I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 20 November 2017

6.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

David Collings

 

Deputy Chairperson

Katrina Bungard

 

Members

Garry Boles

 

 

Jim Donald, JP

 

 

John Spiller

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Adele White

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Nichola  Painter

Democracy Advisor

 

13 November 2017

 

Contact Telephone: 021 396201

Email: Nichola.painter@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

7.1     Petition - Mellons Bay Road                                                                               5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Baverstock Road                                                                       6

9.2     Public Forum - Kilkenny Drive                                                                            6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                    9

13        Councillor Update                                                                                                        11

14        Auckland Transport Update - November 2017                                                         13

15        Flat Bush Library and Community Space Consultation                                         49

16        Howick Local Grant Round Two 2017/2018 grant applications                             53

17        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter one, 1 July - 30 September 2017                                                                                         63

18        Feedback on draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan                           109

19        Review of representation arrangements - process                                               115

20        Renewal of community lease to Howick Hornets Rugby League Football Club Incorporated at 52R Paparoa Road, Cockle Bay                                                   127

21        Input to the Review of Citizens Advice Bureaux services                                    131

22        Delegated Decision relating to feedback on the Remuneration Authority Consultation Document.                                                                                                                  197

23        Howick Local Board Plan 2017 - Chinese Translation                                          219

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     221

25        Workshop Records                                                                                                    225  

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 16 October 2017, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

7.1       Petition - Mellons Bay Road

Purpose

1.       David Malloews and Paula Kappeli will be in attendance to present a petition from the residents of Mellons Bay Road.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      That the Howick Local Board thank David Malloews and Paula Kappeli for presenting the petition from the residents of Mellons Bay Road.

 

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Baverstock Road

Purpose

Grant Maconaghie would like the opportunity to speak to the board on establishing traffic controls on Baverstock Rd.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board thank Grant Maconaghie for his attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Correspondance from Grant Maconaghie .......................................... 245

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Kilkenny Drive

Purpose

1.       Michael Petersen would like the opportunity to speak to the board on Kilkenny Drive and the condition of the reseal.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      That the Howick Local Board thank Michael Petersen for his attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

There were no notices of motion.

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2017/17435

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the Board on any announcements and note the Chairperson’s written report.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Chairperson’s verbal update and written report.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Authors

Nichola  Painter - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 Nina Siers – Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Councillor Update

 

File No.: CP2017/17431

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       An opportunity for the Ward Councillor’s to update the Board on regional matters of interest.

2.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Ward Councillor’s to update the Board on regional matters.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the verbal and written report from Councillor Dick Quax and Councillor Sharon Stewart.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Nichola  Painter - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 Nina Siers – Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - November 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/23529

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to; respond to requests on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), request approval for new LBTCF projects, provide a summary of consultation material sent to the Board and, provide transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Howick Local Board (HLB) and its community.

Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month but the report contains information about the following matters:

·    Auckland Transport Quarterly Report

·    A Local Board Transport Capital Fund update

·    Auckland Transport projects that are being delivered in Howick

·    Attachments include a register of local issues and media releases specific to the Howick area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Transport Update – November 2017 report.

 

 

 

Comments

 

Response to Resolutions

 

3.   The Resolution is recorded below in bold. Auckland Transport’s response is below the Resolution in normal font.

 

Resolution Number HW/2017/178

 

f)       that the Howick Local Board does not support the proposed bus stop on Cook Street or an extension of the existing bus stop on Picton Street outside the Prospect of Howick.

 

4.   Auckland Transport notes this feedback and it has been passed on to the Eastern New Network project team.

 

Auckland Transport Quarterly Reporting

 

5.   Auckland Transport provides quarterly reports about the organisation’s activities. 

·    Attachment A provides information about Auckland Transport’s regional and local activities

·    Attachment B provides information about Auckland Transport’s work with local schools.

 

6.       This section provides a report about how Auckland Transport is supporting the HLB’s transport ‘Advocacy Initiatives’ that are recorded in the Local Board Plan. In this report the HLB’s transport related ‘Advocacy Initiatives’ from the 2017 plan are recorded in the table below providing a summary of actions being taken by Auckland Transport that support them. 

 

Table 1: Advocacy Initiative Status – 2017 Local Board Plan

               

Advocacy Initiative

Key Initiative

Status

A well-integrated efficient public transportation system

Advocate to Auckland Transport to maintain and upgrade existing transportation systems, including

improving safety at congestion hot spots.

 

Since the last report Auckland Transport has supported this ‘Key Initiative’ by:

·    Starting delivery of the Eastern New Network

·    Continuing to work on AMETI

·    Started consultation about installing new bus lanes on Te Irirangi Drive

·    Kept researching geo-technical issues on Chapel Road to develop a business case for funding.

Well designed and quality development in Howick

 

Continue to partner with Auckland Transport to develop the Half Moon Bay area as a transport hub

 Auckland Transport has submitted the consent for this project and is working with Auckland Council to get approval for building work to start.

Continue to develop integrated planning solutions which co-ordinate the planning, design and management of public spaces

In July 2017 the HLB supported Auckland Transport’s new ‘Roads and Streets Framework’ that will provide better integrated planning.

Parks and open spaces allow for a wide variety of recreational activities.

Continue to extend existing walkways and cycle ways, including informative signage.

Auckland Transport has provided quality advice regarding a number of potential projects that the HLB might choose to fund using their Local Board Transport Capital Fund that would meet the intent of this ‘Key Initiative’ including:

·    An off-road walking cycling route running parallel with Aviemore Drive

·    Better cycling connectivity through the Highbrook business park

·    A new path linking Cascades Road with the Cascade Stream Track

·    Three pedestrian focussed projects supporting the Howick Village Plan

·    A signage project supporting the Howick Village Plan.

 

Eastern New Network

 

7.   Auckland Transport staff have been regular visitors to the HLB to discuss various aspects of the Eastern New Network with Members. 

 

8.   The Eastern New Network is a public transport plan that will simplify bus routes across Howick. By simplifying routes, it will increase reliability and the number of buses servicing each individual route. People will be able to use regular, reliable bus services to either get to their final destination or to access trains or ferries with which to complete their journeys.  Further information is available on the Auckland Transport website by using the following link -  https://at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/new-public-transport-network/new-network-for-east-auckland/

 

9.   At this time the main focus of Auckland Transport is getting all the bus stops, shelters and intersections in East Auckland upgraded and ready for the New Network.  In order to provide some perspective Auckland Transport on the scale of this project  is upgrading approx.:

·    500 bus stops and shelters

·    100 of which are new, are being moved or require major modifications

·    Five intersections.

 

10. In recent weeks these changes have been consulted on with local communities and were discussed with the HLB as follows:

 

·    In August 2017 the project was reported formally to the HLB

·    On 20 September 2017 the project team met with the HLB and discussed the plan

·    In early October a list of all the approx. 100 bus stops and shelters that need significant changes or are new, was circulated to elected members

·    In mid-October 2017 the intersections requiring changes were circulated to the HLB members

·    On 18 October 2017 the HLB reviewed and commented on the approx.100 bus stops and shelters that need significant changes or are new

·    On 25 October 2017 the HLB discussed all stops and shelters that concerns had been raised about at the previous workshop

·    Currently there are a small number of stops and shelters (approx. 3-5) that require extra investigation and being discussed further.

 

11. Now that this work is nearing completion the next focus is to inform the community about the changes. Auckland Transport is taking the following steps to ensure that the public knows what is happening, including:

 

·    Posting out approx. 75,000 information flyers

·    Radio advertising

·    Media advertising

·    Public open days

·    Deploying ambassadors to key bus and train stoops to tell people about the plan.

 

12.     In summary delivering the Eastern New Network is a huge job. But, Auckland Transport is taking every reasonable step to ensure that affected residents are consulted, that the HLB has the opportunity to comment on changes and that the whole community is well informed about the changes.

 

Local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) update.

13.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all Local Boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local Boards can use this fund to deliver projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. The limitations being that the project must:

·        Be safe

·        Not impede network efficiency

·        Be in the road corridor. Although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

 HLB’s funding in this term is approx. $ 2.9 million.

14.     Auckland Transport encourages all Local Board’s to identify potential projects as early as possible to ensure delivery within the current electoral term.

Projects

 

15.     Early in this electoral term the HLB started identifying possible projects and planning workshops have been held and reported on previously. 

16.     The current progress of all projects is summarised in the table below:

 

 Table 2: Local Board Transport Capital Fund Projects

Projects

Current Status

 

Problem or Opportunity Being Addressed

Current Status

Half Moon Bay Ferry Pier and Bus Turnaround

 

 

Providing better facilities for ferry passengers at Half Moon Bay

‘Rough Order of Cost’ requested by the HLB in 2013.

‘Detailed Design’ was authorised by HLB in October 2014 .

‘Construction’ The pier is complete and was opened on 7 April 2017.

The project manager met with the HLB in response to a ‘Resolution’ from the HLB requesting information about the delay on 4 October 2017.

The project is delayed but consent is now being processed and work is expected to start early next year.

Buckland’s Beach Walkway Improvements

 

Providing safer pedestrian facilities at Buckland Beach

‘Rough Order of Cost’ of between $1.5 and 2.1 million has been provided to the HLB.

Concept design was carried out in a number of stages:

·    14 July 2014 – Detailed design of a small initial project authorised by resolution.

·    8 June 2015 – The HLB expanded the project to include detailed design for a project running the length of ‘The Parade’.

·    13 July 2015 Concept design reported to the HLB.

·    26 April 2017 the HLB requested investigation of two projects identified during consultation.

This design is broken down into ten separate elements (detailed in February 2017’s report). 

‘Firm Cost Estimate’:  was authorised at the May Howick Local Board meeting for the following elements of the project:

·    Improved pedestrian facilities and one-way options on The Parade

·    A roundabout at the intersection of Buckland Beach and Whitcombe Roads.

A Rough Order of Cost was provided in August 2017.  

Howick Village Centre Plan

 

Supporting improvements to Howick Village that will make it nicer, safer and more pedestrian friendly.

Howick Village Centre Plan is finished. The plan was reviewed.  Auckland Transport discussed proposals for LBTCF with the HLB and ROC for four separate projects were requested by ‘Resolution’ in October 2017.

Cascades Walkway

 

Building a footpath on Cascade Road that will provide access under the bridge on the western edge of the golf course to the walking track that follows the stream.

Auckland Transport has provided options with of either approx. $83,000 or approx.

$225,000 depending on the route of the pathway.

 

‘Rough Orders of Cost’. The HLB accepted the option with the Rough Order of Cost of

$225,000.

 

‘Firm Estimate of Cost’: development of a ‘Firm Cost Estimate’ was authorised at the June 2017 Howick Local Board meeting. The aim being to provide a confirmed cost estimate that could be used to try and seek funding from partners.

Walking and Cycling Access to Half Moon Bay

 

Develop walking and cycling opportunities around Half Moon Bay.

The HLB discussed this project on 8 February 2017.

It was decided to let the ferry pier and bus stop improvements become operational before a new project was started.  

Aviemore  Walking Project

 

Develop walking and cycling opportunities around Highbrook.

The HLB was briefed by Auckland Transport about this project in October 2017.

The HLB choose not to pursue the project at this time.   

Notes:

A ‘traffic light’ code is used to summarize the status of projects. The colours are used as follows:

Green – Project progressing ‘on time’ and on budget.

Orange – An issue has been identified that may need to be resolved.

Red - An major issue has been identified that needs to be resolved

Black – The project has been investigated and the HLB has decided not to pursue it at this time.

 

Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal Update

17.     Building a new ferry pier and bus turn around area at Half Moon Bay was HLB’s key Local Board Transport Capital Fund Project in the 2013-16 term.  The project is not progressing as predicted. In September the HLB expressed their concern with the delay by ‘Resolution’. On 4 October 2017 the project manager visited the HLB, apologised for the delay and explained why the project was not moving as quickly as originally anticipated.

18.     The project manager discussed the revised timeline reported to the HLB in October and confirmed that the consent had been submitted, that planning was still progressing and that the current plan is that work starts in November 2017 and will be completed in early 2018, probably between February and March.

19.     At the meeting the team also listened to the HLB’s suggestions about managing the delay. A key HLB concern was making sure that the public are well-informed. Auckland Transport listened to these concerns and is sending out flyers, is working with the media and has put up information signs at the terminal based on the Member’s suggestions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1:  Information sign at Halfmoon Bay

 

 

20.     Bucklands Beach Update Auckland Transport is currently conducting detailed design work for two projects in Bucklands Beach:

·    Improved pedestrian facilities and one-way options on The Parade

·    A roundabout at the intersection of Buckland Beach and Whitcombe Roads. 

21.     HLB has requested that detailed information about the progress of these projects is put on the public record. The steps taken to date are:

·    The original ‘Resolution’ starting the projects was made in May 2017

·    This ‘Resolution’ was not as clear as Auckland Transport’s Programme Manager required.  Auckland Transport workshopped this matter with the HLB in June 2017

·    In July 2017 a ‘Resolution’ clarifying the HLB’s position was provided. This step is important because any expenditure of public money or resource must be made based on clear instruction from the authorising authority

·    In August 2017 ‘Rough Orders of Cost’ for the project were reported back to the HLB

·    In September 2017 Project Codes were established and the ‘Scheme Design’ started for both projects. 

22.     At this time the project manager is working through the information that is available from within Auckland Transport’s internal departments (i.e. Road Corridor Operations, Road Safety, Public Transport, Maintenance etc.). Technical discussion of this nature takes time but is essential for the development of clear design briefs to contractors.

23.     The key factor in all projects is that they take time.  Initial research requires input from around the organisation. Getting this feedback and analysing it is a time-consuming process but is important because it helps to ‘iron out’ as many technical issues as possible before contracting external resource.  Contracting resource takes time too because Auckland Transport needs to confirm the brief, issue notice, review the tenders before awarding any contract).

24.      When a design contractor is appointed (or allocated ‘in-house’) they then have a detailed process that they must undertake. The reason this takes time is because being a public organisation Auckland Transport must always work to high standards and also be able to demonstrate ‘value for money’ which takes time. This is a constraint of the LBTCF process and is the reason that Auckland Transport advises all Local Boards to identify projects as early as possible within their term.

 

Cascade Road Update

25.     Auckland Transport has appointed a designer and they have started work. The first phase of this work has been looking at options (i.e. the route of pathway, could steps be an option? etc.), identifying key stakeholders and land owners. During October the designer met with the Auckland Transport Relationship Manager and provided an update. The designer also sought clarification of a number of aspects of the project and of potential local concerns.  When design options are more developed the HLB will be briefed and provided with an opportunity to provide their direction.

 

Upcoming projects and activities

 

Consultations

26.     Auckland Transport provides the HLB with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in this Local Board Area.

27.     In this reporting period, a large number of projects were put forward for comment by the HLB and details are included in Attachment C.

28.     Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions from October are included in the table below:

Table 3: Traffic Control Committee Decisions October 2017

Street

Area

Work

Decision

Stancombe Road, Baverstock Road

Flat Bush

No Stopping At All Times, Lane Arrow Markings, Flush Median, Traffic Island, Give-Way Control

Carried

Oakridge Way, Stellamaris Way, Orangewood Drive

North Park

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

Carried

 

Regional and sub-regional projects

 

CBD ferry wharf repairs

 

29.     Auckland Transport has started work on repairs to part of the seawall in the ferry basin at the bottom of Queen St.  Barges and divers have been in action in recent weeks repairing the seawall.  Work started with detailed investigation of the sea wall by divers and installation of monitoring devices. The aim being to get a detailed assessment of the damage and to keep track of any changes.

30.     Once this work was completed the actual repairs started. The first step was clearing the barnacles and debris from the area. The scaffolding and other support equipment was installed.  Soon work on the actual repairs is planned to start in early November.

31.     From a Howick perspective ferry services were redirected to other wharves and there appears to have been minimal disruption.

 

Figure 3: Divers and barges at work on the seawall 

 

Ti Rakau Drive Bus Lanes

 

 

32.     Improving public transport across Auckland is a key part of Auckland Transport’s overall plan.  Soon Auckland Transport is proposing to change intersection layouts, put in peak hour bus lanes and upgrade pedestrian and cycling facilities on and around Ti Rakau Drive.

33.     The modifications will improve journey times on Ti Rakau Drive and nearby streets. This work is part of the wider plan to improve reliability and shorten journey times to make public transport a practical alternative traveller in East Auckland. The plan is directly linked to the Eastern New Network that will start in December 2017 and then later to the AMETI Eastern Busway. The road is wide enough that there is room to install the bus lanes without the loss of normal traffic lanes. Some parking will need to be removed but this will only be a small amount.

34.     Auckland Transport has discussed this project with the HLB and currently discussing this proposal with the local community.  During October 2017 residents and business in the immediate area were sent a flyer in the mail outlining the proposal and providing an opportunity to give feedback. A public open day was held on Saturday 28 October 2017. The public consultation period will close at midnight on Sunday 12 November 2017 and it is expected that it will be early 2018 when a final decision is made about the project’s details.

 

AMETI

 

35.     Improving public transport in Auckland is a key part of Auckland Transport’s wider strategy.  Currently in East Auckland we are delivering the AMETI project, a very large project that will provide better public transport between Panmure and Botany.  AMETI will be delivered in three stages:

·    A busway linking Panmure and Pakuranga

·    Then Reeves Road in Pakuranga will be rebuilt to make sure that traffic can flow through the area better when the bus lanes are built

·     Finally, a busway will be built linking Pakuranga and Botany.

 

36.     AMETI will be New Zealand’s first urban busway providing congestion free ‘bus only’ lanes for commuters running from Panmure Station to Botany.  The aim is that people will be able to commute easily and quickly from Botany to Panmure and vice versa.

37.     The first stage of AMETI, the busway running from Pakuranga to Panmure, is currently undergoing Notice of Requirement (NOR) hearings. Traffic impact assessments for this section of work are also currently underway and the final ‘Scheme Assessment’ update is expected in November 2017 as Auckland Transport works to prepare for when work is able to start.  Final evaluation of the design and consenting professional services contract is in progress, and is expected to be awarded in November 2017.  At the time this report was submitted NOR hearings dates had not been set by Auckland Council.

38.     Public consultation about the Pakuranga to Botany part of the programme has started and the ‘drop in’ centre that Auckland Transport has leased in Pakuranga has been well-utilised as a base for these discussions.

 

Chapel Road

39.     Building new bridge near Ormiston and straightening Chapel Road is a safety project that will look at the area between Stancombe Road and Ormiston Road. The overall aim being to bring it to an ‘urban’ standard for an arterial road. This is required because the road used to be a rural road and as development has occurred it now needs to be upgraded.

40.     The first round of geo-technical investigation is complete. On 4 October 2017 the HLB met the engineers leading the project and they discussed how the geotechnical investigation had shown a large, actively moving landslip immediately north of Otara Creek.

 

41.     The implications of this information are that the original plans for the area need to be reassessed and geotechnical testing continues. The results will help us to fully understand the behaviour and conditions of the landslip. It is anticipated it will require two to three months and when it is complete the HLB will be briefed again by the technical specialists.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Quarterly Report Auckland Transport Activities

23

b

Quarterly Report Howick Local Board School Travel Programme

37

c

Consultations sent to Howick Local Board in October 2017

39

d

Media Releases

43

e

Issues Register

47

     

Signatories

Authors

Ben Stallworthy, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

 


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Flat Bush Library and Community Space Consultation

 

File No.: CP2017/23594

 

  

Purpose

1.       To receive the findings of the recent community consultation on Flat Bush library and community space.

Executive summary

2.       Howick Local Board funded Flock consultancy to consult with the Flat Bush community during August and September 2017.  They used a multi-method consultation approach to answer the question “what do local people want to do in the proposed Flat Bush library and community space?” 

3.       The high level findings include the desired community outcomes, what the community want to do in their new facility and the implications for building design.  The full report including appendices with all the community responses can be found in Attachment A.

4.       The desired outcomes from the community (in order of priority) are:

·    Access (range of activities and programmes in their neighbourhood)

·    Family friendly, caters for cross-generational activities

·    Inclusive for people from all ethnic backgrounds (reflects new migrants as well as Māori culture)

·    Flexible and adaptable

·    Structured and unstructured activities on offer

·    Providing a ‘heart’ for the community

·    Opportunities to learn and participate rather than watch

·    Connection with the environment.

5.       The top five responses to the question “what do you want to do most in the new library and community space” are:

·    Activities for children

·    Borrow books and materials

·    Learn and take part in digital activities

·    School holiday programmes

·    Meet friends and family socially.

6.       The implications for the design of the building include:

·    A large welcoming foyer space with couches, wifi, a cafe and a space for children to play

·    A place to read books and borrow material in a range of languages

·    Spaces that can be used for art, craft, music, and dance lessons, including access to digital resources and devices.

·    A place to study or do quiet activities

·    A place to do loud activities such as practicing music

·    A place for larger community events to be held

·    Indoor and outdoor gardens.

7.       The scope of the library and community space needs to be revisited as a result of the consultation findings.  This includes removing the performance theatre and art gallery space from the scope and focussing instead on spaces that promote participation.

8.       The next steps for the project include sharing the results of the consultation with the community, revisiting the design brief for the concept design, confirmation or renegotiation of consultant contracts, site due diligence and revisiting the cost estimates in light of the revised scope.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the findings of the Flat Bush Library and Community Facility Consultation Report (2017).

 

 

Comments

Background

9.       Provision of a library and multi-use community facility in Flat Bush is a priority action in the Community Facilities Network Action Plan and Howick Local Board Plan (2014).  Funding of $19.8M is provided in the Long Term Plan in financial years 2018 and 2019.

10.     A community needs assessment was undertaken in 2012 and concept designs progressed.  The concept designs included a significant performing arts component and were found to be unaffordable within the Long Term Plan budget.

11.     Howick Local Board provided funding to consult further with the community given the significant growth in the area since the needs assessment completed in 2012.

Approach

12.     Flock consultancy was engaged to consult with the Flat Bush community.  They took a multi-method approach including:

·    Online survey (translated into Hindi and Chinese)

·    Discussion and ‘sticker dots’ voting at Pak’nSave (including translation into Hindi and Chinese and five people on hand who spoke a variety of languages to encourage people to take part)

·    World cafes

·    Family day/ exhibition at Ormiston Senior College 

·    School projects (e.g. art, graphic design, crafts).

13.     The consultation events were advertised through:

·    Letterbox drop

·    Advertisements in Manukau Courier

·    Local Board Facebook and Neighbourly pages

·    WeChat

·    School newsletters

14.     A total of 435 responses were received to the consultation activities.

 High level findings

15.     The consultation results in full are included as appendices to the report in Attachment A.  The high level findings include the desired community outcomes, what the community want to do in their new facility and the implications for building design. 

16.     The desired outcomes from the community (in order of priority) are:

·    Access (range of activities and programmes in their neighbourhood)

·    Family friendly, caters for cross-generational activities

·    Inclusive for people from all ethnic backgrounds (reflects new migrants as well as Māori culture)

·    Flexible and adaptable

·    Structured and unstructured activities on offer

·    Providing a ‘heart’ for the community

·    Opportunities to learn and participate rather than watch

·    Connection with the environment.

17.     The top five responses to the question “what do you want to do most in the new library and community space” are:

·    Activities for children

·    Borrow books and materials

·    Learn and take part in digital activities

·    School holiday programmes

·    Meet friends and family socially.

18.     The implications for the design of the building include:

·    A large welcoming foyer space with couches, wifi, a cafe and a space for children to play

·    A place to read books and borrow material in a range of languages

·    Spaces that can be used for art, craft, music, and dance lessons, including access to digital resources and devices.

·    A place to study or do quiet activities

·    A place to do loud activities such as practicing music

·    A place for larger community events to be held

·    Indoor and outdoor gardens.

Implications and next steps

19.     The scope of the library and community space needs to be revisited as a result of the consultation findings.  This includes removing the performance theatre and art gallery and instead focussing on a large, flexible, multi-use meeting room for approximately 100 people as well as spaces that promote active participation rather than more passive viewing.  Other aspects of the scope include locating as many spaces and services on ground floor as possible and considering how spaces will be available for community use after hours.

20.     In order to progress with the concept design, a number of actions are required this financial year:

·    Revisiting the design brief for the concept design

·    Confirmation and possible renegotiation of consultant contracts

·    Due diligence on the site and site requirements include geotechnical studies and car parking

·    Revisiting cost estimates in light of the revised scope

21.     The findings of the Flat Bush Library and Community Facility Consultation Report will be shared with the community with thanks for their time and contribution.  In particular the centre managers, principals and/or deputy principles of the local schools and child care centres met with Flock prior to the consultation activities and gave helpful feedback on the consultation plans as well as on the facility itself.  Flock will prepare a summary document with a link of the full report and circulate it to schools and those who gave contact details.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

22.     The local board considered the findings of the Flat Bush Library and Community Facility Consultation report at a workshop on 25 October 2017.  An action was taken from the workshop to bring a formal report to a board meeting. 

Māori impact statement

23.     Mana whenua have been involved previously in the planning of the Flat Bush library and community space.  Relevant iwi were contacted mid-2016. Representatives from Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Tamaoho, and Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua then attended a hui in August 2016.  Following the hui, Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki provided an initial written response on behalf of hui participants which supported the provision of a library and community space and gave feedback on a number of design and process elements. 

24.     Iwi have confirmed they wish to continue to be involved in the design and planning process.

Implementation

25.     Staff will continue progressing the concept design and due diligence this financial year.

26.     Construction timing will need to align with Todd Property developing infrastructure, including roads, and removing the temporary stormwater ponds which are currently on the library and community space site.  The project team are in regular communication with Panuku Development Auckland regarding the development timing.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Flat Bush Library and Community Facility  (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Nicola Terry - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Howick Local Grant Round Two 2017/2018 grant applications

 

File No.: CP2017/22492

 

  

Purpose

1.       To present applications received for Howick Local Grants, Round Two 2017/2018. The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Grants Programme 2017/2018 on 15 May 2017. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants (See Attachment A).

3.       The local board is required to allocate grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of becoming the world’s most liveable city.

4.       The Howick Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $395,000 for the 2017/2018 financial year.

5.       A total of $107,343 was allocated for local grants round one, leaving a total of $287,657 to be allocated to two local grant rounds and two quick response rounds.

6.       Twenty five applications were received for Howick Local Grants Round Two 2017/2108, including three multiboard applications, requesting a total of $250,195.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)   agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round, listed in Table One

Table One:  Howick Local Grants Round Two 2017/2018 applications

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1807-201

Howick East Combined Probus Club umbrellaed by The Rotary Club of Howick Incorporated

Towards costs for the monthly outings for the Howick Probus Club members.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-202

Totara Park Riding for Disabled Incorporated

Towards sponsorship of a horse for one year for the disabled riding programme.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-203

Howick Sailing Club Incorporated

Towards replacement of four “Learn to Sail” boats

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-205

Hindu Heritage Research Foundation (New Zealand)

Towards costs of a stage truck for the Papatoetoe Family Fun Day in December 2017

 $4,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-206

Owairoa Primary School

Towards the bee containment unit for Owairoa Primary School

$5,300.00

Eligible

LG1807-207

Elm Park School Board of Trustees

Towards the cost of “Tiger Turf” for the school playgrounds at Elm Park School

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-208

Baseball New Zealand Foundation

Towards operational costs for the Baseball Confederation of Oceania U15 Championship held at Lloyd Elsmore Park in Pakuranga

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-209

Elvis in the Gardens Incorporated Society

Towards staging, a screen, operational expenses and  signage to promote “Elvis in the Gardens 2018” to Howick residents on 4 March 2018

 $3,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-211

Special Olympics Howick-Pakuranga

Towards taxi fares for the athletes to travel to training for the Special Olympics from 1 December 2017 to 30 November 2018.

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-212

The Uxbridge Community Projects Incorporated

Towards costs for an outdoor art installation in the Fencible Walk from 10 to 14 May 2018 for the Veronica Herber art installation

$4,300.00

Eligible

LG1807-213

Uxbridge Community projects Incorporated

Towards the costs of "A Taste of Uxbridge" which includes a two week programme to “have a go in the arts” in April 2018.

$3,659.00

Eligible

LG1807-217

Rotary Club of Pakuranga Incorporated

Towards the entertainment, food stall holders and infrastructure for the Community Carnival on Bramley Reserve on 25 February 2018.

$12,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-218

Kids Safe With Dogs Charitable Trust

Towards printing of material and paying instructors for the Kids Safe programme in schools in the Howick area.

$9,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-219

StarJam Charitable Trust

Towards “Stage One (2018): Music Performance Workshops for Disabled Youth” in Howick, specifically the "Eastside Groovers" at Te Tuhi for eight weeks from 12 February 2018.

$2,032.00

Eligible

LG1807-221

Sunny Hills Tennis Club Incorporated

Towards the coaching fees for the junior coaching program for Term One 2018 for children aged five to 18 years.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-222

Howick and Districts Historical Society Incorporated

Towards replacement of the Pakuranga Highway signage for the Howick Historical Village

$16,556.00

Eligible

LG1807-223

Urban EcoLiving Charitable Trust

 Towards the “Tread Lightly Caravan” programme in six schools in the Howick Local Board area.

$11,948.00

Eligible

LG1807-224

Age Concern Counties Manukau Incorporated

Towards the costs of prepaid envelopes for newsletter mailouts in 2018 for Age Concern Counties Manukau.

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-225

Eastern Stars Band Incorporated

Towards one tutor and administration costs for children and youth; band training and support

$19,400.00

Eligible

LG1807-226

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Towards costs for the health prevention prorgamme for “Life Education” programme delivery in Howick area schools

$20,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-227

New Zealand Council of Victim Support Groups Incorporated

Towards costs of our volunteer programme in Howick, Pakuranga and East Tamaki.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-229

Howick Village Association Incorporated

To pay a consultant to undertake work for the Howick Village Centre Plan including producing a document for streetscaping and signage guidelines.

$11,000.00

Ineligible for a grant as this is a council project. Can be allocated as a service agreement.

LG1807-228

Lions Club of Howick Charitable Trust Incorporated

Towards the Howick Summer Festival on 25 February 2018 at Lloyd Elsmore Park

$24,000

Eligible

LG1811-111

OneTree House Limited

Towards the cost of producing multilingual childrens books

$10,000

Eligible

LG1818-114

One Green Nut Limited

Towards costs of the reverse vending machine trial

$30,000

Eligible

 

 

Total

$250,195

 

 

 

Comments

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme (see Attachment A).

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Howick Local Board will operate two quick response and three local grants rounds for this financial year. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11.     The Howick Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $395,000 for the 2017/2018 financial year.

12.     A total of $107,343 was allocated for local grants round one, leaving a total of $287,657 to be allocated to two local grant rounds and two quick response rounds.

13.     Twenty five applications were received for Howick Local Grants Round Two 2017/2108, including three multiboard applications, requesting a total of $250,195.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Howick Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or deadline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

15.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

16.     A summary of each application received through local grants round two is attached, see Attachment B.

Māori impact statement

17.     Community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori.  As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the new community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori. One organisation applying in this round has identified as Maori and two have indicated their project targets Maori or Maori outcomes.

Implementation

18.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

19.     Following the Howick Local Board allocating funding to the grant round, commercial and finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Grant Programme 2017/2018

59

b

Howick Local Grant Round Two 2017/2018 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

    Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Authorisers

Shane King - Operations Support Manager

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


 


 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter one, 1 July - 30 September 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/23882

 

  

Purpose

1.       To provide the Howick Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter one, 1 July to 30 September 2017.

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against local board key performance indicators, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2017/2018 work programme.

3.       Of significance this quarter:

·    Fruit Trees in Schools launch (Healthy Howick)

·    Sod turning at new Splash Pad at Lloyd Elsmore Park

·    Installation of BBQ at Bramley Reserve.

4.       The snapshot (attachment A), indicates performance against the agreed 2017/2018 work programmes is tracking positively, with 87% of work programme items identified as “green” (on track).

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery (attachment B).  All items are reported as ‘green’ status (on track) except for the following which have a ‘red’ status (behind delivery, significant risk)/’amber’ status (some risk or issues, which are being managed):

AMBER

·    Community Facilities – 310 Te Irirangi Drive, develop dog park

·    Community Facilities – Botany Library. Internal refresh, update audio-visual equipment and replace air conditioning. (Project is carried forward from the previous 16/17 work programme)

·    Community Facilities – Bucklands Beach – develop walkway

·    Community Facilities – Flat Bush – develop multi-purpose facility

·    Community Facilities – Lloyd Elsmore Park Leisure Centre - comprehensive renewal

·    Community Facilities – Ostrich Farm – sand slits, drainage and irrigation – design and consent

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) – Facility Partnership Fund 2017/18

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) - Greenways and Coastal Walkways Network Plan

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) – Leisure facilities operation programme FY17/18

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) – Skate Park Custodians

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) – Mangemangeroa Reserve: Service review and planning

·    Community Leases – 115 Picton Street

·    Community Leases – Pakuranga Athletics Club

·    Community Leases – Pakuranga Bowling Club

·    Community Leases – The Scout Assoc. of NZ – Cockle Bay

·    Community Leases – The Scout Assoc. of NZ – Minerva.

 

RED

·    Community Facilities – Ormiston College – new hockey turf with lights

·    Plans and Places – Implementation of Howick Heritage Plan

·    Community Leases – Pakuranga and Howick Budgeting Services.

6.       The overall financial performance for quarter one 2017/2018 is favourable compared to the budget. There are some points for the board to note:

·        The Howick Local Board’s net cost of service for the September quarter was $4.3m against a revised budget of $4.6m

·        Operating revenue tracked below budget with a variance of $126k. The main driver for the lower revenue is related to enrolment numbers at Howick Early Childhood Education (Kauri Kids). With increased competition in the sector attracting new enrolments and meeting increased targets are difficult. The centre has plans in place for a marketing campaign to attract more enrolments

·        Operating expenditure for asset based services 5% below budget. The new parks maintenance contracts commenced 1 July, the expenditure to date has been considerably less than the budget. There has been higher than usual rainfall in the quarter which has affected some of the work. Some of the programmes such as tree maintenance were not fully delivering outcomes in the quarter with emergency response related activities being the focus for the period

·        Capital investment ($2.7m) for the period was mainly in the Parks, Sports and Recreation activity, related to development of new assets and renewal of existing assets. Implementation of the Barry Curtis Park Master Plan continued, with asset renewals, sports field and greenways investment also contributing to the spend.. Attachment C contains further detailed financial information.

7.       Key performance indicators: for the first and second quarter we will be providing the year-end outlook based on the results of 2016/17 or for any changes to the outlook based on results available. In the third quarter we will be in a better position to accurately project the year-end outlook for all measures.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter ending 30 September 2017.

 

 

Comments

8.       The Howick Local Board has an approved 2017/2018 work programme for the following operating departments:

·    Arts, Community and Events; approved on 15 May 2017

·    Parks, Sport and Recreation; approved on 19 June 2017

·    Libraries and Information; approved on 19 June 2017

·    Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew; approved on 19 June 2017

·    Community Leases; approved on 19 June 2017

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services; approved on 19 June 2017

·    Local Economic Development; approved on 19 June 2017.

Key achievements for quarter one

9.       The Howick Local Board has a number of key achievements to report from the quarter one period, which include:

·    ACE: Community Empowerment – Capacity building, Healthy Howick

The 2016/2017 Fruit Trees in Schools programme concluded with 25 schools receiving fruit trees. Teachers and students from seven schools attended the launch at Farm Cove Intermediate School. The 2017/2018 programme will be further developed in Q2.

·    ACE: Events – Local Civic Events

The Splash Pad Lloyd Elsmore Park sod turning took place on 9 August. This is a new project sponsored by ANZ Bank. Approximately 30 people attended the event, including ANZ management, ward councillors, local board members, and others.

o    

·    Community Facilities – Bramley Reserve – install BBQ area

Project completed.

o    

·    Community Facilities – Lloyd Elsmore Park – renew skate park

Project completed.

Key project updates from the 2017/2018 work programme

10.     The following are progress updates against key projects identified in the Howick Local Board Plan and/or Local Board Agreement:

·    ACE Events Tamaki River Festival

Staff are supporting the local board to investigate transitioning this event to community delivery. If successful funding will be be provided to the community group as a non-contestable grant in Q2.

o    

·    ACE Events – Music Concert

The Open Air Orchestra, a Music in Parks Featured event, will be held on Saturday 24 March. The event will feature a 20 piece orchestra and pop vocalists who will be confirmed by end of October. Music in Parks concerts all feature emerging artists and the programmer is searching for local talent for the opening act. Regional marketing will commence in November, with local event advertising three weeks prior to the event. The Breeze and More FM have agreed to sponsor the event with radio advertising.

Risks identified in the 2017/2018 work programme

11.     The following are risks that have been identified by operating departments where the progress and performance indicator has been set to ‘red’ – significantly behind budget/time or achievement of outcomes/’amber’ status – some risk or issues, which are being managed.

AMBER:

·    Community Facilities – 310 Te Irirangi Drive, develop dog park.

Risks/issues Project cost estimate higher than budget given. To be reviewed with the board

Current status: High level cost estimate complete. Workshopped with the local board on 21 September. Identifying significant site constraints around public access to the site

Next steps: Have agreed with the local board to continue to work on resolving those access issues as the project remains supported by the local board. Will report back to the local board in October.

o  

·    Community Facilities – Botany Library. Internal refresh, update audio-visual equipment and replace air conditioning. (Project is carried forward from the previous 16/17 work programme)

Issues/Risks The library interior refurbishment was completed, however the HVAC upgrade will not be going ahead

Current status: Contractor has completed work

Next step: Finalise defects items.

o           

·    Community Facilities – Bucklands Beach – develop walkway

Risk/issues Local board has approved in principle the development of a one-way road layout through Little Bucklands Beach and have requested Auckland Transport provide plans for consultation purposes. This process needs to be complete before the project can proceed with development of walkway options

Current status: Physical works for safety improvements to Little Bucklands Beach

Next steps: Auckland Transport development of one-way system plans for consultation.

o  

·    Community Facilities – Flat Bush – develop multi-purpose facility

Additional funds are likely to be required to deliver the current project scope. Business case to be finalised and approvals required

Current status: Updated concept design is almost complete. However, it is estimated to exceed the available budget and as a consequence requires the overall scope to be revisited

Next steps: Staff will work with the local community and local board to ensure the requirements for the centre are properly understood and weighted. When completed this will enable the concept design to be modified.

o    

·    Community Facilities – Lloyd Elsmore Park Leisure Centre - comprehensive renewal

Scope has been tendered, but requires final negotiation and agreement, with the scope now to be undertaken in July August 2017 period with certain works including roofing now; needs to be moved to May 2018

Current status: Physical works are currently underway with the only exclusion of the replacement of the sky light, this will be done as programmed in May 2018

Next steps: Close and handover of project.

o    

·    Community Facilities – Ostrich Farm – sand slits, drainage and irrigation – design and consent

Risks/issues Timing of works may be impacted relating to surrounding developments and release of infrastructure

Current status: Site integration with wider subdivisions in progress.

Next steps: Progress developed design of sports field and park layout.

o    

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) – Facility Partnership Fund 2017/18

Due to the large amount of funding available and a lack of staff resource, advice will now be provided in Q2

Advice will outline a process to fairly allocate this funding to groups within the Howick Board area. Part of this process will involve updating the Howick Sport and Recreation Plan so that the areas of priority are understood and decisions on allocation of funding are made based on up to date data about the sport and recreation need in the Howick Local Board area. Mountain Raiders BMX - $125k. Club continue to investigate options to deliver this project. Connection charges and site access (for containers) have been more challenging than anticipated. Additional (non-council) funding will likely be required to complete this project. A focus on track maintenance (in lead up to summer season) has taken up volunteer time, meaning this project will now be delivered in 2018. Council staff will continue to support the club to deliver the project.

o    

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) - Greenways and Coastal Walkways Network Plan

Local Board to resolve funding allocation

$25,000 has been allocated from the Local Boards LDI discretionary opex to fund this activity. Staff will include this in the Pathways Programme from Q2 onwards and consult with the local board on the joint activities.

 

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) – Leisure facilities operation programme FY17/18

Howick Early Childhood Education (ECE) is not on track to meet budget due to a decrease in occupancy which has also had a ripple effect in a decrease of MoE funding levels. This is a result of increased ECE competition within this region. A plan has been put in place however to undertake a digitally targeted marketing initiative to attract new ECE customers in the Howick area

Howick Leisure Centre is on track to meet local board objectives for Q1. Fitness is on track to exceed last year’s membership numbers (estimated 630, compared to 582 last year). Member and Recreation visits are on track to meet local board objectives. Howick Leisure Centre won the 'Centre of the Year' in Auckland Council’s Leisure 'Be Inspired Awards'. Howick Leisure's Recreation Team Leader Amy Yeoman won the 'Inspiring Leadership' award.

o    

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) – Skate Park Custodians

Awaiting scope and/or documentation following workshop in August 2017

The existing contractor has a new draft agreement ready for signing. This will be completed in October.

o    

·    Community Services (Parks, Sports & Rec) – Mangemangeroa Reserve: Service review and planning

Local Board to resolve funding allocation

The scope of this work will be confirmed in a workshop with the Local Board in Q2. It is proposed to allocate $40,000 to this work programme item, from the Response Fund; work programme line item 1062.

o    

·    Community Leases – 115 Picton Street

Expression of interest placed on hold due to progressing needs assessment being done for the premises. This is expected to be completed by the end of the year

Current occupier does not seek to apply for a new lease at 115 Picton Street. She is ready to move out once the expressions of interest process is started following completion of the needs assessment currently being undertaken by Council contractors.

 

 

o    

·    Community Leases – Pakuranga Athletics Club

Lease does not expire until 31 May 2020. This item will be deferred to FY 2019/2020.

 

·    Community Leases – Pakuranga Bowling Club

Lease does not expire until 2020. This item will be deferred to FY2019/2020.

o    

·    Community Leases – The Scout Assoc. of NZ – Cockle Bay

The matter has been delayed as staff attempt to arrange a meeting with Scout Association to discuss the multi-premises lease

Lease has been delayed.

o    

·    Community Leases – The Scout Assoc. of NZ – Minerva

The matter has been delayed as staff attempt to arrange a meeting with Scout Association to discuss the multi-premises lease

Lease has been delayed.

o    

RED

·    Community Facilities – Ormiston College – new hockey turf with lights

Risks/issues This project has been deferred to future years as there was insufficient budget to deliver this project within this financial year. Following the local board’s approval of the work programme, all projects were assessed and re-prioritised to align within local board budget. Low priority projects have subsequently been deferred to next years’ work programme. We will still try to deliver them earlier if it’s possible under the Risk Adjusted programme

This project is in the very early stages, scoping is yet to be defined.

o    

·    Plans and Places – Implementation of Howick Heritage Plan

No budget assigned.

 

·    Community Leases – Pakuranga and Howick Budgeting Services

On hold due to potential development of the building

Site visit was competed on 25 August 2017. Community Outcomes Plan to be discussed with the tenant and finalised before quarter two. Workshopped this with the local board 21 September 2017. Leasing process is placed on hold due to potential development of the building.

o    

Financial performance

12.     The Howick Local Board’s net cost of service for the September quarter was $4.3m against a revised budget of $4.6m.

13.     Operating revenue tracked below budget with a variance of $126k. The main driver for the lower revenue is related to enrolment numbers at Howick Early Childhood Education (Kauri Kids). With increased competition in the sector attracting new enrolments and meeting increased targets are difficult. The centre has plans in place for a marketing campaign to attract more enrolments.

14.     Operating expenditure for asset based services 5% below budget. The new parks maintenance contracts commenced 1 July, the expenditure to date has been considerably less than the budget. There has been higher than usual rainfall in the quarter which has affected some of the work. Some of the programmes such as tree maintenance were not fully delivering outcomes in the quarter with emergency response related activities being the focus for the period.

15.     Capital investment ($2.7m) for the period was mainly in the Parks, Sports and Recreation activity, related to development of new assets and renewal of existing assets. Implementation of the Barry Curtis Park Master Plan continued, with asset renewals, sports field and greenways investment also contributing to the spend.

Key performance indicators

16.     The local board agreements include level of service statements and associated performance measures to guide and monitor the delivery of local services. This report provides information on the performance measure year-end outlook for Howick Local Board’s measures, showing how we are tracking after the first quarter of FY18.

17.     The year-end outlook is that 32 per cent of measures will not achieve target.

18.     Currently all performance measures are being reviewed as part of the development of the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan.

19.     For the first and second quarter we will be providing the year-end outlook based on the results of 2016/17 or for any changes to the outlook based on results available. In the third quarter we will be in a better position to accurately project the year-end outlook for all measures. This is because the frequency of most measures is annual as data is collected through surveys.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

20.     This report informs the Howick Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 30 September 2017.

Implementation

21.     The Howick Local Board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter 2, December 2017.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme snapshot

71

b

Work programme update

73

c

Financial performance

97

d

Key performance indicators

107

     

Signatories

Authors

Ian Milnes - Senior Local Board Advisor Howick

Authorisers

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 



Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 



Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Feedback on draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan

 

File No.: CP2017/21298

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek feedback from the local board on the proposed direction of the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan review.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently undertaking a review of its Waste Management and Minimisation Plan. This plan is prepared under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008, and is part of council’s responsibility to promote effective and efficient waste management and minimisation in Auckland.

3.       This report seeks feedback from the Howick Local Board on the revised proposed approach to waste management and minimisation. In particular:

·    advocating to central government for a higher waste levy and for product stewardship 

·    addressing three priority commercial waste streams:

construction and demolition waste

organic waste, and

plastic waste

·    addressing waste generated from council and council-controlled organisation’s operational activities, particularly construction and demolition waste.

4.       These points were initially discussed with the Howick Local Board at its 12 October 2017 workshop on the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.

5.       The proposed draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee in December 2017, seeking approval to publicly notify the draft plan. Feedback from all local boards will be included as a part of this report.

 

Recommendation

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the proposed direction of the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.

 

 

Comments

Legislative context

6.       Under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008, Auckland Council is required to adopt a Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, as part of its responsibility to promote effective and efficient waste management.

7.       The first Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan was adopted by council in 2012. It set an aspirational vision of achieving zero waste to landfill by 2040. It placed initial priority on waste reduction within the waste services that are more directly managed by council, which account for approximately 20 per cent of all waste to landfill in the region.

8.       Council is required to review the Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan every six years. This includes conducting a Waste Assessment to review progress, to forecast future demand for waste services, and to identify options to meet future demand. This assessment was completed in mid-2017, and the findings have been outlined below.

Findings of the Waste Assessment: progress and challenges

9.       Under the first Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, seven separate council-managed waste services to households are being merged into one standardised region-wide service. This has included:

·    introducing a new inorganic collection service

·    introducing large bins for recycling across the region

·    introducing bins for refuse in areas that had bag collections

·    establishing five community recycling centres in Waiuku, Helensville, Devonport, Henderson and Whangaparaoa, with another seven to be established by 2024.

10.     Some service changes agreed under the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012 are still to be introduced to standardise the approach across the whole Auckland region, most notably, a food waste collection in urban areas and pay-as-you-throw charge for kerbside refuse collections.

11.     Whilst the council-managed services have achieved waste minimisation, the total amount of waste to landfill has increased by 40 per cent between 2010 and 2016. This is due to the increased amounts of commercial waste being generated, particularly construction and demolition waste. The amount of waste sent to landfill is projected to continue to grow unless a concerted effort is made to intervene to address this trend.

12.     Barriers to waste minimisation in Auckland include the low cost of sending waste to landfill compared to diverting waste to other productive uses, the lack of financial incentives to divert waste from landfill, the lack of council influence over the 80 per cent of waste that is commercially managed, and rapid population growth.

Options analysis

13.     The Waste Assessment identified and evaluated three options to guide the direction of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018, as follows below. 

14.     Option one: status quo involving full implementation of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012. Undertaking the actions agreed in 2012 will focus interventions on 20 per cent of waste within council’s direct control. Although this option could be implemented within council’s waste budget envelope it would not meet council’s responsibilities under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008 to minimise waste in Auckland.

15.     Option two: expanded focus.  Full implementation of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012 and a focus on  three priority commercial waste streams identified in the Waste Assessment - construction and demolition waste, organic waste and plastic waste. This option addresses the 80 per cent of waste outside of council’s direct control and could be implemented within the current waste budget, with some reprioritisation.

16.     Option three: significant investment in residual waste treatment technologies. This option requires development of residual waste treatment facilities, with energy from waste (mass-burn incineration facilities) likely to achieve the best diversion. Significant investment is needed from both the private and public sector to develop these technologies, and there would be reputational risks associated with disposal of waste by incineration. 

17.     It is proposed the council adopts option two, which has the potential to significantly reduce total waste to landfill, and can be undertaken within the current funding envelope.

Proposed updates to the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012

18.     It is proposed that the new Waste Management and Minimisation Plan will continue the direction of the 2012 Plan, and extend the focus of council activity from the 20 per cent of waste that is directly managed by council and its contractors, to the other 80 per cent that is commercially managed.

19.     The proposed vision of the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan is ‘Auckland aspires to be zero waste by 2040, taking care of people and the environment, and turning waste into resources’.

20.     It is proposed that zero waste is maintained as an aspirational target. Achieving high diversion rates in Auckland (in the order of 80 per cent as achieved by an exemplar city, San Francisco) is considered to be a successful response to such an aspirational target.

21.     To achieve the zero waste vision, three goals are proposed: minimise waste generation, maximise opportunities for resource recovery, and reduce harm from residual waste.

22.     Three updated targets are proposed:

·    total waste: reduce by 30 per cent by 2027 (no change from the current waste plan)

·    domestic waste: reduce by 30 per cent by 2020/2021 (extension of date from 2018 to align with the roll-out of the food waste kerbside collection service; a new target will be set once this is achieved)

·    council’s own waste:

o reduce office waste by 60 per cent by 2040 (target doubled from current waste plan)

o work across council to set a baseline for operational waste (generated as a result of  council activities such as property maintenance, construction and demolition, and events, and implement these baseline targets by 2019.

23.     The proposed draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan identifies the actions that will be undertaken over the next six years. The priority actions that will have the biggest impact on waste reduction include:

·    continued delivery of the  Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012, including the transition to consistent kerbside services (including introduction of a kerbside organic collection in urban areas and the standardisation of pay-as-you throw kerbside refuse collection across the region), and establishment of the resource recovery network

·    a focus on addressing the 80 per cent of waste that council does not directly influence, by:

o advocating to central government for a higher waste levy and for product stewardship

o addressing three priority commercial waste streams:

-    construction and demolition waste,

-    organic waste, and

-    plastic waste

o addressing waste generated from council and council-controlled organisation’s operational activities, particularly construction and demolition waste.

24.     The draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan will put emphasis on partnership and engagement with other sectors that are relevant to the priority action areas. Council recognises that it cannot achieve its waste minimisation responsibilities by acting alone.

25.     It is important to note that council has limited tools to address commercially managed waste. Achieving policy changes at central government level will be essential to achieving waste to landfill reductions in Auckland. If council is unsuccessful in its advocacy, targets will not be met.

Request for local board feedback

26.     Local boards are being asked whether they support the proposed approach taken in the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, and in particular the focus on:

a)    advocating to central government for a higher waste levy and for product stewardship 

b)    addressing three priority commercial waste streams:

construction and demolition waste

organic waste, and

plastic waste.

c)    addressing waste generated from council and council-controlled organisation’s operational activities, particularly construction and demolition waste.

Financial implications

27.     The actions proposed in the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan can be achieved within existing waste funding. Funding will be obtained through a combination of:

·    pay-as-you-throw domestic refuse collections, which will be progressively introduced across the region

·    rates funding, and

·    revenue from the waste levy (from the $10 per tonne waste levy that is administered by the Ministry for the Environment, 50 per cent of which is distributed to councils, amounting to $6.1 million for Auckland Council in 2016).

28.     Infrastructure to enable commercial resource recovery will require investment from external sources such as government and the private sector.

29.     The budget for implementing the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan will be considered through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 process.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

30.     A workshop was held with the Howick Local Board on 12 October 2017 to discuss the proposals set out in this report. Feedback provided at this workshop will be summarised and tabled at the meeting.

Māori impact statement

31.     Mana whenua and mātāwaka have been actively engaged in implementing the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012. A number of initiatives have enabled waste minimisation from a te ao Māori context. Through Para Kore ki Tāmaki, marae in the Auckland region are able to foster kaitiakitanga practices and affirm their connections with the natural world. More than 2,000 whānau participate in the programme annually, and over 50 Para Kore zero waste events have been held since the programme rolled out in 2014. The programme provides a catalyst for taking the kaitiakitanga message from the marae into homes and the community. Protecting Papatūānuku, connecting with traditions and showing respect for customs has become a priority for whānau through this programme.

32.     The proposed draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan seeks to present a stronger mana whenua and mātāwaka perspective, recognising the close alignment between te ao Māori and zero waste. Two mana whenua hui and one mātāwaka hui held in June 2017 have identified mana whenua and matāwaka principles and priorities, for direct inclusion into the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.

Implementation

33.     The draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan will have financial implications, as the targeted rate for food waste must be costed and included in consultation on the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.  It is proposed that this be aligned with consultation on the Long-term Plan 2018-2028. This will ensure that any budget implications are considered through the Long-term Plan process.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Parul Sood, General Manager Waste Solutions (Acting) and Julie Dickinson, Waste Planning Manager (Acting)

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Review of representation arrangements - process

 

File No.: CP2017/22333

 

  

Purpose

1.       To provide comments to the Governing Body on the proposed process (in Attachment B to the agenda report) for the review of representation arrangements.

Executive summary

2.       All local authorities are required by the Local Electoral Act 2001 to undertake a review of representation arrangements at least once every six years in order to determine the arrangements for the following elections.

3.       Auckland Council was established in 2010 and was not required to undertake a review of representation arrangements for the 2016 elections, but is required to undertake a review for the 2019 elections. The review will take place during 2018.

4.       It is possible to review the following for the Governing Body:

i.          Whether members are elected at-large or by ward or a combination

ii.          If elected by ward, the number of members in each ward, the ward boundaries and ward names.

5.       It is possible to review the following for each local board:

i.          The number of members

ii.          Whether local board members are to be elected by subdivision or at large

iii.         If by subdivision, the number of members in each subdivision and the subdivision boundaries and names

iv.        The local board name.

6.       It is not possible to review the number of governing body members. This is set in the Auckland Council legislation. Other councils are able to review the number of members.

7.       It is also not possible to review the boundaries, or number, of local boards. A reorganisation process is required to do this. This is a separate process under the legislation.

8.       With a governing body and 21 local boards, Auckland Council has more complex arrangements than other councils and an efficient and effective process for undertaking the review needs to be determined. 

9.       The report attached as Attachment A was considered by the Governing Body on 28 September 2017. The report sets out the background and context to the review and a proposed process for conducting the review. 

10.     The Governing Body resolved a proposed process on 28 September 2017, as set out in Attachment B, and is now seeking the views of local boards on this process.

11.     In December the Governing Body will resolve the final process for conducting the review, following feedback from local boards on the proposed process.

12.     This report seeks the local boards’ views on the proposed process as set out in Attachment B, for conducting the review of representation arrangements.

13.     Representation by way of establishing one or more Māori wards is being considered separately by the Governing Body.  There is not a similar provision for Māori seats on local boards.

14.     Feedback from the local board will be communicated to the Governing Body 14 December 2017 meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Provide its comments on the proposed process for conducting the review of representation arrangements.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Process to conduct a review of representation arrangements – report to Governing Body meeting on 28 September 2017

117

b

Process to conduct a review of representation arrangements – resolution of Governing Body

125

     

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton, Principal Advisor Democracy Services

Authorisers

Phil Wilson – Governance Director

Carol McKenzie-Rex – General Manager Local Board Services

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Renewal of community lease to Howick Hornets Rugby League Football Club Incorporated at 52R Paparoa Road, Cockle Bay

 

File No.: CP2017/23544

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for the renewal of the community lease to Howick Hornets Rugby League Football Club Incorporated, located on Paparoa Park at 52R Paparoa Road, Cockle Bay.

Executive summary

2.       The lease was issued by Manukau City Council to Howick Hornets Rugby League Football Club Incorporated for the council owned building on Paparoa Park. The lease to the club was for an initial term of 10 years with one 10 year right of renewal commencing on 1 August 2007 and with a final expiry of 31 July 2027.

3.       The club wishes to exercise its right of renewal for the term 1 August 2017 until 31 July 2027. 

4.       This report recommends the Howick Local Board approve the renewal of community lease to Howick Hornets Rugby League Football Club Incorporated for a term of 10 years commencing 1 August 2017.

5.       In recommending the lease renewal, a process has been followed which includes a review of the tenant’s performance. The organisation must demonstrate that it is sustainable and the services and programmes offered are beneficial to the community.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)   approves the renewal of the community lease to Howick Hornets Rugby League Football Club Incorporated dated 12 October 2007 for part of Paparoa Park, 52R Paparoa Road, Cockle Bay (Attachment A) on the following terms and conditions:

i)    Term: 10 years commencing 1 August 2017;

ii)   Rent: 10 cents per annum plus GST, if demanded

All other terms and conditions as contained in the existing Deed of Lease excluding this right of renewal.

 

Comments

6.       The land at Paparoa Park is described Part Allotment 8 Section 7 Small Lots Near Village of Howick comprising 2.5040 hectares. Contained in NA12B/792, it is held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Reserves Act 1977 as a classified recreation reserve.

7.       The club has a community lease entered into with the legacy Manukau City Council for use of part of the land at Paparoa Park for a term of 10 years commencing 1 August 2007 with one 10 year right of renewal.  The club wishes to exercise its right of renewal for the term 1 August 2017 until 31 July 2027. 

8.       The club was established as an incorporated society in 1961. The club was initially located at Howick Domain. In 1965, the Manukau City Council created two playing fields and constructed the current club building at Paparoa Park.

9.       The two storey building is routinely used by the club and comprise of a tuck shop, toilets, changing rooms, storage, a lounge area, bar and kitchen. The condition of the building has been assessed by Council’s Asset Assessor who has confirmed that the building is in good condition and is fit for use.

10.     The club has approximately 390 members, with the majority ranging from five to 50 years old. During the summer the club shares the premises with other football clubs and a softball club.

11.     Staff have sought input from relevant council departments and no issues have been raised.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     The recommendations within this report fall within local boards’ allocated authority relating to the local, recreation, sports and community facilities.

13.     The sporting activities of the club align with the Howick Local Board Plan outcome, ‘our community is active and healthy’.

14.     The recommendations were discussed at the board’s workshop on 19 October 2017, at which time no objections were raised.

Māori impact statement

15.     There are no changes in use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

Implementation

16.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

17.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan for Howick Hornets Rugby League Football Club Incorporated

129

     

Signatories

Authors

Angela Yang - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Input to the Review of Citizens Advice Bureaux services

 

File No.: CP2017/23813

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft options for supporting the future provision of Citizens Advice Bureaux services to Auckland’s communities.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is reviewing Citizens Advice Bureaux services in Auckland following a resolution by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in April 2016.

3.       The review will determine the appropriate level of Auckland Council support for Citizens Advice Bureaux services from 2018/2019 onwards.

4.       Thirty-one Citizens Advice Bureaux operate in the Auckland region.

5.       Auckland Council fund Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Incorporated $1.839 million a year which then distributes the funds to bureaux.

6.       Local boards have provided input to the review on the local relationships, services and funding. Staff have developed draft options to address the issues and opportunities raised. The options are in the table below:

Option 1: Enhanced status quo

Enhancements are a refined funding model, reporting improvements and strengthened local relationships 

Option 2: Locally driven

Transfers responsibility for existing budget to local boards

Option 3: Regional service provision

Collective review of funding levels and number and location of service sites 

 

7.       Staff consider Option 3 to be the best option to achieve consistent regional service delivery. If CABx and CABNZ do not agree with Option 3, then Option 1 provides for greater consistency of service delivery than Option 2.

8.       Staff will incorporate feedback from local boards on the draft options in to the review findings to be reported to the Environment and Community Committee in early 2018.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Provide feedback on the draft options for supporting the future provision of Citizens Advice Bureaux services to Auckland’s communities by 1 December 2017.

 

Comments

Background

9.       On 7 April 2016 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee resolved to:

“seek information from staff regarding a review of the service after consultation with the 21 local boards on the issues raised by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board regarding Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Incorporated (ACABx) funding, to achieve greater equity and fairness, taking into consideration social issues in local communities across Auckland.” (REG/2016/22)

10.     The review scope includes:

·    alignment to council policy, strategic priorities, local board plans and policies

·    equitable service provision – Aucklanders having access to the services they need across the region, responding to growth and change in Auckland’s communities

·    equity of funding for bureaux across Auckland – the basis for how funding is distributed

·    how Auckland Council interacts and engages with bureaux across Auckland

·    communicating the impact and value of Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB) services

·    council’s governance needs and role with regard to reporting and accountability.

11.     Since 2013 Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Incorporated (ACABx), a board made up of representatives from across Auckland bureaux, has been distributing the council funding to bureaux using a population-based funding model which replaced previous funding arrangements by legacy councils.

12.     ACABx received $1.839 million for 2017/2018, which includes an annual inflation provision. This expenditure is included in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

13.     Some local boards provide funding to their local bureaux in addition to the core funding allocated through ACABx.  Local boards provide support to CAB through accommodation as the majority of bureaux are located in council facilities.

14.     ACABx distributes funds to local CAB so that communities are provided with access to information, advice, referral and client advocacy services.

Current Auckland CAB services and alignment with local board plans and council strategies

15.     Currently there are 31 Auckland CAB sites in 18 local board areas, with over 900 trained volunteers fielding approximately 300,000 enquiries per annum; 75% of the service is delivered face-to-face.

16.     Support for CAB services aligns with the following:

·    local board plan outcomes, such as connected communities, employment and housing

·    Auckland Plan (strategic direction one): to create a strong, inclusive and equitable society that ensures opportunity for all Aucklanders

·    Empowered Communities Approach, where individuals, whānau and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions.

17.     The first annual review of the Auckland Council-ACABx Strategic Relationship Agreement (2016-2018) noted the following achievements and issues:

·    agreed relationship principles, established a governing group and secured CAB New Zealand (CABNZ) involvement to support the relationship

·    work is still in progress to improve measurement and the CAB reporting model

·    both parties acknowledged that the current arrangements limit the collective ability to achieve regional level change, including closure, rationalisation or new sites and influencing local service provision 

·    currently ACABx will not address the overall number and location of service sites operated by member bureaux, which is based on legacy council models.  They will not consider opening new sites unless there is an increase in the overall funding envelope.  Based on current information shared by CAB it is difficult to determine the value of the service in order for the council to review its funding commitment.

The review of CAB Services in Auckland

18.     Local boards provided input to the review during July and August 2017. A comprehensive information pack was provided to resource and support their input. The full summary of local board input is provided in Attachment A.

19.     Feedback from boards highlighted what is working well:

·    Most boards consider the services are of high value to the community.

·    Leverage of council funding as services are delivered by well trained, approachable, multi-lingual and knowledgeable volunteers.

·    Connecting people with information and services otherwise out of reach, especially for migrants, older people, international students and lower socioeconomic groups.

20.     The review has identified a number of issues, including:

·    Inequity in funding of bureaux and service provision across the region – service needs to be responsive to growth and community need.

·    The need for better connections between local boards and bureaux to support improved two-way communication.

·    The need for bureau data and information on trends and emerging issues at regional and site level. 

·    Future service sustainability, including awareness of service and better outreach to targeted groups that currently are under-represented as users (e.g. Māori, some migrant groups, young people, rural communities).

21.     Some local boards have raised deprivation as a factor that should be taken into account in allocating funding to bureaux. These boards consider that areas of high deprivation should get more funding as there is increased and more complex need. Further investigation is needed and staff are seeking evidence from CAB on what they deliver and from which sites, and where their clients live before deprivation can be considered within the funding model.

Draft options for feedback

22.     Three draft options have been developed that respond to the issues and opportunities raised by local boards and the review of the Strategic Relationship Agreement.

 

Table 1: Review of CAB services: Draft options

Option

Description

Pros

Cons

Implementation

Option 1: Enhanced status quo

 

·  Overall funding envelope unchanged

·  Governing Body remains the decision maker for funding

·  Council has funding agreement with ACABx

·  The funding agreement includes:

- A review of the population-based funding model with up-to-date local board population estimates, current CAB sites and exploring the use of deprivation as a proxy for need

- Improved reporting with consistent trend information at regional and site level

- A local relationship framework developed to support strengthened and more strategic relationships between local boards and bureaux

 

·  Valued community service is maintained

·  Continued contribution to regional strategies and improved contribution to local board plan outcomes

·  Updated funding model to include some aspects of need, including population growth and potentially deprivation

·  Improved reporting on the use and value of the service regionally and locally (who is using the service, why and where)

·  Community intelligence is shared to support local decision making and advocacy

·  Efficient bulk funding model because Governing Body would allocate bulk funding to ACABx to distribute to the bureaux

 

·  No change to the fixed funding envelope

·  Does not address the overall number and location of service sites or opening of new sites in high growth areas

·  No strategic approach to the region’s service needs

·  Does not address that some local boards are providing additional funding for bureau services from LDI budgets

·  Does not address the CAB as a largely passive service with limited resources to undertake outreach to vulnerable groups that are currently underrepresented as users

·  Does not address responsiveness of the service to changing demographics and evolving community needs

·  Could be implemented for 2018/2019 with a two-year funding agreement (July 2018 - June 2020)

·  This is the most achievable of the options

a)              

Option 2: Locally driven

 

·  CAB operates as a local service rather than a regional service

·  Governing Body transfers responsibility for existing budget to local boards.  Locally driven initiatives (LDI) budgets adjusted accordingly

·  It would be up to each local board to decide if local bureaux are funded and to what level. From the bureaux perspective, their funding agreement would be with Auckland Council instead of ACABx

·  Local boards govern the relationship with bureaux

·  The funding agreement includes:

- Meeting local board priorities

- Improved reporting and local relationship framework as under Option 1

b)         

·  Opportunity to strengthen alignment of bureaux services with local board plan outcomes and with other local community services

·  Local boards and bureaux work together to respond to growth and local changes

·  Council funding of the service can be more responsive to local need, e.g. seek rationalisation of bureau sites at a local or cluster level, outreach to vulnerable groups that are currently underrepresented as users

·  Boards can direct funding to providers best placed to serve the local community

·  Improved reporting on the use and value of the service regionally and locally (who is using the service, why and where)

·  Community intelligence is shared to support local decision making and advocacy

·  The fixed funding envelope constrains the ability to open new sites

·  No strategic approach to the region’s service needs

·  Significantly higher administrative burden on CAB  which will need to seek local board support for funding arrangements

·  Would require increased dedicated resource from council (Community Empowerment Unit) to administer multiple funding agreements and accountability reports

c)          

·  Could be implemented for 2018/2019

·  Funding could be ring fenced for the 2018/2019 during phased implementation

·  From 2019-2021, local boards could fund on an annual or multi-year basis and could also fund on a local board cluster basis

·  This option is achievable but would require significant change for bureaux and local boards

Option 3: Regional service provision

 

·  Assessment undertaken to understand the value of the service which would also determine the appropriate level of Auckland Council support required

·  This option requires active participation from CABNZ and Auckland bureaux

·  Regional Network Provision Framework developed by council, CABNZ and bureaux that reviews the location of bureau sites across the region to address service gaps and opportunities around accommodation

·  Could also include potential for a single CAB entity for whole of Auckland with a mandate to develop the service regionally – requires major constitutional change for bureaux

·  Comprehensive review of the CAB service going forward and role for Auckland Council in supporting the service

·  Only option that allows for a review of the level of council funding for the service

·  Strengthened contribution to regional strategies and local board plan outcomes

·  Only option that would be able to comprehensively address the overall number and location of service sites, including new sites

·  Strategic approach to the region’s service needs and addresses responsiveness of local service delivery

·  Requires significant commitment and change from a volunteer-based organisation

·  Relies on substantial council involvement and increased dedicated resource

d)             

·  The new approach would be developed during 2018/19 and implemented in 2019/2020

·  Enhanced status quo would apply in 2018/2019

·  This option is the most difficult to achieve and would require long term commitment from all parties and council resourcing to implement

 

23.     Overall Option 3: Regional service provision provides the most likelihood of achieving regional consistency of service delivery to meet changing community need and for this reason staff consider this to be the best option. However, without the agreement of the CABx and CABNZ Option 3 is not achievable. Discussions between council staff, the ACABx board and CABNZ are still ongoing.

24.     If Option 3 is not achievable Option 1: Enhanced status quo will provide for greater consistency of service delivery than Option 2: Locally driven.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

25.     Local boards have detailed knowledge of both local bureau delivery and of their local communities’ needs. Boards have provided input to the review on their relationship with the local bureau, services and funding, indicating that for most boards there is good alignment of the CAB services with local board plan outcomes.

26.     Staff have developed draft options that respond to the issues and opportunities raised by local boards and are seeking feedback on these options. 

27.     Under Option 1 (Enhanced status quo) the funding model is reviewed and an improved local relationship framework would be available to support reporting and discussions between boards and bureaux. Under Option 2 (Locally driven), boards would take on responsibility for funding local bureaux. Under Option 3 (Regional service provision) a fuller assessment would be undertaken with board involvement to determine a new approach for future CAB service provision across the region.

Māori impact statement                          

28.     For 2016/2017, Māori users of CAB services comprised between 2.5% of users in the central Auckland/Waiheke cluster to 13.2% in south/east Auckland cluster (Source: ACABx Accountability Report to Auckland Council July 2016-June 2017). 

29.     Options 2 and 3 are more likely to improve Māori engagement with CAB services as they would support more responsive local service provision.

Implementation

30.     Staff request local boards provide feedback on the draft options by 1 December 2017.  Staff will incorporate this feedback in to the review findings which will be reported to the Environment and Community Committee in early 2018.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of local board input July - August 2017

137

     

Signatories

Authors

Carole Blacklock - Specialist Advisor - Partnering and Social Investment, Community Empowerment Unit, Arts, Community a

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Delegated Decision relating to feedback on the Remuneration Authority Consultation Document.

 

File No.: CP2017/23023

 

  

Purpose

1.       To notify the Howick Local Board of the feedback made under the Local Board’s delegated decision-making process on the Remuneration Authority Consultation Document.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board notes the urgent decision and feedback on the Remuneration Authority Consultation Document.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Delegated Decision of the Howick Local Board

199

b

Howick Local Board Submission

201

    

Signatories

Authors

Nichola  Painter - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Howick Local Board Plan 2017 - Chinese Translation

 

File No.: CP2017/22311

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek the Local Board’s approval to allocate up to $2,000 from the Locally Driven Initiatives {LDIs} fund to have the Howick Local Board Plan 2017 translated into simplified Chinese language.

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires local boards to produce and adopt a local board plan every three years.

3.       Local board plans are strategic plans for the following three years and beyond. The plans reflect the priorities and preferences of the community. They guide how the local board:

·    makes decisions on local activities and projects

·    provides input into regional strategies and policies.

4.       The plans form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes. They also inform the development of council’s 10-year budget.

5.       Under Section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002 local boards are required to use the special consultative procedure in adopting their local board plan.  The consultation period ran from 22 May to 30 June 2017 and some submissions were received in Chinese and translated into English.

6.       The board adopted the 2017 plan on 16 October 2017 and now propose to have the plan translated into simple Chinese to be printed and available online. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve up to $2,000 from the Locally Driven Initiatives {LDIs} fund to have the Howick Local Board Plan 2017 translated into simplified Chinese language.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2017/17449

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the Howick Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

 

Executive Summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Howick Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

223

     

Signatories

Authors

Nichola  Painter - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 



Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 



Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2017/17445

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report attaches the workshop records taken for the period stated below.

Executive Summary

2.       Under Standing Order 1.4.2 and 2.15 workshops convened by the Board shall be closed to the public, however, the proceedings of a workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed or decisions reached, but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.  This report attaches the workshop records for the period stated below.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for workshops held on 4, 5, 11, 12, 18, 19, 25 & 26.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

4 October 2017 Workshop Record

227

b

5 October 2017 Workshop Record

229

c

11 October 2017 Workshop Record

231

d

12 October 2017 Workshop Record

233

e

18 October 2017 Workshop Record

235

f

19 October 2017 Workshop Record

237

g

25 October 2017 Workshop Record

239

h

26 October 2017 Workshop Record

241

     

Signatories

Authors

Nichola  Painter - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 


 

    

  


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 9.1      Attachment a    Correspondance from Grant Maconaghie     Page 245


Howick Local Board

20 November 2017