I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 19 June 2017

6.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

David Collings

 

Deputy Chairperson

Katrina Bungard

 

Members

Garry Boles

 

 

Jim Donald, JP

 

 

John Spiller

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Adele White

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Nichola  Painter

Democracy Advisor

 

12 June 2017

 

Contact Telephone: 021 396 201

Email: nichola.painter@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Cockle Bay Residents and Ratepayers Association Inc.          5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Liston Stream Catchment                                                         6

9.2     Public Forum - Pakuranga Sailing Centre in Farm Cove                                6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Notice of Motion - 80 Vincent Street, Howick                                                            9

13        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                  11

14        Councillor Update                                                                                                        13

15        Development and Improvement of Arts Facilities in Howick                                 15

16        Howick Village Centre Plan                                                                                        25

17        Auckland Transport Update - June  2017                                                                 45

18        Howick Quick Response Round Four 2016/2017 grant applications                    65

19        Road Name Approval for Four New Roads within the Ormiston Town Centre Development at 191R – 211 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush                                          73

20        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Panuku Development Auckland at 187 Flat Bush School Road, Flat Bush                                                81

21        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Jim Rolfe at 38 Colmar Road, Mellons Bay                                                                                                                  85

22        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Finesse Residential Ltd at 6 - 10 Clovelly Road, Bucklands Beach.                                                                         89

23        Approval of 2017/2018 local environment and local development work programme  95

24        Parks, sport and recreation draft annual work programme financial year 2017-2018                                                                                                                                      105

25        Howick Local Board 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme           113

26        Howick Local Board Libraries Work Programme 2017/2018                                129

27        Howick 2017/18 Local Economic Development Programme                                135

28        Application for a weekly Pakuranga farmers’ market to operate from a car park area at the Lloyd Elsmore Park, Pakuranga                                                                              139

29        Locally Driven Initiative Discretionary Capital Programme update for Howick Local Board                                                                                                                                     141

30        Extension and repurpose of grants for Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust and  Lloyd Elsmore Park Badminton Club                                                                                149

31        Relationship Agreements with Mana Whenua                                                       153

32        Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts                                         171

33        Adoption of Local Board Agreement 2017/2018                                                    233

34        Local Board recommendations on Easter Sunday trading                                  253

35        Local Board Appointments and Delegations - Howick Local Board                   271

36        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     273

37        Workshop Records                                                                                                    277  

38        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

                          

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 15 May 2017, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Cockle Bay Residents and Ratepayers Association Inc.

Purpose

Laurie Slee, Chair of the Cockle Bay Residents and Ratepayers Association would like to present to the Board on the Draft 30 Year Howick Village Plan.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board thank Laurie Slee and representatives of the Cockle Bay Residents and Ratepayers Association for their attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Submission on the draft 30 year Howick Village Plan......................... 299

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Liston Stream Catchment

Purpose

1.       Robert McCallum would like the opportunity to speak to the board on the Liston Stream Catchment. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board thank Robert McCallum for his attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Liston Stream Presentation.................................................................. 307

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Pakuranga Sailing Centre in Farm Cove

Purpose

1.       Paul Boswell, Chairman of the Farm Cove Maritime Trust would like to thank the board for the grant to the Pakuranga Sailing Centre in Farm Cove that was used for upgrading the kitchen and installing ceiling sound proof baffles. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board thank Paul Boswell, from the Farm Cove Maritime Trust for his attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) or Standing Order 1.9.1 (LBS 3.10.17) (revoke or alter a previous resolution) a Notice of Motion has been received from <Member Names>  for consideration under item 12.

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Notice of Motion - 80 Vincent Street, Howick

 

File No.: CP2017/10885

 

  

 

In accordance with Standing Order 3.11.1, the following Notice of Motion has been received from Chair David Collings for inclusion on the agenda for the Howick Local Board meeting being held on day, Monday, 19 June 2017:

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      request Panuku Development Auckland provide the board with details of the ownership of the land and how it was vested.

b)      advise Panuku Development Auckland that since the New World supermarket has been developed, with limited onsite parking for staff, there has been a huge increase in parking within this area and loosing this would have a huge effect on the surrounding streets.

c)      request Panuku Development Auckland ask Auckland Transport for the rationale that the site is it was no longer required for AT’s infrastructure purposes.

d)      reaffirm resolution HW/2017/34 that the board does not support the disposal of 80 Vincent Street, Howick.

         

 

Background

1.       The Howick Local Board considered a Disposal recommendation report from Panuku Development Auckland seeking endorsement to recommend to the Finance and Performance Committee the divestment of 80 Vincent Street Howick.

 

2.       The report stated the council-owned site at 80 Vincent Street, Howick has been identified as potentially surplus to council requirements through a review process.  The rationalisation process for 80 Vincent Street, Howick commenced in December 2016.  Consultation with council and its CCOs, Iwi authorities and the Howick Local Board has now taken place.  No alternative service uses have been identified for this property through the rationalisation process.  Due to this, Panuku recommends disposal of the site.  Resolutions approving the disposal of the subject sites are required from the governing body before the proposed divestments can be progressed. 

3.       The board resolved that it did not support the disposal, resolution number HW/2017/34 below:

Resolution number HW/2017/1

MOVED by Chairperson D Collings, seconded by Member J Donald:  

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      advise Panuku Development Auckland that the board does not support the disposal of 80 Vincent Street, Howick.

b)      does not see 80 Vincent Street, Howick as surplus to requirements, as this is a well utilised car park in a commercial area that is short of parking.

CARRIED

4.       The Panuku Development Auckland Board report dated 31 May 2017, minutes of the meeting on 26 April 2017 has a resolution that the Board recommends to the Auckland Council Governing Body that 80 Vincent Street, Howick is surplus to requirements and should be divested.

 

5.       This meeting has totally disregarded the Howick Local Board’s view on the matter and to imply that the Governing Body will decide the outcome is not acceptable and demonstrates Panuku not fully carrying out its’ role and duties to Howick Local Board.

 

6.       The point is that Panuku is a CCO of Auckland Council which is made up of the Governing Body and 21 local boards and also the Independent Maori Statutory Board for that matter.

 

7.       While the Governing Body has required Panuku to find $50M a year in revenue through property sales this does not exempt Panuku from also addressing decisions made by the board.

 

8.       I believe in doing so Panuku should consider both interests of the Governing Body and a local board. What was presented to the board of Panuku was a recommendation that 80 Vincent Street was surplus to requirements, however in the context of servicing the community of Howick which we represent as local board members, it is not surplus to requirements.

 

9.       Furthermore the carpark was vested in council as a contribution towards car parking to service that retail centre when it was established and not purchased by council at the time. The same applies to the service lane behind the block of shops, this was gifted to council to serve for this purpose. If Panuku believe this is not the case then they need to PROVE otherwise and not just say “we can’t find any evidence that it was gifted to council.” My answer is keep looking until you find the documentation that clearly shows council purchased it. And even if it were the case, which it is not, this is no reason to sell it off.

 

10.     In regards to parking in the area: since the New World supermarket has been developed, with limited onsite parking for staff, there has been a huge increase in parking within this area and loosing this would have a huge effect on the surrounding streets. Again if Panuku can’t get the right traffic decision that they want from Auckland Transport then this is not our fault and Panuku need to have that developed to prove their case.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

David Collings - Chair Howick Local Board

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2017/10548

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the Board on any announcements and note the Chairperson’s written report.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Chairperson’s verbal update and written report.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Councillor Update

 

File No.: CP2017/10562

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       An opportunity for the Ward Councillor’s to update the Board on regional matters of interest.

2.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Ward Councillor’s to update the Board on regional matters.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the verbal report from Councillor Dick Quax and Councillor Sharon Stewart.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Development and Improvement of Arts Facilities in Howick

 

File No.: CP2017/10306

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To allocate funding for the development and improvement of arts facilities in Howick.

Executive summary

2.       Staff have been working with the Howick Local Board and community stakeholders to develop plans for a new centre in Flatbush, and improving the Uxbridge Arts and Culture Centre.

3.       At a local board workshop on 9 March staff from Arts and Culture, Libraries and Community Facilities discussed the next steps in the planning process for the Flatbush centre with elected members to identify a strategy to confirm the needs of the local community.  This would follow on from the extensive public consultations that had taken place.

4.       Staff have investigated the issues and possible options and confirm an allocation of $30,000 for the Flatbush community engagement project would be sufficient to test and confirm if the outcomes and attributes of the centre align with community need.

5.       At a 27 April workshop, staff provided advice on three primary issues that had been raised by Uxbridge, namely their financial position, building issues and their ability to pay utility costs. 

6.       Staff recommend, as a first step, that the local board funds an operational review of Uxbridge to provide insights into the best practice, community responsiveness and opportunities for the sustainable development of the centre. A review would cost $30,000 including community engagement.

7.       Last year, the Uxbridge Centre redevelopment was completed and the larger centre has meant that operational costs have increased. A grant to the trust of $35,000 to cover utilities expenses would relieve the immediate financial pressure on the trust.

8.       Staff  have begun investigating the cost of building upgrades at Uxbridge, specifically acoustic treatment and air conditioning with a view to inform the local board of the scope and scale of potential capital works.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve $30,000 for the execution of the Flatbush community engagement project from the 2016/2017 community response fund

b)      approve $25,000 from the 2016/2017 local arts grants and $5,000 from the 2016/2017 community arts programmes for an Uxbridge operational review

c)      approve $8,619 from the 2016/2017 community arts programmes and $26,381 from the 2016/2017 community response fund to cover Uxbridge’s utility costs for FY2017/2018

d)      note that staff have initiated an investigation to ascertain the cost of building upgrades at Uxbridge and will report back to the local board as and when information is confirmed.

 

 

Comments

Flatbush community engagement project

9.       Staff have conducted extensive public consultations with the Flatbush community regarding their needs. Following the workshop on 27 April to confirm the desired outcomes for the Flatbush centre, staff have begun preliminary work on a community engagement project.

10.     The community engagement project will confirm and test the community’s appetite for the centre and validate the comprehensive public consultation that has already taken place. Attachment A – Flatbush workshop feedback details the feedback received from the public consultation. 

11.     The board indicated that a budget of up to $30,000 from the Community Response Fund was available for this project.

12.     Staff have met to discuss the approach and have had preliminary conversations with potential contractors to establish availability and scope.  Should the local board approve funding for a community engagement project, staff will schedule further meetings to develop a methodology and engagement strategy which will include a number of activations across the catchment area, targeting a diverse community cross section of potential users.

Challenges facing Uxbridge

13.     At a workshop on 9 March 2017 Uxbridge presented to the Howick Local Board and requested financial assistance to solve a number of issues which they believed to be of serious concern and impacting on their ability to operate in a sustainable and commercially attractive way.  These included:

·    Uxbridge’s financial position and their ability to continue operations with current funding levels

·    issues with the building, notably the lack of air conditioning and the acoustic problems in the studios

·    their ability to pay utility costs (power, water and gas) based on the increased building footprint.

14.     At a workshop on 4 May 2017 staff provided the following advice on these issues.

Uxbridge’s financial position

15.     Staff recommended that the board should fund an independent contractor to complete an operational review of Uxbridge.  This would provide Uxbridge with expert business advice and an operational strategy which enables success.  It was advised that the scope should be developed in consultation with staff, the Howick Local Board and Uxbridge, and should include community engagement.

16.     This reflects Auckland Council’s commitment to support community organisations, building capacity and delivering effective arts outcomes for Aucklanders. 

17.     A review would cost $30,000 including community engagement. Staff recommended that the board allocate this money from the FY 2016/2017 Community Response Fund.

Uxbridge’s building issues

18.     Apart from the Malcolm Smith Gallery and the theatre, there is currently no air conditioning in the building.  There have been a number of complaints from users of the building, especially those using the meeting room. 

19.     There is no acoustic treatment in the three studios at the back of the building, which has also resulted in a high number of complaints.

20.     The studios and the meeting room are available for hire and are important revenue streams for Uxbridge.  There is a risk that if these issues are not addressed, it will have a negative impact on Uxbridge’s ability to bring in revenue.

21.     Staff are investigating the cost of these building upgrades.

Uxbridge utilities

22.     Uxbridge has estimated their annual utility costs to be $35,000. At the local board workshop in April, elected members committed in principal to covering these costs on a one off basis to help Uxbridge during this transitionary period.  It is recommended that the local board fund this cost by allocating $8,619 from the 2016/2017 community arts programmes and $26,381 from the 2016/2017 community response fund.

Meeting with Auckland Council staff and Uxbridge

23.     On 19 May staff had a meeting with the Uxbridge manager, chair and treasurer to discuss the issues outlined above.  The Uxbridge representatives were supportive of the offer to fund a business review and agreed to fully cooperate.

24.     Uxbridge were informed that Community Facilities had started their investigation regarding the building issues and will provide options to address the building issues and the associated costs.

25.     Uxbridge were informed that the local board were considering paying for a year’s utility costs, which was also greatly appreciated by the trust.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     Both the Flatbush community engagement project and Uxbridge operational review are aligned to the Howick Local Board Plan, specifically the outcome: Valuing our cultural diversity, we are culturally diverse and have great facilities for creative activities including music and dance, theatre and visual arts.

Māori impact statement

27.     These projects do not specifically target Māori groups. However, Māori communities are likely to benefit from the offerings at Uxbridge and the proposed Flatbush facility.

Implementation

Next steps for Flatbush

28.     Should the local board approve funding for a community engagement project, staff will engage a contractor and initiate a services agreement to undertake the Flatbush community engagement.  Staff will inform the local board of the methodology and scope of the project via a memo.

Next steps for Uxbridge

29.     If the local board approves funding for an operational review of Uxbridge, staff will initiate a selection process to appoint a contractor to conduct the Uxbridge business review.  Staff will consult with the local board and Uxbridge regarding the scope of the review.

 

30.     Should the local board approve funding to cover Uxbridge’s utility bills, staff will administer a grant payment to Uxbridge to cover their utility bills for FY2017/2018.  A key performance indicator will be inserted into Uxbridge’s funding agreement that will require the trust to provide invoices for their utility costs.  Any unspent money will be reported to the local board for redistribution to other local board activities or application to Uxbridge’s forward utility costs.

31.     Following the investigation to ascertain the cost of building upgrades at Uxbridge, staff will report back to the local board by August 2017.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Flatbush workshop feedback

19

     

Signatories

Authors

David Hebenton - Arts and Culture Advisor (Central)

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Howick Village Centre Plan

 

File No.: CP2017/10314

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Howick Local Board to adopt the final Howick Village Centre Plan.

Executive summary

2.       The Howick Village Centre Plan is a non-statutory, spatial plan that was developed on behalf of the Howick Local Board.  The plan sets out a 30 year vision for the future of Howick, four concepts and an implementation plan to achieve the vision.

3.       Two rounds of public consultation have shaped this document.  Consultation was undertaken on the draft concepts in January and further consultation was taken on the draft document in April.  Comments received during the consultation periods have been taken into account when writing the final document.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the final Howick Village Centre Plan as set out in Attachment A.

b)      delegate to officers to make any minor amendments to the Howick Village Centre Plan before it is published.

 

 

Comments

4.       The Howick Village Centre Plan sets out a vision, four concepts and supporting actions for the future of Howick. Four draft concepts were developed and approved for consultation at the local board workshop on 24 November 2016. The four concepts are:

A Character Village

A Community Village

An Accessible Village

A Green Village.

5.       The draft concepts were then used to form the draft plan which was approved for consultation at the local board workshop on 22 February 2017.

6.       The proposed 30 year vision for Howick Village Centre Plan was created after listening to the community’s feedback and it is:

“An attractive, lively and walkable village that celebrates its history and provides a strong sense of identity and community”.

Community Engagement

7.       The village centre plan has been prepared in collaboration with the Howick Local Board, Auckland Transport and other key internal and external stakeholders. It has also been prepared in consultation with the community and their feedback has helped to shape the content at every stage in the development of the document.

8.       There were two rounds of community feedback, feedback on the draft concepts in December 2016 to January 2017, and feedback on the draft plan from 27 March to 5 May 2017. We received approximately 300 pieces of feedback from members of the community. As part of the engagement on the draft plan we visited four schools in the area and, during a lesson on town planning and place making, we received feedback on Howick from approximately 100 students.

9.       This feedback was then used to further develop the plan and to work with stakeholders on the actions that are important to the community to create an implementation plan.  The implementation plan sits at the back of the document.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

10.     The Howick Local Board is sponsoring the development of the Howick Village Centre Plan. A number of workshops and meetings have been held with the Board during the preparation of the draft Howick Village Centre Plan.

11.     On 24 November 2016 a workshop with the board was held to present the draft concepts.

12.     On 22 February 2017 a workshop with the board was held to present an overview of the draft plan. The draft document was then approved for public consultation on 20 March 2017.

13.     On 25 May 2017 a workshop with the board was held to present an overview of the final plan, its concepts, actions and a summary of the feedback received to date.

Māori impact statement

14.     All iwi groups with interest in the area were contacted at the beginning of the project.  An initial hui was held with representatives from Ngāti Maru in November 2016 as the only iwi group that expressed interest in the plan. Mana whenua were contacted again in December 2016 and Nga Tai expressed an interest in the plan however they were not able to attend a hui at the time.  All iwi groups were contacted again during the consultation on the draft document but no responses were received.

Implementation

15.     The preparation of the draft Howick Village Centre Plan has required input from across the Council family and beyond. Having a collaborative and inclusive process to the development of the plan will ensure that there is a commitment to deliver on the aspirations and actions upon adoption.  The delivery of this Centre Plan will require agreements with the local board, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the community as outlined in the implementation plan at the end of the document.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Village Centre Plan

27

     

Signatories

Authors

Anne Bradbury - Planner

Authorisers

Trevor Watson - Team Leader Planning - South

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - June  2017

 

File No.: CP2017/10987

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to; respond to resolutions and requests on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), request approval for new LBTCF projects, provide a summary of consultation material sent to the Board and, provide transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Howick Local Board (HLB) and its community.

 

Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month but the report contains information about the following matters:

·    Auckland Transport Quarterly Report

·    A Local Board Transport Capital Fund update

·    Auckland Transport projects that are being delivered in Howick

·    Attachments include a register of local issues and media releases specific to the Howick area.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Transport Update – June 2017 report.

 

 

Comments

Footpaths in Howick Local Board Area

3.       In February 2017 the HLB received a public submission about the state of footpaths in the Howick area.  The HLB has asked Auckland Transport to respond. Auckland Transport has contacted the submitter and provided information to them by email. 

 

4.       Independent surveys are regularly conducted to measure customer satisfaction with all aspects of transport. Measuring customer satisfaction independently is important.  It helps Auckland Transport to understand how people perceive our services and it provides Auckland Council with a measure of Auckland Transport’s effectiveness. 

 

5.       The most recent survey of customer satisfaction was conducted in March 2017 by a company called TNS. Amongst other questions the survey asked people across Auckland “Are you happy with the quality of the footpaths in your area?” the approval rating for Howick was 85 %, the second highest in Auckland.  The regional average is 62%. 

 

6.       The results of the independent survey are important because it demonstrates that most people in Howick are satisfied with the state of the footpaths. 

 

7.       Auckland Transport invests considerable time and effort in maintaining footpaths. Contractors regularly inspect footpaths and programme footpath repairs as required. Inspections cover the whole network at least once every year.  All faults are recorded and repairs are programmed according to the available budget.  

a)             

8.       So far this Financial Year (2016/17) we have spent $965,257 on footpath repairs in Howick alone.  This is nearly $100,000 more than the original budget of $878,098. This is equates to approx. 8 km of footpath repairs in the Howick Local Board area.

 

9.       The submitter provided a number of examples in which AC Fillet (asphalt) is used to repair concrete footpaths.  It is standard practice to use asphalt for a variety of repair tasks because it provides a strong flexible surface that is economical in small quantities. It is used to cover sections of pavements that are being cracked and uplifted by tree roots, to temporarily patch cracks in the footpath or to smooth out the foot path if a section has lifted creating a trip hazard. Sometimes asphalt is used to provide safe pedestrian access across unfinished driveways.  Asphalt provides a simple, cost effective repair that makes the footpath safe until it is replaced.

 

10.     Using concrete requires preparation of the area, framing and close attention during its pouring. It is not possible to economically deliver small quantities of concrete at short notice. It is much more cost effective to plan ahead and concrete a large area all at once. Doing lots of small concreting jobs is inefficient. So asphalt is used to conduct temporary repairs that can make a footpath safe until it is replaced with concrete.

 

11.     If people are concerned about specific areas or sites, the best way to address them is to report them to Auckland Transport directly. We received about 200 reports of damaged footpaths in Howick last year and temporary repairs are normally carried out within approx. 48 hours. The system works and if a complaint is logged and is not addressed there is a customer number recorded that allows the complaint to be followed up and dealt with.

b)             

12.     In summary independent customer surveys have demonstrated a high level of satisfaction with Howick’s footpaths.  Auckland Transport uses asphalt to make temporary repairs because it is a cost effective solution that can be used quickly in small amounts. Using concrete for all repairs is prohibitively expensive.  Using asphalt to repair concrete footpaths is cost effect way of keeping the path safe until it a large section can be repaired. 

c)             

Chip seal

13.     Use of chip seal on residential roads is another issue that has been raised recently by submitters at HLB public forums. The individual submitters have been contacted by Auckland Transport representatives and a number of written responses including formal responses have been provided as well Auckland Transport staff have met on-site and discussed the issues raised.

 

14.     Chip seal is unpopular because it is a noisier, rougher road surface than asphalt. Also immediately after being laid there are often loose stones left behind. While road contractors try to sweep the stones up they are an inevitable consequence of chip seal until over a period of time traffic compresses and smooths the surface.

 

15.     Auckland Transport (and other Council road managers across New Zealand) use chip seal because it is a cost effective road surface. Chip seal has been widely used in New Zealand for a long time. Since the 1960’s chip seal has been used and studied. At this the moment  New Zealand has approx. 90,000km of road network and about 60,000km is chip sealed.  Or about 2/3rd of all roads in New Zealand are surfaced with chip seal.

 

16.     Auckland has a similar proportion and the majority of residential road across Auckland are chip sealed.

 

17.     The reasons why chip seal is used are:

 

·    It provides a hard wearing and very waterproof surface that extends the life of a road by keeping water out of the foundations of the road

·    It is skid resistant

·    It costs less than asphalt.  Chips seal is roughly 20-25% the cost of asphalt.

18.     For these reasons it is the standard road surface funded by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) for re-sealing residential roads. Roughly half of Auckland Transport’s budget is provided by NZTA including the cost of re-sealing residential roads. This means that the actual cost to Auckland Transport of using asphalt is closer to seven times greater than using chip seal.

 

19.     For instance at the time this report was written the following costs and subsidies apply:

 

·    The cost of chip seal is approx. $7 / m2

·    Auckland Transport gets a 43 % subsidy from NZTA

·    This means that the actual cost to Auckland Transport is $7 minus approx.$3 which gives a final cost of $4 / m2

·    This means that for $100 Auckland Transport can seal 25 m2

·    Asphalt costs approx. $30 / m2 to mill and replace the existing road surface

·    To use chip seal the additional cost would be $30 minus the $3 for the NZTA subsidy or $27 / m2.  (NZTA’s standard subsidy for residential roads is chip seal not asphalt so only that subsidy would apply)

·    Using asphalt instead of chip seal would mean that for $100 Auckland Transport could only seal 3.7 m2 compared to the 25 m2 that can be completed with chip seal

·    This is means that the ‘real’ cost of asphalt is about 6.75 times more than chip seal.

20.     Auckland Transport acknowledges that chip seal is not as ‘nice’ a surface as asphalt. It is rougher, noisier and does take time to compress into a smooth surface. But it does provide a safe, robust and waterproof surface at a fraction of the cost of asphalt. This allows Auckland Transport to maintain about seven times the length of road that could be maintained with asphalt alone. 

Local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) update.

21.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all Local Boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local Boards can use this fund to deliver projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. The limitations being that the project must:

·    Be safe

·    Not impede network efficiency

·    Be in the road corridor. Although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

 

22.     HLB’s funding in this term is approx. $ 2.9 million. 

 

23.     Auckland Transport encourages all Local Board’s to identify potential projects as early as possible to ensure delivery within the current electoral term.

 

Projects

 

24.     Early in this electoral term the HLB started identifying possible projects and planning workshops have been held and reported on previously. 

 

25.     The current progress of all projects is summarised in the table below:

 

Projects

Current Status 

Problem or Opportunity Being Addressed

Current Status

Half Moon Bay Ferry Pier and Bus Turnaround

 

 

Providing better facilities for ferry passengers at Half Moon Bay

‘Rough Order of Cost’ requested by the HLB in 2013.

‘Detailed Design’ was authorised by HLB in October 2014 based on a Rough Order of Cost of $ 4.3 million of which the HLB would provide $ 2.5 million.

‘Construction’ The pier is complete and was opened on 7 April 2017.

In previous reports Auckland Transport has stated that the consent for the ‘landside’ works has been submitted. This was not the case. We apologise for the miscommunication. Technical issues arose that meant the consent needed to be held back. It will be submitted soon and should be finalised in late July.  

Developed designs for the landside works (i.e. more detailed than the ones for the consent) have been completed and will be discussed with the HLB ASAP. 

Buckland’s Beach Walkway Improvements

 

Providing safer pedestrian facilities at Buckland Beach

‘Rough Order of Cost’ of between $ 1.5 and 2.1 million has been provided to the HLB.

Concept design was carried out in a number of stages:

·    14 July 2014 – Detailed design of a small initial project authorised by resolution.

·    8 June 2015 – The HLB expanded the project to include detailed design for a project running the length of ‘The Parade’.

·    13 July 2015 Concept design reported to the HLB.

·    26 April 2017 the HLB requested investigation of two projects identified during consultation.

This design is broken down into ten separate elements (detailed in February 2017’s report). 

‘Construction’ of improvements to pedestrian safety between Numbers 61 and 68A of Buckland’s Beach Road has been authorised and is currently being finalized by Auckland Transport. The work will be delivered using funds from Auckland Council’s Community Facilities Department’s Green Ways and Walk Ways Development Fund.

‘Next Steps’

Delivery of the small section between Numbers 61 and 68A of The Parade.

Investigation of options for:

·    Improved pedestrian facilities and one-way options on The Parade

·    A roundabout at the intersection of Buckland Beach and Whitcombe Roads.

 

Howick Village Centre Plan

 

Supporting improvements to Howick Village that will make it nicer, safer and more pedestrian friendly.

Auckland Transport is waiting for the team developing the Howick Village Centre Plan to finish and when this project is more advanced may complete a ROC for proposed work.

 

Cascades Walkway

 

Building a footpath on Cascade Road that will provide access under the bridge on the western edge of the golf course to the walking track that follows the stream.

Auckland Transport has priced two options with ‘Rough Orders of Cost’ of either approx. $83,000 or approx. $225,000 depending on the route of the pathway.

The site visit was useful and Auckland Transport investigated the idea of building the section of footpath in front of the café. This cannot be completed in the 16-17 Financial Year.  It is on the prioritised list for 17-18 .

This project is due to be discussed at a HLB workshop in June 2017. 

 

Walking and Cycling Access to Half Moon Bay

 

Develop walking and cycling opportunities around Half Moon Bay.

The HLB discussed this project at a workshop on 8th February 2017 and gave guidance to officials that, whilst not wishing to proceed at this time, the project is to remain on this list and may be re-prioritised in the future.

 

 

Highbrook Cycling and Walking Project

 

Develop walking and cycling opportunities around Highbrook.

The HLB discussed this project at a workshop on 24th March 2017 and gave guidance to officials that, whilst not wishing to proceed at this time, the project is to remain on this list and may be re-prioritised in the future.”

 

Baverstock Road Crossing

 

 

Building traffic calming and a crossing on Baverstock Road to reduce traffic speed and create a safer pedestrian environment

‘Rough Order of Cost’ of approx. $150,000 has been provided to the HLB.

The HLB discussed this project at a workshop on 8th February 2017 and gave guidance to officials that, whilst not wishing to proceed at this time, the project is to remain on this list and may be re-prioritised in the future.

 

Notes:

A ‘traffic light’ code is used to summarize the status of projects. The colours are used as follows:

Green – Project progressing ‘on time’ and on budget.

Orange – An issue has been identified that may need to be resolved.

Red - An major issue has been identified that needs to be resolved

Black – The project has been investigated and the HLB has decided not to pursue it at this time.

 

 

Cascades Road

26.     HLB members visited the site and discussed the project on 30 March 2017.  The site visit was useful and afterwards Auckland Transport investigated the idea of building the section of footpath in front of the café (the red line in Fig 1). This cannot be completed in the 16-17 Financial Year but is on the prioritised list for the 17-18 Financial Year and this means that it may be funded.


 

 

Figure 1:  Cascades Road Project

 

 

27.     The HLB is keen to improve access from Cascades Road to the Cascades Walkway that follows the stream. The HLB has been provided two options by Auckland Transport. Both of which are shown above and priced below (The prices includes the section in front of the café shown in red):

·  Option A – Building a crossing or pedestrian refuge (shown in yellow) that makes it easier for people to cross Cascades Road then use the existing path down to the walkway. Cost: $ 83,000.

·  Option B – Building a path on the south side of Cascades Road (shown in orange) that takes people down to the walkway. Cost $ 225,000.

 

28.     Both options are safe and have limited impact on network efficiency. The HLB plans to discuss the project on 7 June 2017.

 

Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal Update

29.     Building a new ferry pier and bus turn around area at Half Moon Bay was HLB’s key Local Board Transport Capital Fund Project in the 2013-16 term. The HLB were briefed on progress at the Half Moon Bay ferry terminal on 26 April 2017.

30.     The project is progressing as predicted, the pier is built and consent for the bus turning area is currently being actioned. The project team is concurrently developing detailed plans for the bus turning area. Unfortunately the plans were not available at the time this report was written but will be shared with the HLB and wider community as soon as possible.

Upcoming projects and activities

Consultations

 

31.     Auckland Transport provides the HLB with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in this Local Board Area.

32.     In this reporting period, two projects were put forward for comment by the HLB and details are included in Attachment A.

33.     Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions are reported on a monthly basis. In the previous reporting period there were two TCC decisions in the HLB area.

 

Table 2: TCC Monthly Summary April 2017

Street

Area

Work

Decision

Pakuranga Road / Bucklands Beach Road / Aviemore Drive / Glenmore Road / Wilbur Place / Gossamer Drive / Hutchinsons Road / Stanniland Street / Aberfeldy Avenue / Angelo Avenue / Bells Road / Cromdale Avenue

 

Highland Park

 

A large set of work supporting a ‘Safety Around Schools’ programme.

Prohibited Turn, Prohibited Direction, Prohibited U-Turn, Lane Restrictions, SVL-Bus Lane, SVL-Ambulance, No Stopping At All Times, Clearway, Bus Stop, Bus Shelter, Traffic Islands, Pedestrian Crossing, Traffic Signal Control, Give-Way Control, Flush Median, Edge Line, Keep Clear Zone, No Passing Restriction, Lane Provision

 

Withdrawn

 

 

Swan Crescent / Tiraumea Drive

 

 

Pakuranga

No Stopping At All Times, Give-Way Control

 

Carried

 

 

Regional and sub-regional projects

Roads and Streets Framework (RASF)

34.     Auckland Transport is updating the Auckland Transport Code of Practice (ATCOP) and our current system for classifying roads and streets. RSAF and the Technical Design Manual are two the documents that will replace the ATCOP. 

35.     The RASF is the document that will have the most effect on people changing Auckland Transport’s policy position to provide a better balance between people and place.  Instead of putting road network efficiency first the RASF will require planners and engineers to put people first. 

Local Boards have told us that this how we should be planning and the RASF have been developed jointly with Auckland Council to make sure that the development Auckland’s road network takes the needs of our people into account. The aim is to make guidelines for road corridor infra-structure more flexible and responsive to local needs but still maintain high technical standards.

36.     The draft document has been circulated to HLB members and workshop opportunities are being organised in June 2017. This will provide the HLB with an opportunity to comment on the plan.

AMETI

37.     AMETI is a large transport project that will provide better public transport options between Panmure and Botany. 

38.     The stage of AMETI currently being delivered is a busway running from Pakuranga to Panmure. The AMETI Eastern Busway will be New Zealand’s first urban busway providing congestion free ‘bus only’ lanes for commuters.  This project will help people in East Auckland commute to and from the city more easily.

39.     The Notice of Requirement (NOR) process is progressing as planned. The opportunity to submit on the proposal closed at the end of March 2017. Sixty two submissions were received and are being reviewed.  Auckland Transport will write a report responding to the submissions.

40.     In August 2017 Auckland Transport’s report and the submissions will be reviewed at a hearing before independent commissioners.  The independent commissioners then state their position on any issues and provide a report. If there are any issues at this time the opportunity is taken by participants to try and reach agreement.  If agreement cannot be reached submitters may appeal to the Environment Court.

41.     Providing that the process runs smoothly and there are no significant issues the NOR process should be finished by the end of 2017.

42.     AMETI is a big project and Auckland Transport is already planning for the next step.  Soon we will start discussing the section from Pakuranga to Botany (along Ti Rakau Drive) with the HLB and wider community.

Chapel Road

43.     This safety driven project is about upgrading Chapel Road between Stancombe Road and Ormiston Road to bring it to an ‘urban arterial standard’. This road used to be rural road and as development has occurred needs to be upgraded.  The scope of works includes making the road straighter, building a new bridge, a new signalised intersection, and widening Stancombe Road intersection so that cycle lanes and two southbound traffic lanes will be available.

44.     Auckland Transport is working with New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) and has started investigating the proposal and is looking at options. An early part of the investigative process is a geo-technical study.  This is to find out what is going on under the ground. Geo-technical investigation is now complete and the implications for the project are being discussed by the project engineers.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Consultations in the Howick Local Board Area

57

b

Media Clippings

59

c

Issues Register

63

     

Signatories

Authors

Ben Stallworthy, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Howick Quick Response Round Four 2016/2017 grant applications

 

File No.: CP2017/10470

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present applications received for Howick Quick Response, Round Four 2016/2017. The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Grants Programme 2016/2017 on 9 May 2016. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

3.       The local board is required to allocate grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of becoming the world’s most liveable city.

4.       The Howick Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $435,000 for the 2016/2017 financial year.

5.       To date, the Howick Local Board has allocated $213,502. A total of $221,498 remains to be allocated.

6.       In Quick Response Round Four, 18 applications were received; requesting a total of $33,513 (see Attachment B). Two late multi-board applications have been received; requesting a total of $6,189.66 (see Attachment C).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round, listed in Table One.

Application No.

Organisation Name

Project

Total Requested

Eligibility

QR1707-421

Thursdays @ Seven Concerts, All Saints Church, Howick (umbrella organisation: The Diocese of Auckland)

Towards the artists' fees for the performance of "Stabat mater" during the “Thursdays@Seven Winter Series” on 27 July 2017 at All Saints Church.

$1,000

Eligible

QR1707-424

Manukau Orchestral Society Incorporated

Towards performance of "Classics" on 19 August 2017 at Vodafone Events Centre, specifically the venue hire and technical costs.

$3,000

Eligible

QR1707-403

Waking Dream Collective

Towards the rebranding of the Walking Dream Collective, specifically the cost of graphic design for the new logo and brand look.

$700

Eligible

QR1707-401

Elm Park School

Towards the school's 50th Jubilee Celebration on 28 October 2017, specifically the cost of printing booklets and taking photos during the event.

$3,000

Eligible

QR1707-405

Royal New Zealand Plunket Society Incorporated

Towards the purchase of new toys and arts and crafts supplies for the Anchorage Park Plunket Playgroup for the period 01 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

$656

Eligible

QR1707-408

New Zealand Blue Light Ventures

Towards the cost for five young people, aged 14-17 years, from the Howick Local Board area to attend the “Blue Light” life skills camp in Taupo.

$2,125

Eligible

QR1707-409

U3A Ormiston

Towards operational costs for U3A during 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

$845

Eligible

QR1707-420

OUTLine New Zealand Incorporated

Towards the cost of providing gender identity and sexual orientation counselling and support.

$1,100

Eligible

QR1707-425

Affinity Services Limited

Towards the setting up of support groups in the Howick Local Board area for families of those affected by mental health issues and drug abuse.

$2,000

Eligible

QR1707-406

Farm Cove Intermediate School

Towards Farm Cove Intermediate School for the cost 170 rat traps for phase two of their “Pest Free Auckland - Half Moon Bay Science Cluster Project”.

$3,000

Eligible

QR1707-411

Anchorage Park School

Towards the coaching cost of the gymnastics programme at Anchorage Park School for students and students from the onsite kindergarten, between 15 August to 8 September 2017.

$1,800

Eligible

QR1707-416

Pakuranga Tennis Club

Towards the replacement of tennis nets.

$867

Eligible

QR1703-301

Classy Crafts Market (umbrella organisation: The Diocese of Auckland)

Towards the advertisement cost of “Classy Crafts market”, taking place at Cook Street, on

$3,000

Eligible

QR1707-418

Howick Pakuranga Netball Centre Incorporated

Towards the running of social netball games during the period 24 July to 28 August 2017 at Lloyd Elsmore Park.

$2,250

Eligible

QR1707-423

Howick Softball Club (Fencibles) Incorporated

Towards the 10th anniversary “Bev Smith Memorial Premier Women's Softball Tournament”, between 1 to 3 December 2017, specifically the cost of port-a-loos, helmets and balls.

$2,500

Eligible

QR1707-428

The Howick Tennis Club Incorporated

Towards the tennis beginner coaching programme running for 24 July to 29 September 2017, specifically the cost of equipment.

$3,000

Eligible

QR1707-410

Anchorage Park School

Towards the school pool running cost to enable community usage from 1 November 2017 to 6 April 2018.

$1,800

Ineligible as applicant has already submitted an application for this project in this financial year.

QR1707-414

Combined Probus Club of Pukekohe

Towards increasing the membership of the Combined Probus Club of Pukekohe

$870

Ineligible, as applicant is outside the local board area

 

 

Total Requested

$33,513

 

 

b)      agree to accept the late applications submitted through Local Grant Round Two  and agree to fund, part-fund or decline the applications, listed in Table Two.

Application No.

Organisation Name

Project

Total Requested

Eligibility

LG1703-213

Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club

Towards building one “up trail” and two “down trails” at Waiho Block in Whitford Forest, from 1 June to 31 August 2017.

$3,000.00

Ineligible due to being submitted after the round closed

LG1721-203

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

 

Towards the purchase of three laptops and coordinators' salaries from 30 April 2017 to 1 May 2018

$3,189.66

Ineligible due to being submitted after the round closed

 

 

Total Requested

$6,189.66

 

 

Comments

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme (see Attachment A).

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Howick Local Board will operate four quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11.     The Howick Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $435,000 for the 2016/2017 financial year.

12.     To date, the Howick Local Board has allocated $213,502. A total of $221,498 remains to be allocated.

13.     In Quick Response Round Four, 18 applications were received; requesting a total of $33,513 (see Attachment B). Two late multi-board applications have been received; requesting a total of $6,189.66 (see Attachment C).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Howick Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or deadline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

15.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

16.     A summary of each application received through Quick Response Round Four is attached, see Attachment B.

17.     A summary of each late multiboard applications received through Local Grant Round Two is attached, see Attachment C.

Māori impact statement

18.     Community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori.  As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the new community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

19.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

20.     Following the Howick Local Board allocating funding to the grant round, commercial and finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Board Grants Programme 2016/2017

71

b

Howick Quick Response Round Four 2016/2017 application summaries (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Howick Local Grants Round Two multiboard grant applications additional (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Sara Chin - Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Jennifer Rose - Operations Support Manager

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Road Name Approval for Four New Roads within the Ormiston Town Centre Development at 191R – 211 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush

 

File No.: CP2017/10559

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board to name four new roads, created as part of the new Ormiston Town Centre development, at 191R – 211 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush.

Executive summary

2.       This report outlines the background for the naming of four new roads (two roads and two jointly owned access lots) within the new Ormiston Town Centre development, created by way of an integrated land-use and subdivision resource consent by applicant Todd Property Ormiston Town Centre Limited. This road naming application relates to ‘Block E’ of the development, which involves a 71 lot subdivision and 66 new dwellings, approved on 26 January 2016 (Council reference 48381).

3.       Auckland Council has a road naming policy and guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for naming a new road. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for Auckland.

4.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the applicant’s proposed road names ‘Curtis Road’, ‘Horo Road’, ‘Tomtit Lane’ and ‘Gallipoli Place’ (preferred names) and alterative names ‘Turupa Lane’ and ‘Paterae Lane’ were all determined to satisfactorily meet the road naming guideline criteria.

5.       Local iwi groups were consulted by the applicant. No iwi groups had further comments on, or objections to, the propose names. LINZ and NZ Post also confirmed that the proposed names were suitable for use in this location.

6.       The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy, nor is it considered to have any legal or legislative implications. The applicant is deemed to have a sufficient pool of proposed names for a decision to be made.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the road name ‘Curtis Road’ proposed by the applicant, for the new road created by way of an integrated land use and subdivision resource consent for the Ormiston Town Centre development at 191R – 211 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of  the Local Government Act 1974.

b)      approve the road name ‘Horo Road’ proposed by the applicant, for the new road created by way of an integrated land use and subdivision resource consent for the Ormiston Town Centre development at 191R – 211 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of  the Local Government Act 1974.

c)      approve the road name ‘Tomtit Lane’ proposed by the applicant, for the new road (a jointly owned access lot) created by way of an integrated land use and subdivision resource consent for the Ormiston Town Centre development at 191R – 211 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of  the Local Government Act 1974.

d)      approve the road name ‘Gallipoli Place’ proposed by the applicant, for the new road (a jointly owned access lot) created by way of an integrated land use and subdivision resource consent for the Ormiston Town Centre development at 191R – 211 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of  the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Comments

7.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Policy and Guidelines allow that, where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval. This also applies to private roads (including Jointly Owned Access Lots and Rights of Way) that serve more than five properties.

8.       The four new roads to be named consist of two roads and two jointly owned access lots (JOAL hereafter), forming ‘Block E’ of the Ormiston Town Centre development project. The development will cover a large development site that spans from 191R Ormiston Road to 66 Flat Bush School Road. However, this road naming application relates to ‘Block E’ only, which is located within the development site at 211 Ormiston Road, adjacent to the existing road ‘Haddington Drive’ (see attached maps).

9.       The ‘Block E’ stage of the development involves a 71 lot subdivision around 66 new two and three storey dwellings, an office building, medical centre, retail and carparking area. The resource consent (reference 48381) also approved associated site works including earthworks, landscaping and installation of infrastructure to support the development.

10.     The applicant has provided a brief meaning for the proposed names, as described in the table below:

Road

 

Proposed Name

 

Meaning, as described by applicant:

Preferred Names:

Road 1:

Curtis Road

Sir Barry John Curtis (born 1939) was the Mayor of Manukau from 1983 until 2007. When he announced his intention to retire in 2007, he was New Zealand's longest serving mayor at that time. Barry Curtis Park in Flat Bush is named in his honour.

Road 2:

Horo Road

“Horo” is the Maori word for hall.

JOAL 1:

Tomtit Lane

The tomtit (Petroica macrocephala) is a small passerine bird in the family ‘Petroicidae’; the Australian robins. It is endemic to New Zealand, ranging across the main islands as well as several of the outlying islands.

JOAL 2:

Gallipoli Place

In reference to the Gallipoli Campaign; often considered as marking the birth of national consciousness in Australia and New Zealand. The date of the landing, 25 April / "Anzac Day", is considered the most significant commemoration of military casualties and veterans in Australia and New Zealand, surpassing Remembrance Day (Armistice Day)

Alternative Names:

 

Turupa Lane

Apirana Turupa Ngata was born at Te Araroa on the East Coast on 3 July 1874. He had connections with the leaders of Ngati Porou. His hapu included Te Whanau-a-Te Ao, Ngati Rangi, Te Whanau-a-Karuai and Ngati Rakairoa. His father, Paratene Ngata, was a storekeeper, a progressive farmer, a Native Land Court assessor and an expert in tribal lore. Apirana Ngata was greatly influenced by both men and spent some of his early years living in Rapata's household. Throughout his life he followed their policy of loyalty to the Crown and empire. His mother, Katerina Naki (or Enoka), was the daughter of an itinerant Scot, Abel Knox, and Ngata once said that this Pakeha ancestry was the source of his methodical habits, but otherwise he did not regard it as important. It was his upbringing as a Maori and a speaker of Maori, under the watchful care of Paratene and Rapata, that  he valued more. Nevertheless, they were insistent that he be educated in the learning and skills of the Pakeha so that he could turn them to the benefit of Ngati Porou and the Maori people.      

Paterae Lane

A shallow crater on the surface of a solar system body, having an irregular or scalloped rim, caused either by past volcanic activity or by the impact of a much smaller solar system body.

 

11.     The applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council Road Naming Policy and Guidelines. The proposed names meet all criteria, except that two of the names relate to the names of persons and the applicant was not able to obtain consent from family members (as encouraged by the guidelines). Nevertheless, it is considered that both ‘Curtis’ and ‘Turupa’ are names that are common within the public domain and, in this instance, they are not being used in a commemorative manner as the names are not being used in full, or in connection with a surname, to make them overly identifiable with any individual; therefore they are acceptable for use.

12.     Having undertaken the consultation and process steps described below, the applicants have satisfactorily followed the Local Board Road Naming process as per the guidelines. The resource consent department supports the proposed names and can see no reason that a decision cannot be made from the list of names proposed, considering that the decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy, nor is it considered to have any legal or legislative implications, as described in the ‘considerations’ sections below.

13.     New Zealand Post and Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) have commented that the applicant’s proposed names meet their criteria and standards, as per the New Zealand and Australian ‘Standard for rural and urban addressing policy AS/NZS 4819:2011’. This means that there is no relevant duplication of the names and no similar names already in use in the area that would lead to confusion for emergency and/or postal services.

14.     In terms of community consultation, the applicant contacted Flat Bush Community Group and the local Residents and Ratepayers Association for comment in April 2017. Geoff Prentice, from the Flat Bush Community Group, responded with no objections to the proposed names. No other responses were received.

15.     The suffixes ‘Lane’ and ‘Place are considered appropriate for the two JOAL roads to be named (labelled on attached maps), because  ‘Appendix 1’ of the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines references ‘Lane’ as being a narrow road between walls, buildings, or a narrow country road. Similarly ‘Place’ is referenced as being a short, sometimes narrow, enclosed roadway. In this case, the JOALS are the two shorter roads of the four to be named, they are fairly narrow when compared to the main thoroughfare roads and they will be located in relative proximity to the adjacent new dwellings.

16.     The suffix ‘Road’ is  considered appropriate for the two larger roads to be named (labelled on attached maps), because  ‘Appendix 1’ of the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines references ‘Road’ as an open roadway primarily for vehicles; suiting the type and purpose of those roads.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to the Local Boards.

18.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

19.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Māori impact statement

20.     Consultation undertaken by the applicant with relevant local iwi was used to arrive at the preferred road name. David Williams, representing Te Patukirikiri, replied to defer interests to the remaining iwi groups. No other iwi provided comments or objections, therefore it is determined that the applicant’s proposed names are considered acceptable by relevant iwi.

21.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Implementation

22.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

23.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment 1 - Ormiston Town Centre Development Map

79

     

Signatories

Authors

Emerald James - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Panuku Development Auckland at 187 Flat Bush School Road, Flat Bush

 

File No.: CP2017/09528

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board, for new road names created by way of subdivision at 187 Flat Bush School Road, Flat Bush.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Golden Avenue,’ ‘Ako Road,’ and ‘Te Kura Road’ (applicant’s preferred road names), ‘White Dove Avenue,’ ‘Butterfly Avenue,’ ‘Kareti Road,’ ‘Kaiako Road’ and ‘Kura Ngahere Road’ were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria. 

4.       Local iwi groups were consulted and no responses were received.  

5.       The names ‘Golden Avenue,’ ‘Ako Road,’ and ‘Te Kura Road’ proposed by the applicant and the names ‘White Dove Avenue,’ ‘Butterfly Avenue,’ ‘Kareti Road,’ ‘Kaiako Road’ and ‘Kura Ngahere Road,’ are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the road names Golden Avenue,’ ‘Ako Road’ and ‘Te Kura Road’ for the new roads created by way of subdivision at 187 Flat Bush School Road.

 

 

Comments

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

7.       The residential subdivision (referenced 52130) will be serviced by two new roads coming off Flat Bush School Road (Roads 5 and 6) and a third road to the south of the development (Road 7).

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the roads created as part of the development at 187 Flat Bush School Road, Flat Bush. 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name (Road 5)

Meaning

Preferred Name

Golden Avenue

These names have been chosen as they have significance to the Chinese community who represent a large portion of the applicant’s customer base in the area.

First Alternative

White Dove Avenue

 

Second Alternative

Butterfly Avenue

 

 

The following Maori names have been chosen as they relate to schools and learning, due to the future primary school that will be constructed on the east side of Road 6:

Preference

Proposed New Road Name (Road 6)

Meaning

Preferred Name

Ako Road

Maori word for ‘learning.’

First Alternative

Kareti Road

Maori word for ‘college.’

Second Alternative

Kaiako Road

Maori word for ‘teacher.’

 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name (Road 7)

Meaning

Preferred Name

Te Kura Road

Maori words for ‘the school.’

First Alternative

Kura Ngahere Road

Maori words for ‘bush school.’

Second Alternative

Kareti Road

Maori word for ‘college.’

Figure One: Location and layout of new roads.

 

Decision Making

8.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

9.       The applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

10.     The applicant’s preferred names (‘Golden Avenue,’ ‘Ako Road,’ and ‘Te Kura Road’) meet all the road naming guidelines. The remaining names are considered to be consistent with road naming guidelines.

11.     The proposed suffixes of ‘Road’ and ‘Avenue’ are appropriate as they reflect the physical characteristics of the proposed roads.

12.     As the applicant’s preferred names (‘Golden Avenue,’ ‘Ako Road,’ and ‘Te Kura Road’) meet the criteria, they are recommended for consideration for approval while noting that the alternative names proposed (‘White Dove Avenue,’ ‘Butterfly Avenue,’ ‘Kareti Road,’ ‘Kaiako Road’ and ‘Kura Ngahere Road’) are also appropriate as they comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

Consideration

 

Significance of Decision

 

13.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Maori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Consultation

15.     The applicant has emailed all relevant iwi groups who were given three weeks to respond. No responses were received. 

16.     Consultation was undertaken with New Zealand Post, who confirmed that the proposed road names appeared acceptable.

 

Financial and Resourcing Implications

17.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

18.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

19.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Virginia Loh - Resource Consents Administrator

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Jim Rolfe at 38 Colmar Road, Mellons Bay

 

File No.: CP2017/10107

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board, for a new road name for a road created by way of subdivision at 38 Colmar Road, Mellons Bay.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names “Arawhetu Drive” (applicant’s preferred road name), “Ara Tui Drive” (alternative name 1) and “Awa Iti Drive” (alternative name 2), were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria. 

4.       Local iwi groups were consulted and approve the proposed road names put forward by the Applicant. All local iwis were consulted but only the Ngaitai-ki-Tamaki iwi responded and all other local iwi did not response at all. Ngaitai-ki-Tamaki responded that they have no issue, therefore have no objection to the proposed name put forward by the Applicant.    

5.       The name “Arawhetu Drive”, proposed by the Applicant and the names “Ara Tui Drive” and “Awa Iti Drive” are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the road name Arawhetu Drive”, proposed by the Applicant, for the new road created by way of subdivision at 38 Colmar Road, Mellons Bay while noting that ‘Ara Tui Drive’ and Awa Iti Drive’, also meet the road naming criteria.

 

Comments

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

7.       The subdivision consent P44866 SP11430 had two options available to all owners of the affected properties being, 38, 40 and 42 Colmar Road. Option 1 is for a 5 lot fee simple subdivision and option 2 is for 7 lot fee simple consent and Option 2 was agreed upon by all owners. As part of that consent, a Right of Way was created to service the proposed 7 lots and will be the new road for this development.

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the road created as part of the development at 38 Colmar Road, Mellons Bay

 


 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Arawhetu Drive

Arawhetu means star-path or by the stars, which references the way finding and navigating of the mana whenua (local iwi) of Tamaki.

First Alternative

Ara Tui Drive

Ara means pathway and Tui is reference to the Tui bird.   

Second Alternative

Awa Iti Drive

Awa Iti means little stream and it is referenced to the little stream that runs behind the Applicants property. 

 

 

Figure One: Location and Layout of new Road in red

 

Decision Making

8.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

9.       The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

10.     The Applicant’s preferred road names Arawhetu Drive” , “Ara Tui Drive” (alternative name 1) and “Awa Iti Drive” (alternative name 2) meet the road naming criteria as there is no duplication of the names within the Auckland Region and consultation was carried out with the Local iwi and they have no objection to the proposed names.

11.     The Applicant has chosen the suffix “Drive” and it is appropriate for the road layout

12.     As the Applicant’s preferred name (Arawhetu Drive”) meets the criteria, it is recommended for consideration for approval while noting that the names proposed by the iwi (Ara Tui Drive” (alternative name 1) and “Awa Iti Drive” (alternative name 2)) are also appropriate as they comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

Consideration

 

Significance of Decision

 

13.     The decision sought from the “Howick” Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Maori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

 

Consultation

15.     The Applicant has consulted all the local iwi groups for the area, which were 11 local iwi groups and only one responded supporting the preferred name “Arawhetu Drive”, “Ara Tui Drive” (alternative name 1) and “Awa Iti Drive” (alternative name 2)).

16.     The Applicant has also obtained approval from New Zealand Post. 

Financial and Resourcing Implications

17.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

18.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

19.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Virginia Loh - Resource Consents Administrator

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Finesse Residential Ltd at 6 - 10 Clovelly Road, Bucklands Beach.

 

File No.: CP2017/08944

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board, for a new road name for a road created by way of subdivision at 6 - 10 Clovelly Road, Bucklands Beach.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Finesse Way (applicant’s preferred road name), ‘Te Waiarohia Lane’ and ‘Tomonga Way were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria.  However, in this instance the preferred name only meets the criteria in part, it connects to the historical link the developers have with developing land in the local area.  However a road should not be commercially based and the current developers name (Finesse Residential Ltd) is still in use.  Therefore the first and second alternative road names are more appropriate.

4.       One local iwi group was consulted and responded.  James Brown of Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki suggested ‘Te Waiarohia Lane’ and ‘Tomonga Way’.  The suggested road names were accepted by the Applicant.  No other iwi groups have been consulted, however a statutory process is underway with Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki proceeding to take over Musick Point in 2018/2019.  As this Mana Whenua group has provided input it was determined for these reasons no further consultation was required.

5.       The name ‘Finesse Way’, preferred by the Applicant and the names ‘Te Waiarohia Lane’ and ‘Tomonga Way’ are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the road name ‘Te Waiarohia Lane’ and ‘Tomonga Way’ for the new road created by way of subdivision at 6 - 10 Clovelly Road, Bucklands Beach, while noting that ‘Finesse Way’, proposed by the Applicant, also partly meets the road naming criteria.

 

 

Comments

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

7.       The residential subdivision (SP12409), will be serviced by Clovelly Road.  Approval is sought for the naming of the private way.

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the road created as part of the development at 6 - 10 Clovelly Road, Bucklands Beach.

 

 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Finesse Way

The developer Finesse Residential Ltd has been developing land in the Howick/Pakuranga area for many years, they wish their name to be recognised.

*Another of the applicant’s proposals at 126a Sandspit Road has the same preferred name.  If successful for that site, the applicant would prefer the first alternative.

First Alternative

Te Waiarohia Lane

This is a reflection of the Pa Site name, at Te Naupata, Musick Point.

Second Alternative

Tomonga Way

Tomonga means entrance, entry, way in.

 

Figure One: Location and Layout of new Road

 

Decision Making

8.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

 

 

Assessment

9.       The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

10.    

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Criteria of Road Naming Guidelines

Preferred Name

Finesse Way

Meets the criteria in part, it connects to the historical link the developers have with developing land in the local area.  However a road should not be commercially based and the current developers name (Finesse Residential Ltd) is still in use.

First Alternative

Te Waiarohia Lane

Meets the criteria.  The road is close to an area of significance to Mana Whenua, reflecting the Pa Site name at Te Naupata, Musick Point.  This recognises ancestral linkages to areas of land by Mana Whenua.

Second Alternative

Tomonga Way

Meets the criteria.  This recognises ancestral linkages to areas of land by Mana Whenua.

 

11.     The proposed suffix ‘Way’ is appropriate as it represents the sites short enclosed roadway.  ‘Lane’ is also appropriate as it represents a narrow roadway between the buildings on the site.

12.     As the first and second alternative proposed names by Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki ‘Te Waiarohia Lane’ and ‘Tomonga Way’ meet the criteria, it is recommended for consideration for approval, while noting that the Applicant’s preferred name (‘Finesse Way’) is less appropriate as they do not comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

Consideration

 

Significance of Decision

 

13.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Maori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Consultation

15.     The Applicant has emailed only one of the relevant Howick iwi groups, being Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki.  James Brown of Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki responded proposing two alternative names (‘Te Waiarohia Lane’ and ‘Tomonga Way’).  No other iwi groups have been consulted, however a statutory process is underway with Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki proceeding to take over Musick Point in 2018/2019.  As this Mana Whenua group has provided input it was determined for these reasons no further consultation was required.

16.     New Zealand Post indicated they have no concerns with the proposed road names.

Financial and Resourcing Implications

17.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

18.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

19.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Finesse Residential 6-10 Clovelly Road Bucklands Beach

93

     

Signatories

Authors

Virginia Loh - Resource Consents Administrator

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Approval of 2017/2018 local environment and local development work programme

 

File No.: CP2017/07332

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To approve the 2017/2018 Howick local environment ($103,000) and local development work programmes ($3,759,783).

Executive summary

2.       The Howick Local Board (the board) has identified aspirations in their local board plan that ‘we all treasure and enjoy our environment’ and to ensure ‘Howick’s future growth is managed effectively’. 

3.       To give effect to these aspirations, the board has committed $103,000 in total to local environmental development projects in their Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget for 2017/2018. This funding includes:

·   $42,000 for weed and pest management programme and education parks and walkways;

·   $56,000 for water quality projects; and

·   $5,000 for Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum.

4.       The board also has asset based budget of $3,759,783 for construction of stormwater ponds at Flat Bush.

5.       To deliver on this budget, a proposed work programme was discussed at a workshop with the board on 30 March 2017. An updated work programme is appended to this report at attachment A. This report recommends that the board approve this environment work programme and associated budgets for 2017/2018.

 

Recommendations

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of $103,000 for environmental projects to be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate in 2017/2018 as summarised in the table below;

Project

Budget

Weed management programme

$42,000

Water quality projects, including support for Ōtara lake and waterways

$56,000

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

$5,000

Total budget

$103,000

b)      notes the allocation of $3,759,783 the construction of the stormwater ponds at Flat Bush.

 

Comments

6.       To deliver local board plan outcomes of ‘we all treasure and enjoy our environment and Howick’s future growth is managed effectively’, the board has allocated $103,000 of its LDI budget to support the delivery of a local environment work programme. The board also has just over $3.7 million of asset based budget available to support the construction of new stormwater ponds in Flat Bush.

7.       Staff met with the board at a workshop in March 2017 to discuss options for allocation of this local environment and development budget for 2017/2018. Staff scoped three options for water quality projects for discussion at that workshop, noting that indicated funding at the time would allow only one of the options to be progressed.

Water quality projects, including support for Ōtara waterways and lake project  ($56,000)

8.       Following acknowledgement at the March workshop that all projects were equally valuable and would support water quality improvements, the board resolved to increase budget in the environment activity area (resolution number HW/2017/61). The three water quality projects proposed for funding are outlined in table one below, with further information provided in paragraphs nine to 14.

Water quality projects

Project description

Cost

Small building sites ambassador programme (option a – preferred)

·   To improve water quality outcomes through engaging an ambassador to work with, and support, council’s compliance team to reduce the amount of sedimentation, runoff, and litter produced from small building sites entering waterways.

$20,000

Adopt a Spot – Howick (option b)

·   To improve water quality outcomes by engaging community or business groups to adopt and care for their local creek.

$16,000

Industry pollution prevention programme (option c)

·   To improve water quality outcomes through a proactive programme supporting and encouraging business to be more aware of how their practices impact on local waterways.

$20,000.

 

Total

$56,000

Table one: Summary of proposed 2017/2018 water quality programme

Small building sites ambassador programme  ($20,000)

9.       The small sites building programme is a new project recommended for funding this year. It is designed to address the issue of sediment entering local waterways through a proactive education programme targeting developers of small sites in Flat Bush. Better management of sites to avoid runoff and reduce litter will contribute to improvement of local waterways.

10.     This is a pilot project for Howick, noting the significant development occurring in the Flat Bush catchment. If successful, it will be championed in other parts of Auckland experiencing intense development.

Adopt a Spot – Howick  ($16,000)

11.     This project encourages communities and businesses neighbouring streams to ‘adopt’ a portion of a stream undertaking regular weed control and riparian planting. Encouraging community ownership of local waterways will raise awareness of the importance of waterways in the short term while working towards longer term outcomes of water quality improvements.

Industry Pollution Prevention Programme ($20,000)

12.     Since April 2014, the board has partnered with the Greater East Tamaki Business Association (GETBA) to deliver a proactive educational programme to address pollution at source through encouraging awareness of good site management practices such as in the Industry Pollution Prevention Programme. In 2016/2017, this programme was focused on Ben Lomond Crescent and Cascades Road, Pakuranga.

13.     No location for a 2017/2018 prevention programme has been identified. However, if the board funded a prevention programme next financial year, it is recommended that it focus on re-visiting areas to identify if recommendations have been implemented by businesses.

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum  ($5,000)

14.     The Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum was established as a joint community and political body to advocate for the environmental protection of the Tāmaki Estuary. A vision and strategy for the forum was agreed in April 2016. However, no work programme was designed to support implementation of that vision. Taking its lead from the Manukau Harbour Forum, it was suggested at the April meeting of the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum that each member board contribute up to $5,000 to design and implement a work programme.

15.     Funding of $5,000 in 2017/2018 will enable the design of a strategic work programme supporting initiatives that enhance community awareness of the Tamaki Estuary, and improvements to water quality. This work programme will also acknowledge existing initiatives funded by member boards that indirectly contribute to the Tamaki Estuary, such as the Ōtara Waterways project and restoration work at Tahuna Torea.

16.     This project is subject to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Ōrakei, and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards also agreeing to allocate funding for development of a forum work programme.

17.     Supporting water quality improvements aligns with the objectives and policies of the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management, specifically the compulsory values of ecosystem health and human health recreation. Both these values will be improved as water quality is enhanced.

Weed Management Programme ($42,000)

18.     Ongoing control of noxious weeds and pest management including public education programmes is a key initiative in the local board plan. As such, the board has committed $47,000 of its LDI to support weed control programmes. This report recommends continuing a strategic weed control programme in 2017/2018 consisting of two key work streams – raising community awareness and strategic weed control on a high priority reserve.

19.     Funding will support followup rhamnus control on the Te Naupata Musick Point cliffs. The Regional Pest Management Strategy (RPMS) classifies rhamnus as a containment pest plant along the Bucklands Beach and Eastern Beach peninsula (see map appended as attachment B). Controlling rhamnus and other weeds at Te Naupata Musick Point will aid the prevention of it spreading further into the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana.

20.     Moth plant and rhamnus are widespread in the Howick area on both public and private land. While moth plant is listed as a surveillance plant (not requiring removal), effective control of both of these pest plants ensures that populations are reduced thus protecting the recreational and ecological values of Auckland.

21.     The board has funded a community weed campaign encouraging residents to remove both pest plants since 2015. This includes social media and print advertising, the placement of weed bins at key sites within the board area, and a weed swap event where residents can trade their rhamnus or moth plant for a native tree. Growing community awareness of pest plants requires an ongoing commitment, and as such it is recommended that the board set aside a similar budget to continue the community engagement programme in 2017/2018.

Flat Bush Stormwater Ponds

22.     Included in the board’s asset based budget is $3,759,783 to fund land acquisitions and Infrastructure Funding Agreements for the development and construction of stormwater management infrastructure in Flat Bush. These ponds will support the residential and commercial development in that area and enable growth.

23.     The Long-term Plan 2015-2025 forecast is that the implementation of stormwater infrastructure specific to Flat Bush will be completed by 2022. However, due to various factors outside of council control some land acquisitions may go beyond 2022.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

24.     The projects described above support the board’s work to achieve the priorities of ‘we all treasure and enjoy our environment’ and to ensure ‘Howick’s future growth is managed effectively’. 

25.     At a workshop in March 2017, the board acknowledged that all options for improving water quality were equally valuable. Therefore, the board suggested an increase in the board’s LDI to support all three options for improving water quality presented in this report. This is reflected in the above text and associated recommendations.

26.     The recommendation to partially fund the Tāmaki Estuary Environment Forum was suggested after the workshop. This does not impact the overall LDI allocated to environment activity as it is proposed this funding come from a reduction in the weed and pest management budget.

Māori impact statement

27.     This report provides information for environmental and development projects. It is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environments and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

28.     Some of the identified activities are of interest to Māori and, where appropriate, provisions for mana whenua participation, contribution, and consultation will be incorporated. Table three below highlights how each project in the board’s work programme is expected to contribute to Māori outcomes or which requires consultation and engagement.

Project

Māori outcome assessment

Water quality projects

No consultation with Māori was undertaken for the purposes of this report. Feedback from mana whenua as part of other council consultation is supportive of projects that aim to improve water quality.

The small sites ambassador and ‘adopt a spot’ project align with the Ōtara Lakes and Waterways Plan. This plan notes that riparian planting has the potential to contribute to improving the mauri of the catchment streams.

Weed management programme

The deed of settlement with Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki recognises the iwi’s interest in Te Naupata Musick Point. Restoration work may require feedback and input from Ngai Tai.

Table two: Maori outcome assessment

Implementation

29.     Weed control and planting projects often require ongoing funding in future years. Council’s local and sports parks department has advised that there is limited funding in future years for maintenance of new planting. Future work programmes may include a recommendation to fund this maintenance from the board’s LDI.

30.     Subject to approval, this work programme will commence in the new financial year (1 July 2017). Regular reporting on project delivery will be through the Infrastructure and Environmental Services contribution to the board’s quarterly performance report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed 2017/2018 Howick environment work programme

101

b

Rhamnus containment zone

103

     

Signatories

Authors

Emma Joyce - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 



Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Parks, sport and recreation draft annual work programme financial year 2017-2018

 

File No.: CP2017/08294

 

  

 

  Purpose

1.      The purpose of this report is to present the draft 2017-2018 Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) Annual work programme (AWP) for the consideration and approval of the Howick Local Board.

Executive summary

2.      This report presents the Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme for the 2017-2018 financial year (FY18). 

3.      The work programme includes the Local Board expenditure and Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) programme of works but excludes any works associated with external agency projects.

4.      Should unforeseen works arise or work priorities change from those attached and approved, the Parks Sport and Recreation, Portfolio managers, will discuss this with the delegated local board members. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approves the Howick Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2017-2018 financial year as detailed in Attachment A to this report;

5.      delegates the approval for any changes to the Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017-2018 to the appropriate PSR Portfolio Manager and delegated local board members. 

 

Comments

6.      This report presents Parks, Sport and Recreations draft AWP for the 2017-2018 financial year.  The PSR Annual work programme is sorted by Active Recreation and Parks Services.    

7.      Staff discussed the scope of the Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2017-2018 at a workshop with the local board on 6 April.

8.       The Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2017-2018 has been developed with a strategic focus, in that many projects will be delivered over two or more financial years. 

9.       The Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2017-2018 presented as Attachment A, needs to include some flexibility to account for any unforeseen factors beyond Parks, Sport and Recreations control that may arise. 

10.     Staff may need to adjust priorities as unforeseen complexities in delivering planned projects arise.  Any changes to the Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2017-2018 will be consulted with the local board delegated member/s for the activity, for agreement on the proposed changes or refer the matter for a decision by the local board.  

Budget types contributing to the Parks Sport and Recreation work programme

11.     Activities may be funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: Asset Based Services (ABS) CAPEX or OPEX; Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) CAPEX or OPEX; Growth funding; targeted rates; external funding or sponsorship. 

12.     The Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) programme is part of this draft annual work programme. PSR activity resulting from external agency partnerships is not included unless they have an element of local board funding attached to them. 

13.     Some Active Recreation or Park Services activity programmes do not show a budget amount but have been included in the work programme for the local boards’ information and future quarterly reporting. 

14.     Capital development programmes and asset based activities including renewals will be reported separately and led by Community Facilities. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

15.     The Howick local board provided feedback on the proposed Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2017-2018 at a workshop on 6 April 2017.  Feedback from this workshop has informed the draft programme included as Attachment A.

Māori impact statement

16.     Parks and open spaces, as well as leisure, sport and recreation activities contribute significantly to Maori well-being, values, culture and traditions.  Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to Tangata Whenua, appropriate engagement and consultation will follow.

17.     Section 81 of the Local Government Act 2002  set out Contributions to decision-making processes by Māori:

“(1) A local authority must—

(a)  establish and maintain processes to provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to the decision-making processes of the local authority; and

(b) consider ways in which it may foster the development of Māori capacity to contribute to the decision-making processes of the local authority”. 

 

18.     The Auckland Council Māori Language Policy, 2016, provides a practical means for Council to fulfil its commitments and legal obligations to Māori.  It notes that Auckland Council aims to:

‘Ensure that everyone who receives or uses Auckland Council’s services or contributes to the democratic process has the choice to do so in Māori or English’.

 

19.     PSR presented an opportunity for local boards to support ‘Creating a Māori Identity’. This is intended to be a three year programme of activity.   Year one is intended to: discuss the approach with mana whenua; review the current state of park and facility naming; identify opportunities for Māori naming (new names, renaming or dual naming) of parks and facilities; and engage with Mana Whenua to adopt new Māori place and recreation facility names. 

20.     Howick local board has allocated funding for PSR ‘Creating a Māori Identity’ in 2017-2018. 

Implementation

21.     Once approved the delivery of activities identified in the Howick Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017-2018 will take place from 1 July 2017. 

22.     Capital and asset based activities will be delivered and reported on by Community Facilities as they move into investigation and design, or project delivery phase. 

23.     The progress of the Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2017-2018 projects will be reported to the local board quarterly. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Board PSR draft AWP 2017-2018

109

     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Lucas - Programme Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 



Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 



Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Howick Local Board 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme

 

File No.: CP2017/09121

 

  

Purpose

1.       To approve the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme for the Howick Local Board including all capital works, leasing and operational maintenance projects delivered by Community Facilities.

2.       To approve in principle the 2017-2020 Community Facilities Physical Works Programme for the Howick Local Board.

Executive summary

3.       The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

4.       The Howick Local Board 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme was developed using a combination of local board feedback, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input. Once this programme of work is approved, it will efficiently manage the creation and renewal of all Community Facilities assets and community leases.

5.       In the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme, the following budget has been identified in the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme:

·      $8,823,628 of asset-based services capital funding

6.       The 2017-2020 Community Facilities Physical Works Programme was developed to enable greater visibility, an improved level of project planning, and the ability to integrate projects within a strategically aligned programme. Once this programme is approved in principle, staff will continue to seek local board feedback through regular engagement and this will be adopted into the future years’ programmes.

7.       The local board were given the opportunity to discuss the draft work programmes for capital works, leasing and operational maintenance at a workshop on 5 April 2017. Following this feedback, an updated work programme was developed by staff and is provided in Attachment A. This report recommends that the board approves the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme and associated budget. This report also seeks approval for the 2017-2020 Community Facilities Physical Works Programme.

8.       Once approved by the Howick Local Board, new work will commence from July 2017. Regular updates on the line items will be provided by the Community Facilities Stakeholder Advisors.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the Howick Local Board 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme as detailed in Attachment A.

b)      approve in principal the Howick Local Board 2017-2020 Community Facilities Physical Works Programme as detailed in Attachment B.

c)      delegate approval to the Howick Local Board Chair for any variances in the scope of the projects identified within the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme.

d)      note that the 2017/2018 asset-based services capital works funding envelope, identified for the work programme, is indicative to deliver the work and any budget variances will be managed within the total region-wide asset-based services funding envelope.

 

Comments

9.       Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of Auckland. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art, and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

10.     The 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme detailed in Attachment A contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance. The 2017-2020 Community Facilities Physical Works Programme detailed in Attachment B contains the three year proposed capital works programme for renewals and growth projects.

Community Facilities Department

11.     The purpose of the Community Facilities department is to build, renew, and maintain community assets including but not limited to: buildings, furniture and fit-out, structures, land, trees, and green space. Community Facilities is responsible for maintaining and renewing local and sports parks, regional and specialist parks, cemeteries, pools and leisure centres, libraries, community centres, venues for hire, arts facilities, public toilets, holiday parks and council owned community lease assets.

Physical works programme

12.     Investment in the capital programme will ensure that council facilities and parks open spaces in Howick Local Board remain valuable and well-maintained community assets that continue to meet the agreed levels of service. Asset-based services capital works includes both growth and renewals projects.

13.     The renewals programme is prioritised against three main drivers: asset condition, level of provision and identified risk. Not undertaking timely renewals will have a negative impact on the customer experience and put asset performance at risk, and ultimately increase the cost to maintain the facility. 

14.     Growth projects are prioritised to align with parks strategies, community benefit, and the proportion of population growth in the area.

15.     At a workshop on the 5 April 2017, Community Facilities staff presented a draft three year forward work programme for elected member feedback. A three-year rolling programme promotes well-developed planning and optimal use of resources. By building a programme that is strategically focused, staff can ensure funding allocation for scoped projects, and therefore maximise chances of project delivery on time and on budget. The work included in each year will be comprised of a sustainable balance between the three delivery components of planning, design, and construction. The three-year rolling programme will be a live agreement between local boards and Community Facilities, and will be aligned with strategic goals. A three-year rolling work programme also ensures that the highest priority works are implemented without delay should a delivery opening emerge within the current year’s programme.

16.     The 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme contains the first year of the three year rolling programme and was updated following the workshop on the 5 April 2017:

·        Number of projects: 62

·        Estimated cost for proposed projects: $8,823,628

17.     The 2017-2020 Community Facilities Physical Works Programme contains the follow projects:

·        Estimated cost for proposed projects: $47,279,569


 

 

Leasing work programme

18.     Community leases are a valuable way in which the council provides support to local community organisations to provide the activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities.

19.     Attachment A provides a detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2017/2018 financial year, in addition to those from previous years’ work programmes which have yet to be completed.

20.     Once the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme is approved, staff will be able to  bundle reporting on routine or non-controversial matters whilst focusing attention on those community leases that are more complex.

Operational maintenance work programme

21.     The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

·      increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets

·      improving the safety of Community Facilities assets

·      ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users

22.     Community Facilities will launch ‘Project 17’ in July 2017 which creates new bundled maintenance contracts across the Auckland region for full facility, ecological restoration and arboriculture maintenance contracts.  The Finance and Performance Committee approved these contracts on 30 March 2017.

23.     In the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme, there is one line item dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area. This includes all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, tree management and maintenance, ecological restoration, pest management, riparian planting, coastal management and storm damage. Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly report.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

24.     The Community Facilities Work Programme has been created through a combination of local board feedback, asset condition assessments and agreed levels of service.

25.     The draft 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme and the 2017-2020 Community Facilities Physical Works Programme were considered by the local board at a workshop on 5 April 2017. The views expressed by local board members during the workshop have been reported in Attachment C and adopted in Attachment A and Attachment B.

26.     The Community Facilities work programme supports the achievement of the following 2014-2017 Howick Local Board Plan priorities:

·      An involved and connected community

·      Our community is healthy and active

Māori impact statement

27.     The 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. All community assets contribute significantly to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions. Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

28.     Staff are also attending mana whenua fora on a monthly basis to receive feedback on the 2017/2018 Community Facilities Work Programme.

Implementation

29.     This work programme will be implemented as part of Community Facilities’ usual business practice.

30.     Work programme implementation will be reported regularly by stakeholder advisors and quarterly through the performance report to the local board.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Community Facilities 2017/2018 Work Programme

117

b

Howick Community Facilities 2017-2020 Physical Works Programme

123

c

Feedback from the April Workshop

127

     

Signatories

Authors

Chantelle Subritzky - Manager, Stakeholder Advisory

Hannah Alleyne - Senior Programme Planner

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 



Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Howick Local Board Libraries Work Programme 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/09638

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents the Libraries 2017/2018 Howick Local Board work programme for approval.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides information to support Howick Local Board to make decisions required to approve the Libraries 2017/2018 work programme.

3.       The proposed Libraries work programme aims to provide a defined work programme for the 2017/2018 financial year.

4.       The Libraries work programme for Howick Local Board aligns with the following 2014-2017 Howick Local Board Plan priorities:

·    An involved and connected community

·    Valuing our cultural diversity

5.       The Howick Local Board is being requested to approve the Libraries work programme for FY 2017/2018.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the 2017/2018 Libraries work programme (Attachment A)

 

 

Comments

6.       The libraries work programme for 2017/2018 aligns to the Howick Local Board plan 2014 – 2017 and Te Kauroa – Auckland Libraries Future Directions 2013-2023.

7.       The Libraries work programme aligns to the following 2014-2017 Howick Local Board Plan priorities:

·        An involved and connected community

·        Valuing our cultural diversity

8.       The work programme includes library activities that align with the local board priorities and meet the needs of the Howick community. The cost of running the local libraries largely appears in one activity line – “Library hours of service”. Activities that respond to local community priorities have been included in the work programme but they do not have specific ABS opex budget attached as the cost is included in running the local libraries. The work programme also includes extended hours which are funded from LDI opex.

9.       A workshop was held with the local board and Libraries staff on Thursday, 30 March 2017 where the draft work programme was considered.

10.     The Howick Local Board is requested to approve the Libraries work programme for 2017/2018. Libraries’ staff will continue to work with the local board to ensure activities align with the local board priorities and meet the needs of the Howick community.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     The draft 2017/2018 work programme was considered by the local board at a workshop on Thursday, 30 March 2017.

Māori impact statement

12.     Improving Maori outcomes is core to library services and is defined in Te kauhanganui. The libraries work programme supports Maori initiatives in both programme and service delivery at local libraries.

Implementation

13.     Libraries staff will continue to meet with the board to provide updates on the work programme and ensure it is progressed. The libraries work programme will be implemented within the annual plan 2017/2018 budget and reported on through the quarterly reporting process.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Libraries Work Programme 17/18

131

     

Signatories

Authors

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 



Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Howick 2017/18 Local Economic Development Programme

 

File No.: CP2017/10031

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To approve the Howick local economic development programme for the 2017/18 financial year.

Executive summary

2.       This report introduces the proposed 2017/18 financial year Local Economic Development Work Programme for the Howick Local Board.

3.       The proposed work programme (Attachment A) comprises support for the Young Enterprise Scheme and implementation of the Howick Tourism Plan.

4.       The total value of the Local Economic Development programme is $13,500.

5.       The board is being asked to approve 2017/18 local economic development programme.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approves the 2017/18  local economic development programme as follows;

i)        Young Enterprise Scheme ($3,500).

ii)            Howick Tourism Plan Implementation ($10,000).

 

 

Comments

Background

 

6.       The 2017/2018 local economic development programme has been developed having regard to the Local Board’s priorities for local economic development set out in the Local Board Plan (2014) and the Howick Tourism Plan.

7.       The proposed LED programme comprises the following activities:

 

Young Enterprise Scheme ($3,500)

8.       ATEED, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and experience real profit and loss.

9.       The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) Enterprise-Days (e-days) in February 2018. The e-days are held in sub-regions (north, south, east, central/west) and are the first day students get to meet the Young Enterprise team, and find out about their 2018 year, what YES is about, and what is in store for them. All schools in the local board area that have shown an interest in YES are invited. In addition the invite is extended to those schools who have not shown an interest to enable them to make a decision as to whether to participate.

Howick Tourism Plan Implementation ($10,000)

10.     The adopted Howick Tourism Plan has created a framework to guide tourism development actions for the Howick Local Board area.   The funding will enable the delivery of the tourism plan in the local board area. Further details of specific projects to be delivered and by whom will be presented to the local board before the projects proceed.

Local board views and implications

11.     The proposed LED programme was presented to the Local Board at the 5 April 2017 workshop.

Māori impact statement

12.     There are no direct impacts as a result of this report on Maori.

Implementation

13.     Following approval by the local board the Local Economic Development team at ATEED will begin to implement the programme as approved by the local board. Where there is a need further scoping of activities will be undertaken and presented back to the local Board as required.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2017/18 financial year Local Economic Development Work Programme

137

     

Signatories

Authors

Luo Lei  - Local Economic Advisor – ATEED

Authorisers

John Norman - Strategic Planner Local Economic Development - ATEED

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 



Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Application for a weekly Pakuranga farmers’ market to operate from a car park area at the Lloyd Elsmore Park, Pakuranga

 

File No.: CP2017/11089

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To consider landowner approval for the operation of a weekly Sunday farmers’ market from the Lloyd Elsmore Park, 2R Bells Road, Pakuranga.

Executive summary

2.       At a workshop on 11 May 2017, the Howick Local Board considered the application for landowner approval for the operation of a weekly farmers’ market from a car park area in the Lloyd Elsmore Park.

3.       There are obvious benefits to the local community from the operation of farmers’ markets, however the primary function of the Lloyd Elsmore Park is for passive and active recreation.

4.       This report recommends the Howick Local Board approve the farmers’ market in principle, but decline the application based on the inadequacy of the chosen location.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      decline the landowner application for the operation of a farmers’ market at the Lloyd Elsmore Park.

 

Comments

5.       The car park area proposed as the location for the farmers’ market runs through three different lots of land; one lot is subject to the Reserves Act 1977, while the other two lots are held under the Local Government Act 2002, and therefore would require public notification.

6.       The applicant has stated that there will be a maximum of 110 stalls at the market, and it will operate from 8am to 2pm each Sunday, with vendors arriving at 6.30am to set up their stalls and leaving site at 3.30pm.

7.       The Lloyd Elsmore Park provides for a number of different sporting activities, including netball, swimming, BMXing, cricket, rugby, and lawn bowls.

8.       The applicant has proposed supplying two port-a-loos, 18 bins, and a temporary seating area for use by vendors and attendees of the market.

Support for the land owner approval:

9.       Fresh produce would become more readily available, creating accessible and affordable healthy food options for the community.  Pakuranga residents would not need to commute to other regions of Auckland for fresh market produce.

10.     Prices are generally lower than at other places of purchase, such as supermarkets or corner shops.

11.     It gives families an opportunity to spend a morning outdoors, which may lead to an increased use of Lloyd Elsmore Park for passive recreation.

12.     It creates a sense of togetherness for the local community and supports the Howick Local Board Plan 2014 Outcome: A prosperous Local Economy.

Reasons against the land owner approval:

13.     Increased traffic in the area each Sunday. This would negatively impact residents trying to access the park for sports or recreation purposes. Members of the public who want to use recreational facilities may stop using Lloyd Elsmore Park on Sundays if they are regularly unable to find a car park.

14.     If the site is not managed well by the applicant, there may be some negative environmental effects such as strewn rubbish, or contaminants entering the stormwater system.

15.     Such a regular event in the reserve may push out other users of the park, or may hinder other groups or organisations that wish to use the reserve on a Sunday.

16.     Under the Auckland Unitary Plan, Lloyd Elsmore Park is designated as a Sport and Active Recreation Zone.

17.     After consideration of the information above, staff do not recommend Lloyd Elsmore Park being used for markets on Sundays.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

18.     Consideration of this matter sits under the local board’s allocation of decision-making.

19.     The local board supports the idea of a farmers’ market in principle.

20.     The local board does not support the operation of a weekly farmers’ market at the Lloyd Elsmore Reserve.

21.     The local board is open to reviewing this application in future if a more suitable location is proposed by the applicant, in order to encourage a prosperous local economy.

Māori impact statement

22.     The operation of a farmers market would benefit the local community, including Māori, through the provision of fresh, low cost and easily accessible produce and a sense of social connection.

23.     This proposal does not trigger the council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and no iwi engagement has taken place.

Implementation

24.     Subject to the Howick Local Board’s decision. If the approval is declined, staff will advise the applicant and also suggest that they consider alternative locations.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Nikki Clendinning  - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Locally Driven Initiative Discretionary Capital Programme update for Howick Local Board

 

File No.: CP2017/10681

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for the amendments to budget and scope of the Locally Driven Initiatives discretionary capital funded (LDI Capex) projects at Bramley Reserve, MacLeans Park, 310 Te Irirangi Drive and Burswood Park.

Executive summary

2.       The Howick Local Board have previously resolved for some of their LDI Capex 2015-2018 funding be allocated to the following projects:

·    Bramley Reserve Barbeque

·    310 Te Irirangi Drive dog park development

·    MacLeans Park Stage 2

·    Burswood Park Bollards.

3.       As these projects have now been fully investigated, the budget and scope has been revised. This report outlines the changes required for these four projects and recommends the allocation of an additional $18,000 LDI Capex.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local BoardHowick Local Board:

a)   approve an additional $5,000 to the Bramley Reserve barbecue project.

b)   request that as part of the 310 Te Irirangi Drive dog park development project; Pakuranga Rotary is approached to collaborate in building of  the dog park fencing and track to enable a cost effective and community engaged approach.

c)   approve a scope change for 310 Te Irirangi Drive dog park development plan project, with a reduction in the number of pathways to be delivered.

d)   approve, as part of MacLeans Park stage 2, the installation of signage specifying the age appropriateness for use, to be located by the new equipment and to be achieved within the current approved budget.

e)   allocate an additional $13,000 to the Burswood Park bollards project.

 

 

 

Comments

Bramley Reserve

 

4.       In May 2016, the Howick Local Board resolved (HW/2016/229) to contribute $13,000 of their LDI Capex towards a new electric barbecue at Bramley Reserve in partnership with the Pakuranga Rotary Club in May 2016. After a full investigation by council staff, the previous costs had not fully accounted for the thrusting and trenching the electrics to the desired location. To undertake this it will result in an additional $5,000 in costs that was previously unaccounted for. The local board can undertake one of the following:

·    Option 1: Do nothing.
This will require the Rotary Club to refund all donations received to install the barbecue.

·    Option 2: Locate the barbecue closer to the connection point by the road.
This will mean the barbeque is not by the water which has been deemed most desirable to the local board and the Rotary Club.

·    Option 3: Offer an additional $5,000 LDI Capex to the project to enable the barbecue to be installed in its initially requested location.

5.       By funding an additional $5,000 LDI Capex to the project the Howick Local Board will ensure that the final asset delivered meets what the community originally invested their donations in and can be delivered as soon as possible.

310 Te Irirangi Drive

6.       The local board had resolved (HW/2016/229) in May 2016 to build a fully fenced dog exercise area with pathway connections to the value of $70,000 LDI capex at 310 Te Irirangi Drive. After full investigation of costs, the previously agreed pathways and fencing has now been estimated to exceed this budget by $50,000. To enable this project to proceed, the board can undertake one of the following:

·    Option 1: Do nothing.
This will require a reallocation of funding and a new agreement with Otara Papatoetoe Local Board, as 310 Te Irirangi Drive crosses Local Board area boundaries.

·    Option 2: Increase the budget allocation to this project to enable its original scope to proceed.

·    Option 3: Reduce the scope of the project and consider this stage one for the space. Work alongside the Pakuranga Rotary Club to see if there can be a more cost effective approach made to the reduced scope.

7.       Because of time constraints already in place on delivering an outcome for the community on this project and the future growth expected in this space, it is acceptable to readdress this project as a stage one and reduce the amount of pathway connections in this project. Current designs and any resource consent that may be required can factor in future pathways which can be built at a later date. These can be documented to allow a seamless integration as part of stage 2.

MacLeans Park stage 2

8.       MacLeans Park has been developed as a recreational space for older children. Stage two of this development has requested a 4.5 metre air swing, fitness equipment and a new aggregate track. After meeting with the local board on 27 April 2017 the following revisions to the agreed scope have been requested:

·    have the fitness equipment aligned to the north of the flying fox. This will enable parents to maintain view of children whilst playing

·    signage to be added to the park to indicate age brackets for play equipment use

·    consideration of drainage when designing the new track

·    check if existing track can be renewed at the same time as the new build.

 


 

Burswood Park bollards

9.       In March 2017 the Howick Local Board resolved (HW/2017/30) to allocate $17,000 LDI Capex to install bollards along the perimeter of Burswood Park. This is to prevent vehicles entering and damaging the park. After a full investigation, the project costs have come back at $30,000. The local board can undertake one of the following:

·    Option 1: Do nothing. This will not solve the problem of vehicles damaging the park.

·    Option 2: Consider cheaper options such as rocks.

·      Option 3: Allocate an additional $13,000 LDI Capex to complete the project as per the original scope.

10.     By allocating an additional $13,000 LDI Capex the bollards can be installed to current design standards and immediately reduces the impact of vehicles within the park.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     The projects in this report were discussed at the local board workshop on 27 April 2017;  the local board were in support of the proposed recommendations

1)            Māori Impact Statement

12.     All community assets contribute significantly to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions. Where any aspects of the proposed projects are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Implementation

13.     The changes to scope in this report will be implemented as soon as the report is approved. Full delivery of the projects will be expected within the next 12 months following.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Dog Park Preliminary Site Plan scope change

145

b

Macleans Preliminary Draft Site Plan

147

     

Signatories

Authors

Stephanie Hough - Community Led & LDI Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Extension and repurpose of grants for Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust and  Lloyd Elsmore Park Badminton Club

 

File No.: CP2017/05123

 

  

Purpose

1.       To request Local Board approval for:

·    An extension of the deadline for the Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust grants of $230,000 to 30 June 2018 (Resolution numbers HW/2015/90 and HW/2015/105); and

·    A change in scope of the grant allocated to the Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust (Resolution HW/2015/90) to include funding a feasibility study for an athletics pavilion at Lloyd Elsmore Park; and

·    A change in purpose to the grant allocated to Lloyd Elsmore Park Badminton Club Inc. to fund improved lighting at the club facility on Lloyd Elsmore Park (Resolutions HW/2016/265 and HW/2016/280).

Executive summary

2.       On 15 June 2015, Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust was granted $100,000 from the Howick Local Board facility partnership fund to assist with the design and construction of an athletics pavilion at Lloyd Elsmore Park.

3.       On 30 June 2015, Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust was granted a further $130,000 from the Howick Local Board discretionary operational budget as an additional contribution towards the athletics pavilion project.

4.       Both grants have an expiry date of 30 June 2017.  The trust has requested an extension of the deadline for uplifting the grants to 30 June 2018.

5.       The trust has also requested the purpose of the grant be amended to allow $22,000 to be used towards completing a feasibility study. The trust requires an independent feasibility study to be completed in order to strengthen their applications to other funders for financial support of the project.

6.       On 11 July 2016, Lloyd Elsmore Park Badminton Club Inc. was granted $24,718 from the Howick Local Board’s locally driven initiatives budget towards completing glazing at the club facility on Lloyd Elsmore Park and the purchase of tables and chairs.

7.       The club has requested the purpose of the grant be amended towards improving the badminton court lighting as the glazing is no longer required.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Approve an extension to the deadlines for the $100,000 2013/2014 facility partnership grant and the $130,000 2014/2015 discretionary operational budget grant to Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust to a final expiry date of 30 June 2018; and

b)      Approve an amendment to the purpose of the grant to Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust to include:

iv) With up to $22,000 being available immediately, if needed, for an independent feasibility study into the project.

c)      Approve an amendment to the purpose of the $24,718 grant to Lloyd Elsmore Park Badminton Club Inc. to upgrade the lighting at the badminton courts on Lloyd Elsmore Park.

 

Comments

Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust

8.       The Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust (PACT) has two grants from the Howick Local Board for the construction of an athletics pavilion at Lloyd Elsmore Park.

On 15 June 2015 (Resolution number HW/2015/90):

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Rescinds the following resolution HW/2014/61 from 12 May 2014 to grant funds to Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust.

“Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust for $100,000 towards a seeding grant for the construction of a new 800 seated grandstands and pavilion on Lloyd Elsmore Park.”

b)      Approves the request to extend the deadline and amend the project scope for the 2013/2014 facility partnership funding and allocates Pakuranga Athletic Charitable Trust $100,000 to 30 June 2016:

i)     Towards design and construction of a pavilion at the 100m finish line that will incorporate a photo finish room; race official room; race officials meeting room; small kitchenette and toilets;

ii)    With up to $25,000 being available immediately, if needed, for design; quantity survey; consent fees; and

iii)   The remaining balance of the funding being available towards construction once full project funding is in place.

On 13 July 2015 (Resolution number HW/2015/105):

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Notes the urgent decision made on 30th June 2015 to allocate the remaining discretionary operational budget as detailed in the attached Urgent Decision recommendations a) to g) (Attachment A).

Recommendation d) of Attachment A was:

That the Howick Local Board approves allocation of $130,000 to the Pakuranga Athletics Charitable Trust (PACT) towards construction of the pavilion at 100m finish line, on the condition that the funding is only released when PACT have secured the balance of funds required to complete the pavilion project.

9.       There are two funding agreements with PACT each with a final expiry date to uplift the grants on 30 June 2017.  The original deadline for the $100,000 grant was 12 May 2015 and has been extended twice.

10.     Several meetings have been held with PACT to progress the project over the past year.  It has become apparent to PACT they require an independent feasibility study to support any funding applications to other funders. 

11.     PACT has obtained a quote of $22,000 to complete a feasibility study.  Staff have reviewed the scope of the study and support its direction.  It is anticipated the feasibility study will take up to six months to complete.

12.     PACT requested an extension to the deadline for both grants for a further year to 30 June 2018 to allow time to complete the feasibility study and raise the necessary funding to commence the project.  PACT has also requested consideration to amending the purpose of the grants to include funding a feasibility study. Currently, both grants can only be used for design, construction and associated professional fees.

13.     PACT has applied to the Lottery Grants Board for funding towards the feasibility study but outcome of this is unknown at this time.  If this funding application is successful then the grants will be retained for design and construction.

14.     One of the identified risks is the feasibility study identifies the project as currently planned is not feasible and either should be rescoped, redesigned or should not proceed.  A further risk is the ability of PACT to secure the necessary funding for the construction of the project.  While the completion of a feasibility study should improve the funding viability, it does not guarantee funding will be forthcoming given the very tight funding environment.

15.     The development of an athletics pavilion is contemplated in the Howick Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

16.     The options available for the local board’s consideration are:

i.    Extend the $230,000 funding to final expiry of 30 June 2018 but reject the request to fund the feasibility study.

This would allow PACT to use the grants as seed funding to leverage additional funding for construction of the pavilion.  A risk to this approach is PACT is declined by the Lottery Grants Board and therefore has no funds to complete the required feasibility study.  No feasibility study will undermine the funding viability with other funders.  This would result in further delays to the project.

ii.    Extend the $230,000 funding with a final expiry of 30 June 2018 and approve $22,000 being available immediately, if needed, to fund the feasibility study.

The advantage of this option is PACT can commission the feasibility study immediately with the remainder of funds being available for design and construction costs.

There is a risk the feasibility study recommends changes to the scope or design of the current project, which could incur further delays. Once the feasibility study is completed, PACT will require time to raise the remaining funding therefore there is a possibility the 30 June 2018 deadline will need to be further extended.

This is the preferred option.

iii.   Do not approve the extension of funding.

The grants would expire on 30 June 2017.  As the grants are operational funding from a previous financial year, they cannot be reallocated for another purpose.  The funding would be consolidated into the general council funds.

Lloyd Elsmore Park Badminton Club

17.     On 30 June 2016, Lloyd Elsmore Park Badminton Club was granted $24,718 to complete glazing and the replacement of tables and chairs at their facility in Lloyd Elsmore Park, as part of an urgent decision to allocate a portion of the local board’s unallocated locally driven initiatives fund (Resolution numbers HW/2016/265 and HW/2016/280).

18.     The badminton club has advised the proposed glazing is no longer required and is therefore seeking approval to repurpose the funding towards improving the lights on courts 9, 10 and 11 of the building.  The club still wishes to continue with the replacement of the tables and chairs as per the original grant purpose.

19.     As the building is owned by Pakuranga United Rugby Club, the badminton club has sourced three quotes via the rugby club to complete the lighting upgrade work.  The quotes vary from $23,365 to $26,731 excluding GST.

20.     Any shortfall between the local board grant and the total project cost would be shared between the rugby club and badminton club.  It should be noted that any grant to the club would not attract GST.

21.     In order to provide sufficient time to complete the lighting upgrade, the deadline for uplifting the grant would need to be extended to 30 June 2018.

22.     The project is not contemplated in the Howick Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

23.     The options available for the local board’s consideration are:

i.    Approve repurposing to grant purpose from glazing to lighting improvements and extending the grant deadline to 30 June 2018.

This is the preferred option as it contributes to making the facility more fit-for-purpose and has the most potential to increase participation in the sport.  Staff have assessed there is high likelihood of the project being completed and delivering a positive outcome.

ii.    Decline the request and withdraw the grant offer.

As operational funding from a previous financial year, the grant cannot be reallocated for another purpose.  The funding would be consolidated into the general council funds.

Local board views and implications

24.     Local board feedback on the change and extension requests was sought at a workshop on 23 March 2017. 

Māori impact statement

25.     There are no particular impacts on Maori which are different from general users.

Implementation

26.     If the local board approves the recommendation, staff will inform the respective groups of the local board decision and revise the funding agreements including any additional conditions that the local board may set.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Duncan Chisholm - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Dave Stewart - Manager Sport & Recreation

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Relationship Agreements with Mana Whenua

 

File No.: CP2017/09501

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To obtain the Howick Local Board’s approval to enter into formal governance relationship agreements with mana whenua groups in the greater Auckland area.

Executive summary

1.       This report recommends that the Howick Local Board approves a relationship agreement template as the basis for discussions with mana whenua. 

2.       It further recommends that where the agreement remains substantively the same as the template, albeit with the inclusion of information describing the mana whenua party, that it proceed to a formal signing without a further approval process.

3.       The Governing Body is also being asked to approve the relationship template to support the expeditious completion of relationship agreements with mana whenua.

4.       Auckland Council has an existing range of instruments and mechanisms to recognise and provide for its relationships with mana whenua. There is a strong desire from all parties to formalise the foundational governance relationships through the development of relationship agreements and in some cases acknowledge and build from legacy agreements held with former councils.

5.       The mana whenua groups with interests in the Howick Local Board area are:

Iwi / Hapū

Mana whenua representative organisation

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

Te Kawerau a Maki

Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority

Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi Authority

Te Ahiwaru

Makaurau Marae Māori Trust

Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

Ngāti Paoa

Ngāti Paoa Trust

Ngāti Whanaunga

Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated

Ngāti Maru

Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Incorporated

Ngāti Tamaterā

Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

Te Patukirikiri

Te Patukirikiri Iwi Inc

Waikato-Tainui

Waikato Tainui Te Kauhanganui Inc

 

6.       The final draft agreement for consideration (Attachment A) recognises the two parties, sets out the purpose, aspirations and shared principles, and in particular acknowledges the governance context of Auckland Council through the governing body and the relevant local board(s).

7.       There are appendices to the agreement - the administrative provisions, existing and future projects or arrangements, and specific local board arrangements. These appendices are intended to be added to over time without alteration to the main agreement.

8.       Discussions have begun with some mana whenua groups who have indicated they are ready to enter into this process.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the relationship agreement template attached to the agenda report at Attachment A as the basis for discussions with mana whenua

b)      approve a process of reaching these agreements whereby the agreement may proceed to signing without further approval so long as any inclusions are either descriptive or in the nature of minor drafting changes.  For the avoidance of doubt, any changes of substance will be re-presented to the Howick Local Board, other local boards and the governing body, as relevant, for final approval

c)      authorise the Chairperson to sign the agreement on behalf of the local board at signing ceremonies arranged between the parties to each agreement.

 

 

Comments

9.       Since Auckland Council was established, relationships with mana whenua have been sustained in a variety of ways.  The demands for information and engagement that the Council family places on mana whenua has led to a range of different approaches and mechanisms to make this efficient and effective for all. 

10.     A foundation for the interactions is the negotiation of contracts with each mana whenua group to support their capacity to engage with the Council.  These contracts specify deliverables which include participation in governance activities with Auckland Council.  Additionally, some of the high contact parts of the Council family have set up separate fora to provide for project level engagement.

11.     In 2013, the Governing Body, Local Board Chairs and the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), considered a discussion document about Auckland Council entering into relationship agreements with the nineteen iwi and hapū recognised as mana whenua for Tāmaki Makaurau.  As a result, a political working party of governing body and local board members was established that was expected to work on the development of the relationship agreements. 

12.     Subsequent discussions with mana whenua indicated that they preferred to advance some form of collective body prior to dealing with relationship agreements, negating the need for the working party. This collective body, the Regional Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, has been recently established and is developing a forward work programme at present.

13.     At a governance level, opportunities to establish relationships between mana whenua and elected members have included:

·        mana whenua leading pōwhiri and the inauguration ceremonies for each new council and local board

·        kanohi ki te kanohi / face to face discussions between elected members and mana whenua within major regional planning processes – notably the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan and the Unitary Plan 

·        at a local level, specific engagement with mana whenua who relate to the local board areas.

14.     Since the establishment of the Auckland Council, a strong desire has been expressed from many mana whenua groups and the Independent Māori Statutory Board to formalise the governance relationships through the development of relationship agreements and, in some cases, to acknowledge and build on legacy agreements held with former councils.

15.     Relationship agreements support elements of the Auckland Plan strategic direction to “enable Māori aspirations through recognition of Te Tirit o Waitangi / The Treaty of Waitangi and customary rights” through formal acknowledgement of the mutual interests of council and mana whenua.”

16.     They are a means of documenting each party’s intention to work together respectfully and positively, and the development of the agreement itself may assist in mutual understanding.  Nevertheless, relationship agreements may not be considered necessary by all mana whenua groups or be a current priority for some.  Should that be the case, the current arrangements with each group will continue to support the relationship.

 

Structure and details of Agreement

17.     Te Waka Anga Mua, with the support of Legal Services has developed a governance relationship agreement template attached to this report as Attachment A.

18.     This agreement has been drafted so as not to be over-prescriptive but containing the essential elements for agreements of this nature.

19.     The agreement recognises the two parties to the agreement and, in particular, acknowledges the governance context of Auckland Council by including the governing body and the relevant local boards as the Auckland Council party. 

20.     The first part of the agreement outlines the purpose, aspirations and shared principles. Any specific commitments, projects and arrangements, engagement and meeting protocols can also be contained, or referred to, within the body of the Agreement.

21.     The agreement has appendices - the administrative provisions, existing and future projects or arrangements, and specific local board arrangements – as standard inclusions. Any other relevant departmental and operational documents will be added as schedules to the agreement with the intention that these can be amended as needed without requiring alteration of the main agreement.

Next Steps

 

22.     All mana whenua have been approached regarding a potential relationship agreement. A number of groups have indicated they are ready to progress discussions and these discussions have commenced in some cases.

23.     As the agreement is intended to record a mutual intention to form a close working relationship with mana whenua which is already committed to in a range of council’s strategic documents, Howick Local Board is not being asked to approve entering into these relationship agreements.  Rather, it is being asked to approve a template agreement which sets out the areas expected to be covered in this relationship agreement which, in general, describes matters of relevance to each of the parties to the agreement.

24.     While the details about mana whenua and the arrangements or projects underway will be particular to each agreement it is expected that, in most cases, the agreements will not include any additional detail that requires governing body or local board approval.

25.     It is proposed that, where the agreement remains substantively the same as the template, albeit with the inclusion of information describing the mana whenua party, it proceeds to a formal signing without a further approval process.

26.     Should any of the mana whenua parties seek inclusion of matters which require new commitment by the council parties, the agreement will be referred back to the governing body and/or the local board(s) for approval on these matters.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

27.     Local Boards were presented with the broad approach proposed to relationship agreements in workshops in 2015 and there was general approval of the approach. 

28.     To expedite the process of negotiating relationship agreements, this report is also being made to each local board for approval, tailored to recognise the iwi / hapū relevant to the local board area.

29.     As relationship agreements are developed and signed, arrangements will be made for initial formal meetings with mana whenua representatives to begin new or continue current relationships.

30.     The mana whenua groups with interests in the Howick Local Board area are:

Iwi / Hapū

Mana whenua representative organisation

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

Te Kawerau a Maki

Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority

Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi Authority

Te Ahiwaru

Makaurau Marae Māori Trust

Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

Ngāti Paoa

Ngāti Paoa Trust

Ngāti Whanaunga

Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated

Ngāti Maru

Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Incorporated

Ngāti Tamaterā

Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

Te Patukirikiri

Te Patukirikiri Iwi Inc

Waikato-Tainui

Waikato Tainui Te Kauhanganui Inc

 

Initial discussions have began with Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki and Waikato-Tainui. Once the mana whenua interest in entering into discussions about relationship agreements is more certain, we will update the Board with an indicative timetable.

Māori impact statement

31.     Although Auckland Council engages with mana whenua across a wide range of activities currently and has relationships with mana whenua at both governance and operational levels, the establishment of governance level relationship agreements are a further step towards cementing an enduring positive relationship with treaty partners.  Entering into relationship agreements will also complete one of the recommendations made in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s 2015 Treaty Audit.

Implementation

32.     .    In order to finalise the relationship agreements, a formal signing ceremony including the mana whenua group, governing body and the relevant local boards will be arranged at times to suit all parties.  Te Waka Anga Mua staff will administer the agreements and maintain oversight of any commitments made within the agreements.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Relationship Agreement with Mana Whenua Template

159

     

Signatories

Authors

Dean  Martin - Principle Advisor Maori Relations & Governance

Authorisers

Graham Pryor - GM Maori Responsiveness & Relationships

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Project 17: Auckland Council Maintenance Contracts

 

File No.: CP2017/11627

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek agreement from the local board on:

·      community and workforce priorities for this local board area (smart procurement); and

·      site specific issues (if any) that are unique to the local board and may require particular attention over and above standard maintenance service specifications. 

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s maintenance contracts for parks, buildings and open space expire on 30 June 2017.  This has presented a unique opportunity to reconsider and reshape how council approaches the maintenance of Auckland Council’s assets and open spaces in the future.

3.       At the end of March 2017, a new contract structure was approved by the Strategic Procurement Committee and Finance and Performance Committee, with contracts due to commence 1 July 2017.

4.       One of the key performance indicators for each supplier is a Community Outcomes and Workforce Development Plan, which includes smart procurement measures and targets.

5.       This report seeks formal feedback from the local board on community and workforce measures (smart procurement) that are a priority to this local board, noting that targets may be developed over the next six to twelve months as a baseline is established.

6.       This report seeks formal feedback from the local board on site specific issues (if any) that are unique to the local board area and may require particular attention for 2017/2018, and is over and above standard service specifications.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      agree the following local priorities for year one (2017/2018) of new maintenance contracts:

·      community and workforce priorities for this local board area: smart procurement (Attachment A)

·      site specific issues, if any, that are unique to the local board and may require particular attention over and above standard maintenance service specifications

b)      note that community and workforce (smart procurement) targets may be developed over the next six to twelve months to establish a baseline.

c)      note that Auckland Council will continue to encourage, support and work with volunteer and community groups across the region in alignment to the new maintenance contracts. 

 

 


 

Comments

Background

7.       Auckland Council’s maintenance contracts for parks, buildings and open space expire on
30 June 2017.  This presented a unique opportunity to reconsider and reshape how we approach maintenance of Auckland Council’s assets and open spaces in the future.

8.       Over the last twelve months, Community Facilities has engaged with local boards and the governing body to provide direction and shape up the procurement of a new contract structure.  This included receiving formal feedback from all local boards in March 2017, prior to a decision being made.

9.       At the end of March 2017, the new contract structure was approved by the Strategic Procurement Committee and Finance and Performance Committee, with contracts due to commence on 1 July 2017.

10.     The new maintenance contracts incorporate three main service types for the Auckland region:

·     Full Facilities – maintenance of parks, open spaces, sports fields, buildings, public toilets, cleaning (including toilets in town centres), locking and unlocking services of park gates and public toilets, rubbish bin emptying, weed control, mowing and maintenance of streetscape gardens

·     Arboriculture - street tree pruning, park tree pruning, street tree and powerline clearance, species specific pruning, tree inspections and removals and planting/aftercare maintenance

·     Ecological - pest animal and pest plant monitoring and control, ecological restoration, revegetation and enrichment planting and reactive pest control/monitoring

11.     A key change to maintenance contracts is that the majority of service levels will now be outcome based (e.g. ‘rubbish bins shall not exceed the bin’s capacity and items shall not overflow’), as opposed to services that were previously prescriptive or frequency based (e.g. ‘rubbish bins are emptied once a day’).

12.     Refer to Attachment B for the final version of the Full Facilities Service Specifications which outline agreed outcome statements that will apply across the Auckland region from
1 July 2017.

13.     Arboriculture and ecological services are specialist contracts, largely based on compliance with legislation and policies.  Specifications are detailed, technical and more prescriptive in nature.

 

Smart Procurement

14.     Key performance indicators measure how well the supplier is doing to meet their contractual agreement with Auckland Council.

15.     One of the key performance indicators for each supplier is a Community Outcomes and Workforce Development Plan.  This outlines community and workforce measures and targets to be agreed with each supplier.

Community and Workforce

16.     These key performance indicators include setting smart procurement targets that reflect the local character of each area, of which local boards play a key role in identifying.

17.     Attachment A outlines a minimum set of community and workforce measures (smart procurement), noting that specific targets will be determined over the next six to twelve months as a baseline is established.

18.     This report seeks agreement from the local board on identifying key community and workforce measures (smart procurement) to focus on for year one (2017/2018).

Environmental

19.     Each supplier is also required to develop an environmental management system that monitors, measures and sets goals.  At a minimum the following will be measured – local boards will have the opportunity to identify (at a later date) what measures they seek regular reporting on:

·     energy conservation

·     water conservation

·     waste management and recycling

·     chemical use

·     Scope 1 and Scope 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

20.     Environmental key performance indicators will track progress of these goals, noting that this specifically includes targets for suppliers to annually reduce their carbon footprint and annually reduce use of agri-chemicals (as outlined in Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy).

 

Local Service Level Variations

21.     Feedback received from local boards indicates the following most common and typical maintenance issues experienced in their area, which is largely due to the prescriptive nature of the previous contract model:

·     Toilets not being clean

·     Rubbish bins overflowing

·     Grass in parks getting too long

22.     New maintenance contracts intend to address these common issues through an outcome based model, as outlined in the background section above.

23.     In some cases, there may be some site specific issues, or a common maintenance problem, that is unique to the local board area and requires particular attention.  For example a 100% spray free reserve, overflowing bins near tourist beaches, litter caused from freedom campers in a particular location.

24.     This report seeks agreement from the local board on site specific issues (if any) that are unique to the local board area and may require particular attention for 2017/2018, and is over and above standard service specifications.

 

Asset Data

25.     Over the last six months, Auckland Council’s asset data team conducted a full system review of asset information to support the development of new maintenance contracts. 

26.     Attachment C outlines an updated asset list for this local board area as at 2 June 2017.

27.     Note that asset data is continually updated to reflect council decisions and asset assessments, and that new maintenance contracts have flexibility to accommodate changes.

 


 

 

Volunteers and Community Groups

28.     Auckland Council values the huge number of volunteer and community groups across the region, who undertake a significant amount of work over many years to shape and maintain the beauty of Auckland. 

29.     Council will continue to encourage and support volunteers, community empowerment initiatives and local community groups where they align to council’s objectives and enhance our community.

30.     Under the new maintenance contract model, council does not expect volunteers to have to undertake work to address poor performance in contract delivery, such as cleaning up litter where the supplier has a responsibility to do so. 

31.     It is acknowledged that many volunteer and community groups achieve a sense of pride, value and enjoyment in supporting maintenance work, such as restoration, garden maintenance and pest control.  Council will continue to work with these groups and with suppliers to support them as best as possible in these activities.

32.     Over the next few months council staff will be in contact with key volunteer and community groups where maintenance related work is undertaken, to ensure alignment of objectives and determine how council and suppliers can best support this work.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

33.     Project 17 has engaged with local boards through various channels including:

o   Local Board Chairs Procurement Working Group;

o   Local Board Chairs Forum presentations;

o   memorandums;

o   cluster workshops;

o   individual local board workshops; and

o   business meeting reports.

34.     Community Facilities is now seeking agreement from local boards on smart procurement priorities and local service level variations (if any) for 2017/2018, prior to new contracts commencing on 1 July.

35.     This information will be provided to suppliers and Community Facilities before new contracts commence.

Māori impact statement

36.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori.

37.     Māori responsiveness requires the collective effort of everyone. Under the new contracts, suppliers will work collaboratively with council to achieve better outcomes with Māori and for Auckland. This will include:

o   Building positive relationships with Māori – effective communication and engagement with Māori, developing resilient relationships with mana whenua;

o   Significantly lift Māori social and economic well-being; and

o   Building Māori capability and capacity.


 

 

38.     Through these contracts, opportunities to support local community outcomes and economic development include (but are not limited to):

o   Providing employment opportunities, in particular for local people and for youth;

o   Increasing capability and capacity (apprenticeships, cadetships or equivalent) in particular for youth;

o    Building on community and volunteer networks;

o   Focusing on smart procurement initiatives that support Maori outcomes.

 

Implementation

39.     Mobilisation is currently underway with suppliers to prepare for 1 July 2017 (day one). This includes finalising processes, implementing systems, recruiting staff, purchasing equipment, creating health and safety plans and developing work schedules. 

40.     Local boards are meeting new suppliers in June 2017 and will have the opportunity to present and discuss local priorities with the supplier.

41.     Reporting requirements for local boards on local service levels and contractor performance is currently underway.

42.     New maintenance contracts take effect on 1July 2017, noting that there may be up to twelve months to bed in changes, particularly with regards to systems and reporting.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community and workforce measures (smart procurement)

177

b

Full facilities service specifications

179

c

Asset List

221

     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh – Principal Business Analyst

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Karen Lyons – General Manager Local Board Services

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Adoption of Local Board Agreement 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/09587

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks adoption of local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018, including a Local Board Agreement 2017/2018, a message from the chair, local board advocacy, local activity budgets and local performance targets, together with adoption of a local fees and charges schedule for 2017/2018.

Executive summary

2.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement between the governing body and the local board, for each local board area.

3.       Every three years a local board plan is developed to inform the long-term plan (and associated local board agreements) which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a 10 year period.

4.       In February and March this year, the council consulted on proposed changes for the Annual Budget 2017/2018.  Local boards then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on regional policy issues, community feedback and key initiatives that local boards are advocating for.

5.       Local boards are now considering local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, local board advocacy, local activity budgets and local performance targets, together with a local fees and charges schedule for 2017/2018.

6.       Local board agreements will include the allocation of locally driven initiative (LDI) funding to projects and services.

7.       On 29 June 2017, the governing body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s Annual Budget 2017/2018 including 21 local board agreements and associated performance targets and budgets.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      adopts local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018 (Attachment A), including:

i)          a Local Board Agreement 2017/2018

ii)         a message from the Chair

iii)         local board advocacy

iv)        local activity budgets

v)         local performance targets

b)      adopts local fees and charges schedules for 2017/2018 (Attachment B)

c)      notes:

i)          that the local activity budgets have been updated to reflect final budget decisions made by the governing body on 1 June 2017;

ii)       that if there are outstanding (not yet agreed) matters in the local board agreement, the local board should include an explanation of these matters in the Chair’s message at the front of the local board agreement;

iii)      that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the governing body when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2017/2018 on 29 June 2017.

d)      agrees that the Chair be delegated authority to make any final minor changes to the local content for the Local Board Agreement 2017/2018

 

 

Comments

8.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement between the governing body and the local board, for each local board area.

9.       Every three years a local board plan is developed to inform the long-term plan (and associated local board agreements) which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a 10 year period.

10.     In February and March this year, the council consulted on proposed content for Annual Budget 2017/2018. Local boards then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on regional policy issues, community feedback and key initiatives that local boards are advocating for.

11.     Local boards are now considering local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018 (Attachment A).

12.     Local boards are also considering the adoption of a local fees and charges schedule for 2017/2018 (Attachment B)

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     This report seeks adoption from the local board on its content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018 and other associated material.  Engagement with the community, including consultation, and a number of workshops and meetings have been held by the local board and with the governing body to finalise their local board agreement.

Māori impact statement

14.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori.  The local board agreement is based on the local board plan and the Annual Budget 2017/2018 which have both been developed through engagement with the community, including Māori. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Implementation

15.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the governing body on 29 June 2017, when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2017/2018 including 21 local board agreements and associated performance targets and budgets.

16.     Decisions on the local board agreement, a message from the chair, local board advocacy, local activity budgets and local performance targets are required in order for staff to finalise local content for the Annual Budget 2017/2018.

17.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the annual budget is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes.  Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the Local Board Chair to make final changes if necessary.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local content to support the Annual Budget 2017/2018:
o          Local Board Agreement 2017/2018
o          Message from the Chair
o          Local Board Advocacy
o          Local activity budgets
o          Local performance targets

237

b

Local fees and charges schedule 2017/2018

249

     

Signatories

Authors

Pramod Nair – Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Christine Watson, Manager Financial Advisory Services Local Boards

Karen Lyons, General Manager Local Board Services

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

Part 2: Local Board information and agreement 2017/2018

Howick Local Board

 

Appendix B: How to contact your Local Board

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Local Board recommendations on Easter Sunday trading

 

File No.: CP2017/08525

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek a local board recommendation to the Governing Body on whether or not to expand Easter Sunday trading in Auckland.

Executive summary

2.       Councils were given the power to adopt a policy to expand Easter Sunday trading through a law change in August 2016.

3.       In August 2017, the Governing Body will decide whether or not to propose a policy to expand Easter Sunday trading in all or parts of Auckland for public consultation.

4.       Any decision on Easter Sunday trading will impact on Auckland Council’s economic, social, recreational and cultural objectives, for example through increased wages and revenue, or the ability to retain an additional day’s holiday for family, leisure time or religious observance.

5.       This report enables the local board to advocate a position to the governing body on whether or not to expand Easter Sunday trading in Auckland. This is consistent with the local board’s community advocacy role under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

6.       In February 2017, the Governing Body approved community engagement to inform its August 2017 decision on whether to retain the status quo or to expand Easter Sunday trading (Resolution GB/2017/22). A copy of the Governing Body report is contained in Attachment A.

7.       The Governing Body report (Attachment A) provides information to assist to make a recommendation on Easter Sunday trading, including:

·        background on the Easter Sunday trading legislative change, rationale, current regulations

·        options for responding to the legislative change, including:

o   issues and options analysis

o   pros and cons.

8.       Planned engagement initiatives in May and June 2017, include:

·        a survey of a representative group of 1600 Aucklanders

·        an online feedback form promoted through online, media and external networks

·        engagement with key stakeholders.

9.       Staff will circulate preliminary findings of overall engagement to local board members in an information memo in mid-June 2017.These preliminary findings will show regional views as well key views of Māori, Pacific, diverse and hard to reach Aucklanders with whom engagement will be prioritised.

10.     The local board can either:

·        make its recommendation at a business meeting before 30 June 2017 with or without the preliminary findings of engagement

·        delegate this responsibility to the Chair, or appropriate board member, if it wishes to delay its recommendation until after members have received the preliminary findings of engagement in mid-June, and the local board is unable to meet before 30 June 2017.

11.     Local boards’ recommendations are required by 30 June 2017 in order for them to be included in the report to the Governing Body in August.

12.     Local boards’ views will be summarised within the report to the Governing Body and the resolutions attached verbatim.

13.     In making its August 2017 decision, the Governing Body will consider the findings of engagement as well as local boards’ recommendations.

14.     If the Governing Body decides to adopt a policy to expand Easter Sunday trading, it must use the special consultative procedure. This allows for public consultation prior to a final decision being made by Easter 2018.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governing Body report (Attachment A) provides information to assist to make a recommendation on Easter Sunday trading, including:

i.   background on the Easter Sunday trading legislative change, rationale, current regulations

ii.     options for responding to the legislative change, including:

iii. issues and options analysis

iv. pros and cons.

AND EITHER

b)      recommend that the Governing Body retain the status quo, so that only shops that can currently open for trade on Easter Sunday can continue to do so.

OR

c)      recommend that the Governing Body adopt a policy to allow shops in all of Auckland to trade on Easter Sunday.

OR

d)      recommend the Governing Body adopt a policy to allow shops in the following parts of Auckland to trade on Easter Sunday: [local board to insert parts in list format]

OR

e)      delegates the Local Board Chair to recommend to the Governing Body by email via the Manager Social Policy and Bylaws by 30 June on whether to retain the status quo, or to allow shops in all or parts of Auckland to trade on Easter Sunday.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A: Governing Body Report_Response to Easter Sunday trading legislation

255

     

Signatories

Authors

Pania   Elliot - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Local Board Appointments and Delegations - Howick Local Board

 

File No.: CP2017/11131

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To review the appointment of board members to represent the board at the Howick Village Business Association.

Executive summary

2.       The board reviewed the Local Board Appointments and Delegations in April 2017 following the by-election.

3.       Chair, David Collings and Member Jim Donald were re-confirmed as the Lead and Alternate to the Howick Village Business Association.

4.       The board now wishes to amend this appointment and appoint member Adele White as the Alternate to the Howick Village Business Association. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)       reconfirm David Collings as Lead and appoint Adele White as Alternate to the Howick Village Business Association.

 

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

5.       This report seeks the local board’s decision on representatives to external community organisations relevant to the local board area.

Māori impact statement

6.       This report has no specific impact on Māori. It covers appointments of local board members to external organisations and community networks to represent the view of local communities, including Māori communities.

Implementation

7.       There are no implementation issues as a result of the recommendations in this report.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2017/11280

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the Howick Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

 

Executive Summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Howick Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

275

     

Signatories

Authors

Nichola Painter - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2017/11282

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report attaches the workshop records taken for the period stated below.

Executive Summary

2.       Under Standing Order 1.4.2 and 2.15 workshops convened by the Board shall be closed to the public, however, the proceedings of a workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed or decisions reached, but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.  This report attaches the workshop records for the period stated below.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for workshops held on 3, 4, 10, 11, 16, 18, 24, 25 and 31 May 2017.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

3 May 2017 Workshop Record

279

b

4 May 2017 Workshop Record

281

c

10 May 2017 Workshop Record

283

d

11 May 2017 Workshop Record

285

e

16 May 2017 Workshop Record

287

f

18 May 2017 Workshop Record

289

g

24 May 2017 Workshop Record

291

h

25 May 2017 Workshop Record

293

i

31 May 2017 Workshop Record

295

     

Signatories

Authors

Nichola Painter- Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

    

  


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Submission on the draft 30 year Howick Village Plan Page 299

Item 9.1      Attachment a    Liston Stream Presentation                           Page 307


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

19 June 2017