relationships through the development of relationship agreements and in some cases acknowledge and build from legacy agreements held with former councils.

5.       The mana whenua groups with interests in the Franklin Local Board area are:

Iwi / Hapū

Mana whenua representative organisation

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi Authority

Te Ahiwaru Waiohua

Makaurau Marae Māori Trust

Ngāti Paoa

Ngāti Paoa Trust

Ngāti Maru

Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Incorporated

Ngāti Tamaterā

Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

Ngāti Whanaunga

Ngāti Whanaunga

Waikato-Tainui

Waikato-Tainui Te Kauhanganui Incorporated

 

6.       The final draft agreement for consideration (Attachment A) recognises the two parties, sets out the purpose, aspirations and shared principles, and in particular acknowledges the governance context of Auckland Council through the governing body and the relevant local board(s).

7.       There are appendices to the agreement - the administrative provisions, existing and future projects or arrangements, and specific local board arrangements. These appendices are intended to be added to over time without alteration to the main agreement.

8.       Discussions have begun with some mana whenua groups who have indicated they are ready to enter into this process.


 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local BoardFranklin Local Board:

a)      approves the relationship agreement template attached to the agenda report at Attachment A as the basis for discussions with mana whenua

b)      approves a process of reaching these agreements whereby the agreement may proceed to signing without further approval so long as any inclusions are either descriptive or in the nature of minor drafting changes.  For the avoidance of doubt, any changes of substance will be re-presented to the  Franklin Local Board, other local boards and the governing body, as relevant, for final approval

c)      authorises the Chairperson to sign the agreement on behalf of the local board at signing ceremonies arranged between the parties to each agreement.

 

Comments

9.       Since Auckland Council was established, relationships with mana whenua have been sustained in a variety of ways.  The demands for information and engagement that the Council family places on mana whenua has led to a range of different approaches and mechanisms to make this efficient and effective for all. 

10.     A foundation for the interactions is the negotiation of contracts with each mana whenua group to support their capacity to engage with the Council.  These contracts specify deliverables which include participation in governance activities with Auckland Council.  Additionally, some of the high contact parts of the Council family have set up separate fora to provide for project level engagement.

11.     In 2013, the Governing Body, Local Board Chairs and the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), considered a discussion document about Auckland Council entering into relationship agreements with the nineteen iwi and hapū recognised as mana whenua for Tāmaki Makaurau.  As a result, a political working party of governing body and local board members was established that was expected to work on the development of the relationship agreements. 

12.     Subsequent discussions with mana whenua indicated that they preferred to advance some form of collective body prior to dealing with relationship agreements, negating the need for the working party. This collective body, the Regional Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, has been recently established and is developing a forward work programme at present.

13.     At a governance level, opportunities to establish relationships between mana whenua and elected members have included:

·        mana whenua leading pōwhiri and the inauguration ceremonies for each new council and local board

·        kanohi ki te kanohi / face to face discussions between elected members and mana whenua within major regional planning processes – notably the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan and the Unitary Plan 

·        at a local level, specific engagement with mana whenua who relate to the local board areas.

14.     Since the establishment of Auckland Council a strong desire has been expressed from many mana whenua groups and the Independent Māori Statutory Board to formalise the governance relationships through the development of relationship agreements and, in some cases, to acknowledge and build on legacy agreements held with former councils.

15.     Relationship agreements support elements of the Auckland Plan strategic direction to “enable Māori aspirations through recognition of Te Tirit o Waitangi / The Treaty of Waitangi and customary rights” through formal acknowledgement of the mutual interests of council and mana whenua.”

16.     They are a means of documenting each party’s intention to work together respectfully and positively, and the development of the agreement itself may assist in mutual understanding.  Nevertheless, relationship agreements may not be considered necessary by all mana whenua groups or be a current priority for some.  Should that be the case, the current arrangements with each group will continue to support the relationship.

Structure and details of Agreement

17.     Te Waka Anga Mua, with the support of Legal Services has developed a governance relationship agreement template attached to this report as Attachment A.

18.     This agreement has been drafted so as not to be over-prescriptive but containing the essential elements for agreements of this nature.

19.     The agreement recognises the two parties to the agreement and, in particular, acknowledges the governance context of Auckland Council by including the governing body and the relevant local boards as the Auckland Council party. 

20.     The first part of the agreement outlines the purpose, aspirations and shared principles. Any specific commitments, projects and arrangements, engagement and meeting protocols can also be contained, or referred to, within the body of the Agreement.

21.     The agreement has appendices - the administrative provisions, existing and future projects or arrangements, and specific local board arrangements – as standard inclusions. Any other relevant departmental and operational documents will be added as schedules to the agreement with the intention that these can be amended as needed without requiring alteration of the main agreement.

Next Steps

22.     All mana whenua have been approached regarding a potential relationship agreement. A number of groups have indicated they are ready to progress discussions and these discussions have commenced in some cases.

23.     As the agreement is intended to record a mutual intention to form a close working relationship with mana whenua which is already committed to in a range of council’s strategic documents Franklin Local Board is not being asked to approve entering into these relationship agreements.  Rather, it is being asked to approve a template agreement which sets out the areas expected to be covered in this relationship agreement which, in general, describes matters of relevance to each of the parties to the agreement.

24.     While the details about mana whenua and the arrangements or projects underway will be particular to each agreement it is expected that, in most cases, the agreements will not include any additional detail that requires governing body or local board approval.

25.     It is proposed that, where the agreement remains substantively the same as the template, albeit with the inclusion of information describing the mana whenua party, it proceeds to a formal signing without a further approval process.

26.     Should any of the mana whenua parties seek inclusion of matters which require new commitment by the council parties, the agreement will be referred back to the governing body and/or the local board(s) for approval on these matters.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

27.     Local Boards were presented with the broad approach proposed to relationship agreements in workshops in 2015 and there was general approval of the approach. 

28.     To expedite the process of negotiating relationship agreements, this report is also being made to each local board for approval, tailored to recognise the iwi / hapū relevant to the local board area.

29.     As relationship agreements are developed and signed, arrangements will be made for initial formal meetings with mana whenua representatives to begin new or continue current relationships.

30.     The mana whenua groups with interests in the Franklin Local Board area are:

Iwi / Hapū

Mana whenua representative organisation

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi Authority

Te Ahiwaru Waiohua

Makaurau Marae Māori Trust

Ngāti Paoa

Ngāti Paoa Trust

Ngāti Maru

Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Incorporated

Ngāti Tamaterā

Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

Ngāti Whanaunga

Ngāti Whanaunga

Waikato-Tainui

Waikato-Tainui Te Kauhanganui Incorporated

 

Initial discussions have begun with Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki and Waikato-Tainui.  Once the mana whenua interest in entering into discussions about relationship agreement is more certain, we will update the Board with an indicative timetable.

Māori impact statement

31.     Although Auckland Council engages with mana whenua across a wide range of activities currently and has relationships with mana whenua at both governance and operational levels, the establishment of governance level relationship agreements are a further step towards cementing an enduring positive relationship with treaty partners.  Entering into relationship agreements will also complete one of the recommendations made in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s 2015 Treaty Audit.

Implementation

32.     In order to finalise the relationship agreements, a formal signing ceremony including the mana whenua group, governing body and the relevant local boards will be arranged at times to suit all parties.  Te Waka Anga Mua staff will administer the agreements and maintain oversight of any commitments made within the agreements.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Relationship Agreement with Mana Whenua Template

35

     

Signatories

Authors

Dean  Martin - Principle Advisor Maori Relations & Governance

Authorisers

Graham Pryor - GM Maori Responsiveness & Relationships

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

                                                                                                                                                        

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Relationship Agreement]

 

 

 

between

 

 

 

[Iwi name]

 

 

 

and

 

 

 

Auckland Council

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

[Date]

 

 

 

 

 

[Iwi name Logo]

               

logo


 

 

 

[KARAKIA/MIHI]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[IMAGERY]


[IWI NAME]

1.         [Insert a description of the Iwi and its rohe].

2.         [Insert a description of the Iwi's representative entity].

3.         [Insert a description of the current status of Treaty settlements/negotiations for the Iwi].

4.         [Insert other relevant background from an Iwi perspective].

AUCKLAND COUNCIL

5.         Auckland Council (“Council”) is a territorial and regional authority established under section 6 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009. 

6.         Council has two complementary decision-making parts, the governing body and local boards. The governing body and the local boards are autonomous and make decisions as Council within their respective areas of responsibility.

7.         The governing body consists of the mayor and 20 governing body members. The governing body focuses on the big picture and on region-wide strategic decisions. Each of the 21 local boards has between five and nine members. Local boards represent the communities in their area and make decisions on local issues, activities and facilities.

8.         Council's purpose is to enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, communities; and to meet the current and future needs of communities for good-quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost-effective for households and businesses.

9.         The Council has committed to achieving better outcomes for Māori that contribute significantly to lifting Māori economic, social and cultural well-being, strengthen Council’s effectiveness for Māori, and optimise post-Treaty settlement opportunities for the benefit of Māori and the wider public of Auckland.  One outcome identified through the Auckland Plan is "A Māori identity that is Auckland's point of difference in the world." 

10.        These commitments are reflected in, for example, the following Council documents:

(a)         the 'Māori Responsiveness Framework';

(b)        the Auckland Plan;

(c)         the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan;

(d)        the Long Term Plan; and

(e)         Local Board Plans.

 

 

11.        The Council also has an important relationship with the Independent Māori Statutory Board which was established in the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

12.        Within that broader context, this Agreement focuses on the individual relationship between [Iwi name] and Auckland Council.

PURPOSE

13.        The purpose of this Agreement is to provide a mechanism for the parties to:

(a)         acknowledge the mana of [Iwi name] and the role of the Council in Tamaki Makaurau;

(b)        develop and enhance a positive and enduring working relationship;

(c)         record shared aspirations and shared working principles; and

(d)        make specific commitments in terms of how they will work together.

ASPIRATIONS

14.        The parties both desire to work together in a manner that acknowledges and respects:

(a)         the mana of [Iwi name] in Tāmaki Makaurau;

(b)        the relationship of [Iwi name] and their culture and traditions with their ancestral lands, water, sites, wāhi tapu and other taonga in Tāmaki Makaurau;

(c)         the desire of [Iwi name] to enhance the cultural, social, economic, and environmental wellbeing of their people;

(d)        the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Treaty of Waitangi and the importance of the parties working together in accordance with those principles in a manner consistent with relevant legislation;

(e)         the significance of the [record the status of the Treaty settlement process for the Iwi];

(f)         the rights and interests of all mana whenua and Māori in Auckland;

(g)        the statutory purpose, functions and structure of Auckland Council;

(h)         the goals of the Auckland Council's Māori Responsiveness Framework, being to provide for effective Māori participation in democracy; to provide for an empowered Council organisation; and to provide for strong Māori communities;

(i)          the drivers of the Auckland Council's Māori Responsiveness Framework, being to enable Te Tiriti o Waitangi/ Treaty of Waitangi outcomes; to enable Māori outcomes; to fulfil statutory Māori obligations; and to value Te Ao Māori;

(j)          the role of Council as a steward, and the need for cultural, social, economic and environmental sustainability of Tāmaki Makaurau; and

(k)         the interests of all communities, ratepayers, customers, citizens and visitors in Tāmaki Makaurau.

15.        [Iwi name] wishes to work more closely with the Council so as to enable [Iwi name] to have more opportunity to contribute to and influence Council decision-making and service delivery, and also provide opportunities for [Iwi name] to improve or expand its own delivery of services to its communities.

16.        The Council wishes to work more closely with [Iwi name] for those reasons and to explore and develop the opportunities that a closer relationship between the parties will bring.

17.        [Insert any other shared or individual aspirations].

SHARED principles

18.        The parties commit to the following shared principles and to working together in a manner that reflects:

(a)         a partnership approach based on respect, good faith, integrity, transparency and open and effective communication;

(b)        a co-operative, supportive, positive and proactive approach;

(c)         respect for the roles and responsibilities of both parties;

(d)        a focus on the parties assisting each other to achieve the shared aspirations outlined in this Agreement;

(e)         early engagement and the provision of quality information; and

(f)         a constructive and timely approach to communicating any issues that may arise in the relationship and an open-minded approach to addressing those issues.

[SPECIFIC COMMITMENTS]

19.        [Insert any specific commitment between the parties at this point]

PROJECTS AND ARRANGEMENTS

20.        The parties are working together on the current or proposed projects and arrangements:

(a)         [Insert current projects and arrangements in Appendix Two].

21.        The parties may agree to work together on future projects or arrangements and the parties may agree to include these projects or arrangements in Appendix Three to this Agreement.

ENGAGEMENT AND meetings

22.       [example, Iwi representatives, the Mayor and Councillors will meet as mutually agreed but within a 6 month period. Iwi representatives, the Local Board Chairperson, members and Ward Councillor will meet a 6 monthly basis. There will be provision for additional meetings to be held at the request of either party.}

review AND AMENDMENT OF AGREEMENT

23         The parties will meet to discuss the state of the relationship and the implementation of this Agreement at least once each year.

24         The parties will meet to formally review this Agreement at least once every three years.

25         Either party may request an earlier review of this Agreement.

26         Any amendment to this Agreement must be agreed by the parties and recorded in writing. 

ROLES AND RESPONSBILITIES PRESERVED

27         The parties acknowledge that nothing in this Agreement restricts, fetters or derogates from the rights or responsibilities of [Iwi name] under the Local Government Act 2002, Resource Management Act 1991 or any other statute or regulation. If anything in this Agreement is inconsistent with any of those rights or responsibilities, then those rights or responsibilities prevail and this Agreement shall be construed and interpreted accordingly.

28         The parties acknowledge that nothing in this Agreement restricts, fetters or derogates from the statutory functions, duties and obligations imposed on the Council by the Local Government Act 2002, Resource Management Act 1991, or any other statute or regulation. If anything in this Agreement is inconsistent with any of the Council’s functions, duties, or obligations pursuant to statute or at law generally, then the functions, duties, and obligations of the Council pursuant to statute or at law generally prevail and this Agreement shall be construed and interpreted accordingly.

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

29         Further provisions relating to the administration of this Agreement are included in Appendix One.

 


 

 

EXECUTED on behalf of [Iwi name]

 

 

 

by                                                                    ______________________________________

                                                                        CHAIRPERSON

 

 

EXECUTED on behalf of AUCKLAND COUNCIL

 

 

 

 

by                                                                    ______________________________________

                                                                        MAYOR

 

 

EXECUTED on behalf of [to insert] Local Board

 

 

 

 

by                                                                    ______________________________________

                                                                        CHAIRPERSON

 

 


 

APPENDIX ONE

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

 

KEY CONTACT PERSONS & COMMUNICATION

1.   The key contact persons, and contact details for each party at the time of the signing of this Agreement are:

a.          [Insert for Iwi]; and

b.         [Insert for Council].

2.   All formal notices must be sent to the addresses set out above.

Protection of sensitive information

3.   The parties acknowledge that some information shared between them will be confidential, but that under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 the Council may be required to provide requested information.

4.   Where a party receives, or has received, whether before or after the commencement date, confidential information from the other party the recipient must, except as required by law:

(a)         keep the confidential information confidential;

(b)        not use, disclose or reproduce the confidential information for any purpose other than the purpose for which it was provided by the disclosing party;

(c)         not, without the disclosing party's prior written consent, disclose the confidential information to any person other than the recipient's employees, subcontractors, agents, officers and representatives who need the information for the purpose for which it was provided by the disclosing party; and

(d)        establish and maintain effective security measures to safeguard the confidential information from unauthorised access, use, copying or disclosure.

Issue Resolution

5.   Within one month after the commencement date of this Agreement, the parties will agree one person to act as a mediator in the case of any issues between the parties under this Agreement.  That person may be replaced from time to time by agreement between the parties.

6.   The parties will endeavour to act in good faith to address any issues arising in respect of rights or obligations specified in this Agreement at the immediate time such issues arise.

7.   Where an issue cannot be resolved between the parties after 10 working days the issue will be escalated to:

(a)         in the case of the [Iwi name] the Chairperson of [Māori entity]; and

(b)        in the case of the Council, the Governance Director.

8.   Where an issue is still not resolved after one month of having been escalated under clause 7, the issue shall be referred to the mediator agreed under clause 5, who will work with the parties to resolve the dispute.

9.   To assist in the ongoing development of a transparent and accountable relationship, Council and [Iwi name] will inform each other of any situation or development which may jeopardise or comprise each party’s commitment to this Agreement and their overall relationship with each other.

 

Managing Conflicts

10.  Council and [Iwi name] representatives will actively manage any conflict of interest that may arise, be they perceived or actual conflicts.

[to discuss other administrative provisions including notice provisions]

 

Resourcing

Capacity Funding

11.  Council recognises that it has a responsibility to enable (Iwi name) to participate and contribute to council decision-making processes. Council will negotiate a capacity funding agreement with the (Entity name) to enable (Iwi name) contribution.

Master Service Agreement

12.  Council will require the assistance and information from (Iwi name) through a range of policy planning and service initiatives. Council will negotiate a mater service agreement with the Iwi Trust that will enable departments to seek technical, cultural and professional advice from (Iwi name).

13.  Council will encourage Council Controlled Organisations to develop similar instruments to enable more effective engagement with (Iwi name).


 

APPENDIX TWO

Existing projects or arrangements

[e.g. attach statutory obligations, co-management agreements, other agreements and instruments,  iwi/hapu projects of interest to council, engagement protocols for iwi/hapu, local boards and governing body, local board projects of interest to mana whenua, regional projects of interest to mana whenua, resource consent protocols.]

 

 


 

APPENDIX THREE

FURTHER projects or arrangements

[e.g. attach joint work programme, projects or arrangements agreed in the future at the time they are agreed]

 


 

APPENDIX FOUR

SPECIFIC LOCAL BOARD ARRANGEMENTS

[Insert any specific arrangements for local boards]


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Reallocation of budget in Arts, Community and Events Work Programme 2016/17 for public safety camera system management in Pukekohe

 

File No.: CP2017/12095

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to reallocate $9,000 budget in the Heritage and Identity line (# 2354) of the Arts, Community and Events Work Programme 2016/17 to be granted to the Pukekohe Business Association Incorporated for the transition to the management of Pukekohe’s public safety camera system (CCTV).

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board has an adopted Arts, Community and Events Work Programme for the 2016/17 financial year.

3.       Line item #2354 in the work programme entitled “Heritage and Identity” has a budget of Locally Drive Initiatives operational funding of $17,000.  The description of this activity is “to support communities to lead placemaking activities … strengthen the visibility of Franklin heritage and identity in the community”.

4.       To date, $8,000 of the budget has been allocated.

5.       At a local board workshop on 16 May 2017, the Franklin Local Board gave direction to develop a community based partnership for the management of the council owned public safety camera system in the Pukekohe town centre in partnership with the Pukekohe Business Association (business association).

6.       The business association has agreed to manage the system for the 2017/2018 financial year.

7.       The agreed model enables ownership of the system to be retained by Auckland Council whilst enabling monitoring of the system by the business association, to be managed in the best interests of the town centre and local businesses. 

8.       The request to reallocate available funding is to cover the costs of additional components that will be needed, e.g. new server, large screen.   Additional electronic/internet wiring or ‘boxes’ may also be needed ensure the system works well.

9.       If the local board approves the reallocation, a funding agreement will be developed to complete the technical and installation requirements to provide access to the public safety camera system into the business association’s office.

10.     There is an opportunity for the business association to review the system’s effectiveness and application over the coming year.

Full transfer of ownership of the system to the business association remains an option for the future.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board approves the reallocation of $9,000 Locally Driven Initiatives opex funding from the Heritage and Identity budget (line # 2354) of the Arts, Community and Events Work Programme 2016/17 to be granted to the Pukekohe Business Association Incorporated to cover the costs of the transition to the management of Pukekohe’s public safety camera system for the 2017/18 financial year.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jane Cain - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Grants Round Two 2016-2017 grant applications

 

File No.: CP2017/05681

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present applications received for Franklin Local Grants Round Two 2016/2017. The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $156,000.00 for the 2016/2017 financial year. 

3.       A total of $104,649.00 has been allocated under quick response grant rounds one, two, three, four and five and local grants round one, leaving a balance of $51,351.00.

4.       The local board also has $25,000.00 available for allocation to community grants (FR/2017/1). A total of $76,351.00 can now be allocated for the remaining final local grant round two.

5.       $11,000 is also available to allocate to community grants from an underspend in School Pool fund.

6.       Twenty-one applications were received in local grant round two, including six multi-board applications, requesting a total of $195,683.00.

The Pohutukawa Coast Community Association received a grant in 2009 for a project to maintain the water quality of the stream in Adah Platts-Mills Reserve and has $14,000 remaining. The Association now seeks the local boards permission to reallocate the remaining funds to other planting projects within the Pohutukawa Coast area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      consider the applications listed in Table One and Table Two and agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

Table One: Franklin Local Grants: Round Two Applications

App ID

Applicant

Project/

activity focus

Project

Requested

Eligibility

LG1703-204

Auckland Urban Mission

Community

Towards Auckland Urban Mission for office administration and avan coordinator for their mobile street project.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1703-214

Waiuku Family Support Network

Community

Towards Waiuku Family Support Network for air conditioning and heat pump units in their venue. 

$4,305.00

Eligible

LG1703-215

Children's Autism Foundation

Community

Towards Children’s Autism Foundation for the cost of social skills programmes and support for autistic children in Franklin n terms three and four in 2017.

$7,580.00

Eligible

LG1703-219

Whitford Playcentre

Community

Towards replenishing the bark in the playground, to meet New Zealand standards, in stage two of our playground improvements.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG1703-222

The Ararimu Residents and Ratepayers Association Incorporated

Community

Towards The Ararimu Residents and Ratepayers Association for the purchase of the seating units for community tiered seating project.

$8,260.00

Eligible

LG1703-225

Franklin Tourism Group Incorporated

Community

Towards Franklin Tourism Group Incorporated for the cost of administration, website upgrade and maintenance labour costs.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1703-208

Brian Blake

Environment

Towards the cost of plants on a riparian site on Awhitu Peninsula.

$2,450.00

Ineligible

Applicant had applied for same project in quick response round four 2016-17.

LG1703-201

Clevedon Lawn Tennis Club

Events

Towards Clevedon Lawn Tennis Club for the marquee, table, chairs and table cloths hire and cake for the 125th Commemoration of the Clevedon Tennis Club.

$4,690.00

Eligible

LG1703-209

Pukekohe Vegetable Growers Organisation

 

Events

Towards Pukekohe Vegetable Growers Organisation for venue hire to host the Young Vegetable Grower of the Year event.

$1,900.00

Ineligible,

event occurred on 11/05/2017 before the decision meeting.

LG1703-211

Pukekohe East Church Preservation Society

Historic Heritage

Towards Pukekohe East Church Preservation Society for the cost of a painter and scaffolding to complete the church buildings’ exterior painting project.

$20,000.00

Eligible

LG1703-224

Clevedon Anglican Parish

Historic Heritage

Towards Clevedon Anglican Parish for the cost of scaffolding for the building.

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG1703-210

Mauku School

Sport and recreation

A contribution towards Mauku School for their Bikes in Schools project.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1703-220

Counties-Manukau Sports Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards Counties-Manukau Sports Foundation for the cost of the events and activities delivered and personnel costs in coordinating the  Counties Manukau Sport 2017 to 2018 programmes

$30,500.00

Eligible

LG1703-223

Kokako Lodge Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards Kokako Lodge Trust for the construction of a shelter at the archery area including steps.

$7,800.00

Eligible

LG1713-231

New Zealand Mounted Games Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards New Zealand Mounted Games Association for the ‘World Team Championships Under 17s 2017 New Zealand’ event.  

$46,030.00

Eligible

 

 

 

Total:

$156,515.00

 

 

Table Two: Franklin Local Grants: Round Two Multi-board Applications

App ID

Applicant

Project/

activity focus

Project

Requested

Eligibility

LG1703-216

Life Education Trust Counties

Community

Towards Life Education Trust Counties Manukau for the cost to deliver their “Life Education - learning with Harold” programme (including cost to run mobile classroom, insurances, salary and professional development of the educator, resource development).

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG1710-212

Ages Concerns Counties Manuka Incorporated.

Community

Towards counselling services for older adults across south Auckland; specifically the cost of salary and travel expenses.

$12,000.00

Eligible

LG1720-207

Dress for Success Incorporated

Community

 Towards service delivery: rent, salary and general operating costs

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG1721-203

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards Big Buddy Mentoring Trust for the cost of laptops and salary for volunteer coordinators. 

$2,578.77

Ineligible

Applied for $2,578.00 after the grant round closed

LG1703-203

Project Litefoot Trust

Environment

Towards Project Litefoot Trust for the costs of salaries, materials installed at the club, administration costs, travel and promotion.

$7,089.00 

Eligible

LG1703-213

Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club (PCBC)

Sport and recreation

Towards Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club for the cost of the “PCBC Trail, Building One Up Two Down 2017” project.

$3,000.00

 

Eligible

 

 

 

Total:

$39,167.77

 

 

b)      reallocates the remaining $14,000, from a 2009 grant from Manukau City Council and Auckland Regional Council, to the Pohutukawa Coast Community    Association, to other planting projects within the Pohutukawa Coast area, including planting, forest restoration and beach restoration.

 

Comments

7.       The implementation of the new Community Grants Policy commenced on 1 July 2015. The policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme for 2016/2017, see Attachment A.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The new community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the new council grant webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters and Facebook pages, council publications, radio, local newspapers and community networks. Staff have also conducted a series of public workshops in local board areas.

10.     The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $156,000.00 for the 2016/2017 financial year. 

11.     A total of $104,649.00 has been allocated under quick response grant rounds one, two, three, four and five and local grants round one, leaving a balance of $51,351.00.

12.     The local board also has $25,000.00 available for allocation to community grants (FR/2017/2). A total of $76,351.00 can now be allocated for the remaining final local grant round two.

13.     Twenty-one applications in total were received in local grant round two, requesting a total of $195,683.00, including six multi-board applications.

14.     IN 2009, the Pohutukawa Coast Community Association (PCCA) received a $20,000 grant from Manukau City Council and Auckland Regional Council for a project to maintain the water quality of the stream in Adah Platts-Mills Reserve, through the planting of native species, in an adjacent forest block, to reduce sediment run-off. 

15.     The PCCA has $14,000 remaining from this grant and would like to use this funding for other environmental projects within the Pohutukawa Coast area. These environmental projects would include planting, forest restoration and beach restoration. The original forest block is private land and it is now viewed as more appropriate to continue planting projects on public land.

16.     The PCCA now seeks the Franklin Local Boards permission to reallocate the remaining funds to other planting projects on public land within the Pohutukawa Coast area.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Franklin Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     Section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

Māori impact statement

19.     The provision of community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, and activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori. As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the new community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

21.     Following the Franklin Local Board allocating funding for local grants round two, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Grants Programme 2016/17 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Franklin Local Grants Round Two applicantion information  (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Franklin Local Grants Round Two Multi-board application information  (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Daylyn D'Mello - Environmental and Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Jennifer Rose - Operations Support Manager

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Franklin Local Board Coastal Sea Rescue Services Fund 2016-2017 grant applications

 

File No.: CP2017/05621

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present applications received for Franklin Coastal Rescue Services Fund 2016/2017. The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board has set a Coastal Sea Rescue Services Fund budget of $45,000.00 for the 2016/2017 financial year. 

Five applications in total were received for the Franklin Local Board Coastal Sea Rescue Services grant round 2016-2017 requesting a total of $63,283.00.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board considers the applications listed in Table One and agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

Table One:

App ID

Applicant/
Organisation

Project

Requested

Eligibility

CR1703-101

Coastguard Maraetai Incorporated

Towards the running cost of “Coastguard Maraetai - Saving Lives At Sea” programme (including rent, training expenses, fuel, administrative expenses, equipment maintenance and replacement and community boating education.

$40,000.00

Eligible

CR1703-102

Pohutukawa Coast  Helping Hand Trust

Towards Pohutukawa Coast  Helping Hand Trust for their open water safety programme.

$7,483.35

Eligible

CR1703-103

Pohutukawa Coast  Helping Hand Trust

Towards Pohutukawa Coast  Helping Hand Trust  for water safety in their pre-school community programme.

$3,220.00

Eligible

CR1703-104

Waiuku Search and Rescue Association Limited

Towards Waiuku Search and Rescue Association Limited for replacement of night vision equipment.

$10,580.00

Eligible

CR1703-105

Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated

Towards Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated for water safety in our pre-school community programme.

$2,000.00

Eligible

 

 

Total:

$63,283.35

 

 

Comments

3.       The implementation of the new Community Grants Policy commenced on 1 July 2015. The policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme for 2016/2017, see Attachment A.

4.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

5.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grant webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters and Facebook pages, council publications, radio, local newspapers and community networks. Staff have also conducted a series of public workshops in local board areas.

6.       The Franklin Local Board has set a Coastal Sea Rescue Services Fund 2016-2017 budget of $45,000.00 for the 2016/2017 financial year. 

7.       Five applications in total were received in the Franklin Local Board Coastal Sea Rescue Services grant round 2016-2017 requesting a total of $63,283.00.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.       Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Franklin Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

9.       Section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

Māori impact statement

10.     The provision of community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, and activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori. As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

11.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

12.     Following the Franklin Local Board allocating funding for Franklin Local Board Coastal Sea Rescue Services Fund 2016-2017, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Grants Programme 2016-17  (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Franklin Coastal Sea Rescue Fund 2016/2017 grant applications  (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Daylyn D'Mello - Environmental and Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Jennifer Rose - Operations Support Manager

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Approval to name two Private Ways with access off 9A-C Bush Road, Runciman

 

File No.: CP2017/10838

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name two Private Ways with access off Bush Road, Runciman.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the preferred names for Private Way 1 (Lot 3) ‘Suzanna Lane’ and Private Way 2 (Lot 20) ‘Pryor Lane’ are consistent with the road naming guideline criteria.

4.       The alternative name(s) for Private Way 1 ‘Farmers Grove’ and ‘Wood Pigeon Grove’; and Private Way 2 ‘Valley Springs Way’ and ‘Wood Pigeon Way’ are also consistent with the road naming guideline criteria.

5.       Local iwi groups were consulted and no responses have been received from any Iwi groups. 

6.       The preferred names ‘Suzanna Lane’ for Private Way 1, and ‘Pryor Lane’ for Private Way 2 proposed by the Applicant, and the alternative names ‘Farmers Grove’ and ‘Wood Pigeon Grove’ for Private Way 1; and ‘Valley Springs Way’ and ‘‘Wood Pigeon Way’ for Private Way 2 are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the name ‘Suzanna Lane’, proposed for Private Way 1, and ‘Pryor Lane’ for Private Way 2 of a subdivision off  Bush Road, Runciman, while noting that the names ‘Farmers Grove’ and ‘Wood Pigeon Grove’ for Private Way 1, and ‘Valley Springs Way’ and ‘Wood Pigeon Way’ also meet the road naming criteria.

 

Comments

7.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred road name for the Local Board’s approval.

8.       In March 2017, Resource Consent was granted by Auckland Council for a subdivision at Bush Road, Runciman (Reference VCC/2016/2351).  Two Private Ways will serve multiple lots.

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the two Private Ways as part of the development off 9A-C Bush Road, Runciman:

Preference

Proposed New Private Way Name

Meaning

Private Way 1:

 

 

Preferred Name

Suzanna Lane

Named after the developers mother

First Alternative

Farmers Grove

Rural land used for farming and rural lifestyle blocks

Second Alternative

Wood Pigeon Grove

Named after a native bird that resides in the area

 

 

 

Private Way 2:

 

 

Preferred Name

Pryor Lane

Surname associated with the developer.

First Alternative

Valley Springs Way

Where natural springs occur in the valley

Second Alternative

Wood Pigeon Way

Named after a native bird that resides in the area

Location and Layout of the two Private Ways

Decision Making

9.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

10.     The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines.

11.     The Applicant’s preferred name, ‘Suzanna’ for Private Way 1 and ‘Pryor’ for Private Way 2, and the alternative names, ‘Farmers Grove’ and ‘Wood Pigeon Grove for Private Way 1, and ‘Valleys Springs’ and ‘Wood Pigeon’ for Private Way 2 comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.  

12.     The proposed suffix ‘Lane’ for both Private Ways is in accordance with the Road Naming Guidelines, as it describes a ‘Narrow roadway between walls, buildings or a narrow country roadway’.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     The decision sought from the Franklin Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Māori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Franklin Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Consultation

15.     Consultation with 11 Iwi groups has been undertaken.  No responses have been received from any iwi groups

16.     NZ Post was consulted and has no objection to the proposed names.

Financial and Resourcing Implications

17.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

18.     The decision sought from the Franklin Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

19.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Mineke Meyerink - Intermediate Planner

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Approval to name two Roads and One Private Way with access off 9D Bush Road, Runciman.

 

File No.: CP2017/10843

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name two Roads and one Private Way with access off Bush Road, Runciman.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the preferred names for Road 1: ‘Gordon Francis Drive’; Road 2: ‘Loxton Lane’ and the Private Way ‘Donald Gavin Way’ are consistent with the Road Naming Guideline criteria.

4.       The alternative names for Road 1: ‘Francis Gordon’; Road 2: ‘Ben’ and ‘Val Trust’; and the Private Way ‘Lofty’ and ‘Vitex Lucens’ are also consistent with the road naming guideline criteria.

5.       The alternative name for Road 1: ‘Kohekohe’, already exist in the Auckland area, and as such this name is not consistent with the road naming guideline criteria.

6.       Local iwi groups were consulted and no responses have has been received from any Iwi groups. 

7.       The preferred names ‘Gordon Francis Drive/Road’ for Road 1; ‘Loxton Lane’ for Road 2 and ‘Donald Gavin Way’ for the Private Way proposed by the Applicant, and the alternative names ‘Francis Gordon Road’ for Road 1; ‘Ben Place’ and ‘Val Trust’ for Road 2; ‘Lofty’ and ‘Vitex Lucens’ for the Private Way, are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the name ‘Gordon Francis Drive’ for Road 1: ‘Loxton Lane’ for Road 2 and ‘Donald Gavin Way’ for the Private Way, for a subdivision off 9D Bush Road, Runciman, while noting that the names ‘Francis Gordon’ for Road 1; ‘Ben’, and ‘Val Trust’ for Road 2; ‘Lofty’ and ‘Vitex Lucens’ for the Private Way also meet the road naming criteria.

 

Comments

8.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred road name for the Local Board’s approval.

9.       On 11 July 2016, Resource Consent was granted by Auckland Council to undertake a 32 lot subdivision at 9D Bush Road, Runciman (Reference R/JSL/2015/0814).  Two roads and one private way will serve the 32 lots.


 

10.     The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the two roads and one Private Way as part of the development off 9D Bush Road, Runciman:

Preference

Proposed New Private Way Name

Meaning

Road 1:

 

 

Preferred Name

Gordon Francis Drive

The name is derived from the Christian names (Gordon and Francis) of the previous owners of the ex-dairy farm at 247 Runciman Road. The two men were well known around the Pukekohe area for breeding and racing horses between 1960-1980

First Alternative

Francis Gordon Drive

Reversal of the preferred name

Second Alternative

Kohekohe Road

This name is derived from the developments marketing name ‘Kohekohe Heights’

 

 

 

Road 2:

 

 

Preferred Name

Loxton Lane

Family name of the applicant and landowners of the subdivision

First Alternative

Ben Place

Ben was the name of Gordon’s most winning horse who won 18 races

Second Alternative

Val Trust Lane

This was the name of Gordon and Francis’ breeding mare

 

 

 

Private Way

 

 

Preferred Name

Donald Gavin Way

In honor of the Loxton family member WW2 soldier shot down over France at 20 years of age

First Alternative

Lofty Way

Lofty is the nickname of the father’s first generation of Loxtons that purchased the land (now deceased)

Second Alternative

Vitex Lucens

Vitex Lucens is the botanical name of the Puriri Tree, a prominent tree in this location

 


 

Location and Layout of the two Roads and one Private Way

 

Decision Making

11.     The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

12.     The Applicant’s proposed road name has been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines.

13.     The Applicant’s preferred name, ‘Gordon Francis’ for Road 1; ‘Loxton’ for Road 2; and ‘Donald Gavin’ for the Private Way, and the alternative names, ‘Francis Gordon’ for Road 1, ‘Ben’ and ‘Val Trust’ for Road 2; ‘Lofty’ and ‘Vitex Lucens’ for the Private Way comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.  

14.     The proposed suffix ‘Drive’ for Road 1 is in accordance with the road naming guidelines, as it describes a ‘ ‘wide main roadway without many cross-streets’.  The proposed suffix ‘Lane’ for Road 2 is in accordance with the road naming guidelines, as it describes a ‘narrow roadway between walls, builds or a narrow country roadway’.  The proposed suffix ‘Way’ for the Private Way is in accordance with the road naming guidelines, as it describes a ‘short enclosed roadway’.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

Significance of Decision

15.     The decision sought from the Franklin Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Māori impact statement

16.     The decision sought from the Franklin Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Consultation

17.     Consultation with 11 Iwi groups has been undertaken. No responses have been received from any Iwi groups.

18.     NZ Post was consulted and had no objection to the proposed names.

Financial and Resourcing Implications

19.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

20.     The decision sought from the Franklin Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

21.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Mineke Meyerink - Intermediate Planner

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Request for locally driven initiatives capital funding towards upgrade works at Waiuku Community Recycling Centre

 

File No.: CP2017/11216

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for a contribution of $40,000 from Franklin local board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital fund, towards upgrade works at the Waiuku Community Recycling Centre, in order to facilitate future improvements.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council (Waste Solutions) has entered into a contract with Broadspectrum (New Zealand) Limited to carry out upgrade works at the Waiuku Community Recycling Centre. Part of the upgrade work is the design and construction of a new building at the centre to provide a new location for the re-use shop, provide re-use material storage and education and community facilities.

3.       During the tender process for the contract, the submitted tenders were found to exceed the budget for the works, so the scope of the contract was reviewed to better match the budget.  Tenderers were asked to resubmit prices for a “shell only” building, therefore deducting the cost of a proposed mezzanine floor, and lunchroom, washroom facilities and electrical testing room, along with all internal linings, from the original tender prices. 

4.       As civil engineering works on the site were arranged, the design for the building was also commenced.  The designers enquired about future internal works for the building, including the items mentioned above as having been deducted from the tender price.  The intention was to include provision in the foundations and building columns (to be constructed as part of the “shell”) for additional works to reduce the cost and difficulty of future works.  In identifying future works the desire by the operators, Waiuku Zero Waste Limited, to increase the size of the mezzanine floor was also included.

5.       The contractor has provided a price for the additional foundation and column works at around $66,000.  Waste Solutions has a limited contingency fund for the contract but, given that the contract is at an early stage, is only able to commit $20-25,000 towards the additional costs.

6.       This is an opportunity for Franklin Local Board to assist Waste Solutions to fund this desirable modification to the new building design.  The additional work would potentially fast track future work on the mezzanine floor and ancillary facilities, enabling more services to be delivered to the community such as workshops, training courses and school visits. Attendance by more people also increases opportunities for job creation and volunteering.

7.       This request is being brought to the local board in advance of other potential LDI capital projects because of the urgency, in that the works on the foundations are programmed to commence shortly. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the allocation of $40,000 from the Franklin locally driven initiatives capital fund towards the upgrading of the Waiuku Community Recycling Centre;

b)      requests regular written updates from officers in Waste Solutions on the progress of the upgrade work and the ongoing development of the Waiuku Community Recycling Centre facilities.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Karen Gadomski - Senior Local Board Advisor -  Franklin Local Board

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Removal of alternate Franklin Local Board member appointment to the Franklin Localities Leadership Group

 

File No.: CP2017/11398

 

  

Purpose

1.       To remove the alternate local board member from the appointment to the Franklin Localities Group.

Executive summary

2.       On 28 February 2017 the Franklin Local Board agreed the appointment of Andrew Baker to be the Franklin Local Board representative on the Franklin Localities Leadership Group with Angela Fulljames as the alternate (resolution number FR/2017/18)

3.       At the Localities Leadership Group meeting on Tuesday, 6 June 2017, Franklin Localities Leadership Group confirmed their Terms of Reference.

4.       The first sentence in paragraph 9 of the terms of Reference proposes that alternate representatives were not accepted. This came about because of the technical detail and continuity of the items discussed making it difficult for an alternate coming in randomly to be able to contribute in a meaningful way to the group. When discussed on the day there was unanimous support for this.

5.       A resolution of a local board previously passed at a meeting may be altered on a recommendation contained in a report to a meeting of the same local board (Standing Orders 3.10.17).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      alters resolution FR/2017/18 (‘Change of Franklin Local Board member appointment to the Franklin Localities Leadership Group’) decided at the meeting of the Franklin Local Board held on 28 February 2017.

b)      removes Angela Fulljames as the alternate Franklin Local Board member to the Franklin Localities Leadership Group.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Anthea Clarke  - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

      

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

a)                                           

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Acquisition of land for open space - Clarks Beach

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Term one newsletter - The Rising Foundation Trust Page 73


Franklin Local Board

27 June 2017