I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Henderson-Massey Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

4.00pm

Council Chamber
Henderson Civic Centre
6 Henderson Valley Road
Henderson

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Shane Henderson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Peter Chan, JP

 

Members

Paula Bold-Wilson

 

 

Brenda Brady, JP

 

 

Warren Flaunty, QSM

 

 

Will Flavell

 

 

Matt Grey

 

 

Vanessa Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Glenn Boyd

(Relationship Manager)

Local Board Services (West)

 

 

Busola Martins

Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)

 

14 September 2017

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 892 4455

Email: busola.martins@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome/Karakia                                                                                                           5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Ward Councillors’ Update                                                                                            5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Brian O’Shea, Te Atatu Rugby League Club and the potential for future development of Jack Colvin Park                                                                       5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Chairperson's report                                                                                                     7

13        Local Government New Zealand conference - Report from Deputy Chair Peter Chan                                                                                                                                         9

14        Relationship Agreement with Mana Whenua                                                           11

15        Auckland Transport Update - September 2017 to the Henderson-Massey Local Board                                                                                                                                       29

16        Te Whau Pathway Scheme Assessment Report                                                     37

17        Agreement to lease and community lease to Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust, Moire Park, 91-93 Moire Road, Massey                                                                                43

18        Youth Space at Massey Leisure                                                                                 77

19        Riverpark Reserve Playground Upgrade                                                                  85

20        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Elite Investment Group Limited at 289 Great North Road, Henderson.                                                         91

21        Remuneration Authority consultation document                                                    95

22        Public alerting framework for Auckland                                                                 131

23        Auckland Plan Refresh - Local Board Engagement                                              203

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     215

25        Confirmation of Workshop Records                                                                       219  

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome/Karakia

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The following are declared interests of elected members of the Henderson-massey local board:

 

BOARD MEMBER

ORGANISATION

POSITION

Updated

Shane Henderson (Chairman)

Waitakere Licensing Trust

Waitakere Badminton

Elected Member

Patron

13 December 2016

Peter Chan, JP (Deputy Chairman)

Cantonese Opera Society of NZ
Asian Leaders Forum
NZ-Hong Kong Business Association
NZ-China Business Association
Auckland Chinese Environment Protection Association (ACEPA)

Whau Coastal Walkway Trust

Auckland Asian Association

Member
Member
Member
Member
Advisor 

 

Trustee

President

15 Nov 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

21 Feb 2017

Brenda Brady, JP

Safer West Community Trust
District Licensing Committee

Trustee
Member

15 Nov 2016

Matt Grey

Zeal

CEO

15 Nov 2016

21 March 2017

Paula Bold-Wilson

Community Waitakere

Henderson Budgeting Services

Unitec Institute of Technology

Board member

Board member

Employee

15 Nov 2016

 

21 March 2017

Vanessa Neeson, JP

Village Green Quilters

Ranui Advisory Group 

Member

Chairperson

15 Nov 2016

17 February 2017

Warren Flaunty, QSM

Westgate Pharmacy
NorSGA Properties
Westgate Pharmacy Ltd
The Trusts Community Foundation Ltd

Life North West Pharmacy

Waitemata District Health Board
Waitakere Licensing Trust
Massey Birdwood Settlers Ass.
Taupaki Residents & Ratepayers Ass.

Contractor
Director
Director
Director
Director

Elected Member
Elected Member
Member
Member

15 Nov 2016

Will Flavell

Te Atatū Tennis Club

Asia New Zealand Leadership Network

Rutherford College

Waitākere Literacy Board

Member

Member

Employee

Board Member

15 Nov 2016

 


 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 15 August 2017, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Ward Councillors’ Update

 

Ward Councillors are given an opportunity to update the local board on regional issues impacting the board.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Henderson-Massey Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Brian O’Shea, Te Atatu Rugby League Club and the potential for future development of Jack Colvin Park

Purpose

1.   To receive a deputation from Brian O’Shea, Chair of the Te Atatu Rugby League Club, and his request for support on the future-proof development of Jack Colvin Park, located in Te Atatu Peninsula, next to the North Western Motorway.

 

a)            Background:

2.   Jack Colvin Park is being used much more than just Rugby League.  We see a future park that has a stand alone toilet and shower facility that caters for netball and the public.  Currently there are no ablutions available to the public when the clubrooms are closed.  We would like to see the bottom carpark sealed with appropriate lighting to cater for netball teams to train there.  We also believe there is also room for a modern children's playground adjacent to the proposed tar seal area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receives deputation from Brian O’Shea, Chair of the Te Atatu Rugby Club.

 

Attachments

a          Jack Colvin Park aerial and contours.................................................. 231

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

There were no notices of motion.

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Chairperson's report

 

File No.: CP2017/19670

 

  

 

 

Local Board LTP Submission:  Pool and Sports Fields

1.   It is no secret that this Board has been strong advocates across several terms for infrastructure in the Northwest to cater to growth.  Our new Westies need to be welcomed to Red Hills and Massey North with open arms, and with public services that will improve their quality of life.

2.   To that end, Auckland Council are shortly consulting with our Board on the local initiative that we wish to promote in the Long Term Plan.  We again will be arguing for strategic land purchase for sports fields, local community facilities and a public pool to serve the Red Hills and Westgate areas. 

3.   The case is well made over many years, but I need to be clear.  We have only one public pool in West Auckland and this Board does not think that is good enough.  We also have recreation, greenspace and sports field needs in the Northwest that are dire and need to be addressed.  We will be making this case as the LTP discussion continues.  I wish to acknowledge the support of our Councillors on this issue.

Henderson Moving Forward

4.   The electronic gates in Henderson station have been a great addition to the community.  Our rail bridge is much safer, and we are shortly going to be installing art work to make it a feature of a renewed, vibrant community.

5.   This Board appreciates the work of Panuku Development Auckland, Council’s development arm, who are doing great work to promote Henderson.  Shortly we will be looking to approve small events to activate under-used parts of our centre.  This will give Henderson a buzz, and our message to Aucklanders everywhere is come on over, because Henderson is on the way up.

6.   The area of Henderson Valley Rd formerly known as Wilsher Village has had resource consent approved for housing.  We now have a green light for around 100 new houses, right in the heart of the West.  They will be subject to the highest quality urban design, and some of these houses will be set aside for our elderly to enjoy. 

Maori Language Week

7.   Last week was Maori language week, and it is a good reminder to the entire populace that Te Reo is a precious taonga, to be promoted and encouraged.  I want to acknowledge our Board in this term, who have made improving Maori outcomes a priority. 

A Message of Support to our Local Schools

8.   A candidate for this year’s election has made a statement picked up on by the media, giving an impression that a local school has a problem with drugs.  I was in two minds as to whether to mention it, as I am aware of the risks of giving such false impressions accidental oxygen.

9.   I feel however that as representatives of this community, we need to make a clear statement of support for our local schools.  I am saddened by the comments made, as they give a negative and false impression of that school. 

10. In fact, the school mentioned is one of the best in New Zealand, with one of the highest NCEA Level 3 pass rates in the country.  They also have great recent achievements in cultural and entrepreneurial pursuits.  Most importantly, it is a school that has a community focus, and young people coming out of that school will do great things for West Auckland and its people.

11. Simply put, it is clear to local residents that our schools provide a fantastic start in life for young West Aucklanders.  We are growing leaders right here, and as your representatives we are so proud of the work done.  Our schools have great leadership and passionate staff.  To all of our local schools, keep up the good work, the community appreciates it.

Community Wins on Waterview Tunnel issue

12. This Board has stood with the community in advocating to NZTA to keep a consistent speed of 100 km/hr on the motorway, and I am proud to say that the Agency has listened and is changing the speed limit back.  It is a testament to what residents can do, an encouraging story of people banding together to make changes to their benefit.  We will be continuing in our advocacy for rapid transit along the Northwestern motorway in our plans, and we hope to continue the generous support we have had from the public on this next step for smarter transport in the Northwest.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Authors

Shane Henderson – Chairperson Henderson-Massey Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Local Government New Zealand conference - Report from Deputy Chair Peter Chan

 

File No.: CP2017/16381

 

  

 

Purpose

1.    To report back on Deputy Chair Peter Chan’s attendance at the recent Local Government New Zealand conference held in Auckland.

 

LGNZ Report from Member Peter Chan

2.    The LGNZ Conference was from 24-25 July 2017.

3.    I attended the LGNZ Conference 2017 in Auckland as the Henderson-Massey Local Board Delegate. The theme of the Conference this year was Building a vibrant and prosperous New Zealand.  About 250 delegates attended the Conference held at the Sky City Convention Centre.

4.    The Conference did provide an excellent networking opportunity and a forum to develop thinking and expertise to best fulfil the role of local government.

5.    It is important to ensure communities are safe and have the range of social services appropriate to their needs.  The future of our communities cannot be left to the central government alone. We need a stronger local democracy. As Lawrence Yule, President of the LGNZ, said at the opening of the Conference that local government is the pathway to the prosperity of our communities, we need to empower and unleash the potential of our communities to ensure a successful future for all New Zealanders.

6.    There were four interactive sessions:

i.    Managing uncertainty and impacts of climate change to meet your communities 2050 objectives.

ii.    Better economic development.

iii.   Cross district collaboration – how regions and districts are breaking silos and working together to deliver excellence for communities.

iv.  Managing community expectations for fresh water quality and quantity and delivering the government’s objectives.

7.    Delegates were asked at the time of registration to attend one of the above.  I attended the fourth interactive session and the Fulton Hogan conference dinner in the evening.

8.    Water quality was a key issue under discussion and I think that it will have a great impact on local government and its communities over the decades ahead. I was impressed by how the Waitomo District Council trying to engage communities on difficult conversations around cost and affordability to meet these changes.

9.    The Conference closed after a keynote speech Future proofing our communities by Holly Ransom, a futurist and global strategist.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the Local Government New Zealand conference report from Deputy Chair Peter Chan.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Peter Chan – Deputy Chairperson Henderson-Massey Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Relationship Agreement with Mana Whenua

 

File No.: CP2017/18948

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To obtain the Henderson-Massey Local Board’s approval to adopt a relationship agreement template as the first step towards entering into formal relationships with mana whenua.

Executive summary

2.       This report recommends that the Henderson-Massey Local Board approves a relationship agreement template as the basis for discussions with mana whenua. 

3.       It further recommends that where the agreement remains substantively the same as the template, albeit with the inclusion of information describing the mana whenua party, that it proceed to a formal signing without a further approval process.

4.       The Governing Body is also being asked to approve the relationship template to support the expeditious completion of relationship agreements with mana whenua.

5.       Auckland Council has an existing range of instruments and mechanisms to recognise and provide for its relationships with mana whenua. There is a strong desire from all parties to formalise the foundational governance relationships through the development of relationship agreements and in some cases acknowledge and build from legacy agreements held with former councils.

6.       The mana whenua groups with interests in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area are:

Iwi / Hapū

Mana whenua representative organisation

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

Nga Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Development Trust

Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Maia Ltd

Te Kawerau a Maki

Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority

Te Akitai Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi Authority

Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Ngāti Paoa

Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

Ngāti Maru

Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Incorporated

Ngāti Tamaterā

Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

7.       The final draft agreement for consideration (Attachment A) recognises the two parties, sets out the purpose, aspirations and shared principles, and in particular acknowledges the governance context of Auckland Council through the governing body and the relevant local board(s).

8.       There are appendices to the agreement - the administrative provisions, existing and future projects or arrangements, and specific local board arrangements. These appendices are intended to be added to over time without alteration to the main agreement.

9.       Discussions have begun with some mana whenua groups who have indicated they are ready to enter into this process.

 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      approve the relationship agreement template attached to the agenda report at Attachment A as the basis for discussions with mana whenua

b)      approve a process of reaching these agreements whereby the agreement may proceed to signing without further approval so long as any inclusions are either descriptive or in the nature of minor drafting changes.  For the avoidance of doubt, any changes of substance will be re-presented to the  Henderson-Massey Local Board, other local boards and the governing body, as relevant, for final approval

c)      authorise the Chairperson to sign the agreement on behalf of the local board at signing ceremonies arranged between the parties to each agreement.

 

Comments

10.     Since Auckland Council was established, relationships with mana whenua have been sustained in a variety of ways.  The demands for information and engagement that the Council family places on mana whenua has led to a range of different approaches and mechanisms to make this efficient and effective for all. 

11.     A foundation for the interactions is the negotiation of contracts with each mana whenua group to support their capacity to engage with the Council.  These contracts specify deliverables which include participation in governance activities with Auckland Council.  Additionally, some of the high contact parts of the Council family have set up separate fora to provide for project level engagement.

12.     In 2013, the Governing Body, Local Board Chairs and the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), considered a discussion document about Auckland Council entering into relationship agreements with the nineteen iwi and hapū recognised as mana whenua for Tāmaki Makaurau.  As a result, a political working party of governing body and local board members was established that was expected to work on the development of the relationship agreements. 

13.     Subsequent discussions with mana whenua indicated that they preferred to advance some form of collective body prior to dealing with relationship agreements, negating the need for the working party. This collective body, the Regional Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, has been recently established and is developing a forward work programme at present.

14.     At a governance level, opportunities to establish relationships between mana whenua and elected members have included:

·        mana whenua leading pōwhiri and the inauguration ceremonies for each new council and local board

·        kanohi ki te kanohi / face to face discussions between elected members and mana whenua within major regional planning processes – notably the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan and the Unitary Plan 

·        at a local level, specific engagement with mana whenua who relate to the local board areas.

15.     Since the establishment of Auckland Council a strong desire has been expressed from many mana whenua groups and the Independent Māori Statutory Board to formalise the governance relationships through the development of relationship agreements and, in some cases, to acknowledge and build on legacy agreements held with former councils.

16.     Relationship agreements support elements of the Auckland Plan strategic direction to “enable Māori aspirations through recognition of Te Tirit o Waitangi / The Treaty of Waitangi and customary rights” through formal acknowledgement of the mutual interests of council and mana whenua.

17.     They are a means of documenting each party’s intention to work together respectfully and positively, and the development of the agreement itself may assist in mutual understanding.  Nevertheless, relationship agreements may not be considered necessary by all mana whenua groups or be a current priority for some.  Should that be the case, the current arrangements with each group will continue to support the relationship.

 

Structure and details of Agreement

18.     Te Waka Anga Mua, with the support of Legal Services has developed a governance relationship agreement template attached to this report as Attachment A.

19.     This agreement has been drafted so as not to be over-prescriptive but containing the essential elements for agreements of this nature.

20.     The agreement recognises the two parties to the agreement and, in particular, acknowledges the governance context of Auckland Council by including the governing body and the relevant local boards as the Auckland Council party. 

21.     The first part of the agreement outlines the purpose, aspirations and shared principles. Any specific commitments, projects and arrangements, engagement and meeting protocols can also be contained, or referred to, within the body of the Agreement.

22.     The agreement has appendices - the administrative provisions, existing and future projects or arrangements, and specific local board arrangements – as standard inclusions. Any other relevant departmental and operational documents will be added as schedules to the agreement with the intention that these can be amended as needed without requiring alteration of the main agreement.

Next Steps

 

23.     All mana whenua have been approached regarding a potential relationship agreement. A number of groups have indicated they are ready to progress discussions and these discussions have commenced in some cases.

24.     As the agreement is intended to record a mutual intention to form a close working relationship with mana whenua which is already committed to in a range of council’s strategic documents, Henderson-Massey Local Board is not being asked to approve entering into these relationship agreements.  Rather, it is being asked to approve a template agreement which sets out the areas expected to be covered in this relationship agreement which, in general, describes matters of relevance to each of the parties to the agreement.

25.     While the details about mana whenua and the arrangements or projects underway will be particular to each agreement it is expected that, in most cases, the agreements will not include any additional detail that requires governing body or local board approval.

26.     It is proposed that, where the agreement remains substantively the same as the template, albeit with the inclusion of information describing the mana whenua party, it proceeds to a formal signing without a further approval process.

27.     Should any of the mana whenua parties seek inclusion of matters which require new commitment by the council parties, the agreement will be referred back to the governing body and/or the local board(s) for approval on these matters.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

28.     Local Boards were presented with the broad approach proposed to relationship agreements in workshops in 2015 and there was general approval of the approach. 

29.     To expedite the process of negotiating relationship agreements, this report is also being made to each local board for approval, tailored to recognise the iwi / hapū relevant to the local board area.

30.     As relationship agreements are developed and signed, arrangements will be made for initial formal meetings with mana whenua representatives to begin new or continue current relationships.

31.     The mana whenua groups with interests in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area are:

Iwi / Hapū

Mana whenua representative organisation

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

Nga Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Development Trust

Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Maia Ltd

Te Kawerau a Maki

Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority

Te Akitai Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi Authority

Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Ngāti Paoa

Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

Ngāti Maru

Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Incorporated

Ngāti Tamaterā

Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

 

32.     Initial discussions have begun with Te Kawerau a Maki. Once the mana whenua interest in entering into discussions about relationship agreements is more certain, we will update the Board with an indicative timetable

Māori impact statement

33.     Although Auckland Council engages with mana whenua across a wide range of activities currently and has relationships with mana whenua at both governance and operational levels, the establishment of governance level relationship agreements are a further step towards cementing an enduring positive relationship with treaty partners.  Entering into relationship agreements will also complete one of the recommendations made in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s 2015 Treaty Audit.

Implementation

34.     In order to finalise the relationship agreements, a formal signing ceremony including the mana whenua group, governing body and the relevant local boards will be arranged at times to suit all parties.  Te Waka Anga Mua staff will administer the agreements and maintain oversight of any commitments made within the agreements

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Relationship Agreement with Mana Whenua Template

17

     

Signatories

Authors

Dean  Martin - Principle Advisor Maori Relations & Governance

Authorisers

Graham Pryor - GM Maori Responsiveness & Relationships

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

                                                                                                                                                        

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Relationship Agreement]

 

 

 

between

 

 

 

[Iwi name]

 

 

 

and

 

 

 

Auckland Council

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

[Date]

 

 

 

 

 

[Iwi name Logo]

               

logo


 

 

 

[KARAKIA/MIHI]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[IMAGERY]


[IWI NAME]

1.         [Insert a description of the Iwi and its rohe].

2.         [Insert a description of the Iwi's representative entity].

3.         [Insert a description of the current status of Treaty settlements/negotiations for the Iwi].

4.         [Insert other relevant background from an Iwi perspective].

AUCKLAND COUNCIL

5.         Auckland Council (“Council”) is a territorial and regional authority established under section 6 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009. 

6.         Council has two complementary decision-making parts, the governing body and local boards. The governing body and the local boards are autonomous and make decisions as Council within their respective areas of responsibility.

7.         The governing body consists of the mayor and 20 governing body members. The governing body focuses on the big picture and on region-wide strategic decisions. Each of the 21 local boards has between five and nine members. Local boards represent the communities in their area and make decisions on local issues, activities and facilities.

8.         Council's purpose is to enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, communities; and to meet the current and future needs of communities for good-quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost-effective for households and businesses.

9.         The Council has committed to achieving better outcomes for Māori that contribute significantly to lifting Māori economic, social and cultural well-being, strengthen Council’s effectiveness for Māori, and optimise post-Treaty settlement opportunities for the benefit of Māori and the wider public of Auckland.  One outcome identified through the Auckland Plan is "A Māori identity that is Auckland's point of difference in the world." 

10.        These commitments are reflected in, for example, the following Council documents:

(a)         the 'Māori Responsiveness Framework';

(b)        the Auckland Plan;

(c)         the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan;

(d)        the Long Term Plan; and

(e)         Local Board Plans.

 

 

11.        The Council also has an important relationship with the Independent Māori Statutory Board which was established in the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

12.        Within that broader context, this Agreement focuses on the individual relationship between [Iwi name] and Auckland Council.

PURPOSE

13.        The purpose of this Agreement is to provide a mechanism for the parties to:

(a)         acknowledge the mana of [Iwi name] and the role of the Council in Tamaki Makaurau;

(b)        develop and enhance a positive and enduring working relationship;

(c)         record shared aspirations and shared working principles; and

(d)        make specific commitments in terms of how they will work together.

ASPIRATIONS

14.        The parties both desire to work together in a manner that acknowledges and respects:

(a)         the mana of [Iwi name] in Tāmaki Makaurau;

(b)        the relationship of [Iwi name] and their culture and traditions with their ancestral lands, water, sites, wāhi tapu and other taonga in Tāmaki Makaurau;

(c)         the desire of [Iwi name] to enhance the cultural, social, economic, and environmental wellbeing of their people;

(d)        the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Treaty of Waitangi and the importance of the parties working together in accordance with those principles in a manner consistent with relevant legislation;

(e)         the significance of the [record the status of the Treaty settlement process for the Iwi];

(f)         the rights and interests of all mana whenua and Māori in Auckland;

(g)        the statutory purpose, functions and structure of Auckland Council;

(h)         the goals of the Auckland Council's Māori Responsiveness Framework, being to provide for effective Māori participation in democracy; to provide for an empowered Council organisation; and to provide for strong Māori communities;

(i)          the drivers of the Auckland Council's Māori Responsiveness Framework, being to enable Te Tiriti o Waitangi/ Treaty of Waitangi outcomes; to enable Māori outcomes; to fulfil statutory Māori obligations; and to value Te Ao Māori;

(j)          the role of Council as a steward, and the need for cultural, social, economic and environmental sustainability of Tāmaki Makaurau; and

(k)         the interests of all communities, ratepayers, customers, citizens and visitors in Tāmaki Makaurau.

15.        [Iwi name] wishes to work more closely with the Council so as to enable [Iwi name] to have more opportunity to contribute to and influence Council decision-making and service delivery, and also provide opportunities for [Iwi name] to improve or expand its own delivery of services to its communities.

16.        The Council wishes to work more closely with [Iwi name] for those reasons and to explore and develop the opportunities that a closer relationship between the parties will bring.

17.        [Insert any other shared or individual aspirations].

SHARED principles

18.        The parties commit to the following shared principles and to working together in a manner that reflects:

(a)         a partnership approach based on respect, good faith, integrity, transparency and open and effective communication;

(b)        a co-operative, supportive, positive and proactive approach;

(c)         respect for the roles and responsibilities of both parties;

(d)        a focus on the parties assisting each other to achieve the shared aspirations outlined in this Agreement;

(e)         early engagement and the provision of quality information; and

(f)         a constructive and timely approach to communicating any issues that may arise in the relationship and an open-minded approach to addressing those issues.

[SPECIFIC COMMITMENTS]

19.        [Insert any specific commitment between the parties at this point]

PROJECTS AND ARRANGEMENTS

20.        The parties are working together on the current or proposed projects and arrangements:

(a)         [Insert current projects and arrangements in Appendix Two].

21.        The parties may agree to work together on future projects or arrangements and the parties may agree to include these projects or arrangements in Appendix Three to this Agreement.

ENGAGEMENT AND meetings

22.       [example, Iwi representatives, the Mayor and Councillors will meet as mutually agreed but within a 6 month period. Iwi representatives, the Local Board Chairperson, members and Ward Councillor will meet a 6 monthly basis. There will be provision for additional meetings to be held at the request of either party.}

review AND AMENDMENT OF AGREEMENT

23         The parties will meet to discuss the state of the relationship and the implementation of this Agreement at least once each year.

24         The parties will meet to formally review this Agreement at least once every three years.

25         Either party may request an earlier review of this Agreement.

26         Any amendment to this Agreement must be agreed by the parties and recorded in writing. 

ROLES AND RESPONSBILITIES PRESERVED

27         The parties acknowledge that nothing in this Agreement restricts, fetters or derogates from the rights or responsibilities of [Iwi name] under the Local Government Act 2002, Resource Management Act 1991 or any other statute or regulation. If anything in this Agreement is inconsistent with any of those rights or responsibilities, then those rights or responsibilities prevail and this Agreement shall be construed and interpreted accordingly.

28         The parties acknowledge that nothing in this Agreement restricts, fetters or derogates from the statutory functions, duties and obligations imposed on the Council by the Local Government Act 2002, Resource Management Act 1991, or any other statute or regulation. If anything in this Agreement is inconsistent with any of the Council’s functions, duties, or obligations pursuant to statute or at law generally, then the functions, duties, and obligations of the Council pursuant to statute or at law generally prevail and this Agreement shall be construed and interpreted accordingly.

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

29         Further provisions relating to the administration of this Agreement are included in Appendix One.

 


 

 

EXECUTED on behalf of [Iwi name]

 

 

 

by                                                                    ______________________________________

                                                                        CHAIRPERSON

 

 

EXECUTED on behalf of AUCKLAND COUNCIL

 

 

 

 

by                                                                    ______________________________________

                                                                        MAYOR

 

 

EXECUTED on behalf of [to insert] Local Board

 

 

 

 

by                                                                    ______________________________________

                                                                        CHAIRPERSON

 

 


 

APPENDIX ONE

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

 

KEY CONTACT PERSONS & COMMUNICATION

1.   The key contact persons, and contact details for each party at the time of the signing of this Agreement are:

a.          [Insert for Iwi]; and

b.         [Insert for Council].

2.   All formal notices must be sent to the addresses set out above.

Protection of sensitive information

3.   The parties acknowledge that some information shared between them will be confidential, but that under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 the Council may be required to provide requested information.

4.   Where a party receives, or has received, whether before or after the commencement date, confidential information from the other party the recipient must, except as required by law:

(a)         keep the confidential information confidential;

(b)        not use, disclose or reproduce the confidential information for any purpose other than the purpose for which it was provided by the disclosing party;

(c)         not, without the disclosing party's prior written consent, disclose the confidential information to any person other than the recipient's employees, subcontractors, agents, officers and representatives who need the information for the purpose for which it was provided by the disclosing party; and

(d)        establish and maintain effective security measures to safeguard the confidential information from unauthorised access, use, copying or disclosure.

Issue Resolution

5.   Within one month after the commencement date of this Agreement, the parties will agree one person to act as a mediator in the case of any issues between the parties under this Agreement.  That person may be replaced from time to time by agreement between the parties.

6.   The parties will endeavour to act in good faith to address any issues arising in respect of rights or obligations specified in this Agreement at the immediate time such issues arise.

7.   Where an issue cannot be resolved between the parties after 10 working days the issue will be escalated to:

(a)         in the case of the [Iwi name] the Chairperson of [Māori entity]; and

(b)        in the case of the Council, the Governance Director.

8.   Where an issue is still not resolved after one month of having been escalated under clause 7, the issue shall be referred to the mediator agreed under clause 5, who will work with the parties to resolve the dispute.

9.   To assist in the ongoing development of a transparent and accountable relationship, Council and [Iwi name] will inform each other of any situation or development which may jeopardise or comprise each party’s commitment to this Agreement and their overall relationship with each other.

 

Managing Conflicts

10.  Council and [Iwi name] representatives will actively manage any conflict of interest that may arise, be they perceived or actual conflicts.

[to discuss other administrative provisions including notice provisions]

 

Resourcing

Capacity Funding

11.  Council recognises that it has a responsibility to enable (Iwi name) to participate and contribute to council decision-making processes. Council will negotiate a capacity funding agreement with the (Entity name) to enable (Iwi name) contribution.

Master Service Agreement

12.  Council will require the assistance and information from (Iwi name) through a range of policy planning and service initiatives. Council will negotiate a mater service agreement with the Iwi Trust that will enable departments to seek technical, cultural and professional advice from (Iwi name).

13.  Council will encourage Council Controlled Organisations to develop similar instruments to enable more effective engagement with (Iwi name).


 

APPENDIX TWO

Existing projects or arrangements

[e.g. attach statutory obligations, co-management agreements, other agreements and instruments,  iwi/hapu projects of interest to council, engagement protocols for iwi/hapu, local boards and governing body, local board projects of interest to mana whenua, regional projects of interest to mana whenua, resource consent protocols.]

 

 


 

APPENDIX THREE

FURTHER projects or arrangements

[e.g. attach joint work programme, projects or arrangements agreed in the future at the time they are agreed]

 


 

APPENDIX FOUR

SPECIFIC LOCAL BOARD ARRANGEMENTS

[Insert any specific arrangements for local boards]


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - September 2017 to the Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

File No.: CP2017/12891

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to respond to requests on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), provide a summary of consultation material sent to the Board and, provide transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Henderson-Massey Local Board and its community.

Executive summary

2.       In particular, this report covers:

·    Progress report on the Board’s advocacy initiatives

·    Progress report on the Board’s transport capital fund projects

·    Consultation documents on proposed safety improvements

·    Local Board requests on transport-related matters.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receives the Auckland Transport update September 2017.

b)      approves the sum of $160,000.00 to implement the Rathgar Road Crossing (outside the Shops) from the Henderson-Massey Local Board Transport Fund.

 

Strategic alignment

 

3.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has outlined through its 2014-17 local board plan, that it has a strong interest in the role of transport and how it helps to create a connected community. This includes improving safety in our neighborhoods, improving the look of our town centres, as well as supporting people to get to the places they want to go for work and recreation.

 

4.       The local board plan has a specific transport outcome in which Auckland Transport has a key role in bringing to life:

 

OUTCOME: REAL CHOICES BETWEEN WALKING, CYCLING, PUBLIC TRANSPORT AND CARS

 

·    We (HMLB) have identified our transport priorities as increasing investment in walking and cycling infrastructure, improving public transport and reducing reliance on roads and cars.

 


 

Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan 2014-17 (Pages 38-41).

 

5.       Auckland Transport is supporting the Local Board initiatives and delivering on it’s Statement of Intent strategic themes.  Five strategic themes guide Auckland Transport’s decisions and actions and are aimed at providing an accessible, integrated, efficient and innovative transport system.  They are also critical to the realisation of Auckland Council’s vision for transport as expressed in Chapter 13 of the Auckland Plan.

 

6.       The five strategic themes endorsed by Auckland Transport’s Board are:

·    Prioritise rapid, high frequency public transport

·    Continually transform and elevate customer experience

·    Build network optimisation and resilience for travel times

·    Enable quality urban growth to meet demand

·    Fast-track creative, innovative and efficient transport services.

 

7.       The initiatives below contributes to either the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan outcomes or one of Auckland Transport’s strategic themes:

·    Auckland Transport launched a new phone app which makes catching a bus, train or ferry more intuitive and easier to use. After four months the AT Mobile app has been downloaded by over 100,000 Aucklanders. The tracking function has been a huge hit with Aucklanders, it’s a simple thing that’s made a big difference.

·    Auckland Transport will work with the Local Board and public requests for footpath improvements, through our footpath renewals and new footpath programmes.  If there are any safety issues in relation to existing footpaths AT will assess them on an individual basis and repair as required.

·    Electronic ticketing at Henderson Station went live at the beginning of August.

 

Transport Capital Fund Update

 

8.       The Local Board are in the process of deciding on some projects to allocate their Funds to:

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$4,623,969

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$1,680,349

Remaining Budget left

$2,943,620

 

Rathgar Road Crossing (Outside Shops)

 

9.       Auckland Transport has completed the Rough Order of Cost for the Rathgar Road Crossing outside the Shops as requested by the Local Board.

 

10.     As background, this project is to improve safety and to encourage slower speed on Rathgar Road for the 6 school communities in the area. Both pedestrian (in particular students from both primary schools and high schools) and cyclist demand was observed at this crossing facility.

 

11.     Observations show that vehicles sometimes fail to give way to pedestrians and cyclists at this zebra crossing facility, due to vehicles travelling too fast and not having sufficient time to brake and, it being a very busy intersection. This behaviour could lead to a pedestrian using this facility to be hit and injured or killed:   

·        During the afternoon peak (2.30-6.00pm), approximately 250 pedestrians were observed to use this crossing facility, with 50% of these pedestrians being children.

·        It is proposed to raise the existing zebra crossing with a raised speed table to increase the visibility of this facility to approaching drivers and to reduce vehicle speeds at this location.

·        While this project will enhance safety at this crossing facility and improve the amenity of the street, this project has not been prioritised at this time due to the large number of higher risk areas in Auckland that required safety interventions. 

 

12.     Therefore, Auckland Transport is seeking the Local Board to approve $160,000 from the Henderson-Massey Local Board Transport Fund to construct the pedestrian crossing on Rathgar Road outside the shops.

 

Upcoming Projects and Activities

 

Traffic Control Committee (TCC) Report

 

13.     Decisions of the TCC over the month of August 2017 affecting the Henderson-Massey Local Board area are shown below:

 

Moire Road / Manutewhau Road / George McWhirter Avenue / Ambar Ridge Avenue / Granville Drive / White Heron Drive

Massey

Lane Arrow markings, No Stopping At All Times, removal of Bus Stop, Road Hump, Give-Way control, Flush Median, Traffic Island and Number of Lanes

 

Consultation documents on proposed safety improvements

 

14.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Henderson-Massey Local Board for its feedback. As the Board’s transport portfolio holders provide feedback on the Board’s behalf, the material below is included for general information purposes only:

 

·    Proposal to install a roundabout on Sel Peacock Drive, Henderson

 

Local Board Response

 

15.     The Local Board were supportive of what is being proposed.

 

Te Atatu Business Association P120 Car Parks, Bus Shelter and Timetable Requests

 

P120 Car Parks

 

16.     Auckland Transport’s (AT) Parking Services team has noted that the local board is meeting with Parking Designer to discuss the issues.  We will undertake an investigation and inform the association of the result.

 

Bus Shelter and Timetable

 

17.     AT’s Public Transport team can advise that Bus Stop 5091 is located next to the Community Centre and Library. The architectural design of the building provides shelter for passengers, and at this point in time there are no plans to install additional seating or shelter. Requests for amendments to the current structure are the responsibility of Auckland Council (AC).  The Henderson-Massey local board’s comments regarding the bus timetable has been passed on to our Service Information team for investigation. A timetable was attached and installed to the bus stop pole prior to the implementation of the New Network in West Auckland. If it has gone missing, AT will endeavour to replace it as soon as possible.

 

Hepburn and Great North Road Intersection Safety Issues

 

18.     AT has considered the option of a speed table on the left turn slip lane however, because of the sharp angle compounded with the high volume of heavy vehicles, this option is not feasible. Additionally, the installation of a speed table here would affect the capacity and level of service on this route, cause discomfort for bus passengers, and result in on-going maintenance costs due to the high stress on the road surface.

 

19.     AT have studied the reported crashes for the intersection area over a five-year period, none have involved left turning vehicles from Great North Road. While on site we observed that the Give Way signs and markings are not clearly visible to oncoming traffic. The signs are obscured by the vegetation and the bus stop sign on the corner. This may have contributed to the speeding traffic on the slip lane. To improve visibility for the oncoming traffic, we propose to carry out the following works:

 

·    Remove the vegetation

·    Relocate the Give Way marking further west so it is clearly visible to drivers

·    Install an additional Give Way sign at the back of the guardrail so it clearly visible to drivers

·    Relocate the bus stop sign further west to align with the bus stop marking

·    Install continuity lines on Hepburn Road in front of the Give Way Limit Line to provide   better delineation for left turning traffic.

 

20.     The measures above will be implemented by the end of September 2017. 

 

Wadier Place Parking Issues

 

Site visit to Wadier Place, Great North Road

 

21.     AT’s Parking Services Team completed its investigation with the manager of WestCity Halal Meats. The manager explained that the request for a loading zone and for parking near the butchery, was to assist with the accessible unloading of their large truck deliveries which usually happen twice a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The P30 restrictions on Wadier Place are directly outside the storage area of the butchery, which is on the ground floor of a large residential block of approximately 40 to 50 apartments. The residents in the apartment block have allocated off-street parking.

 

 

Request For P120 Restrictions On Current Unrestricted Side Of Wadier Place

 

22.     Parking time restrictions are normally used as a tool to facilitate turnover and manage high parking demand. There are no parking availability issues identified in the area. The site visit indicated that the section of Wadier Place near WestCity Halal Meats was close to capacity. However, there were available unrestricted parking spaces within close proximity to the butchery. Therefore, installing time restrictions on Wadier Place at this stage is not justified. On-street parking is a valuable public asset, where changes are not made solely to meet the needs of a particular individual, business, or organisation. If amendments to the parking layout are to be made, then it has to be ensured that the varied needs of the wider community are met.

 


 

Request For Loading Zone

 

23.     The suggested location (Being the P30 area closest to the butchery - see attached drawing) is too narrow, as it is only 2.5 metres in width and therefore unsuitable as a loading zone. Alternative parking was discussed with the manager, to ensure there was available parking on his delivery days. It should also be noted that large delivery trucks can get into the private parking area directly in front of the butchery but the manager says that this is less convenient than unloading on Wadier Place. There have also been incidents involving large trucks causing damage to the overhanging canopies of the building.

 

(See attachment A)

 

Enforcement of parking restrictions on Wadier Place

 

24.     There are three P30 spaces, and these are monitored daily and during the night shift. Since 1 May 2017, 22 infringement notices have been issued.

 

Request For NSAAT Lines On One Side Of Wadier Place

 

25.     A further detailed investigation needs to be undertaken to ensure a comprehensive review of this issue. This investigation has been prioritised and programmed for review. An update will be provided to the local board by the end of November 2017.

 

Vodanovich Road Intersection Safety Issues Update

 

26.     AT have completed data collection and analysis at this intersection, which includes video monitoring of vehicular movements. AT is currently investigating options to improve safety at this intersection and has developed preliminary designs. AT will be in a position to finalise the preferred option for further investigation by end of September. Auckland Transport will be in a position to consult the Local Board and residents once the preferred option is finalised. Any construction would be expected to occur in the 2018/19 financial year.

 

Local Board Issues Being Investigated

 

27.     The Local board have requested the following issues be investigated and they are in the initial investigation stage:

 

·    10 Waitoro Lane, Henderson street lighting request

·    59 Swanson Road, requesting for no stopping lines

·    Alan Ave Reserve Walkway

·    Felgrove Street Parking Issues

·    Westgate Drive, Westgate Speed.

 

28.     Auckland Transport will report back to the Local Board on these once the work is  completed.

 

Consideration

 

Local board views and implications

 

29.     The Board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

 

Māori impact statement

 

30.     No specific issues with regard to impacts on Maori are triggered by this report and any engagement with Maori will be carried out on an individual project basis.

 

Implementation

 

31.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritization, funding and consultation.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Wadier Place Parking Issues - Attachment

35

     

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster, Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Te Whau Pathway Scheme Assessment Report

 

File No.: CP2017/17464

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to note the completion of the Te Whau Pathway Scheme Assessment Report, endorse the move to detailed design and resource consent and request Local Board Transport Capital Funds for Te Whau Pathway.

Executive summary

2.       Te Whau Pathway will link the Waitemata and Manukau Harbours via a shared path designed to accommodate pedestrians and cyclists.  Modelling predicts over 110,000 pedestrians and cyclists will use the path each year when it is complete.

3.       The Scheme Assessment Report for Te Whau Pathway has been completed and includes a Benefit Cost Ratio (BCR) calculated in accordance with the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) Economic Evaluation Manual.  The BCR is 2.2 for metal handrails and 2.4 for wood handrails.  The strategic fit and link to SH16 are strong benefits.

4.       Te Whau Pathway is a partnership project and work to date has been funded by these partners: the Whau Coastal Walkway Environment Trust, Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and the Whau and Henderson-Massey Local Boards.

5.       Funding for Te Whau Pathway is required through the Auckland Council Long Term Plan.  Once funding is secured, external funding will be sort, including an application to the New Zealand Transport Agency.  The Whau Coastal Walkway Environment Trust will also raise further funds for the pathway.

6.       $100,000 from the Local Board’s Transport Capital Fund in 2017/18 is requested for the connector path in Tiroroa Esplanade Reserve which will join the growth funded main path in Roberts Field.

7.       An allocation of $300,000 in 2018/19 and $300,000 in 2019/20 from the Local Board’s Transport Capital Fund is requested for Te Whau Pathway.  This will be used on physical works and will assist when applying to NZTA for funding.

8.       It is proposed that Te Whau Pathway proceed to the detailed design and consent stage and be funded by the Long Term Plan because the pathway will provide a safe and efficient off road environment for hundreds of people each day, including many of the 6,000 students who live near the path.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      note the completion of Te Whau Pathway Scheme Assessment Report dated 30 June 2017.

b)      agree to proceed to detailed design and resource consent for Te Whau Pathway.

c)      allocate $100,000 of Local Board Transport Capital Fund in 2017/18 to construction of the connector path in Tiroroa Esplanade Reserve.

d)      allocate $300,000 in 2018/19 and $300,000 in 2019/20 of Local Board Transport Capital Fund towards Te Whau Pathway for physical works.

 

Comments

Scheme Assessment Report

9.       Te Whau Pathway will be 12km long and connect the Waitemata and Manukau Harbours following the ancient Maori portage route between the harbours (figure 1).

Te Whau Pathway AT Consultation map

Figure 1: Te Whau Pathway route between Te Atatu and Green Bay in West Auckland

 

10.     The pathway is part of the Auckland Cycle Network and will be both an express metro route and a local connector.  It will link currently unconnected communities along the river and improve the environmental and recreational value of 30 parks along its route.

11.     The Scheme Assessment Report (SAR) for Te Whau Pathway has been completed (30 June 2017) for Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.  It is over 1,000 pages and includes a preliminary design, economic evaluation, geotechnical investigation, archaeological report, ecological reports, regulatory analysis, a reviewed project cost, proposed materials, contamination assessment, arborist report, visual assessment, staging options, public art framework and an urban and landscape design framework. 

12.     The report, funded by Auckland Transport, outlines the preferred route and material options for the pathway and completes the last stage in the project investigation phase.  It provides a solid foundation for investment in the project going forward. 

Risks and Issues

13.     Risks and issues identified in the Scheme Assessment Report include:

·    Objections from a small number of adjacent residents because of impacts on visual amenity, uninterrupted views and loss of privacy.  To address this it is proposed to provide mitigation measures such as fencing, screen planting and tinted windows for severely impacted properties.  The resource consent application will be publically notified to ensure the full range of public opinion is heard on the proposal.

·    Areas of the pathway feeling unsafe because they are isolated.  Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles have been used to minimise this issue where ever possible, to create well used open public spaces with good visibility and passive surveillance.

·    A risk that costs increase during project development, for example if unforeseen geological conditions exist.  The current project budget includes 30% contingency to provide a buffer for such scenarios. 

Benefits of Te Whau Pathway

14.     Te Whau Pathway strongly supports many Auckland Plan, Long Term Plan and Local Board Plans such as:

·    a well-connected and accessible Auckland

·    improved performance of the transport network by providing infrastructure to make walking and cycling real options for more Aucklanders

·    providing quality public open space which is a critical component for healthy lifestyles in an urban environment

·    a green Auckland, creating ecological connections through seven suburbs

·    Whau Local Board outcomes: “A healthy Whau River and valued environment” and “In the Whau, it’s 20 minutes to everything we need”

·    Henderson-Massey Local Board outcomes: “Real choices between walking, cycling, public transport and cars”

15.     Te Whau Pathway will provide a safe and efficient environment for pedestrians and cyclists in communities along the Whau River and Portage Road.  The pathway is an essential link in the Auckland Cycle Network.  Te Whau Pathway has a dual purpose: it is both an express metro route and a local connector.  It will improve access to the city via the State Highway 16 cycle path and the proposed New Lynn to Avondale shared path.  This will maximise the benefits of all of these pathways and provide links to the New Lynn and Avondale rail stations, enabling multi-modal travel. 

16.     The pathway is in the catchment of 23 schools with 6,000 students and will provide a new safer off road path that connects schools with the community.  Modelling predicts 620 pedestrians and 310 cyclists a day will use the busiest section of the pathway when it is complete.

Consultation and Support

17.     383 submissions were received during public consultation on the draft Scheme Plan. Overall, most submitters indicated great support for the project, and are excited about the new recreational, educational and commuting opportunities that the pathway will provide.  They liked that the pathway design is simple and fits with the environment and the path is scenic and away from traffic

18.     25 submitters did not support the project with the main reasons being safety and security, particularly at night.  Other issues raised included the pathway being an eyesore and unsympathetic with the Whau River environment.  Some said the pathway will destroy outlooks and privacy and devalue property.  The pathway will be lit at night and has been designed to achieve Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles. 

Project Partners

19.     Te Whau Pathway is a partnership between the Whau Coastal Walkway Environment Trust, mana whenua (Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei), Auckland Transport, the Whau and Henderson-Massey Local Boards and Auckland Council. 

Project Funding

20.     The Whau Coastal Walkway Environment Trust has raised $1.5 million for the 3km of paths built in parks so far.  The Trust plans to raise another $5 million over the next five years for the pathway.  Auckland Council has funded the detailed design and consenting of the paths built to date.

21.     Auckland Transport funded the Project Feasibility Report and the Scheme Assessment Report (approx. $1.1M).  Auckland Transport budget has been secured to enable detailed design to continue in 2017/18 ($1.4M). 

22.     Both the Whau and Henderson-Massey Local Boards have provided funds for the project and have indicated they will continue to support and fund the project going forward.

23.     There is a significant opportunity to secure a portion of the project costs from the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA).  This requires evidence of the local share of costs in the first instance, such as inclusion of the project in the Auckland Council Long Term Plan. 

24.     This report requests Henderson-Massey Local Board consider allocating $100,000 for the connector path in Tiroroa Esplanade Reserve from its Local Board Transport Capital Fund in the 2017/18 financial year. This will complement the main path to be built in neighbouring Roberts Field from growth funding.

25.     This report requests an allocation of $300,000 in 2018/19 and $300,000 in 2019/20 to Te Whau Pathway for physical works.  This will assist the bid for the project when applying for NZTA funding. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     Te Whau Pathway is mentioned in the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan and is a high priority action for trails in the Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan. 

27.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board have provided $50,000 towards Te Whau Pathway for interpretation panels, restoration plans and planting. 

Māori impact statement

28.     Representatives from mana whenua iwi (Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei) sit on the project steering group and are involved in project decision making at this governance level. 

29.     Cultural Impact Assessments have been provided by these two iwi as well as Ngati Te Ata Waiohua. 

30.     The Landscape and Urban Design Framework of the Scheme Assessment Report defines the design principles and concepts of Te Whau Pathway.  It includes the Te Aranga Design Principles and lists mana whenua aspirations for the pathway including mana whenua-led creative expression of aspirations and traditions and appropriate inclusion of Te Reo Māori throughout the project. 

Implementation

Long Term Plan

31.     Funding for the remaining 9km of the pathway is not yet secured.  The cost estimate for the rest of the pathway is $64-69 million, depending on the type of handrails used on the boardwalk in the final design.  This figure includes 30% contingency. 

32.     An application to the NZTA can be made to part fund the project.  If NZTA agree the project fits their criteria they can reimburse a portion of the project costs, up to 53%.  However, NZTA require evidence of the local share of funding.  Therefore, Council must agree to fund the project in full through the Long Term Plan before NZTA funding can be made available. 

Detailed Design and Resource Consent

33.     The Scheme Assessment Report provides a solid foundation for the pathway and is the final step in the project investigation phase.  The project will now move to the design stage, which includes detailed design of priority sections and publically notified resource consent for the entire pathway route. 

34.     Once funding is secured and resource consent is granted, physical works on the boardwalk sections of Te Whau Pathway can begin.  It is hoped to complete Te Whau Pathway by 2022.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jacki Byrd - Te Whau Pathway Project Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Agreement to lease and community lease to Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust, Moire Park, 91-93 Moire Road, Massey

 

File No.: CP2017/19008

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To grant an agreement to lease and a community lease to Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust located at Moire Park, 91-93 Moire Road, Massey.  

Executive summary

2.       Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust (the trust) has a current Deed of Lease for a council owned hall expiring 31 October 2025 and a Deed of Lease for a group owned crèche expiring 31 October 2017.

3.       On 21 July 2016 the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to approve the asset transfer of the council owned hall to the trust. The committee also requested that staff liaise with the trust to surrender its current lease arrangements and enter into an agreement to lease and new community lease for the land. This will enable the trust to build its proposed new community facility (Attachment A).

Resolution number FIN/2016/106        

4.       Before a new lease can be issued to the trust, the portion of recreation reserve occupied by the trust must be reclassified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

5.       On 15 August 2017 the Henderson-Massey Local Board resolved to endorse the proposed reclassification of a portion (977.3m2 more or less) of Part Lot 241 DP 83562 from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in terms of section 24 (1) (b) of the Reserves Act 1977 (Attachment B).

Resolution number HM/2017/136

6.       Council has satisfactorily completed the required statutory process of engagement with iwi. Reclassifying the 977.3m² portion of Part Lot 241 DP 83562 currently classified as recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve would mean that the trust may be granted a new agreement to lease and community lease without the need for public notification.  

7.       This report recommends the Henderson-Massey Local Board grant an agreement to lease and new community lease to the trust. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      grant an agreement to lease to Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust Incorporated subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – five years commencing 19 September 2017;

ii)       the landlord successfully reclassifying that part of the premises which is recreation reserve as local purpose reserve;

iii)      Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust securing all necessary funding and intent from suppliers for the proposed new facility prior to the commencement of its works;

iv)      Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust obtaining all necessary regulatory consents for the proposed new facility prior to the commencement of its works;

v)      Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust obtaining landowner approval and adhering to the conditions detailed in the landowner approval throughout its works;

vi)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

b)      approves the surrender of the current Deeds of Lease dated 2 December 2010 and 9 January 2008 effective upon the date of Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust entering in to a new community lease.

c)      grant a new community lease to Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust located on part of Moire Park, 93 Moire Road, Massey (Attachment C) on the following terms and conditions:-

i)        term – 10 years with one right of renewal for a period of 10 years commencing on the date of practical completion and issue of code compliance certificate for its proposed new facility;

ii)       rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      the approved Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust Community Outcomes Plan be attached to the lease document (Attachment D);

iv)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

 

 

Comments

8.       The trust currently has a deed of lease for a council owned hall expiring 31 October 2025 and a deed of lease for a group owned crèche expiring 31 October 2017.  These leases will be surrendered once the agreement to lease conditions have` been satisfied and the trust will enter into a new community lease for the existing crèche and new build. 

9.       An agreement to lease of five years will enable the Trust time to raise funds, obtain landowner approval and obtain all necessary regulatory consents for the proposed new facility prior to the commencement of its works.

10.     The trust have long held a desire to demolish the council owned hall and build a new facility that will better cater to the needs of its community, with a strong focus on empowering Samoan children and their families and preparing them for long term education (Attachment E).

11.     The proposed new facility will allow the trust to maintain and protect its heritage language and culture and increase the number of Pasifika children attending the centre. 

Trust’s history and background

12.     The trust is an early childhood education and care centre in Massey.  Its learning programme is designed to develop children’s appreciation of fa’a samoa and christian values. 

13.     The trust delivers educational programmes to children from birth to five years under a license with the Ministry of Education and has developed strong community engagement with active involvement in supporting parent’s literacy and educational achievements. 

14.  The vision of the trust is to:

-     provide quality care and education in a warm, loving, caring and safe environment offered from a Samoan, Christian and cultural perspective;

-     help children to grow up as confident and competent learners and communicators, healthy in mind, body and spirit, secure in their sense of belonging and in the knowledge that they make a valued contribution to society.

15.     The trust provides programs to support parents in literacy and numeracy and assist local children and students with homework support.

16.     The trust is financially viable and audited accounts show proper accounting records have been kept.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     In June 2016 a report to the Henderson-Massey Local Board approved recommending to the governing body the transfer of the community hall to the trust.

18.     In June 2017 the Henderson-Massey Local Board gave informal support for Auckland Council staff to consult with mana whenua on the reclassification of a portion of land at Moire Park, to allow for an agreement to lease and new community lease to the trust.

19.     In August 2017 a report to the Henderson-Massey Local Board approved endorsing the proposed reclassification of a portion (977.3m2 more or less) of Part Lot 241 DP 83562 from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in terms of section 24 (1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Māori impact statement

20.     During June and July 2017, Auckland Council staff engaged with 11 mana whenua identified as having an interest in land in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

21.     Engagement was undertaken by way of email.  Of the three iwi that responded, there were no concerns raised with the proposal (Attachment F).

22.     The trust has an established and on-going working relationship with the local marae Te Piringatahi Marae, Luckens Road, West Harbour.

23.     A treaty clause will be included in any new deed of lease to the trust about the possibility of the land being returned to the Crown should a successful claim be lodged over the land. 

Implementation

24.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Finance & Performance Committee Report 2017

47

b

Resolution Henderson Massey 2017

59

c

Site Plan

61

d

Community Outcomes Plan

63

e

Concept Plan

65

f

Iwi Consultation

67

     

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Knudsen - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Attachment B

 

18

Endorsement to re-classify a portion of land located at Moire Park, 93 Moire Road, Massey

 

Resolution number HM/2017/136

MOVED by Chairperson S Henderson, seconded by Member V Neeson:  

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)         endorse the proposed reclassification of  a portion (977.3m² more or less) of Part Lot 241 DP 83562 from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in terms of section 24(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977 (Attachment A).

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Attachment C:  Blue outline – Moire Park

Red outline – New leased area to Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

 

Name and Location of Land/Facility

Moire Park, 93 Moire Road, Massey

Name of the Community it serves

Waitakere

Local Board Area

Henderson-Massey

Name of Community Group

Leataata O Le Lumanai Samoa Trust 

Contact person

Taha Fasi

Name of Community Lease Advisor

Michelle Knudsen

 

Auckland Council and Local Board Priorities

Performance Measure

Target

Achievements

Local Board Outcome

A community where we know our neighbours, work together on issues and value diversity

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Plan Outcome

A fair, safe and healthy Auckland

 

 

Engage with the community

 

 

 

 

Recruitment

 

 

Number of children attending the pre-school

 

Pre-school hours of operation

 

 

 

 

Parental and community support programmes

 

 

Paid staff

 

 

Volunteers

 

 

Operate under Ministry of Education guidelines

 

 

Safe practices

 

 

 

Conduct or participate in two community events per annum

 

List the community events

 

List the Trust’s initiatives for recruitment

 

Approximately 50  children

 

 

Monday - Friday

8.00am to 5.00pm

 

Saturday - Sunday

As and when required

 

List the programmes provided by the Trust for parents and students

 

Number of full time paid staff

Number of part time paid staff

 

Number of full time volunteers

Number of part time volunteers

 

Contract with Ministry of Education to continue – review annually

 

1 adult per pre-school to have a current first aid certificate

 

 

Local Board Outcome

We are an eco-city

 

Auckland Plan Outcome

A green Auckland

Educate children about recycling, sustainable living and protecting the environment. 

3 lessons on recycling waste per annum

 

2 lessons on how to protect the environment per annum

 

Ensure that Auckland Council recycling bins are available at all times

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 



Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Youth Space at Massey Leisure

 

File No.: CP2017/18969

 

  

 

Purpose

 

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide the Henderson – Massey local board with information on a proposal from the YMCA of Auckland (YMCA) who are seeking funding for developing a dedicated youth space at the Massey Leisure Centre and Library.

Executive Summary

2.       Massey Leisure Centre is a council owned recreation centre in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area that is operated by the YMCA under an operational contract. 

3.       The YMCA’s contract includes the delivery of youth programmes aimed at building community resilience and relationships by engaging with community groups and delivering targeted programmes.

4.       The YMCA would like to transform an under-utilised space within the Massey Leisure Centre and Library into a designated youth hub where young people can study and learn, participate in workshops and events, socialise with their peers and build a support network.

5.       The YMCA has costed the works at $87,448 which includes interior and external building works and fit out, and have already secured funding from the Trusts Million Dollar Mission and are seeking the remaining $36,538 from the Henderson-Massey Local Board to undertake the project.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      approve funding of $36,585 plus GST from unallocated LDI capex 2017/2018 to the YMCA of Auckland to develop the dedicated youth space at the Massey Leisure Centre and Library.

 

Comments

 

6.       The YMCA of Auckland currently operates the Massey Leisure Centre on behalf of Auckland Council.  They have consistently had a focus on youth and youth leadership and have successfully run the Raise Up programme at the centre over a long period of time. 

7.       The young people in the programme (Raise Up crew) make decisions that affect their local community and assist in the planning, promotion and running of programmes and events offered in the local area. The crew is overseen and facilitated by the Raise Up Coordinator.

8.       Young people who volunteer on the programme gain leadership skills, self-confidence and offer skills to Raise Up that will benefit other young people, their whanau and their community. Each local programme also supports young people to access other volunteering opportunities through their local networks.

9.       Programmed youth focused activities are offered to the local community such as dance classes, basketball programmes, leadership courses, youth fitness etc. The need for these activities is determined by gaining feedback from the local youth community via the Raise Up crew members and social media.

10.     This programme is currently run out of a small office in the centre and events are activities are delivered in shard space throughout the centre.

11.     There is currently there is no designated youth space in the Massey community, with the nearest being Zeal in Henderson and the travel is prohibitive for the youth of Massey. 

12.     The YMCA would like to transform an under-utilised space within the Massey Leisure Centre and Library into a designated youth hub where young people can study and learn, participate in workshops and events, socialise with their peers and build a support network.

13.     The youth hub will be a venue for meetings, workshops and events hosted by local youth. It provides a space to bring young people together in one place; to plan and implement youth-focused activities and events, learn new skills, share experiences, socialise with their peers and build support networks. It fosters in a sense of belonging and community spirit in young people. These events include arts, culture and sport that are tailored to the interest of the local youth.

Proposal

14.     The YMCA is proposing to develop the area at the end of the corridor that runs alongside the stadium which is currently underutilised and to create a link to the courtyard at the back of the building which is currently not used. 

15.     The YMCA has scoped and costed the works which include, conducting interior and exterior building works; including: new exterior aluminium windows and doors, relocate gym windows and doors, landscaping and decking as well as a full fit out of the new space. This has been costed at $87,448.  A copy of the estimate is attached in appendix 1 and a high level breakdown is attached in the table below.

CPL invoice interior

$45,416.00

 

CPL Interior fit out

$38,587.00

 

Cable Com (Wi-Fi cabling)

$1,335.00

 

Tomizone Wi-Fi  hardware

$1,550.00

 

Opening event

$600.00

 

TOTAL Project Cost

$87,448.00 (+gst)

 

 

16.     The Trusts Million Dollar Mission has approved $38,375 (plus GST) towards the project.  The Henderson-Massey Local Board has already approved $12,000 from LDI community response opex 2017/2018 (resolution number HM/2017/57).

The Trust

$38,375.00

Received

HM Local Board (council)

$12,000.00

Received

Unfunded

$36,585.00

 

TOTAL Revenue

$86,960.00 (+gst)

 

 

Option 1 – Additional Local Board Funding

17.     The YMCA is seeking additional ($36,585 plus GST) funding from the local board to fund the fit out of the project.

18.     Approval of work would allow the centre to have a dedicated space for local youth to plan and meet on a regular basis, helping YMCA achieve the Raise UP KPI. Currently they use the centre’s group fitness space which has limited availability.

19.     In addition to the current Raise Up KPI, Active Recreation will be monitored YMCA on the following; 5 hours of extra programming for young people per week, 2 extra partnership programme ran from the youth hub per year, 10 hours per week of drop in time for young people, 2 hours of extra group fitness hours available to be offered (in space vacated by the youth programmes).

 

 

 

Option 2 – Provide part funding

20.     Part funding would allow some work to occur around the dedicated space however this would not give a fully functional space where they can run workshops, plan event and hold meetings and would require the YMCA to seek additional funding from other agencies to complete the project.

Option 3 – Don’t support the project

21.     With the Library moving to Westgate there is an opportunity for a dedicated youth space to be developed as part of the centre redevelopment at that time.   Work is still underway to confirm what activity or activities will be undertaken in the vacant library space, the local board could ensure space is made available to cater for the needs of the youth and the youth programme. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

22.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board has expressed their support for the development of a youth hub at Massey Leisure Centre through the previous allocation of funding.

Māori impact statement

23.     Massey Leisure Centre works closely with community organisations and youth groups. This includes Maori organisations like Te Wananga o Aotearoa, to promote Raise Up opportunities to youth. The youth hub will improve Maori social wellbeing by giving young Maori a space, with the support that they need, to thrive, achieve their goals and develop qualities of contributing members of society.

Implementation

24.     Additional Key Performance Indicators will be included for this project within the YMCA’s contract for service at Massey Leisure Centre.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Massey Interior Fit OUt Quote 1

81

b

Massey New Space Fit Out Quote 2

83

     

Signatories

Authors

Darryl Hamilton – Aquatic and Recreation Facilities Contract Manager

Authorisers

Rob McGee - Manager Leisure – Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Riverpark Reserve Playground Upgrade

 

File No.: CP2017/17641

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Henderson-Massey Local Board to allocated funding to upgrade the playground at Riverpark Reserve and install fitness stations purchased by Riverpark Action Group.

Executive summary

2.       Members from Riverpark Action Group (RAG) have approached the Henderson-Massey Local Board requesting that the playground at Riverpark Reserve be upgraded.  RAG have also proposed to purchase four fitness stations for Riverpark Reserve and ask that the Henderson-Massey Local Board fund the installation of these fitness stations.

3.       The Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan 2015-2025 (OSNP) identifies that the playground at Riverpark should be expanded to a medium sized playground.

4.       The playground at Riverpark Reserve will not be renewed for several years.  There is an opportunity for the local board to fund the expansion of the playground in 2018/2019 to provide improved play opportunities for the local community and further activate the park.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      approve LDI Opex funding of $10,000 for consultation and design to be undertaken by the Investigation and Design team in the 2017/2018 financial year

b)      approve LDI Capex funding of $110,000 for the upgrade of the play facilities at Riverpark Reserve to be undertaken in the 2018/2019 financial year

c)      approve LDI Capex funding of $4,000 for the installation of fitness stations provided by Riverpark Action Group, to coincide with physical works in the 2018/2019 financial year

d)      approve the reallocation of LDI Capex funding of $4,000, as part of upgrading the play facilities, should Riverpark Action Group not be successful in purchasing the fitness stations.

 

 

Comments              

Background

5.       The playground at Riverpark Reserve consists of a swing set with a junior and senior swing and a small ladder and slide module.  Woodchip safety surfacing is contained within a raised timber edge.

6.       Riverpark Reserve playground was audited in 2015 as part of council’s ongoing asset condition auditing programme.  The playground was given a condition rating of three, indicating that the playground asset is in a moderate condition.  Condition ratings range from one (new condition) to five (poor condition).  This playground is not included within the current three year renewal programme.

7.       The Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan 2015-2025 (OSNP) has identified that the playground at Riverpark Reserve should be expanded to a medium sized playground to increase the diversity of play experiences for the local community.

8.       The level of service outlined by the OSNP for a medium sized playground is outlined in the table below

Playground Size

Number of play experiences provided

Number of age ranges provided for (age ranges: 1-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12, 13+)

Playground support facilities

Medium

7 to 12

Minimum of 3 age ranges

Seating

Rubbish bin

Table: Level of service for playgrounds from the Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan

9.       The two closest playgrounds to Riverpark Reserve are at Kingdale Reserve and Don Buck Corner which are 750 metres and 900 metres walking distance away respectively.  Access to both of these sites would be across main arterial roads and would be a safety concern for young children to access without parental supervision.

10.     There is a lack of play opportunities in the Lincoln North area.  Current reserve areas within Lincoln North are not appropriate for the development of play facilities. Providing improved play experiences at Riverpark Reserve would also benefit the Lincoln North community. RAG propose to apply for external funding to purchase four double fitness stations from Playground Centre (an approved Auckland Council supplier), and request that the local board fund the installation in Riverpark Reserve.  The fitness stations would be installed on concrete pads along an existing well used footpath network. The fitness stations would become council assets once installed.

11.     This proposal is strategically aligned with the Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan, Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan and the Local Board Plan. 

12.     The proposal also aligns with Auckland Councils organisational strategy of Six Steps Up:

·    Our citizens have a strong voice and are key in shaping Auckland.

·    We do more with less without compromising services and the customer experience.

Funding

13.     Funding is not currently allocated to renew or upgrade the playground or install fitness stations at Riverpark Reserve.

14.     Community Facilities have advised that approximately $30,000 would be available to renew the playground at Riverpark Reserve in future years.  This funding could be brought forward to align with construction of a larger playground in 2018/2019.

15.     Initial discussions with the Investigation and Design team have indicated that a medium sized playground and associated services would cost between $120,000 and $150,000.  A high level concept layout is attached as Attachment A.  Once consultation has been undertaken and a concept design developed a more accurate cost can be provided.

16.     $10,000 would be required to undertake site investigations, consultation and design.  It is proposed to undertake this in the 2017/2018 financial year.

17.     Budget of up to $110,000 would be required to undertake detailed design, obtain any necessary consents, project management and construction.  It is proposed to undertake this work in the 2018/2019 financial year.

18.     The installation of four double sized fitness stations on concrete pads would cost approximately $4,000.  It is proposed that this funding would sit as a provisional sum within the physical work contract to upgrade the playground.  In the event that RAG is unable to purchase fitness stations, it is also proposed that this budget be reallocated budget to the playground upgrade project.  

Consideration

Local board views and implications

19.     The playground upgrade and fitness stations were discussed with the Henderson-Massey Local Board at a workshop on 8 August 2017.  Members are supportive of both proposals in principle and have indicated support for associated funding allocation.  Members requested that an upgraded playground be challenging, unique, incorporate elements of natural play, and appeal to a broad age range. 

Māori impact statement

20.     Riverpark Reserve contains a cultural landing site. Historic heritage is of fundamental importance to Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions. Should funding be approved, the project will be developed in consultation with Mana Whenua.

Implementation

21.     The Investigation and Design team will undertake consultation with the local community and RAG to develop a concept design.  The concept design will be presented to the board.

22.     Renewal funding allocated for the playground at Riverpark Reserve will be brought forward to the 2018/2019 financial year and be incorporated into the project budget.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Riverpark Reserve Play Space Layout Plan

89

     

Signatories

Authors

Parks and Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Elite Investment Group Limited at 289 Great North Road, Henderson.

 

File No.: CP2017/18137

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Henderson-Massey Local Board, for new road names for the private right of way created by way of subdivision at 289 Great North Road, Henderson.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming.

3.       The Applicant Elite Investment Group Limited have submitted the following road names in order of preference :

·    Sophie Lane

          With the alternatives being:

·    Mirko Lane

·    Luka Lane

4.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically requires that road names reflect:

·    a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·    a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity feature; or

·    an existing (or introduce) thematic identity in the area

         The criteria also encourage the use of Maori names. Names also need to be easily identifiable and intuitively clear, thus minimising confusion.

5.       All of the proposed road names are deemed to meet the criteria and are acceptable to NZ Post and Land Information New Zealand (LINZ).

6.       The road naming criteria suggests road types that could be used and the Applicant has chosen Lane. This road type meets the road naming criteria.

7.       Therefore, the following road names are put forward for consideration of the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

·    Sophie Lane

With the alternatives being:

·    Mirko Lane

·    Luka Lane

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the proposed road names for the new roads constructed within the subdivision being undertaken by Elite Investment Group Limited at 289 Great North Road, Henderson.

·    Sophie Lane

          With the alternatives being:

·    Mirko Lane

·    Luka Lane

 

 

Comments

8.       According to the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines, where a new public or private road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

9.       Local iwi were consulted and responses were received from Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki & Te Runanga o Ngati Whatua responded and deferred to other iwi for comment. No other responses were received.

10.     The Applicant has proposed the road names listed in the table below, in order of preference. 

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Road Naming Criteria

Road 1

Sophie Lane

(Preferred)

 

Their client’s preference for a street name, as they have invested significant time and energy into the project and very proud of what is being created. The choice of Sophie Lane is due the name being of importance to the investor and their client wishes to honour the efforts made to develop the land.

 

Meets criteria – promotes diversity.

Mirko Lane

The historical owner of the property was Mirko Ozich (1895-1964), who owned and operated Sunrise Vineyards at this address.

Meets criteria – historical significance.

Luka Lane

Luka Ozic Basic is the father of Mirko Ozich.

Meets criteria – historical significance.

 

11.     A map showing the location of the roads is shown below.

 

 

 

Assessment

12.     Auckland Councils road naming criteria typically requires that road names reflect a historical or ancestral linkage to an area or a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity feature, or reflect an existing (or introduce) thematic identity in an area. The criterion also encourages the use of Maori names. Names also need to be easily identifiable and intuitively clear, thus minimising confusion.

13.     The applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

14.     Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names are deemed to meet the assessment criteria.

15.     All of the proposed names are acceptable to NZ Post and Land Information New Zealand (LINZ).

16.     The road naming criteria suggests road types that could be used and the Applicant has chosen Lane. This road type meets the road naming criteria.

17.     Therefore, the following road names are put forward for consideration of the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

·    Sophie Lane

With the alternatives being:

·    Mirko Lane

·    Luka Lane

Consideration

Local board views and implications

18.     The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2012-2022, allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to Section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to boards. A decision is sought from the local board in this report.

19.     The decision sought from the Henderson-Massey Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Māori impact statement

20.     The decision sought from the Henderson-Massey Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

21.     Local iwi were consulted and responses were received from Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki & Te Runanga o Ngati Whatua and deferred to other iwi for comment. No other responses were received.

Implementation

22.     The Western Consenting Subdivision Team will ensure that the appropriate road name signage will be installed by the Applicant at their full cost, once an approval is obtained for the new road name and prior to the completion of the subdivision.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Dale Rewa - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Remuneration Authority consultation document

 

File No.: CP2017/17403

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide comments on the Remuneration Authority’s Consultation Document “Local Government Review” by 15 December 2017.

Executive summary

2.       The Remuneration Authority is consulting local authorities on proposals in its consultation document “Local Government Review”. Feedback is due by Friday 15 December 2017. The Remuneration Authority wants to discuss the proposals with Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) zone meetings.

3.       The Authority has noted that they are seeking the views of councils, not individual elected members or staff.  All local boards are being provided the opportunity to respond as is the governing body.

4.       The Authority proposes the following long-term changes to the way in which remuneration is decided:

(i)         each council is sized according to proposed factors such as population

(ii)        a remuneration pool for the council is determined based on the size

(iii)       the mayor’s salary is determined by the Authority

(iv)       the council then proposes how to allocate the total pool (after the mayor’s salary is deducted) among elected members to recognise positions of responsibility

(v)        there is relativity between mayors and MPs, with the Auckland mayor being paid no more than a cabinet minister.

5.       The consultation document sets out the proposals and asks for feedback in regard to specific questions. 

6.       The proposals do not impact on expenses policies or meeting fees for resource management hearings. 

7.       The body of this report summarises the content of each section of the document and quotes the questions. Comments from staff highlight issues the local board might wish to consider. The document is in Attachment A and provides the full details of the proposals.

8.       The proposal to provide each council with a remuneration pool gives councils more flexibility to recognise varying responsibilities among members, but it puts elected members in the position of making decisions about their own salaries.

9.       The consultation document does not discuss local boards.  In other councils, community board salaries would be funded from the council pool, unless they were funded by a targeted rate.  Local boards are very different from community boards and local boards should make their comments in the context of their role and responsibilities within Auckland Council. Local boards may wish to comment on how, if the remuneration pool concept proceeds, the remuneration of local boards should be decided.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      provide its comments on the Remuneration Authority’s Consultation Document Local Government Review.

 

10.     The Remuneration Authority has circulated a discussion document with a request for comments by 15 December 2017. This is appended in Attachment A. The Authority states that a separate consultation document will be circulated for Auckland Council but that the principles in the current document will apply to Auckland Council.

11.     The Authority has noted that they are seeking the views of councils, not individual elected members or staff.  All local boards are being provided the opportunity to respond as is the governing body.

12.       Currently, the key aspects for setting remuneration for councils other than Auckland are:

(i)      a size index for each council based on population and expenditure

(ii)      job-sizing council positions in sample councils

(iii)     assessing the portion of full-time work

(iv)    the Authority’s pay scale

(v)     a pool equivalent to one member’s salary for recognising additional positions of responsibility

(vi)    a loading of 12.5% for unitary councils

(vii)    hourly rates for resource consent hearings.

13.     The report summarises the content of each section of the discussion document and quotes the questions. Comments from staff highlight issues the local board might wish to consider. The document is in Attachment A and provides the full details of the proposals.

Council size

14.     The discussion document defines council size as “the accumulated demands on any council resulting from its accountability for its unique mix of functions, obligations, assets and citizenry”.  It proposes a number of measures on which to base council size such as:

(i)      population

(ii)      operational expenditure

(iii)     asset size

(iv)    social deprivation

(v)     guest nights.

15.     For regional councils, social deprivation would not be used to assess size, but land area would be.

16.     For unitary councils, land area would be added to all other factors in order to recognise regional responsibilities.  The previous 12.5% loading would not apply.

17.     Detailed explanations about why these factors were chosen are in the discussion document.

18.     Remuneration Authority questions on sizing factors:

With regard to the proposed factors to be used for sizing councils

·    Are there significant influences on council size that are not recognised by the factors identified?

·    Are there any factors that we have identified that you believe should not be used and why?

·    When measuring council assets, do you support the inclusion of all council assets, including those commercial companies that are operated by boards?

·    If not, how should the Authority distinguish between different classes of assets? 

19.     Comments:

(i)   It is noted that prior to 2013, the Authority took population growth into account.  The councils experiencing higher growth might be expected to be faced with more complex issues to resolve than councils with stagnant growth.

(ii)  In a review conducted in 2012, the Authority stated:

The adjustment for ‘abnormal population growth’ has been discontinued, because it is felt that such growth will be reflected in a council’s expenses

Weighting

20.     The discussion document proposes weighting the factors slightly differently for different types of council.

Territorial authorities:

Population, operational expenditure

Assets

Deprivation index, visitor nights

 

Regional councils:

Operational expenditure, geographic size

Assets, population

Visitor nights

 

Unitary authorities:

Population, operational expenditure, geographic size

Assets

Deprivation index; visitor nights

 

21.     Remuneration Authority questions on weighting:

·    Are you aware of evidence that would support or challenge the relativity of the factors for each type of council?

·    If you believe other factors should be taken into account, where would they sit relative to others?

22.     Comments:

(i)   Staff do not see any issues with this proposal.

Mayoral remuneration

23.     Mayors are considered to be full-time positions.  The discussion document states that a base rate would be determined and additional amounts would be based on the size of the council as assessed above.  The Remuneration Authority would set the mayor’s salary.

24.     Remuneration Authority questions on Mayoral remuneration:

·    Should mayor/chair roles should be treated as full time?

·    If not, how should they be treated?

·    Should there be a “base” remuneration level for all mayors/chairs, with additional remuneration added according to the size of the council?

·    If so, what should determine this “base remuneration”?

25.     Comments:

(i)   For Auckland Council, the roles of the mayor, councillors and local board chairs have all been treated as full-time. There has been no diminution in role responsibilities since that was determined.  There is no rationale for change.

Councillor remuneration

26.     A total remuneration pool would be set for each council and each council would decide how to distribute the pool among elected members (after the mayoral salary has been deducted).  A 75% majority vote would be required.  The Remuneration Authority would receive each council’s decisions and would then make formal determinations.

27.     The pool could be used to recognise additional workload arising from appointments to external bodies.

28.     Remuneration Authority questions on councillor remuneration:

·    Should councillor remuneration be decided by each council within the parameters of a governance/representation pool allocated to each council by the Remuneration Authority?

·    If so, should each additional position of responsibility, above a base councillor role, require a formal role description?

·    Should each council be required to gain a 75% majority vote to determine the allocation of remuneration across all its positions?

29.     Comments:

(i)   Setting a remuneration pool for an entity with the entity then responsible for deciding how it is allocated among members, is a valid remuneration practice. 

(ii)  One issue to consider relating to the pool proposal is that the size of the pool, once determined, is fixed.  If a pool is determined for each local board, then if the number of members on a board is increased or decreased, say by a review of representation arrangements, the amount that each member is paid will decrease or increase accordingly.  This issue is acknowledged in paragraphs 102 and 103 of the discussion document.

(iii) In view of this, the local board might wish to consider its view on the assumption that the governance responsibility can be represented by a fixed pool.

(iv) A further issue to consider is that elected members would need to debate how to allocate the pool. The Remuneration Authority currently fully sets Auckland Council’s elected member remuneration.  Council has not had to debate how remuneration might be apportioned among governing body and local board members.  This would be a major change.

(v)  Staff do not see any issues with the proposals for role descriptions and a 75% majority vote.

External representation roles

30.     The Authority notes that elected members are increasingly being appointed to represent councils on various outside committees and bodies.

31.     Remuneration Authority questions on external representation roles:

·    Should external representation roles be able to be remunerated in a similar way to council positions of responsibility?

32.     Comments:

(i)   There are many bodies such as trusts and co-governance entities to which Auckland Council elected members are appointed.   These appointments are currently treated as part of the role of being an elected member.

(ii)  If the pool proposal allows councils to recognise additional responsibilities (or workload) attached to representation on external organisations, an issue to consider is whether such recognition of additional workload might then extend to internal committee membership, including the number of committees a member is part of. The issue is how granular the recognition of responsibilities should be.

Appointments to CCOs

33.     The Authority notes that some councils make appointments of elected members to CCOs.

34.     Remuneration Authority questions on appointments to CCOs:

·    Do the additional demands placed on CCO board members make it fair for elected members appointed to such boards to receive the same director fees as are paid to other CCO board members?

35.     Comments:

(i)   Auckland Council cannot legally appoint elected members to substantive CCOs, other than Auckland Transport. 

(ii)  In the current term, Auckland Council has not appointed elected members to Auckland Transport, but in previous terms the two appointees received directors’ fees.

Community boards

36.     The discussion document includes proposals and questions regarding community boards. Auckland Council does not have community boards and we recommend this is clearly stated in any local board response.

37.     Community board salaries would either come from the council pool or be separately funded by way of a targeted rate.

38.     Remuneration Authority questions on community boards:

·   Should community board remuneration always come out of the council governance/representation pool?

·   If not, should it be funded by way of targeted rate on the community concerned?

·   If not, what other transparent and fair mechanisms are there for funding the remuneration of community board members?

Local Boards

39.     The discussion document does not mention local boards.

40.     Most local boards are larger or similar in size to other councils in New Zealand.

41.     Local boards have decision-making and governance responsibilities over $500million per annum

Comments:

Local boards should comment

(i)   On the merits or otherwise of a bulk funding approach

(ii)  If the Remuneration Authority does decide on a bulk funding approach

a.   Should the governing body determine remuneration for each local board or

b.   Should the Remuneration Authority determine separate bulk funding for the governing body and each local board.

 Local government pay scale

42.     The discussion document discusses how the role of elected members might compare to other roles and other entities for the purposes of setting a pay scale.  It considers local government managers, central government managers and boards of directors.   These are not elected member roles.

43.     The document then considers parliamentary elected member salaries for comparison.

44.     Remuneration Authority questions on local government pay scale:

·    Is it appropriate for local government remuneration to be related to parliamentary remuneration, but taking account of differences in job sizes?

·    If so, should that the relativity be capped so the incumbent in the biggest role in local government cannot receive more than a cabinet minister?

·    If not, how should a local government pay scale be determined?

45.     Comments:

(i)   The Authority suggests in the document that mayor/chair salaries are related to MPs. The question refers to the “biggest role in local government” which would be the Auckland mayor.  By setting the salary of the Auckland mayor to that of a cabinet minister, other mayors would be scaled accordingly.

Timetable

46.     A determination setting councils’ remuneration pools will be made around 1 July in each election year.  Following the elections, each council is to resolve its remuneration policy on the allocation of the pool for the triennium.  In the years between elections, adjustments will be made based on published “Labour Market Statistics”.

Conclusion

47.     These proposals constitute a major change for Auckland Council.  From its inception, the salaries of Auckland Council elected members have been fully determined by the Remuneration Authority. 

48.     The remuneration pool proposal provides councils with more flexibility to recognise varying responsibilities among members, but this puts elected members in the position of making decisions about their own salaries.   

Consideration

Local board views and implications

49.     This report seeks the local boards’ views on the proposals contained in the Remuneration Authority’s discussion document. Local board views will be reported individually to the Remuneration Authority.

Māori impact statement

50.     The level at which elected members are remunerated does not impact differently on Māori as compared with the wider community. 

Implementation

51.     Feedback from the local board will be communicated to the Remuneration Authority. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A  Local Government Remuneration Review

101

     

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Paul Wilson - Team Leader Bylaws

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Public alerting framework for Auckland

 

File No.: CP2017/18315

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide information on the Public Alerting Framework for Auckland.  The report also provides the results of an analysis carried out by GNS Science, identifying communities at risk from tsunami across Auckland.

2.       In addition, the report also seeks in-principle support for the proposed enhancement of Auckland’s tsunami siren network.

Executive summary

3.       In February 2017, the Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management (CDEM) Group Committee endorsed the draft Public Alerting Framework for Auckland.

4.       Following on from this, crown research agency, GNS Science was commissioned to provide an analysis of those communities most at risk from tsunami within the orange and red tsunami evacuation zones.

5.       The GNS report and the Public Alerting Framework was presented to local boards in workshop sessions. Auckland Emergency Management is asking local boards for in principle support for the Public Alerting Framework and for an enhanced tsunami siren network.

6.       Next steps involve procurement and design of tsunami siren and signage. Further information will be presented to local boards in due course.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Notes the approach to public alerting as outlined in the Public Alerting Framework for Auckland. (Attachment A)

b)      Provides in-principle support for the development of an enhanced and expanded regional tsunami siren network, noting that further information on design, placement and other considerations for the network will be reported in due course.

Tsunami risk for Auckland

7.       A tsunami is a natural phenomenon consisting of a series of waves generated when a large volume of water in the sea, or in a lake, is rapidly displaced[1]. Tsunami threats pose a risk to New Zealand and to Auckland. Occurrence rates of tsunami are higher in the Pacific than for other oceans because of the "Ring of Fire".[2] Tsunami waves are most commonly caused by underwater earthquakes.  In addition, these events have the potential to cause multiple other hazards including but not limited to; fire, fault line ruptures, coastal inundation, landslides, lifeline utility failures and serious health issues.[3] The Tonga-Kermadec trench is one of the Earth’s deepest trenches, and is Auckland’s highest risk for tsunami. Auckland is susceptible to regional and distant source tsunami, that is, tsunami generated from earthquakes in and around the Pacific Rim with travel time more than 1 hour as well as locally generated tsunami. Tsunami can be categorised as local, regional or distant based on their travel time or distance to the Auckland coastline.

·    Local source – less than 1 hour travel time. These tsunamis can be generated by offshore faults, underwater landslide or volcanic activity.

·    Regional source – Earthquakes in and around the Pacific Islands and the Tonga-Kermadec Trench 1 to 3 hours travel time to Auckland

·    Distant source – Commonly generated by a large earthquake from any location around the Pacific Rim including but not limited to South America, Japan, the Aleutian Islands and Alaska. The travel time to Auckland will be 3 hours or greater. [4]

 

Figure 1. This map shows the position of New Zealand in the Pacific Ocean within an area of intense seismic activity called the ‘Ring of Fire’. Source: GNS Science

 

Tsunami sirens

5.       Currently, Auckland has 44 fixed tsunami warning sirens across nine sites in legacy Rodney and Waitakere. These sirens were installed in 2008 and 2010 and do not meet current government technical standards[5] for tsunami warning sirens. All new and existing siren installations will need to meet these standards by June 2020.

6.       Auckland Emergency Management is currently investigating the upgrading of its existing siren network from ‘tone-only’ sirens to those with PA/voiceover loudspeaker capability. The sirens have a strong immediate effect and can prompt immediate action to seek further information. There are valuable benefits in using tsunami sirens, in particular, sirens can be used when other communications (e.g. cell phones and radio broadcasting) may not have the maximum reach or be as effective. It is commonly accepted across the emergency management sector that effective public alerting systems are those that take a holistic view. This being said, public alerting needs to be well planned, understood, and in conjunction with effective public education information and campaigns. This is imperative for a regionally consistent approach to public alerting that communities can use and understand.

7.       The limited locations of the present tsunami siren systems have been identified as a gap in the public alerting capabilities of Auckland region. Presently, Auckland is not well represented by tsunami sirens with the estimated reach of Auckland’s current sirens being only eight per cent of the ‘at-risk’ population. Auckland’s tsunami siren network is currently being considered for enhancement and expansion through the delivery of the Public Alerting Framework

Public Alerting Framework

8.       Auckland Council has recognised the need for a regionally consistent approach to public alerting through the adoption of the Public Alerting Framework. The Framework, which was approved for consultation with local boards in February 2017, has been designed to:

·    explain what public alerting in a CDEM sense is, what it can and cannot do;

·    give detail on the range of channels for public alerting currently available in Auckland;

·    highlight the advances being taken with regards to public alerting at a national level;

·    provide some commentary on tsunami sirens, their uses and limitations; and

·    assist with decisions taken by the Auckland CDEM Group Committee, local boards and partners and stakeholders with regards to the prioritisation of budgets and options for enhancing public alerting across the Auckland region.

 

9.       Auckland Council recognises the need to enhance the public alerting network, and as such, has allocated funds from the Long-Term Plan for this venture. This funding provides a starting point for consultation on the future of Auckland’s tsunami siren network and the enhancement of public alerting.

10.     It is important to understand that no one public alerting system is without fault. The Public Alerting Framework focusses on the use of multi-platforms, understanding that a holistic approach is one that maximises the reach of public alerting in an emergency or hazard event. Through this project, prioritised public education is critical. Without effective public education and engagement activities, sirens alone are not considered a standalone approach to public alerting.

 

GNS Science report

Introduction and methodology

11.     Following the endorsement of the Public Alerting Framework, crown research agency GNS Science was contracted to complete an independent analysis (see Appendix B) of those communities most at-risk of tsunami.

12.     A GIS based analysis was used to calculate the number of exposed residents in communities.  The analysis used 2013 census population data to identify the number of residents located in the red and orange tsunami evacuation zones. (see Figure 2.) For further detail on the evacuation zones and the methodology please see Appendix B.

 

Figure 2. Auckland red and orange tsunami evacuation zones as used in the GNS Science analysis

 

Results

13.     The results of the analysis carried out by GNS Science identified 217 communities at-risk from tsunami. For all 217 communities modelled, there are a total of 49,853 people at-risk from tsunami in the orange and red evacuation zones. For detailed information on the results of this analysis including detail on those communities at risk of tsunami please refer to the report from GNS Science at Appendix B.

 

Next steps

14.     Workshops have been held with local boards across the region in order to share the results of the GNS Science report and the intention to implement an enhanced and expanded regional tsunami siren network. This report seeks in-principle support for this enhanced and expanded network. More information on design, placement and other considerations for the network will be reported in due course.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

15.     Workshops on tsunami risk were held with local boards in 2016.  Following the development of the Public Alerting Framework further information on tsunami risk, including the results of the GNS Science report, were shared with local boards between July and October 2017.  Local boards were told that in-principle support for the enhanced and expanded tsunami siren network would be sought at formal business meetings of local boards.

16.     As key decision makers representing local communities, local board input into this important project will continue.

Maori impact statement

17.     There are no particular impacts on Maori communities which are different from the general population arising from this report.  The Public Alerting Framework for Auckland notes the importance of community resilience, of reaching all members of the community and of having systems in place to ensure that public alert messages are understood and ubiquitous. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Public Alerting Framework -  Attachment A

137

b

GNS Science report - Attachment B

147

     

Signatories

Authors

Celia Wilson, Project Manager

Authorisers

Craig Glover, Head of Strategy and Planning                                  

John Dragicevich, Civil Defence Emergency Management Director

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Auckland Plan Refresh - Local Board Engagement

 

File No.: CP2017/18838

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek local board feedback on draft Auckland Plan content to inform the final draft of the refreshed Auckland Plan.

Executive summary

2.       In June and July 2017 the Auckland Plan refresh team provided all local boards with summaries of the strategic themes and focus areas for the refreshed Auckland Plan for their consideration.

3.       Resolutions and feedback from local boards over June and July, and feedback from stakeholders informed the further development of the content and development of the strategic framework. The framework was approved in principle by the Planning Committee on 1 August 2017.   A summary of the feedback from local boards accompanied the report to the Planning Committee.

4.       A further update on the Auckland Plan refresh was sent by memo to local boards on 16 August. This memo highlighted next steps, in particular that there would be further engagement with local boards in September 2017. 

5.       Local boards are scheduled to hold workshops during September 2017 to review the Auckland Plan package of materials, including content across the six outcome areas and the Development Strategy. This report seeks formal feedback on this content which will be considered as part of the proposed Auckland Plan.  

6.       Further Planning Committee meetings will be held in October and November to finalise draft content for the proposed Auckland Plan prior to public consultation in early 2018. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      provide feedback, including any specific feedback on the package of materials across the six outcome areas and the Development Strategy (attachment A).

b)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Planning Committee for consideration in the drafting of the refreshed Auckland Plan.

 

 

Comments

7.       Auckland Council is required under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 to develop and review a spatial plan for Auckland. The Auckland Plan refresh provides an opportunity to revisit Auckland’s most challenging issues, to ensure the plan continues to be a useful guiding document for Auckland.

8.       On 28 March 2017, the Planning Committee endorsed a streamlined spatial approach for the refresh of the Auckland Plan. The refreshed plan is intended to be more focused and structured around a small number of inter-linked strategic themes that address Auckland’s biggest challenges. The plan is also intended to have a greater focus on the development strategy.

Local Board involvement in the refresh

9.       Local board chairs have been invited to all Planning Committee workshops on the Auckland Plan during 2017.  Throughout these workshops, chairs (or their representatives) have provided early input into opportunities and challenges for Auckland over the next 30 years and feedback on the proposed strategic framework for the refreshed Auckland Plan. This input was the views of chairs only and does not represent formal local board feedback.

10.     At local board cluster briefings in February and April 2017, local board members gave feedback and information which was used to refine the scope of strategic themes and focus areas. 

11.     A report on the Auckland Plan Refresh was considered at local board business meetings in June and July.  Local boards were invited to consider their formal position on the themes and focus areas and provide further feedback. 

12.     Local board cluster briefings were also held in April and July on the Development Strategy which is a core component of Auckland Plan.

13.     Resolutions and feedback from local boards over June and July informed the further development of a draft strategic framework. This was approved in principle by the Planning Committee on 1 August.   A summary of the feedback from local boards accompanied this report to the Planning Committee.

14.     A further update on the Auckland Plan refresh was sent by memo to local boards on 16 August 2017. This memo highlighted next steps, in particular that there would be further engagement with local boards in September 2017.

15.     Local boards are scheduled to hold workshops during September 2017 to review the Auckland Plan package of materials, including content across the six outcome areas and the Development Strategy. This report seeks formal feedback on this content which will be considered as part of the proposed Auckland Plan. 

16.     Further Planning Committee meetings will be held in October and November to finalise draft content for the proposed Auckland Plan prior to full public consultation in early 2018. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     Local board feedback on the package of engagement material is being sought in this report.

18.     Local boards play an important role in relation to the content of the Auckland Plan through communicating local views to the governing body and providing input to regional strategies, policies, and plans  

 

Māori impact statement

19.     The council is required to provide opportunities for Māori engagement and to support Māori capacity to participate in decision-making. When making significant decisions in relation to land or a body of water, the council must take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water, sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

20.     Staff from the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) provided guidance on the strategic themes of the plan. The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the strategic themes and focus areas.

21.     The strategic themes acknowledge and celebrate Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and Māori as Treaty partners in Auckland.

22.     Māori Identity and Wellbeing is one of the six outcomes of the plan. The outcome describes the application of Te ao Māori values to the region, acknowledges the unique role of mana whenua as kaitiaki of Tāmaki Makaurau and acknowledges the foundational role of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

23.     Engagement with mana whenua, mataawaka, and relevant Māori community groups has been undertaken to develop the draft plan.

Implementation

24.     Feedback from the local boards will be summarized and provided to the Planning Committee for consideration in the drafting of the refreshed Auckland Plan.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Plan Draft Content Package

207

     

Signatories

Authors

Denise O’Shaughnessy - Manager Strategic Advice

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2017/19684

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present to the Henderson-Massey Local Board with their most current governance forward work calendar.

Executive Summary

2.       This report introduces the governance forward work calendar: a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings over the upcoming months. The governance forward work calendar for the board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant Council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      note the updated Governance Forward Work Calendar for September 2017 (attachment A).

 

Comments

5.       Council’s Quality Advice Programme aims to improve the focus, analysis, presentation and timeliness of staff advice to elected representatives. An initiative under this is to develop forward work calendars for governing body committees and local boards. These provide elected members with better visibility of the types of governance tasks they are being asked to undertake and when they are scheduled.

6.       Although the document is new, there are no new projects in the governance forward work calendar. The calendar brings together in one schedule reporting on all of the board’s projects and activities previously approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes governing body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response.

7.       This initiative is intended to support the boards’ governance role. It will also help staff to support local boards, as an additional tool to manage workloads and track activities across council departments, and it will allow greater transparency for the public.

8.       The calendar is arranged in three columns, “Topic”, “Purpose” and “Governance Role”:

·    Topic describes the items and may indicate how they fit in with broader processes such as the annual plan

·    Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates

·    Governance role is a higher-level categorisation of the work local boards do. Examples of the seven governance categories are tabled on the following page.

Governance role

Examples

Setting direction/priorities/budget

Capex projects, work programmes, annual plan

Local initiatives/specific decisions

Grants, road names, alcohol bans

Input into regional decision-making

Comments on regional bylaws, policies, plans

Oversight and monitoring

Local board agreement, quarterly performance reports, review projects

Accountability to the public

Annual report

Engagement

Community hui, submissions processes

Keeping informed

Briefings, cluster workshops

 

9.       Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar. The calendar will be updated and reported back every month to business meetings. Updates will also be distributed to relevant Council staff.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

10.     All local boards are being presented with governance forward work calendars for their consideration.

Māori impact statement

11.     The projects and processes referred to in the governance forward work calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Implementation

12.     Staff will review the calendar each month in consultation with board members and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar - September 2017

217

     

Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)  

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2017/19685

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents records of workshops held by the Henderson-Massey Local Board on:

·        8 August 2017

·        15 August 2017

·        22 August 2017

·        29 August 2017

Executive Summary

2.       At the workshop held on Tuesday, 8 August, the Henderson-Massey Local Board had briefings on:

·    Quick Response, Round One 2017/2018

·    Conflict of Interest session

·    Investing in play

·    Waitakere Ethic Board (WEB)

·    Governance Framework Review: finance and funding workstream

·    Riverpark Reserve Playground Strategic Assessment

·    Taitapu Park Half Court Strategic Assessment

3.       At the workshop held on Tuesday, 15 August 2017, the Henderson-Massey Local Board had a briefing on:

·  Updates from Zeal about Event Box and workplan activities at Zeal Youth Facility in Henderson

·    Update on pay as you throw Northwest rubbish collection changes

·    Harbourview/Orangihina master plan

·    Local Board Plan Discussion

·    Governance Framework review

4.       At the workshop held on Tuesday, 22 August 2017, the Henderson-Massey Local Board had briefings on:

·    Henderson Valley Park negotiations

·    Local Board Plan Deliberations

·    399 Don Buck Road

·    Community Parks and Places Work Programme 17/18

5.       At the workshop held on Tuesday, 25 July 2017, the Henderson-Massey Local Board had briefings on:

·  Land owner request to stockpile topsoil at Selwood road carpark as part of NZTA upgrade works

·    Land owner approval request to locate a storm water outlet within Riverpark Reserve

·    Long Term Plan (LTP)

·    LDI capex discussion

·    LBS/Members' Updates

·    Governance Framework Review Organisational Support

6.       The workshop records are attached to this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop records held on:

·   8 August 2017

·   15 August 2017

·   22 August 2017

·   29 August 2017

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey local board - August 2017 Workshop records

221

    

Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)  

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 

    

  


Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Jack Colvin Park aerial and contours           Page 231



Henderson-Massey Local Board

19 September 2017

 

 

 



[1] Berryman, K. et al. (2005) Review of Tsunami Hazard and Risk in New Zealand. Dunedin, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Limited.

[2] GNS Science, Tsunami in New Zealand data accessed on 26th June 2017 from https://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Our-Science/Natural-Hazards/Tsunami/Tsunami-in-New-Zealand

[3] ACDEM (2016), Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Plan 2016-2021

[4] Auckland Council, Natural hazards and emergencies- Tsunami data accessed on 26th June 2017 from http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/en/environmentwaste/naturalhazardsemergencies/hazards/pages/tsunamihazardsinauckland.aspx

 

 

[5] [5] MCDEM (2014), Tsunami Warning Sirens Technical Standard [TS 03/14]