I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 13 December 2017

5.00pm

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office
Shop 17B
93 Bader Drive
Māngere

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Deputy Chairperson

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Members

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

 

 

Carrol Elliott, JP

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese, JP

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Janette McKain

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

7 December 2017

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: janette.mckain@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum -  Mangere Connect                                                                     5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Manukau Ward Councillors Update                                                                            7

13        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                          9

14        Chairpersons Report and Announcements                                                             11

15        Auckland Transport Update - December 2017                                                         13

16        Release of business associations funding Māngere-Ōtāhuhu 2017/2018            21

17        Otāhuhu Portage                                                                                                       165

18        Renewal of community leases at Old Ōtāhuhu Library, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu  177

19        Renewal of community lease to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board at 23 Atkinson Avenue, Ōtāhuhu                                                                                      185

20        Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Streetscape Upgrade (Stage 3)                                        191

21        Landowner approval for the operation of a community led food truck from 362 Massey Road, Māngere East                                                                                                  195

22        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 May to 31 October 2017                                                                                                                             199

23        10-year Budget 2018-2028 consultation                                                                  207

24        Decision making allocation                                                                                      211

25        Revising the local board Standing Orders                                                             229

26        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback on the: Review of the representation arrangments - process.                                                                                             237

27        Local board resolution responses and information report                                  241

28        Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Achievements Register 2016-2019 Electoral Term    263

29        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     267

30        Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                                 271

31        Local board feedback on rates remission and postponement policy review     283  

32        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

33        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               317

31        Local board feedback on rates remission and postponement policy review

d.      All community and sporting remissions by local board area                     317  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 15 November 2017, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum -  Mangere Connect

Purpose

1.       Toni Helleur and members from Māngere Connect would like to introduce themselves to the local board.

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board thanks Toni Helleur and members from Māngere Connect for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

There were no notices of motion.

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Manukau Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2017/24740

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the verbal reports from Cr Alf Filipaina and Cr Efeso Collins be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2017/24741

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This item allows the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their leads and appointments meetings.

Resolution number MO/2016/182

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member C O'Brien:  

Organisation

 

Lead

Alternate

Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Bridge BID

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Town Centre BID

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Makalita Kolo

Mangere East Village BID

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Otahuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

Makalita Kolo

South Harbour Business Association BID

Carrol Elliott         

Makalita Kolo

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Carrol Elliott

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Youth Connections South Local Governance Group (3 members)

Christine O’Brien, Makalita Kolo,

Lemauga Lydia Sosene 

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich (appointed 15 March 2017)

Maori input into local board decision-making political steering group (1 lead, 1 alternate)

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Ambury Park Centre

Christine O’Brien

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Mountain Education Trust               

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Local Board Leads

Infrastructure and Environmental Services lead

 

Carrol Elliott

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Arts, Community and Events lead

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Christine O’Brien

Parks, Sport and Recreation lead and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Libraries and Information Services lead

Christine O’Brien

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Makalita Kolo

 

Local planning and heritage lead – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (Planning)

Carrol Elliott

(Heritage)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Transport lead

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Carrol Elliott/

Makalita Kolo

 

Economic development lead

Christine O’Brien

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

The Southern Initiative Joint Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (appointed 17 May 17)

Liquor Licence Hearings – Delegation to represent

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

(appointed 17 May 17)

 

Manukau Harbour Forum

Carrol Elliott (appointed 19 April 2017)

Togiatolu Water Togiamua (appointed 19 April 2017)

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the verbal and written updates from local board members be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Chairpersons Report and Announcements

 

File No.: CP2017/24744

 

  

 

Purpose

This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and for the local board to receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the verbal update and written report be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - December 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/25244

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to; respond to resolutions on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and, provide transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board (MOLB) and its community.

Executive summary

2.       This month a decision is not required and information is provided about the following matters:

·    Auckland Transport’s strategic alignment and how it impacts on people in this community will be discussed.

·    How Auckland Transport is supporting the MOLB’s Local Board Plan.

·    The Local Board Transport Capital Fund including an update on existing projects and a request for a guidance by ‘resolution’ from the MOLB. 

·    Information about Auckland Transport projects being delivered in the area.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Note the Auckland Transport Update – December 2017 report.

 

 

Comments

Strategic Alignment

 

Long Term Plan and Regional Land Transport Programme

 

 

4.      Auckland Transport and Auckland Council are preparing to start working with all elected members and the community to discuss and plan budgets for the next three years early next year.  Auckland Transport has advised all local boards to carefully consider their key issues and to engage fully in these processes because once budgets are set by Auckland Council’s Governing Body the opportunity to start new projects is small.

 

5.      It is very important that any transport related issues or concerns are raised so they can be considered at the time when there is greatest flexibility in budgets. Auckland Transport has provided a draft list of projects to Local Boards and has asked for comment.

 

 

 

 

6.      The next step is that Auckland Transport will prioritise all of the proposed project based on technical considerations (i.e. against all of the other potential projects in Auckland and looking at safety, network efficiency and cost effectiveness how does project rate?) When it is available the prioritised list will be circulated to elected members and then the public for comment.

 

7.      Public consultation is scheduled for early in the new year and when this is completed the feedback will be considered and discussed with Auckland Council’s Governing Body.

 

AT’s actions against advocacy plans

 

8.      This section provides a regular report about how Auckland Transport is supporting the MOLB ‘Advocacy Initiatives’. The Board’s ‘Advocacy Initiatives’ are recorded in the MOLB Local Board Plan. Auckland Transport is not reporting this month because due to Christmas this month’s report was drafted less than a week after the last MOLB meeting and there are no significant changes to report.  

 

Local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) update

 

9.      The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all Local Boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local Boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. The limitations being that the project must:

·        Be safe.

·        Not impede network efficiency.

·        Be in the road corridor. Although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome. 

10.    MOLB’s funding in this term is approx $1.8 million.

 

Projects

 

11.    The MOLB identified a number of possible projects and the table below summarises the projects that are currently progressing.

Table 2: Local Board Transport Capital Fund Projects

Projects

Current Status

Problem or Opportunity Being Addressed

Current Status

Upgrading the footpaths in and around the Mangere East Town Centre.

 

 

Providing better pedestrian facilities in and around Mangere East.

 ‘Rough Order of Cost’ approx. $700,000 - 1,000,000.

The re-development of the Mangere East Town Centre is the MOLB’s main priority during the Long Term Plan and strong business case has been developed to test Auckland Council’s support. This business case has passed the first round of discussion.

Building a two lane roundabout at the intersection of Bader Drive and Idyllwild Road

 

Easing congestion at the intersection of Bader Drive and Idle wild Roads.

Rough Order of Costs: (21 June 2017) $700,000 - $1 million.

More design work has been completed and was reported to the MOLB last month.

Widening Bader Drive in front of the Cosmopolitan Club

 

Remove the road 'narrowings' near the Mangere Town Centre that create congestion on Bader Drive.

Rough Order of Costs: (21 June 2017) $200,000  

More design work has been completed and was reported to the MOLB last month.

Ashgrove Reserve Cycle Route

 

Build a new improved walking and styling pathway through Ashgrove Reserve.

Rough Order of Costs: (16 August 2017) $400,000  

.

Notes:

A ‘traffic light’ code is used to summarize the status of projects. The colours are used as follows:

Green – Project progressing ‘on time’ and within budget.

Orange – An issue has been identified that may need to be resolved.

Red - An major issue has been identified that needs to be resolved

Black – The project has been investigated and the HLB has decided not to pursue it at this time.

 

 

Potential Projects

 

Vine Street Upgrade

 

                                

12.    Recently another small project has been proposed by NZ Police, Auckland Council staff and the local community. The project has not been workshopped with the MOLB but has been recommended for consideration so is being reported. It is not recommended that a decision is made tonight.

13.    The proposal involves making some small modifications to the parking area and road corridor in front of the Vine Street shops to deter criminal activity (See Fig 1 below).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Vine Street Shops

 

14.    The requested modifications to the street are summarised as follows:

 

·    Change the off-street parking area to a ‘one-way with the entrance from Vine St and the exit onto Farmer St.

·    Install judder bars at the entry and exit points with pedestrian crossings.

·    Narrow the Vine St entrance so that it is one-lane width.

·    Widen the footpath along the shop frontages.

·    Change the existing parallel parking in front of the shops to angle parking and remove parking on the other side of the ‘right of way’.

·    Include disabled parking.

·    Investigate a way to restrict access to the service lane at the rear of the buildings.

 

15.    While this project may benefit the local community it would not contribute to road safety or to a more efficient road network so is unlikely to be a priority for Auckland Transport’s work programme.  Therefore, the project may be considered by the MOLB as a possible Local Board funded project.

Upcoming projects and activities

 

Consultations

 

16.    Auckland Transport provides the MOLB with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in this Local Board Area.

17.    In this reporting period, one project was put forward for comment by the MOLB. (Attachment A).

Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions

These are reported on a monthly basis.

Street

Area

Work

Decision

Bader Drive, Mascot Avenue, Ashgrove Road

 

Mangere

Bus Lane, Ambulance Service, Bus Stop, Bus Shelter, Nsaat, Shared Path, Cycle Lane, Cycle Lane, Lane Arrow Markings, Give-Way, Give-Way Controlled Roundabout, Traffic Island, Flush Median

 

Carried

Bukem Place, Aruna Place

 

Mangere

No Stopping At All Times, Give-Way

 

Carried

 

Regional and sub-regional projects

 

Mangere Bridge ‘Safer Community’ project

 

 

18.    Auckland Transport is delivering a new road safety programme is called ‘Safer Communities’. This programme by concentrates road safety funding in certain areas to get a bigger effect. Mangere-Bridge is part of this initiative and initial discussions with key stakeholders were recently undertaken by the project team.

19.    It is likely that the project will focus on the area around the town centre. This is because the engineering aims to put people first and to make sure that anything delivered is closely linked to local people’s requirements.

20.    Auckland Transport met with the MOLB on 29 November 2017 and presented their feedback by the team to the MOLB. 

 

Mangere Bridge Boat Ramp Crime

 

21.    Local residents have reported anti-social behavior around the Mangere Boat Ramp.  The MOLB have been proactive and Council Parks and Auckland Transport staff are discussing options for reducing anti-social behavior.

22.    Closing the road to the boat ramp has been discussed but is not legally possible because the road is a ‘gazetted’ (i.e. legally recognized road) and therefore access can only be limited for short periods of time (up-to 30 days in a year)

23.    Other options still being discussed are:

·    Putting more lighting in the area.

·    Using the existing ‘boyracer’ bylaw to exclude cars from the area during certain times of the day.

24.    At the time this report was written both options were under investigation.

 

 

Auckland Transport Support to Tongan Fan Zones

25.    The recent success of Tonga in the Rugby League World Cup has seen Otahuhu become the centre of celebrations. The MOLB and local Councillors have worked with the community to help make sure celebrations are safe and fun.

26.    Auckland Transport has supported this initiative and has worked pro-actively with the Police and organisers to facilitate road closures in and around the Otahuhu town centre.

27.    Our transport operations centre monitors helps with safety by monitoring activity using our CCTV network and manages traffic safety using traffic light phasing and other measures. In addition, Auckland Transport have assisted the local business association to employ Pacific Wardens to help manage safety for pedestrians in particular.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Consultations in November 2017

19

     

Signatories

Authors

Ben Stallworthy, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Release of business associations funding Māngere-Ōtāhuhu 2017/2018

 

File No.: CP2017/20748

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the 2016/2017 accountability reports of the business improvement district and business associations in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area and seek approval on proposed funding to the five business improvement districts and business associations for 2017/2018.

Executive summary

2.       On 21 June 2017 the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board approved the Arts, Community and Events 2017/2018 work programme which included the work programme line to “Build capacity: business improvement districts safety activities” (MO/2017/118).

3.       The work programme line includes funding of $262,000 from the CCTV and safety initiatives budget, which is broken down into:

·        $47,000 for public safety camera maintenance and contingencies

·        $215,000 for BIDs to build capacity: business improvement districts safety activities.

4.       The work programme includes a further decision point for the board – that the release of the funding for 2017/2018 is subject to receipt and approval of a budget breakdown and a 2016/2017 accountability report on Business Improvement Districts (BID) activity. 

5.       Staff received 2016/2017 grant accountability reports from the five business associations and BIDs:

·        Māngere Bridge Progressive Business Association

·        Māngere East Village Business Association Society Incorporated

·        Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated

·        Ōtāhuhu Business Association Incorporated

·        South Harbour Business Association Incorporated.

6.       The funding recipients have met the following funding accountability measures:

·        maintaining good governance and management practices

·        deliver on objectives from the business association strategic plans for the current year

·        providing worthy employment to long term unemployed individuals

·        increasing the perceived safety of local residents and visitors

·        providing safety related services

·        responding to all requests from Police for support

·        carrying out events and activities that increase commercial, community and social activity

·        delivering community events and develop of a sense of pride in the culture of the area.

7.       These accountability measures contribute to local board outcomes of a strong local economy, a place where communities thrive and belong and Māngere-Ōtāhuhu being at the heart of Māori and Pasifika arts and culture.

8.       The staff view is that the BIDs and business associations have met their accountabilities and should be allocated the following funds, as allocated in the ACE 2017/2018 work programme, to continue to deliver on safety activities:

·        Māngere Bridge Progressive Business Association ($30,000)

·        Māngere East Village Business Association Society Incorporated ($45,000)

·        Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated ($45,000 top-up grant; placemaking and  ambassador subsidy)

·        Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated ($50,000 grant; contributing towards active public safety camera monitoring for Mangere East Village and Mangere Town Centre)

·        Ōtāhuhu Business Association Incorporated ($15,000)

·        South Harbour Business Association Incorporated ($30,000).

9.       Staff recommend the local board releases the funding to the five business associations and BIDs listed in paragraph 8.

10.     Staff recommend that the local board approves a further $47,000 to the Community Empowerment Unit for the annual maintenance of the CCTV cameras in Māngere Town Centre and Māngere East Village, and contingencies.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the budget allocations of $47,000 for CCTV and town centre safety initiatives 2017/2018.

b)      confirm the release of 2017/2018 funding grants of $215,000 to Māngere Bridge Progressive Business Association, Māngere East Village Business Association Society Incorporated, Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated, Ōtāhuhu Business Association Incorporated and South Harbour Business Association Incorporated as follows:

Recipient

Purpose

Allocation amount

Annual maintenance and contingency allocation

 

 

Community Empowerment Unit

To be used for maintenance and repair of council assets at Māngere Town Centre and Māngere East Village.

NB: Four analogue cameras are currently identified for repair and replacement in 2018.

$27,000

Community Empowerment Unit

 

Contingency funding – for significant or emergency asset repair and/ or replacement of council assets Māngere Town Centre and Māngere East Village

The local board will be notified in Q3 reporting advising if unspent contingency and maintenance funding is available for reallocation

$20,000

2017/2018 BID and business association grant allocation

 

 

Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - Placemaking and ambassador subsidy

$45,000

Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated

Placemaking grant for Māngere Town Centre and Māngere East Village  - provision for active public safety camera monitoring and crime prevention

$50,000

Māngere East Village Business Association Society Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - Placemaking and ambassador subsidy

$45,000

Māngere Bridge Progressive Business Association Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - Placemaking and safety

$30,000

Ōtāhuhu Business Association Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - Placemaking and safety

$15,000

South Harbour Business Association Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - Placemaking and safety

$30,000

Total

 

$262,000

 

 

 

 

Comments

Background

 

11.  The local board allocates Business Improvement Districts (BID) funding grants to business associations and BIDs to encourage partnerships with local commercial communities and provide resources to support the following local board and community outcomes:

·    delivering robust economic outcomes and services for the community

·    encouraging local employment activity

·    supporting community crime prevention

·    maintaining positive community perceptions of safety around town centres

·    encouraging community events and development of a sense of pride in the culture of the area.

12.    BID funding grants enable business associations and BIDs to:

·    enhance community safety and local economic development

·    create opportunities for business and community-led events and initiatives

·    enable management and oversight by business associations of public safety camera systems which support community and police crime prevention activities.

13.     On 21 June 2017 the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board approved the Arts, Community and   Events (ACE) work programme 2017/2018 which included the work programme line to “Build capacity: business improvement districts safety activities” (MO/2017/118).

14.     The work programme includes funding of $262,000 from the CCTV and safety initiatives budget, which is broken down into:

·        $47,000 for public safety camera maintenance and contingencies. This is made up of:

a $27,000 maintenance budget to cover operational costs of maintaining council public safety camera assets at Māngere Town Centre and Māngere East village

a $20,000 contingency budget reserved for significant maintenance that may require CCTV asset replacement and repair.

·        $215,000 for BIDs to build capacity of business associations and develop business improvement districts safety activities.

15.     In approving the 2017/2018 work programme, the local board resolved to release the $262,000 funding once the BIDs and business associations provided adequate accountability reports and staff have provided a breakdown of how the budget $262,000 will be distributed.

 

Grant accountability reports

16.     Staff received 2016/2017 grant accountability reports from five funding recipients:

·    Māngere Bridge Progressive Business Association

·    Māngere East Village Business Association Society Incorporated

·    Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated

·    Ōtāhuhu Business Association Incorporated

·    South Harbour Business Association Incorporated.

19.     Funding agreements issued state that recipients must meet a number of accountabilities which contribute to the 2014- 2017 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan outcomes. Staff consider the funding recipients to have met the accountabilities as detailed in the table below:

Local Board Plan outcome

Funding accountability measures within funding agreements

A Strong Local Economy

 

·    maintain good governance and management practices.

·    deliver on objectives from the business association strategic plans for the current year

·    provide worthy employment to long term unemployed individuals.

A place where communities thrive and belong

 

 

·    increase the perceived safety of local residents and visitors by providing a friendly town centre

·    provide safety related services to support provision of safe environments and reduce the level of crime and anti-social behaviour

·    respond to all requests from Police for support. Response will vary on a case by case basis

·    carry out events and activities that increase commercial, community and social activity.

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu is the heart of Māori and Pasifika arts and culture

·    deliver community events and develop of a sense of pride in the culture of the area.

 

20.     Staff have provided a summary of the business associations and BIDs accountability reports in attachment A. Grant 2016/2017 accountability reports from each funding recipient are included as attachments B – F.

Proposed distribution of funding

21.     Table 1 outlines the proposed funding allocation and includes the amounts committed to maintenance and operation of the existing council public safety camera assets for 2017/2018.

Table 1: Funding allocation 2017/2018

Recipient

Purpose

Allocation amount

Annual maintenance and contingency allocation

 

 

Community Empowerment Unit

To be used for maintenance and repair of council assets at Māngere Town Centre and Māngere East Village.

NB: Four analogue cameras are currently identified for repair and replacement in 2018.

$27,000

Community Empowerment Unit

 

Contingency funding – for significant or emergency asset repair and/ or replacement of council assets Māngere Town Centre and Māngere East Village

The local board will be notified in Q3 reporting advising if unspent contingency and maintenance funding is available for reallocation

$20,000

2017/2018 BID and business association grant allocation

 

 

Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - placemaking and ambassador subsidy

$45,000

Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated

Placemaking grant for Māngere Town Centre and Māngere East Village  - provision for active public safety camera monitoring and crime prevention

$50,000

Māngere East Village Business Association Society Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - placemaking and ambassador subsidy

$45,000

Māngere Bridge Progressive Business Association Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - placemaking and safety

$30,000

Ōtāhuhu Business Association Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - placemaking and safety

$15,000

South Harbour Business Association Incorporated

BID top-up grant  - placemaking and safety

$30,000

Total

 

$262,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22.     Staff will notify the board of any unspent or unallocated budget in the ACE Q3 quarterly performance report.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

23.     As stated in paragraph 15, the CCTV and town centre safety initiatives grants support the following outcomes in the 2014- 2017 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan:

·    a strong local economy - delivery of robust economic outcomes for the community and local employment activity

·    a place where communities thrive and belong - improving community perceptions of safety around town centres and community crime prevention activity

·    Māngere-Ōtāhuhu is the heart of Māori and Pasifika arts and culture – delivery of community events and development of a sense of pride in the culture of the area.

24.     Releasing the funds enables the business associations and BIDs to continue to contribute to those local board outcomes.

Māori impact statement

25.     The ethnic composition of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area is 15.9 per cent Māori and 60.1 per cent Pacific, which is greater than the Auckland-wide average of 11 and 15 per cent respectively.

26.     Grant funding provided to Mangere Town Centre and Mangere East Village business associations and BIDs contributes towards the ambassador employment programme in partnership with Work and Income New Zealand and subsidised by the participating business associations. The ambassador programme provides six months of work experience for older long term unemployed workers.

27.     One hundred per cent of the long term unemployed on the ambassador’s programme are of Māori or Pacific Island descent. For many, the ambassador programme is their first opportunity to train and pass a NZCA qualification. Between 75 and 80% of programme participants went on to find regular employment.

Implementation

28.     On the release of funding for the business associations and BIDs, staff will administer 2017/2018 funding agreements to them.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - CEU commentary; Release of business association bulk funding 2017-2018

29

b

Attachment B MBP reports

33

c

Attachment C MEV reports

65

d

Attachment D MTC reports

95

e

Attachment E OBA reports

127

f

Attachment F SHA reports

141

     

 

Signatories

Authors

Ayr Jones - Team Leader – Community Advisors South

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Neil Taylor - Senior Local Board Advisor  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Otāhuhu Portage

 

File No.: CP2017/24080

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek board approval on Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group proposals.

Executive summary

 

2.       Ōtāhuhu Portage link is a key project for the Mangere Otahuhu Local Board. The purpose of the project is to create transformational change for open space recreation and connection within the Otahuhu Spatial Priority Area.

3.       Since October 2016, Auckland Council officers have been working alongside mana whenua, the Mangere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Manakau ward councillors to propose a highly collaborative approach to establishing a project that will repurpose the area currently occupied by the Ōtāhuhu Canal Reserve.

4.       Preliminary planning was undertaken and in the coming years physical works are expected to transform the site to create a key east / west cycleway and pedestrian connection as part of the Local Paths and wider cycleways network. Moreover, the site provides a unique and culturally significant opportunity to celebrate historical heritage, and guide cultural expression into the future,

5.       The project is referred to as Totōia.  It is to deliver a piece of community infrastructure that may include heritage, green technology and public greenway access, linking esplanade reserves on Mangere Inlet to Tāmaki River and including provision of a new access over the North Island main trunk line.

6.       This is a complex project that is expected to have a project duration in excess of 10 years from framing to implementation.

7.       A project steering group structure has been proposed to ensure adequate representation, support and advocacy from the broader community is maintained throughout the project development.

8.       Following a number of hui with mana whenua, several workshops with the board and advice from the Local Board services team this report focuses on the governance structure and seeks approval from the board on both the steering group structure and its terms of reference.

9.       The report seeks nomination of two members and one alternate to represent the the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on the project steering group.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group structure and terms of reference

b)      nominate the two Local Board representatives (and one alternate) for the Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group

 

 

Comments

10.     The Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group is proposed to be made up of three mana whenua representatives, 2 local board representatives and one ward councillor.

(see attached project structure diagram)

11.     The three mana whenua representatives and alternate have been agreed and are:

§ Hero Potini (Ngāti Tamaoho)

§ Kathleen Wilson (Te Akitai Waiohua)

§ Edith Tuhimata (Ngaati Te Ata)

§ Gavin Anderson (Ngaati Whanaunga) - alternate

12.     10.12.     Officers have met again with Manukau Ward Councillor Filipaina to talk through the project, the project structure, Councillor involvement and likely approach to move forward.  Officers are advised that that Councillor Filipaina will be the Councillor to sit within the Project Steering Group.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     The Project Steering Group will be charged with project governance and may address the following (but are not limited to):

§ Community advocacy and relationships

§ Local Board advocacy and relationships

§ Mana Whenua advocacy and relationships

§ Auckland Council advocacy and relationships

§ Other stakeholder advocacy and relationships

§ Advocating for social procurement opportunities

§ Exploring opportunities for long-term co-governance of the final project outcome between Auckland Council (or delegated body) and ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki (or designated body)

§ Directing Auckland Council Project Working Group to undertake research, provide quality advice to assist and inform PSG decision-making

Māori impact statement

14.     Parks and heritage is of fundamental importance to mana whenua. The development discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through increased access to recreational opportunities and improved connections between local communities.

15.     This project has begun with mana whenua engagement and this has been instrumental in developing the project vision. The inclusion of balanced mana whenua and broader community representation in the Project Steering Group will ensure mana whenua aspirations, values and principles are embedded within the development of the Canal Reserve.

16.     The mana whenua working group, members of the Mangere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and the Manukau Ward Councillors have collectively workshopped the project, and there is a common aspiration for this project to proceed.

17.     The project will be guided by Māori design principles to ensure that the rich narratives relating to the Ōtāhuhu Portage are celebrated through design.

Implementation

18.     Following confirmation of the project governance through the Project Steering Group, council officers will begin preliminary design investigations.

19.     A variety of potential funding sources including Healthy Waters, Auckland Transport, Arts, Culture and Environment, Panuku and other stakeholders have been identified and discussions are underway to seek ongoing support for this project. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Project Structure Diagram

169

b

Terms of Reference

171

     

Signatories

Authors

Tim Keat - Senior Growth Development Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

a)      !Totōia! Te taiuru, te taiwhiti. He haumi waka. He hononga tangata!

 

 

Project Vision

 

Draft Vision Statement

 

Respectfully acknowledging our tūpuna, celebrating our place, to provide places our mokopuna can thrive and stand with pride.

 

§ ! Totōia! Te taiuru, te taiwhiti. He haumi waka. He hononga tangata!

 - binds Mana Whenua, Iwi Māori and the communities of Tāmaki Makaurau with our pasts, our present and our futures.

The Ōtāhuhu portage is recognised locally, regionally, nationally and internationally as a site of cultural and historic significance and for its environmental importance. 

The mana of the portage is held firmly by Mana Whenua, who in partnership with our communities ensure that the mauri of our place is valued and upheld by us all.

Re-connecting our two great harbours and coasts, the portage instils a strong sense of pride, place and identity that is celebrated by Tāmaki Makaurau.

Project Steering Group – Terms of Reference

 

1.   Introduction

§ As part of Council’s Ōtāhuhu-Middlemore Spatial Priority Area (SPA), re-establishing the regionally significant historical Ōtāhuhu portage connection has the potential to transform and stimulate the broadest range of Council Strategic Objectives and SPA drivers. Totōia! Te taiuru, te taiwhiti. He haumi waka. He hononga tangata!

 (the project) is the project that will deliver this aspiration.

Engagement with Mana Whenua and the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has identified a broad range of benefits in forming a Project Steering Group (the PSG) to champion strategic planning and oversight of the project.

2.   Background / Context

The Tāmaki Portage Network is a regional taonga/treasure for all of the peoples of Auckland which traverses the entire region, from Te Hana in the north to Waiuku in the south. The Ōtāhuhu area is home to three known portages, and it is understood that these were amongst the most heavily used portages of the Tāmaki network, imbuing local importance to these features within a broader regional significance.

The project has been designed to ensure that the mana and heritage values of ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki in relation to this project are recognised and that Mana Whenua are embraced and involved as full project partners alongside the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Auckland Council. 

 

3.   Purpose

The purpose of the PSG is to provide a strategic mechanism for collective Local Board/Ward/Mana Whenua advocacy and oversight for the project to promote best practice and best outcomes.

The primary functions of the PSG are to:

§ act as kaitiaki for the agreed project vision (the vision), and to ensure that the vision is given effect to, and provided for across strategic planning for the project

§ ensure the project is advocated for and supported in a strategic and co-ordinated manner as a regionally significant place-based initiative.

b)                  

4.   Principles

The PSG is in principle collectively accountable for providing strategic oversight, support and as advocates for the delivery of the agreed vision for the project.

The PSG:

§ Is strategic, not operational

§ Is committed to giving effect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi and partnership, participation and protection

§ Is committed to supporting definition and delivery of the vision through advocacy and strategic oversight

§ Will focus, through the project vision, on commonalities rather than differences

§ Will work actively and collaboratively to ensure that it acknowledges and recognises the interests and responsibilities of Mana Whenua in relation to the significant cultural importance of the Ōtāhuhu portage as a taonga for ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki katoa

§ Will work actively and collaboratively to ensure that it acknowledges and recognises the interests and responsibilities of the community of Ōtāhuhu and Tāmaki as a taonga for all Aucklanders

c)                                                                                                                                                                                    

5.   Responsibilities

The authority of the PSG has been delegated by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and shall only be applied within the scope of that delegation. This delegated authority (appended) applies within the area described (legal description and maps appended).

Matters to be addressed by the PSG may include (but are not limited to):

§ Community advocacy and relationships

§ Local Board advocacy and relationships

§ Mana Whenua advocacy and relationships

§ Auckland Council advocacy and relationships

§ Other stakeholder advocacy and relationships

§ Advocating for social procurement opportunities

§ Exploring opportunities for long-term co-governance of the final project outcome between Auckland Council (or delegated body) and ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki (or designated body)

§ Directing Auckland Council project working rōpu to undertake research, provide quality advice to assist and inform PSG decision-making

§ Annual reporting to Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board, Mana Whenua Governance, Auckland Council Governing Body and the Ōtāhuhu-Middlemore Spatial Priority Area working group (supported by Auckland Council project working rōpu)

d)                  

6.   Scope of PSG advocacy

e)         

§ the PSG is the primary advocate for the vision and the project within the Community, dealing with the Local Board/Mana Whenua/Auckland Council and in any/all other areas of engagement

§ the PSG is to equally consider all stakeholder groups in undertaking its roles and decision-making

f)        

7.   Membership

The PSG will comprise equal membership from ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki and elected officials of Auckland Council. The term of membership will be three years.

Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki:  3 x representatives from the 19 Tāmaki Mana Whenua groups

Nominations will be sought from ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki through the existing project working group, who will then select three representatives from those nominated.

Auckland Council:  3 x representatives, comprising:

§ 2 x members of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

§ 1 x Manukau Ward Councillor

For clarity, the Manukau Ward Councillor nominee will act within the delegated authority of the PSG as kaitiaki of the vision.

All parties will have the ability to appoint Alternate Members to attend scheduled meetings. These individuals will be identified and agreed at the initial PSG meeting.

8.   Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson

The PSG will appoint a Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson at the first meeting. The term of the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson will be one year, or until a new and Deputy Chairperson is appointed (whichever is longer).

9.   Decision-making

The PSG shall aspire to make all decisions by consensus.

PSG is responsible for oversight of all major milestones to be outlined in the project plan for ‘Portage route’. Meeting agendas will be based on the work plan and milestones to ensure timely direction and steer by the PSG.

Operational, day-to-day, business as usual matters will be in accordance to Council’s delegations protocol, unless otherwise agreed to. E.g. ‘Land Owner Approval’, lease management will require local board decision making.

10. Quorum

Two Mana Whenua representatives and two Auckland Council representatives.

11. Meeting Frequency

Meetings of the PSG will be held twice a year unless otherwise resolved by the PSG. The PSG will agree upon a meeting schedule at its first meeting. Every effort will be made to schedule PSG meetings to avoid PSG members’ professional commitments. 

12. Funding

PSG support and funding will be provided for within project budgets. Agreement as to meeting fees and disbursements (including travel expenses) will be agreed at the initial PSG meeting. These amounts will be reviewed by the PSG on an annual basis and amendments will be incorporated in annual reporting.

13. Other matters

Local Board Funding Policy determines the scope of budgetary decisions by local boards.

 

 

 

Business as usual reporting and updates to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be maintained through the monthly Community Facilities local board updates   

Key council departments

1.   Community Facilities – Investigation and Design

2.   Auckland Design Office

3.   Community Services - Service and Asset Integration

4.   Governance Directorate – Local Board Services

g)                  

Attachments:

h)                  

§ TBC

 

References

 

§ Local Board Funding Policy

§ Delegations protocol

§ Allocation of Local Board decision making

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Renewal of community leases at Old Ōtāhuhu Library, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu

 

File No.: CP2017/25243

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to grant the renewal of community lease to:

·    Ōtāhuhu Historical Society Incorporated, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu.

·    South Auckland Income Planning Service Incorporated, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu.

Executive summary

2.       The Ōtāhuhu Historical Society Incorporated holds a community lease for the council owned building which commenced 1 October 2006 and expired 31 September 2011. The lease has two 5 year renewal terms. The first renewal term from 1 October 2011 to 31 September 2016 has been executed. The club wishes to exercise its second renewal term.

3.       The South Auckland Income Planning Service Incorporated holds a community lease for the council owned building which commenced 1 October 2006 and expired 31 September 2011.  The lease has two 5 year renewal terms. The first renewal term from 1 October 2011 to 31 September 2016 has been executed. The club wishes to exercise its second renewal term.

4.       For each of the recommended leases, a process has been followed which includes a review of the lessee’s performance, that the organisation is sustainable, the services and programmes offered are beneficial to the community.

5.       Staff recommend that the lease renewals be approved under the terms and conditions listed in the recommendations below.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local BoardMāngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      grant a renewal of the community lease to Ōtāhuhu Historical Society Incorporated at 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu (outlined in red in Attachment A) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term - five years commencing 1 October 2016 to 31 September 2021.

ii)       rent -  $1.00 plus GST per annum (if demanded).

b)      grant a renewal of the community lease to South Auckland Income Planning Service Incorporated, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu (outlined in red in Attachment B) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term - five years commencing 1 October 2016 to 31 September 2021.

ii)       rent -  $500.00 plus GST per annum.

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

The Land

6.       The Old Ōtāhuhu Library building at 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu sits on five separate land parcels described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 89294 and Part Allotment 9 Section 3 Village of Ōtāhuhu. The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

Ōtāhuhu Historical Society Incorporated

7.       Ōtāhuhu Historical Society Incorporated first registered as an incorporated society on 11 October 1978 (under the name Ōtāhuhu-Tamaki Historical Society Incorporated). The society was renamed Ōtāhuhu Historical Society Incorporated on 26 January 1999. The society continues to occupy the council owned building known as the Old Ōtāhuhu Library at 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu (Site Plan – Attachment A).

8.       The society was formed in 1976 and celebrated its 40th anniversary in August 2016. The aim of the society is to encourage an interest in the history of the Ōtāhuhu area and to preserve items and photographs of historical importance. The society is open 10.00am to 12.00pm every Wednesday from February to November or by appointment to visitors and researchers.

9.       In 1998 the society published a book “A passing parade” that includes the pre-European history of the Ōtāhuhu area. The society is represented at local events, Ōtāhuhu Family Fun Day, Ōtāhuhu Christmas Parade and has participated in the annual Heritage Festival every year since 2008. The society publishes a monthly newsletter that is distributed to members and libraries.

South Auckland Income Planning Service Incorporated

10.     South Auckland Income Planning Service Incorporated first registered as an incorporated society on 4 October 1989 and continues to occupy the council owned building known as the Old Ōtāhuhu Library at 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu (Site Plan – Attachment B).

11.     The organisation provides financial budgeting services which includes one to one budget advice, ongoing budgeting support and financial seminars to assist families and individuals in the community and surrounding areas. The organisation also offers food parcels and a clothing bank service.

12.     Five part time and seven full time staff work Monday to Friday from 8.00am to 4.30pm.  Lalotoa I Aotearoa Community and Social Services Trust run their anger management courses from the premises, also the organisation works with probation referrals, provides free fitness classes throughout the week and liaises with various social services groups.

Recommendation

13.     Staff recommend that the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board grant the renewal of leases to both Ōtāhuhu Historical Society Incorporated and South Auckland Income Planning Services as the groups have meet all the requirements in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. These groups have the right to renew their lease agreements for a further two terms as provided for in their original leases. The first renewal terms have been executed and the groups wish to exercise their second renewal terms. This is the preferred and only option as it meets council’s contractual responsibilities.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     The recommendations within this report fall within local board’s allocated authority to grant leases within local community facilities in line with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

15.     The recommendations support the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2017 outcome facilities to meet diverse needs.

Māori impact statement

16.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori. Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Te Toa Takitini, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

17.     The services that are offered by both Ōtāhuhu Historical Society Incorporated and South Auckland Income Planning Services benefits all Aucklanders including Māori living in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

Implementation

18.     Community leases staff will work with both Ōtāhuhu Historical Society Incorporated and South Auckland Income Planning Services to finalise the lease documentations.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Leased area for Otahuhu Historical Society Inc.

181

b

Leased area for South Auckland Income Planning Services Inc.

183

     

Signatories

Authors

Tai Stirling – Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Community Relations

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Renewal of community lease to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board at 23 Atkinson Avenue, Ōtāhuhu

 

File No.: CP2017/25752

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for the renewal of the community lease to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board at 23 Atkinson Avenue, Ōtāhuhu.

Executive summary

2.       The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board holds a community lease for the group-owned building which commenced 9 August 2006 and expired 8 August 2011. The lease contains two five year right of renewals. The first renewal term from 9 August 2011 to 8 August 2016 has been executed. The trust wishes to exercise its second, and final, right of renewal effecting final expiry of the lease on 8 August 2021.

3.       For the lease renewal in question, a process has been followed which includes a review of the lessee’s performance, assessing the finances of the organisation, and that services and programmes offered are beneficial to the community. 

4.       An approved project is in place for the reserve to be transformed into an open space area.  Staff within Community Facilities anticipates the design process will commence in 2018. An early termination clause is outlined in the recommendations, which will allow flexibility in accessing the site once works commence.

5.       Staff have undertaken a site visit of the group-owned building and discussed the proposal and possibility of early termination of the lease. The group understands and accepts this.

6.       Staff recommend that the lease renewal be approved under the terms and conditions stated in the recommendations below.

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      grant a renewal of community lease to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board for the property at 23 Atkinson Avenue, Ōtāhuhu (outlined in red in Attachment A) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term - five years commencing 9 August 2016 to 8 August 2021.

ii)       rent - to remain at $500.00 plus GST per annum.

iii)      the inclusion of the following clauses:

i.    right of termination - If the Landlord should at any time during the term or any renewal of this lease require possession of any part or the whole of the Premises for any purpose, the Landlord may determine this lease or any renewal of this lease as to the part or whole required by the Landlord, by giving six (6) months’ notice in writing to the Tenant.  Upon the expiry of such notice this lease will immediately terminate in respect of the part or whole to which the notice relates, and the Tenant must yield up vacant possession of that part or whole of the Premises to the Landlord.

ii.    no compensation or damages - the Tenant will not be entitled to any compensation or damages from the Landlord arising in any way directly or indirectly in connection with termination of this lease under this clause.  However, the rent will reduce in proportion.

 

Comments

The Land

7.       The parcel of land at 23 Atkinson Avenue, Ōtāhuhu is legally described as Part Allotment 199B Parish of Manurewa. The land is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as a classified local purpose (canal) reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in the Auckland Council, in trust, for canal purposes.

8.       The Manukau and Waitematā harbours lie within one kilometre of each other at this point on the Auckland isthmus. During the latter part of the nineteenth century it was decided by the Crown to preserve and establish a strip of land between the two harbours to ensure the land would be available for construction of a canal to enable ships to move between the two harbours.

9.       Construction of the canal has never proceeded due to the practical problems of continual silting, the ever-changing bar at Manukau Heads, the difference in tidal movement of the two harbours, and the massive increase in the size of ships over the last century.

10.     A proposal is in place for the reserve to be transformed into an open space area. Staff within Community Facilities anticipate that the design process will commence in 2018.

 

The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board

11.     The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board first registered as an incorporated society on 8 April 1940 (under the name St John Ambulance Association Auckland Centre Trust Board). The trust was renamed The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board on 13 July 2000. The trust continues to occupy the council owned land at 23 Atkinson Avenue, Ōtāhuhu (Attachment A).

12.     The objective of the trust is to prevent and relieve sickness and injury, and act to enhance the health and wellbeing of all New Zealanders. The trust operates twenty four hours seven days a week helping people in medical and accident emergencies, relieving sickness and injury.

13.     The trust holds various events for the cadets (e.g. MAD - Make a Difference), provides a platform for cadets to discuss initiatives to address bullying, held in conjunction with other organisations including Youthline and the Live More Awesome Foundation.

14.     The trust runs school programmes which provide learning experiences for pre-school, primary and intermediate school aged children to empower them to act in an emergency.  The programme aims to develop confident young individuals who care for the health and well-being of their communities and provides young people with the skills and knowledge to respond in an emergency situation, the lesson times varies from 30 – 90 minutes.

15.     The trust holds regular first aid training for the community from the property. All the tutors hold pre-hospital emergency care qualifications, or higher, and are experienced in operational ambulance or first aid work. The trust also provides a Monday to Friday (excluding public holidays) shuttle service to transport locals to doctor and hospital appointments.

16.     The hall is hired out to a community church and a line dancing group who both use it on a weekly basis.

 

 

 

 

Renewal

17.     The lease contains the right for the trust to renew their lease agreement for an additional two terms.  The first renewal term has been exercised and the trust wishes to exercise the second renewal. This is the preferred and only option as it meets council’s contractual responsibilities.

18.     Staff recommend that the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board grant the renewal of lease to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board, as the trust has met all the requirements in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. An early termination clause will be included in anticipation of the reserve transformation to allow flexibility in accessing the site once works commence.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

19.     The recommendations within this report fall within local board’s allocated authority to grant leases within local community facilities in line with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

20.     The recommendations support the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2017 outcome range of facilities to meet diverse needs.

Māori impact statement

21.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori. Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Te Toa Takitini, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

22.     The services that are offered by The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board benefits all Aucklanders including Māori living, visiting and working in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

Implementation

23.     Community leases staff will work with The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board to finalise the lease documents.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Land area for The Order of St John Northern Regional Trust Board

189

     

Signatories

Authors

Tai Stirling – Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Community Relations

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Streetscape Upgrade (Stage 3)

 

File No.: CP2017/26053

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to:

a)  update the local board on the outcome of the public consultation for the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre and specifically on the amendments made to the proposals based on the feedback received; and

b)   seek approval of the local board for the final concept design and for the project to proceed to detailed design and construction stages.    

Executive summary

2.       Ōtāhuhu Town Centre is within the Ōtāhuhu-Middlemore Spatial Priority Area.  In 2015 the Local Board adopted the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Framework to guide any future streetscape upgrades.  A total project budget of $17 million was agreed through the 2015-2025 LTP and 2016 Annual Plan.

3.       To date two stages have been completed – Stage 1 of the Mason Ave in 2015 and Avenue Road in 2017 (Stage 2).

4.       A draft concept design for the third stage of the upgrade of Ōtāhuhu Town Centre, for the purposes of consultation, was agreed with the Local Board on the 14th June 2017.

5.       Public consultation has been completed with 220 submissions received from the community.   The feedback will inform the next stage of Detailed Design.  The key revisions proposed as a result of the feedback are as follows:

·          A Shared Path for cyclists and pedestrians will run the full length of the southern side of Station Road and the southern and western side of Mason Avenue

·          Mixed species street planting within the carriageway

·          Removal of some on street parking required for street greening, traffic calming and street furniture amenity.

6.       Subject to the Local Board approval detailed designs will be prepared to allow for construction to commence in early 2018. Construction of Stage 3 (starting with Station Road) is anticipated to be completed by late 2018 (subject to the outcome of Tender costs).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the Final Concept Design.

b)         endorse the final design and support the commencement of the Detailed Design             phase as the basis for construction.

 

Comments

7.       The revitalisation, enhancement and improved connectivity of the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre is both a priority of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan and the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Area Plan.

 

8.       The Town Centre is within the Ōtāhuhu-Middlemore Spatial Priority Area, one of the ten Spatial Priority Areas identified by the Council through the Long Term Plan process.  The enhancement of the public realm and the improvement of public transport infrastructure is key to the achieving the transformation of this Spatial Priority Area.

9.       A new, fully-integrated bus-train station at the existing Ōtāhuhu railway station has been completed.  Ōtāhuhu Station is key in the provision of a more connected and more frequent public transport service to be introduced across south Auckland.

10.     The Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Framework was adopted by the Local Board in 2015 to provide guidance for future streetscape or public realm upgrades of the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre.   The Framework was prepared in consultation with key stakeholders and partners including the Local Board, iwi and the Ōtāhuhu Commercial and Main Street Association.  The purpose of the Framework is to ensure that any upgrade will result in a high-quality, well connected and safe environment which is attractive for residents, visitors and businesses alike.

11.     The Framework noted that the streetscape upgrade will be delivered as a series of projects. Stage 1 of the streetscape upgrade was completed in mid-2015.  This was only a small section of Mason Avenue at the intersection with Great South Road but it confirmed and ‘showcased’ the design intention of the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Framework.  Stage 2 Avenue Road was recently completed.

12.     The concept proposals for the third stage of the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre streetscape upgrade seek to improve the quality of Great South Road, Mason Ave and Station Road in line with the adopted Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Framework and the upgraded eastern portion of Mason Ave.  

             Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Streetscape Upgrade

           

13.     A concept design for the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre upgrade was prepared and has been out for public consultation since the 16th August 2017.

14.     Subject to detailed design process and costings it is anticipated that Great South Road, Mason Ave (excluding the portion already upgraded) and Station Road will be addressed as part of the streetscape upgrade and will be constructed in stages.  

15.     The streetscape elements will be consistent with the Town Centre Framework and the design of the upgraded portion of Mason Avenue.  The upgrade will provide for:

·     wider footpaths of aggregated concrete to match the Mason Ave upgrade

·     new street lights to match those on Great South Road and the upgraded portion of Mason Ave

·     new street furniture and street planting

·     enhanced civic spaces.

16.     Extensive engagement was undertaken as part of the preparation of the concept plan.  As agreed with the Local Board, Business Association and mana whenua, engagement commenced prior to the engagement of design consultants and the formal design process. A total of 220 submissions were received from the public engagement including specialist feedback from council’s internal Major Projects Design Review panel. This feedback has informed the development of the final design proposal.

17.     The overall feedback from public consultation was positive.  Staff received very positive feedback on the proposals in terms of how it would improve the look and feel of Ōtāhuhu Town Centre. The key feedback themes (both supported and rejected) received from public consultation included;

· Shared path vs protected cycleway (Station Road and Mason Ave)

· Removal of car parking spaces

· Palms and Cook Pine tree removals

18.        A summary of the feedback has been reviewed by the design project team.  As discussed at the Local Board workshop on the 29th October 2017 the key outcomes of consultation has led to the following concept design revisions;

·        A Shared Path for cyclists and pedestrians will run the full length of the southern side of Station Road and the southern and western side of Mason Avenue.

·        Mixed species street planting within the carriageway (retaining 26 of the Palms at the gateways and key intersections and the introduction of 89 new native trees). Relocation of the Cook Pine at Criterion Square and retention of the Cook Pine at the southern square

·        Removal of some on street parking required for street greening, traffic calming and street furniture amenity.

19.     A revised concept plan based on the above revisions, which has been informed by the outcomes of both the public and stakeholder consultation, will be tabled at this business meeting.  Given the tight timeframes for this project staff is seeking Local Board approval to progress to Detailed Design and to construction on the basis of this revised concept plan.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

20.     The Town Centre Framework, which sets the direction for the streetscape component of this project, was adopted by the Local Board in May 2015.

21.     There have been ongoing regular workshops with the Local Board on the proposed streetscape upgrade, including on the first two construction stages since this time.   There have been two recent Local Board workshops on the 14th of June and the 29th of November 2017 as part of the engagement process on the development of the proposals for this stage of the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre upgrade. The Mangere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board endorsed the draft concept design to go out to public consultation.

Māori impact statement

22.     It is noted that mana whenua were actively involved in, and informed the development of the, 2015 Town Centre Framework.   The Framework encompasses specific reference to the Te Aranga Maori design principles and values and how these will be applied through any streetscape proposals. This has been taken into account in the development of the concept for the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre upgrade.

23.     Iwi have been regularly involved through the Auckland Transport southern hui. Hui have been provided throughout 2016 and 2017 and included an agreement on mana whenua preference for involvement in the development of the concept design.

24.     As agreed through the hui, two mana whenua representatives have been engaged (selected by mana whenua) in assisting in the design of the upgrade to ensure Te Aranga principals are included and the design consultant has utilised the input from mana whenua to strengthen the design outcomes. Wider iwi groups have been kept informed through hui on the 27th July 2017 and 30th November 2017.

Implementation

25.     Budget was allocated for the new Town Centre streetscape works in the 2015 - 2025 Long Term Plan (LTP). Subject to completing the design and consenting processes construction is intended to start on site in 2018 (starting with the construction of Station Road).

26.     Staff will work closely with stakeholders and particularly affected businesses and the Business Association to develop an implementation plan that mitigates disruption during construction. 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Lisa Spasic - Senior Project Leader

Authorisers

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Landowner approval for the operation of a community led food truck from 362 Massey Road, Māngere East

 

File No.: CP2017/24477

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for the landowner approval application for a licence to occupy for a community led food truck to be located at 362 Massey Road, Māngere East (Walter Massey Park).

Executive summary

2.       An application has been received for a mobile food truck at Walter Massey Park (362 Walter Massey Road).

3.       The food truck will be operated by the Māngere East Access Trust and will provide work experience for hospitality students.

4.       There will be food products sold from the truck, however, this would not compete with neighbouring commercial food outlets.

5.       Staff recommend that the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board approves the proposed location at 362 Massey Road for the operation of the food truck Monday to Saturday, 7am to 9pm for 12 months.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the landowner approval application from the Māngere East Access Trust to operate a food truck at the front of the Metro Theatre at 362 Massey Road (Walter Massey Park) for 12 months.

b)      approve the food truck to operate from Monday to Saturday, 7am to 9pm.

c)      delegate to the Manager Land Advisory the establishment of conditions of approval.

d)      agree to review the approval at the end of the 12 months if the food truck proves to be successful.

e)      delegate to local board chairperson to decide on an appropriate rent that is not a commercial rate, given the applicant is a charitable trust raising funds for community projects.

 

 

Comments

6.       The applicant, Māngere East Access Trust, is a not-for-profit charitable trust (charitable trust number: CC34317).

7.       The trust is seeking to operate the food truck from the site outside the Metro Theatre Monday to Saturday, 7am to 9pm. The truck would be removed from the site at the end of each day of operation, and brought back each morning. The nature of mobile trading means that the food truck should not be permanently located on site.

8.       The trust currently has a temporary landowner approval for the operation of the food truck in this location which expires in January 2018.

9.       The Metro Theatre is located on land legally described as Part Lot 6 Deeds Plan 65 and is subject to the Local Government Act 2002. A long-term license to trade on this site does not require public notification.

10.     The trust currently employs one paid staff member to operate the food truck and this is likely to increase to two. In a proposed agreement between the trust and a local hospitality school, Level 3 and 4 students enrolled in the school will complete work experience at the food truck operated by the trust. As the work experience is for course credits, the students will not be financially compensated for their work.

11.     The trust is organising with the manager of the Metro Theatre the use of an unused, unbookable office space as an eating area for food truck patrons. This will not be considered as part of the landowner approval application, and will need to be arranged between the applicant and the manager of the Metro Theatre as part of a separate agreement.

12.     The truck will need to meet health and safety requirements, and obtain a food licence and insurance to operate on site. These are non-negotiable terms in the proposed licence to occupy.

13.     The trust has proposed selling healthy food from the site, which is not readily available from the takeaways and bakeries in the immediate vicinity. The menu items will change based on the seasonal availability of ingredients.

14.     It is possible that due to not having to pay overheads, rent, or their student workers, the food truck operation may be able to undercut nearby takeaways and bakeries. There are a number of chain takeaways in the area, as well as a number of small bakeries and dairies, which are the businesses more likely to be negatively impacted by the operation of the food truck.

15.     To mitigate this risk, a copy of the trust’s menu items and prices can be attached to the landowner approval to ensure that the food truck does not undercut local businesses or begin selling similar products. This can take into account the seasonal changes in the menu.

16.     It is possible that the operation of this food truck may lead to more applications of this nature, (including commercial businesses) being submitted to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for consideration.

17.     If the local board considers that rent is appropriate for this activity on the park, it can seek advice separately on rate or amount, and apply any rent requirement as part of any review.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

18.     The local board has the authority to determine matters requiring landowner approval.

19.     At a workshop on 11 October 2017, staff presented the proposal to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. The local board was receptive to the proposal of the food truck operating from the Walter Massey Park, in front of the Metro Theatre.

20.     This application aligns with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board plan outcomes; a strong local economy, a place where communities thrive and belong, and a range of facilities to meet diverse needs.

21.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has previously indicated that they may support the application for the food truck at Walter Massey Park.

Māori impact statement

22.     The operation of the food truck would benefit the local community, including Māori, through the provision of healthy food options.

23.     The proposal does not trigger the council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and no iwi engagement has taken place.

Implementation

24.     Subject to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board approval of the landowner approval application, council staff will prepare the necessary documentation with the aim of issuing the approval before the current temporary approval expires in January 2018.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Nikki Clendinning  - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Community Relations

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Advisor  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 May to 31 October 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/19479

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area for the six months from 1 May to 31 October 2017.

Background

2.       Panuku was established in September 2015 as a result of the merger of two Council Controlled Organisations – Waterfront Auckland and Auckland Council Property Limited (ACPL).

3.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland – from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

4.       Panuku manages around $2 billion of council’s property portfolio, which we continuously review to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio or release land or property that can be better used by others.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 May to 31 October 2017.

 

 

Local Activities

Portfolio management

5.       Panuku manages ‘non-service’ properties owned by Council and Auckland Transport (AT) that are not currently needed for service or infrastructure purposes. These properties are generally being held for planned future projects, such as road construction, park expansion or development of future town centres.

6.       The property portfolio comprises 1437 properties, containing 1119 leases, as at 31 October 2017. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

7.       The return on the property portfolio for the period ending 30 June 2017 was above budget, with a net surplus to Auckland Council and AT shareholders of $1.1 million ahead of budget.

8.       The average monthly tenantable occupancy rate, for the six month period, is more than 98 per cent, which is above the Statement of Intent target of 95 per cent.

Properties Managed in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Area

9.       Panuku currently manages 15 commercial and 12 residential properties within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

Business Interests

10.    Panuku also optimises the commercial return from business interests it manages on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

11.    There are currently no managed business interests in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

12.     The Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2015-2025 reflects a desire of council to materially reduce or slow down expenditure, and unlock value from assets no longer required, or which are sub-optimal for service purposes. In response to this, prior to the establishment of Panuku, ACPL developed a new method of dealing with service property, called optimisation. 

13.     Asset optimisation deals with ‘service property’. It is self-funding, it maximises efficiencies from service assets, and maintains levels of service, whilst releasing property for sale or development. A key element of optimisation is that the sale proceeds are locally reinvested, to advance approved projects and activities on a cost-neutral basis. It does not include the Auckland Transport portfolio. Panuku continues to advance this programme of work. This includes the development of a cross-council project to coordinate and execute asset sales and optimisation.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

14.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale, and development if appropriate. Panuku has a particular focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

15.     Target for July 2016 to June 2017:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$75 million disposal recommendations

$76.9 million as at 30 June 2017

16.     Panuku works closely with council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

17.     Target for July 2017 to June 2018:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$60 million disposal recommendations

$22 million as at 31 October 2017

Process

18.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council, CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku board approval, engagement with local ward councillors and the Independent Māori Statutory Board, and finally, a governing body decision.

Under review

19.     There are no properties currently under review in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. \

 

 

Acquisitions and Disposals

20.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. We buy property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other service needs. We manage the sale of properties that are surplus to council requirements. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

21.     Panuku doesn’t make the decision on what properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of council.

22.     We purchased 22 properties for open space across Auckland in the last financial year (ending 30 June 2017) at a cost of $48.6 million. We also bought seven properties for storm water use at a value of $19.4 million.

23.     We have signed agreements for three properties across Auckland in the current financial year (July 2017), worth $12.7 million. We have purchased one property for storm water use that cost $3.15 million.   

24.     No properties were purchased in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area during the reporting period.

Disposals

25.     The Disposal team sold five properties for a total of $6.6 million (net amounts) from July-October 2017.  The team’s 2017/18 target is $8.0 million for the year. The target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis.  The team sold $22.92m (net sale proceeds) in 2016/17.

26.     No properties were sold in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area during the reporting period.

Housing for Older People

27.     Council owns and operates 1412 units located in 62 villages across Auckland, to provide rental housing to older people in Auckland.

28.     The Housing for Older People (HfOP) project involves council partnering with a third party provider, to deliver social rental housing services for older people.

29.     On 21 December 2015, council announced that The Selwyn Foundation was its preferred joint venture partner to manage the HfOP portfolio.

30.     Panuku negotiated the new joint venture (JV) arrangements with Selwyn over 2016, and the JV was formally established in December 2016. 

31.     The new JV business, named Haumaru Housing (Haumaru meaning ‘to shelter’), took over the tenancy, facilities and asset management of the portfolio, under a long-term lease arrangement, from 1 July 2017.

32.     Haumaru Housing was granted Community Housing Provider (CHP) status in April 2017. CHP registration enables Haumaru to access the government’s Income Related Rent Subsidy (IRRS) scheme.

33.     Auckland Council has delegated Panuku to lead a multi-year development programme.

34.     The first new development project will be a 40-unit apartment building on the former Wilsher Village site, Henderson. Once completed, this development will increase the provision to 1452 units.

35.     The following HfOP village is located within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area:

Village

Address

Number of units

Bridge Court

7 Coronation Road, Mangere Bridge

68

Court Town Village

23 Court Town Close, Mangere

12

Lambie Court Village

11 Yates Road, Mangere East

22

Topping Court

13a Ashley Avenue, Mangere East

49

Regional Activities

Highlights

36.     Over the year, Panuku achieved key project milestones and performance results in our priority development locations. Panuku categorises three types of priority locations:

37.     Transform locations – Panuku ‘Transforms’ locations by creating change through urban regeneration. Panuku leads the transformation of select parts of our region; working alongside others and using our custodianship of land and planning expertise. The catalytic work Waterfront Auckland led at Wynyard Quarter is a great example of the transformation of urban locations.

38.     Unlock locations – Panuku also ‘unlocks’ development potential for others. By acting as a facilitator; using relationships to break down barriers and influence others, including our council family, to create development opportunities.

39.     Support locations – Panuku plays a ‘support’ role to ensure council is making the most of what it already has. Intensification is a key driver in the Auckland Plan. Panuku will support housing demands by enabling development of council-owned land.

Transform locations

40.     The Wynyard Quarter is undergoing rapid change both commercially and residentially, with thousands of Aucklanders using this space every week, while regeneration is just beginning in Manukau and Onehunga.

a)   The first three phases of structural steel have been installed at the Park Hyatt Hotel. All up, approximately 2000 tonnes of primary structural steel will be used to construct the luxury five-star hotel, which will span a total area of 37,000sqm.

b)   In April 2017, Mayor Phil Goff officially opened the Mason Bros. building, a former industrial warehouse that has been redeveloped into a three-level office space, bringing together a community of entrepreneurs and businesses. It is the centrepiece of Wynyard Quarter’s innovation precinct.

c)   The Innovation Precinct in Wynyard Quarter has expanded with the newly opened five-floor building at 12 Madden Street. The purpose-built home for entrepreneurs offers the latest in flexible co-working spaces. This milestone marks two years since the GridAKL initiative was launched by ATEED, partnering with Panuku and Precinct Properties to develop the commercial space to house ambitious companies and connecting technologists, designers, digital content makers, product designers and start-ups.

d)   Developer Willis Bond is constructing 500-600 apartments of various types and sizes that are set to house around 1100 people. There are two developments currently under construction, Wynyard Central and 132 Halsey. The first residents have moved in in September 2017.

e)   In June 2017, Panuku handed over to Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) the management of the Queens Wharf facilities, including Shed 10 and The Cloud. Panuku continues to lead the delivery of place making and the future development of the wharf.

 

41.     Transform Manukau was the first location to have a Framework Plan completed, outlining the five key moves for the project and the vision for Manukau in 2040. We are aiming to get the first housing site underway soon at Barrowcliffe Place. Public realm projects anticipated to start next year include the Council’s Hayman Park Playground and Putney Way street improvements in conjunction with the new bus station is targeted for completion by May 2018. Panuku is also exploring with the Scentre Group on how the shopping mall’s future development could relate to and interface with the town centre.

42.     Plans to Transform Onehunga, on a similar scale to Wynyard Quarter and Manukau, were approved in March 2017. These plans were completed involving significant consultation with communities. Panuku is leading the redevelopment of strategic council-owned land, and works in partnership with the Government and others, to deliver positive outcomes for the local community. The Board of Inquiry relating to the East West link is currently going through a hearing process. A draft decision is expected to be made in October and will be finalised in November. This will contain numerous conditions of consent. Once the decision is known, Panuku can advance planning on the Onehunga wharf and foreshore precinct.

Unlock locations

43.     In Takapuna, Auckland Council owns nearly four hectares of land focused around the Anzac Street carpark and the Gasometer site, consultation on redevelopment of these sites has started.

44.     In Northcote, we completed a Framework Plan in November 2016 that outlines the initial proposals for the town centre. An information kiosk was also opened by Homes Land Community in April. The town centre masterplan and the Awataha Greenway masterplan is targeted for completion in December 2017.

45.     Plans to repurpose the iconic Civic Administration Building in Aotea Square into high quality apartments and develop the surrounding area were announced in September 2016, apartment sales are progressing well.

46.     Hobsonville 20ha Airfields site - stage one of construction of 102 standalone and terrace homes is underway. Avanda Group have been announced as the developers that will deliver more than 500 homes in stage two, of which a minimum of 10 per cent will be affordable housing.

47.     The Council’s Planning Committee approved the over-arching plans to redevelop Old Papatoetoe in June. Panuku is leading the redevelopment of the mall, a 2.5ha block of land, which will see the area opened up with a new plaza space, reconfigured shops, upgraded carpark and a revamped New World supermarket. In addition to the upgrade of the mall which is expected to be completed early next year, approximately 110 new homes are planned to be developed in the surrounding area.

48.     With the overall plan for Henderson being approved in May 2017, the vision for Henderson is for it to grow into an urban eco-centre. This vision will guide planning and development with an outcome towards ‘liveable growth’ by creating a safe, attractive and vibrant mixed-use environment with a uniquely west Auckland identity.

49.     The opportunity to revitalise Avondale has been given the green light in November 2017 with the approval of the over-arching plan for its regeneration by the Planning Committee. The vision for Avondale will be enabled through a number of key moves. Panuku will work closely with the local board and community to implement a retail strategy that attracts new businesses, increasing diversity of products and services. The train station, upgraded bus network and new cycleways offer great transport options and we will continue to strengthen connections between these activity hubs and the town. A focus for the regeneration of Avondale is working with developers to build quality residential neighbourhoods that offer a mix of housing types, including terraces and apartments. A number of significant developments are already underway in the area.

50.     A development agreement was signed with Todd Property for the delivery of more than 350 homes in Flat Bush, Ormiston. In December 2016, Panuku sold a site at 187 Flat Bush School Road for a 30-lot subdivision.

Support locations

51.     The Mariner Rise subdivision at 20 Link Crescent, Whangaparoa has been completed by our development partner McConnell Property along with the delivery of a 2700sqm park and playground. Sixty new homes will be built on this new subdivision.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

52.     This report is for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s information.

53.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries you have relating to a property in your Local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz

Māori impact statement

54.     Tāmaki Makaurau has the highest Māori population in the world with one in four Māori in Aotearoa living here. 

55.     Māori make up 12% of the region’s total population who mainly live in Manurewa, Henderson-Massey, Papakura, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Māngere-Ōtahuhu and Franklin. Māori have a youthful demographic with 50% of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau under the age of 25 years. 5% of the Māori population in the region are currently 65 years and over.      

56.     There are 19 Mana Whenua in the region, with 13 having indicated an interest in Panuku lead activities within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. 

57.     Māori make up 16 percent of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board population, and there are eight marae located within the local board area.   

58.     Panuku work collaboratively with Mana Whenua on a range projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

59.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.

Implementation

60.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Sven Mol - Corporate Affairs Advisor Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Toni Giacon - Manager Stakeholder Engagement

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Advisor  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

10-year Budget 2018-2028 consultation

 

File No.: CP2017/25977

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To agree local engagement events, and adopt local content and supporting information for consultation as part of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 process.

Executive summary

2.       Consultation on the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 (Long-term plan) will take place from 28 February – 28 March 2018. Local boards will be consulting on their areas of focus and advocacy for their 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. The Local Board Agreement is part of the budget setting process for the first year of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

3.       There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Plan Refresh (APR), Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP), Regional Pest Management Plan (RPMP) and the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP). 

4.       This report seeks agreement from local boards on spoken interaction events that will be held in their local board area during the consultation period and to adopt their local content and supporting information for consultation, including:

·     areas of focus for 2018/2019

·     the key advocacy project.

5.       The governing body will agree regional items for consultation on 11 December 2017 and local boards will agree their items by 14 December 2017. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the consultation document and supporting information, which will be adopted by the governing body on 7 February 2018.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      agree, subject to approval by the governing body, to hold the following spoken interaction events during the consultation period:

i)        Have Your Say – Ōtāhuhu Town Hall Community Centre, Tuesday, 6 March 2018 from 6.00pm to 8.00pm.

ii)       Drop In – Māngere East Community Centre, Thursday, 15 March 2018 from 5.00pm to 7.30pm.

iii)      Drop In – Māngere Bridge Library, Sunday, 25 March 2018 from 9.00am to 12.00pm.

b)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through “spoken/NZ sign language interaction” in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events during the consultation period for the 10-year Budget 2018-2028:

i)     Local Board Members and Chair;

ii)    General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor; and

iii)    any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Chief Financial Officer.

 

c)      adopt Attachment A (to be tabled at the meeting) to the agenda report : local content for consultation and Attachment B (to be tabled at the meeting) to the agenda report :local supporting information for consultation, including their key advocacy project

d)      delegate authority to the local board chair to approve any final minor changes required following review by council’s legal team and/or Audit NZ, of the local consultation content for the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 prior to publication, including online consultation content, and should any changes be made they are to be reported to the next business meeting.

 

Comments

6.       The 10-year Budget sets out the priorities and funding for council activities that are planned over a 10-year period. It includes financial and non-financial information for the whole Auckland Council group. The Long-term Plan is reviewed and consulted on every three years.

7.       As part of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 process, the council is required to produce a consultation document. This will cover any significant or important issues proposed to be included in the 10-year Budget 2018-2028. The consultation document and supporting information will also include information on local board issues and priorities. 

8.       As part of the consultation on the 10-year Budget 2018-2028, local boards will consider and be consulting on their areas of focus and advocacy for their 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. The Local Board Agreement is part of the budget setting process for the first year of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

9.       Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 will take place from 28 February – 28 March 2018.There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Plan Refresh (APR), Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP), Regional Pest Management Plan (RPMP) and the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP).  

10.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation process through a variety of channels which include verbal (or face to face), written, social media and digital. A report on how council will receive verbal feedback from the public was considered by the Finance and Performance Committee on 21 November 2017. At a high level, the report outlines several different types of events which are planned for specific audiences and communities as well as those planned for general Auckland residents. At that meeting, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to:

a)      approve the approach…to receive all feedback from Aucklanders on the Long-term Plan and Auckland Plan from 28 February 2018 to 28 March 2018 comprising of:

·        up to 25 Have Your Say events targeting general Auckland residents are held in local board areas across the region;

·        four regional stakeholder events (traditional hearing style);

·        an independently commissioned quantitative survey;

·        community specific events to collect feedback from different demographic and interest groups. Demographic events will target Youth, Seniors, Pacific, Ethnic, Rainbow and Disability communities;

·        hui with mana whenua and mataawaka.

and

c)      require the Mayor and Councillors to attend a minimum of three Have Your Say events each to hear the views of Aucklanders and all regional stakeholder events.

11.     The final consultation process for the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 will be approved by the governing body on 7 February 2018.

12.     Spoken interaction constitutes any opportunity where Aucklanders have a dialogue with decision makers or their official delegations on the themes relating to the consultation. The spoken interaction events recommended to be held in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area are:

·        Have Your Say – Ōtāhuhu Town Hall Community Centre, Tuesday, 6 March 2018 from 6.00pm to 8.00pm.

·        Drop In – Māngere East Community Centre, Thursday, 15 March 2018 from 5.00pm to 7.30pm.

·        Drop In – Māngere Bridge Library, Sunday, 25 March 2018 from 9.00am to 12.00pm.

13.     Local boards are requested to agree their key priorities and key advocacy project for 2018/2019 and adopt their local content and supporting information for consultation, as attached in Attachments A and B (to be tabled at the meeting).

14.     Any new local BID targeted rates must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are therefore also requested to agree any new proposals for consultation.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

15.     Local board decisions are being sought in this report.

16.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as council progresses through the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 process.

Māori impact statement

17.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were adopted in September and October of 2017, form the basis for local priorities.

18.     Bespoke consultation materials for the Māori community are being developed. These materials will explain how the Long-term plan (LTP) and APR are relevant for them. Engagement advisors will have access to this collateral to support local engagement.

19.     Specific regionally supported local engagement with Māori is being targeted for south and west Auckland.

20.     An integrated approach to mana whenua engagement is being taken, with LTP and APR discussions already happening through the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.

21.     There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Implementation

22.     The governing body will approve the consultation document, supporting information and consultation process for the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 on 7 February 2018.

23.     Following consultation, the governing body and local boards will make decisions on the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 and Local Board Agreements 2018/19 respectively.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Christie  McFayden - Graduate Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Decision making allocation

 

File No.: CP2017/25985

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board input on the allocation of non-regulatory decision-making as part of the 10 Year Budget 2018-2028.

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires the Governing Body to allocate decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities, either to the Governing Body or to local boards. This must be undertaken in accordance with certain legislative principles and after considering the views and preferences of each local board. There is a presumption that local boards will be responsible for making decisions on non-regulatory activities, except where decision-making on a region-wide basis will better promote the wellbeing of communities across Auckland because certain criteria are satisfied.

3.       Each long-term plan and annual plan must identify the non-regulatory activities allocated to local boards.

4.       A significant review of this decision-making allocation was undertaken during the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan cycle. The allocation was also recently considered during the Governance Framework Review, over the period 2016-2017. A comprehensive review is, therefore, not being undertaken in this Long-term Plan cycle.

5.       One substantive change to the allocation is proposed in order to implement a policy decision from the Governance Framework Review: allocating certain local service property optimisation decisions to local boards. There are various other minor wording amendments to improve clarity and consistency.

6.       Local board feedback is sought on this proposed allocation. It will be considered by the Governing Body during its adoption of the 10 Year Budget 2018-2028.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      endorse the proposed allocation of non-regulatory decision-making as attached to this report.

 

 

Comments

Background

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 sets out the functions and powers of the Governing Body and local boards. Local board functions and powers come from three sources:

·        those directly conferred by the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009

·        non-regulatory activities allocated by the Governing Body to local boards

·        regulatory or non-regulatory functions and powers delegated by the Governing Body or Auckland Transport to the local boards.

 

8.       The Auckland Transition Agency (ATA) was given the task of determining the initial allocation of the council’s non-regulatory activities using the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 (the Auckland Council Act). In undertaking this exercise, the question considered by ATA was not ‘why should the activity be allocated to local boards?’ but ‘why not?’ This was in line with the Auckland Council Act.

9.       The non-regulatory decision-making allocation has been reviewed twice since the ATA first developed it, as part of the Long-term Plan 2012-2022 and the Long-term Plan 2015-2025.The current non-regulatory decision-making allocation was determined as part of the  Long-term Plan 2015-2025. It is written on an inclusive basis; it does not contain an exhaustive list of all elements that might make up an allocated activity.

10.     A significant review of the allocation was undertaken during the Long-term Plan 2015-2025. The review concluded that a number of clarifications and text changes were required, but no substantive changes were needed to the allocated responsibilities. The review also concluded that the then allocation had worked well and there had been a growing understanding and increasing sophistication of how to use it.

11.     The 2016 independent Governance Framework Review report also considered the decision-making allocation as part of the respective roles of the Governing Body and local boards, and what is working well and not working well in Auckland Council’s governance. As with the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 review, the Governance Framework Review found that the current allocation is well understood, sensible, and generally works well. It did recommend that one minor technical change be made to the allocation to more accurately describe the current practical limitations of local board roles in park acquisitions. Further analysis and consultation demonstrated that this recommended change was not necessary.

12.     In responding to the Governance Framework Review report, and considering how local boards could be further empowered, the Governing Body decided on a policy change that requires the allocation table to be amended. This is described below.

13.     Local boards were extensively consulted during the Governance Framework review.

14.     Due to the recent timing of the Governance Framework Review and the consideration of the allocation of non-regulatory decision-making as part of it, no comprehensive review of the allocation table is being undertaken this Long-term Plan cycle.

15.     The Governance Framework Review did identify other decision-making opportunities for local boards, e.g. around service levels. No change is required to the allocation table to provide for this; local boards already have the necessary responsibilities allocated to them. Rather, the organisation needs to be in a position to provide local boards with quality advice when making those decisions.

Summary of proposed amendments

16.     The current allocation with proposed amendments is attached as Attachment A.

17.     The only substantive amendment to the allocation is to allocate decision-making for disposal of local service properties and reinvestment of sale proceeds to local boards where this falls within the service property optimisation policy. This policy was adopted in 2015 by the Governing Body and sets out the purpose and principles for optimisation of underperforming or underutilised service property. A key element is that sale proceeds from underperforming service property are locally reinvested to advance approved projects or activities on a cost neutral basis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

18.     Under the current allocation the Governing Body makes the final decision on disposal and acquisition of all property assets, including local service properties that may be optimised.  Through the Governance Framework Review process the Governing Body agreed that these local service property optimisation decisions should be made by local boards.[1] This amendment to the allocation implements this decision. This issue was canvassed with local boards during consultation on the Governance Framework Review and they were supportive of local boards holding this decision-making.

19.     The current allocation has one specific allocation for the Governing Body on acquisition and disposals - ‘acquisition and divestment of all park land, including the disposal of surplus parks.’ This was introduced to the allocation table in 2012 to provide clarity of decision-making responsibility in this space. This allocation would conflict with the new allocation given to local boards (disposal and reinvestment of property assets in line with the Service Property Optimisation Policy). In order to retain clarity an amendment has been made to the parks allocation to make it clear that the Governing Body’s responsibility for acquisition and divestment of parks does not apply in the case of the Service Property Optimisation Policy applying.

20.     Other minor changes to wording include:

·        Amending ‘Auckland-wide’ to ‘regional’ in several instances to maintain consistency throughout the allocation table.

·        Updating various names (such as Panuku Development Auckland and various parks and maunga) to bring them into line with Auckland Council style.

·        Updating descriptions of governance arrangements for several reserves to more accurately describe the current arrangements.

·        Renaming themes and activity groups to bring them in to line with the new LTP nomenclature.

·        Updating the planning language to bring it in line with Auckland Plan refresh nomenclature.

21.     Whilst not part of the allocation of decision-making, the preamble to the allocation table that describes what powers have been delegated to local boards has also been updated to note the recent decision to delegate certain Reserves Act powers to local boards. This delegation was an outcome of the Governance Framework Review.

Consideration            

Local board views and implications

22.     Local board views on the proposed allocation are being sought via this report.

23.     There was extensive consultation with local boards about their decision-making roles and powers during the Governance Framework Review. This included:

·        workshops with each local board during the independent review phase;

·        workshops and one business meeting with each local board during the response phase.

24.     The review found that the allocation table was generally working well and no substantive changes to the allocation were recommended. This was specifically discussed with local boards during workshops. Feedback from local boards was generally supportive of this position.

Māori impact statement

25.     There are no particular impacts to Maori in relation to this report.

Implementation

26.     As the changes proposed to the decision-making allocation are not significant it is not necessary to publicly consult on them. Local board feedback will be reported to the Governing Body in 2018. Changes to the allocation would come into effect on 1 July 2018.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed allocation of decision-making for local board feedback

215

     

Signatories

Authors

James Liddell - Portfolio Manager

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Revising the local board Standing Orders

 

File No.: CP2017/25189

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To consider and adopt revised Standing Orders for local board meetings.

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders are the rules for conduct and procedure at meetings. They are used to help meetings run smoothly and in accordance with relevant legislation, to ensure the integrity of the decision-making process, and to help elected members and members of the public understand how they can participate.

3.       The current local board Standing Orders (SOs) were set by the Auckland Transition Agency on 27 October 2010. It is now timely to revise them to ensure they remain a clear, relevant and practical tool for local board meetings. 

4.       At its meeting on 28 May 2015, the Governing Body resolved to amend its Standing Orders on the basis of work undertaken by a political working party.

5.       The revised Standing Orders have a simplified layout, are written in a plain language style, and contain a summary and process diagram at the front for ease of reference during a meeting. 

6.       A working group of Democracy Advisors has assessed each provision of the current (generic) local board Standing Orders against the corresponding revised governing body Standing Orders. For each local board standing order they considered whether to retain the current wording, use the revised Governing Body wording or to have a combination of the two.

7.       A draft set of revised local board Standing Orders is set out in Attachment A for local boards’ consideration. It is based on the recommendations of the Democracy Advisor working group and follows the revised Governing Body Standing Orders in terms of style. 

8.       The more significant suggested changes include new provisions for electronic attendance at meetings, dealing with conflicts due to the non-financial interests of members, processes for Governing Body and Māori input and enabling use of New Zealand Sign Language at meetings.

9.       This report recommends that local boards consider and adopt the revised Standing Orders in Attachment A.

10.     Any changes to a board’s Standing Orders requires a majority vote of not less than 75% of members present.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      adopt the standing orders detailed in Attachment A to the agenda report, entitled “Auckland Council Standing Orders of the Local Board”, in replacement of its current standing orders.

 

 

 

Comments

Background

11.     Standing Orders are the rules for conduct and procedure at meetings. They are used to help meetings run smoothly and in accordance with relevant legislation, to ensure the integrity of the decision-making process, and to help elected members and members of the public understand how they can participate.

12.     The Governing Body Standing Orders were compiled in 2010 by the Auckland Transition Agency from legacy council standing orders and the NZ Standards Model Standing Orders.

13.     Local Board Standing Orders were modelled on the Governing Body Standing Orders.

14.     A political working party was set up in November 2013 to review the Governing Body’s Standing Orders. The working party’s findings were reported back to the Governing Body at its 28 May 2015 meeting (Attachment B).

15.     Recent amendments to the Local Government Act 2002 (the Act) allowed additional changes to be considered by the working party. These changes included a provision to allow members to attend meetings via audio or audiovisual link.

16.     At its 28 May 2015 meeting, the Governing Body adopted an amended set of Standing Orders which have a simplified layout, are written in a plain language style, and contain a summary and process diagram at the front for ease of reference during a meeting.

17.     It was resolved at this meeting to forward the report to all local boards, drawing their attention to the suggestion to provide for councillor participation at local board meetings in their Standing Orders.

18.     Over the last 18 months, a working group of local board Democracy Advisors has assessed each provision of the current (generic) local board Standing Orders against the corresponding revised Governing Body Standing Orders. For each local board standing order they considered whether to retain the current wording, use the revised Governing Body wording or to have a combination of the two.

19.     A revised set of local board Standing Orders has been developed as an outcome of this work (Attachment A) which is in accordance with the recommendations of the Democracy Advisor working group. 

20.     The revised local board Standing Orders follow a similar format to the Governing Body Standing Orders with a simplified layout, a plain language style, and a summary and process diagram at the front for ease of reference during a meeting. 

21.     Key substantive changes from the current local board Standing Orders are summarised below. They aim to ensure the local board Standing Orders are up to date, fulfil Auckland Council’s legal obligations and are practical and useful for business meetings.

22.     Many standing orders reflect provisions in legislation. In some cases the wording of the standing order may have been changed to a plain language style but the intention of the standing order remains the same. These standing orders are usually indicated by a reference underneath to the relevant clause in legislation. These standing orders may not be suspended.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key changes

23.     Key substantive suggested changes from the current local board Standing Orders are set out below. 

 

Issue

 

Suggested changes

Purpose of suggested change

Reference in the revised LB Standing Orders

Quorum

Provision for the Chairperson to extend the 30 minute waiting time for a quorum, at the start of a meeting, by another 10 minutes - where members are known to be travelling to the meeting but are delayed due to unusual weather or traffic congestion.

 

Change in the waiting time for a quorum to be reestablished (where, after a meeting starts, member(s) leave and there is no longer a quorum) from 20 minutes to 10 minutes.

 

Assists smooth running of meeting and ensures

consistency with GB Standing Orders

 

3.1.4 and 3.1.6

 

Record of a workshop

Deletion of the requirement for the chairperson to sign-off the record of a workshop.

 

Record of workshop proceedings will be circulated.

 

Assists smooth running of meeting

12.1.4

 

Public excluded business not to be disclosed

 

Clarification on situations where the duty of non-disclosure of information, at a meeting where the public were excluded, does not apply - namely where:

·      a meeting has resolved to make the information publically available

·      there are no grounds under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for withholding the information when requested

·      the information is no longer confidential.

 

Clarification and ensures consistency with GB Standing Orders

7.4.3

Languages

Amendments to allow New Zealand Sign Language (as well as English and Māori) to be used by members and in deputations, presentations and public forum.

 

Two clear working days’ notice must be provided when an address is not in English (this is the same as the notice period required under the current local board Standing Orders and the governing body Standing Orders). 

 

The Governing Body input and Māori input sections also provide for addressing the meeting in New Zealand Sign Language, English or Māori.

 

Recognition of NZ Sign Language as an official language

1.1.2, 5.1.5, 6.1.5, 7.6.1, 7.7.5 and 7.8.4. 

Minutes

Clarification of what meeting minutes are to record.

 

Clarification

8.1.2

Agendas

Clarification that agendas can be sent electronically, and that names of local board and committee members are to be on each agenda.

 

Clarification

2.4.1

7.3.3

Non-financial interests

Suggested new provision regarding procedure for dealing with non-financial interests of members. If a member considers that there is a conflict of interest for an item, they may not take part in the discussions about or vote on the relevant matter.

 

Helps ensure robust, legally defensible decisions and consistent with GB Standing Orders

1.3.8

Repeat Notices of Motion

Suggested amendment that a Notice of Motion that the local board or a committee has considered twice and rejected within the previous six months may be refused by the Chairperson. (There is no longer the option for a further notice - prior to the expiration of the original period of 6 months - where signed by a majority of all members.)

Assists smooth running of meetings and ensures

consistency with GB Standing Orders

 

2.5.8

Procedural motions

Suggested new provision that the Chairperson has discretion about whether to allow any other procedural motion that is not contained in these Standing Orders.

 

Assists smooth running of meeting and ensures

consistency with GB Standing Orders

 

1.7.12

Urgent items

Suggested change in title, from ‘Major items of business not on the agenda may be dealt with (extraordinary business)’ to ‘Urgent items of business not on the agenda may be dealt with (extraordinary business)’.  

 

This provision sets out when items not on an agenda may be considered. The suggested change in title aims to help clarify the types of issues that fall under this provision and better reflect the purpose of the provision.

 

Text has also been added clarifying that extraordinary business may be brought before a meeting by a report of the Chief Executive or Chairperson. Where the matter is so urgent a written report is not practical, the report may be verbal.

 

Clarification

2.4.5 and Appendix D

 

Governing body input

A proposed section on Governing Body input sets out that a Governing Body member may provide input at meetings via speaking rights on items at the discretion of the chair and a report on the agenda for a Governing Body member to provide a general update on matters of interest to the board. This can include reporting on regional matters of interest to the local board or any matter the Governing Body member wishes to raise. 

This section aims to be more flexible than the current local board SO 3.9.14, by applying to Governing Body members in general rather than ward councillors for the local board area.

Whilst the right for Governing Body members to speak as a deputation has also been retained, the Governing Body input section enables a more flexible/permissive option, given it does not require the authorisation of a governing body resolution. Use of the process for Governing Body deputations will be appropriate for more formal circumstances, where the Governing Body member is representing the views of the Governing Body as a whole. 

The suggested notice period is seven clear working days, to enable sufficient time for it to appear on the agenda.  However, this is at the discretion of the Chairperson and can be shortened if necessary.

The suggested speaking time is five minutes, in accordance with provisions in the Governing Body Standing Orders.

More permissive input provisions

Part 5

Order of business

Clarification that the order of business for an extraordinary meeting should be limited to items relevant to the purpose of the meeting. The Chairperson may allow governing body, Māori and public input that is relevant to the purpose of the meeting.

The items listed in this section have been amended to fit with the order of business generated by Infocouncil.

Clarification and ensures consistency with GB Standing Orders

2.4.2

References to working parties and briefings

These have been taken out, as these forums tend to be less formal and not covered by Standing Orders.

Relevance

 

Public forum

Suggested changes clarifying that:

·      public forum may not be required at the inaugural meeting, extraordinary meetings or a special consultative procedure

·      members may not debate any matter raised during the public forum session that is not on the agenda for the meeting, or take any action in relation to it, other than through the usual procedures for extraordinary business if the matter is urgent. The meeting may refer the matter to a future meeting, or to another committee, or to the Chief Executive for investigation

·      Māori or New Zealand Sign Language can be used at public forum, as long as two clear working days’ notice is provided. Where practical, council will arrange for a translator to be present

·      the Chairperson may direct a speaker to a different committee and prohibit a speaker from speaking if he or she is offensive, repetitious or vexatious, or otherwise breaches these standing orders.

 

Clarification

7.8

Suspension of standing orders

A provision has been included for a member to move a motion to suspend standing orders as a procedural motion. The member must name the standing orders to be suspended and provide a reason for suspension. If seconded, the chairperson must put it without debate. At least 75 per cent of the members present and voting must vote in favour of the suspension, and the resolution must state the reason why the SO was suspended.

 

It should be noted that some SOs reflect provisions in legislation so cannot be suspended. These are usually indicated by a reference underneath the SO to the relevant clause in legislation.

 

To assist the smooth running of meetings and ensure consistency with GB Standing Orders

1.7.11

Notice to be seconded

A notice of motion delivered to the Chief Executive must be signed by another member of the meeting as a seconder – unless member is giving notice of motion to revoke or alter a previous resolution.

 

Consistency with GB Standing Orders

2.5.2

Chairperson discretion

The discretion of the Chairperson has been clarified and made as consistent as possible in Standing Orders relating to Governing Body input, Māori input, public forum and deputations.

Clarification and consistency

Parts 5 and 6, 7.7 and 7.8

Māori responsiveness

Suggested provisions for representatives of Māori organisations to provide input at local board or committee meetings via speaking rights during relevant items. The main purpose of the provisions is to recognise the special status of Māori and increase the council’s responsiveness to Māori.. The provisions also provide more flexibility than the deputations process, which restricts the number of deputation members that may address the meeting. 

 

The suggested notice period is seven clear working days, to enable sufficient time for such an item to appear on the agenda.  However, this is at the discretion of the chair and can be shortened if need be.

Recognition of the special status of  Māori and IMSB’s role under section 85 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009

Part 6 and

4.2.2

Working days / clear working days

The term “clear working days” has been used throughout the document, to refer to the number of working days prescribed for giving notice. It excludes the date of service of that notice and the date of the meeting itself.  This is in accordance with legislation (Local Government Act 2002, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the Interpretation Act).

Clarification and consistency

 

Governing body input, Māori input, public forum, deputations

The provisions in these sections have been made as consistent as possible and, where appropriate, in accordance with the Governing Body Standing Orders. 

 

Legal advice has been followed regarding the subjects a speaker may not speak about and the questions which can be put to speakers. 

Clarification

 

New appendices

New appendices have been added, setting out who must leave the meeting when the public is excluded and how business is brought before a meeting. 

 

Provisions in the current local board Standing Orders relating to workshops have been placed in an appendix, given their exemption from Part seven of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1978.

Clarification

Appendices B-D

Electronic attendance at business meetings

Recent changes to the Local Government Act 2002 now allow members to attend meetings by audio or audio-visual means in certain situations.

There are a number of restrictions for this provision in the legislation including that relevant technology is available and of suitable quality, all those participating can hear each other and there is no reduction in accountability or accessibility of the member in relation to the meeting. Members attending meetings by electronic link may vote but are not counted as part of the quorum.

The revised Standing Orders contain provisions to enable members to attend meetings by electronic link, where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable, to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity or in emergencies.

This provision will only apply where the technology is available.

 

Allows members to attend meetings whilst away on council business, or during illness or other emergency.

3.3

Membership of committees

In accordance with section 85 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, a clause has been included acknowledging that the Independent Māori Statutory Board  must appoint a maximum of two people to sit as members of committees that deal with the management and stewardship of natural and physical resources.

Clarification

4.2.2

Powers of delegation

Clause 36D of schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002 identifies who a local board may delegate decision-making to,  and the powers a local board cannot delegate.

This clause does not include the power to delegate to other subordinate decision-making bodies or more than one member of a local board. Therefore references to subordinate decision-making bodies have been removed.

Clarification

Part 4

 

Key differences from the governing body standing orders

24.     The revised local board Standing Orders contain some points of difference with the governing body Standing Orders. Key points of difference are in the areas of refreshment breaks, petitions, notices of motion, and public input.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

25.     This report provides information and a revised set of Standing Orders for local board consideration and adoption.

Māori impact statement

26.     The local board Standing Orders deal with meeting procedure. They provide for Māori to be spoken at business meetings and for deputations, presentations and petitions to be in Māori. They also enable:

·        Māori to participate on local board committees, even if they are not members of the relevant local board. See current local board SO 2.9.2 which states: “members of a committee or subcommittee may, but need not be, elected members of the Local Board”. As such, non-members may be appointed to committees or subcommittees if they have relevant skills, attributes or knowledge.

·        the suspension of Standing Orders, which can be useful to flexibly incorporate tikanga at meetings.

27.     New suggested provisions relating to Māori in the revised Standing Orders include:

·        a section on Māori input, to recognise the special status of Māori and encourage their input at local board meetings. This is in accordance with advice from Te Waka Angamua and work being undertaken by some local boards on a co-design process with mana whenua to improve Māori input into local board decision-making

·        clarifying that the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) must appoint a maximum of two people to sit as members of committees that deal with the management and stewardship of natural and physical resources (in accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 85)

·        providing for Māori to be spoken at public forum, and by the governing body or Māori organisations providing input, as long as two clear working days’ notice is given of the intention to do so.

28.     Including these provisions recognises the special status of Māori under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Local Government Act 2002 requirements to provide opportunities and processes for Māori to contribute to decision-making processes.[2] It is also in accordance with the goals of council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework, Whiria Te Muka Tangata. In particular, to foster more positive and productive relationships between council and Māori, and contribute to Māori well-being by developing strong Māori communities.

Implementation

29.     Changes to Standing Orders requires a majority vote of not less than 75% of members present (s27(3) Schedule 7, Local Government Act 2002).

30.     If approved, the revised Standing Orders will come in to effect immediately.

31.     Copies of the revised Standing Orders will be provided to all local board members, where local boards choose to adopt changes.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Revised Local Board Standing Orders  (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Governing Body Political working party’s finding (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Blair Doherty - Kaipatiki Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback on the: Review of the representation arrangments - process.

 

File No.: CP2017/26078

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to endorse feedback to the, Review of representation arrangements – process, on how the review will be conducted.

Executive summary

2.       All local authorities are required by the Local Electoral Act 2001 to undertake a review of representation arrangements, at least once every six years, in order to determine the arrangements for the following elections.

3.       Auckland Council was established in 2010 and was not required to undertake a review of representation arrangements for the 2016 elections, but is required to undertake a review for the 2019 elections. The review will take place during 2018.

4.       The Governing Body resolved a proposed process on 28 September 2017 and is now seeking the views of local boards on this process. In December 14th, the Governing Body will resolve the final process for conducting the representation review.

5.       At Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board October 2017 business meeting, The Review of representation arrangements – process was presented to the board (CP2017/21880). To further consider its input the board resolved to: 

 “Delegate to the Chair and Deputy Chair to develop and complete the board’s feedback on the Review of representation arrangements – process, before the 14 December 2017 deadline” (Resolution number MO/2017/204).

6.       This matter was considered by the board at workshops on the, 1 November and 6 December 2017, to endorse its feedback. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      support the review of the political working party as outlined in the, Review of the representation arrangements – process (attachment), including:

i)        establishing a political working party, comprising an equal number of Governing Body and local board members, being formed to look at the representation review.

ii)       the proposal from the political working party be developed and presented to local boards and the Governing Body for comments before the Governing Body makes the resolution to release the proposal for consultation.

b)      note: Mana Whenua views are considered by the political working party in developing the council’s proposal for consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed - Review of the representation arrangements - process

239

     

Signatories

Authors

Daniel Poe - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

 

File No.: CP2017/25436

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

 

Regional Facilities Auckland First Quarter Report 2017/18

2.       The  Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board receive the Regional Facilities Auckland First Quarter Report 2017/18 (Attachment A).

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the Regional Facilities Auckland First Quarter Report 2017/18.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Facilities Auckland First Quarter Report 2017/18

243

    

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Achievements Register 2016-2019 Electoral Term

File No.: CP2017/25280

 

  

 

Executive Summary

Providing an update on achievements of the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board for the 2016 – 2019 electoral term (Attachment A).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Achievements Register 2016-2019 Electoral Term report be received.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Achievements Register

265

    

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

MANGERE-OTAHUHU LOCAL BOARD

ACHIEVEMENTS REGISTER 2016-2019 ELECTORAL TERM

 

Date

ACHIEVEMENT

18 November 2017

Famili zone in Otahuhu – Rugby League World Cup

15 November 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Feedback on the Auckland Transport Election Signs Bylaw 2013 and its impact on local parks

15 November 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Feedback on the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan

15 November 2017

Input into the Review of Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

8 November 2017

MO Arts Jam – Signature Event

19 October 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board and Community for the winning category of the Bike Awards NZTA 2017 Cycle conference held in Christchurch, then the Supreme Award NZTA.

20 September 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Feedback on the Public Alerting Framework for Auckland

20 September 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Feedback on the Auckland Plan Refresh – Local Board Engagement

20 September 2017

Adoption of the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Plan 2017-2020

24 August 2017

Te Pukaki Tapu o Poutukeka (Pukaki Crafter) Blessing – This project was funded by the environment work programme and supports the protection and enhancement of a culturally significant geological and archaeological site.

22 July 2017

Kīngi Tāwhiao Cottage Dawn Blessing and opening

19 July 2017

Auckland Plan Refresh 2018 – early feedback to inform draft plan

July 2017

Liquor license rejection by DLC

30 June 2017

Relationship Agreement Signing Ngāti Tamaoho, Manurewa, Papakura, Otara-Papatoetoe and Mangere-Otahuhu Local Boards

29 June 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board hosted the Mangere-Otahuhu Volunteer Awards

21 June 2017

Auckland Council Maintenance -  Project 17

21 June 2017

Approved the Relationship Agreement with Mana Whenua Template

21 June 2017

Approval of ACE Work Programme 2017/2018

21 June 2017

Approval of Community Facilities Work Programme 2017/2018

21 June 2017

Approval of Local Economic Development Work Programme 2017/2018

21 June 2017

Approval of Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme 2017/2018

21 June 2017

Approval of the concept plan for Norana Esplanade Walkway

21 June 2017

Funding for a Crime Prevention Officer for Mangere Town Centre and Mangere East Village

7 June 2017

Adoption of Local Board Agreement 2017/2018 (deferred local fees and charges schedules 2017/2018)

7 June 2017

Approval of Libraries Work Programme 2017/2018

7 June 2017

Approval of Local Environment and Local Development Work Programme 2017/2018

25 May 2017

Have Your Say Event -  Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Plan

17 May 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Feedback for Auckland Council's submission on Government's Urban Development Authorities Discussion Document

17 May 2017

 

17 May 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Feedback to the Governing Body on the Easter Sunday Trading

17 May 2017

Granted $150k from the Facility Partnership Fund 2016/17 to Bridge Park Tennis Club Incorporated

9 May 2017

The Chair presented at the Finance and Performance Committee workshop - LB Advocacy discussions Annual Budget 2017/2018

3 May 2017

Approve the Annual Budget 2017/2018

26 April 2017

Luau Night - World Masters Games

19 April 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board agree to reinstate the Manukau Harbour Forum

19 April 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Submission to the East West Link

19 April 2017

Approved the draft Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Plan 2017

19 April 2017

Board supported the 2017 Tuia Te Here Tangata Leadership Development Programme

16 March 2017

Presentation by Chair on Overcrowding and Homelessness to the Community Development and Safety Committee

15 February 2017

Support for Council submission to the Point England Development Enabling Bill

16 December 2017

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board hosted Community Christmas morning tea.

14 December 2017

Input into Council’s submission on the Rates Rebate (Retirement Village Residents) Amendment Bill

14 December 2017

Supports the  Mayor’s commitment to Auckland Council becoming a living wage employer

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2017/24751

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Executive Summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board notes the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Calendar December 2017

269

     

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2017/24748

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Attached are the notes for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 1st, 8th, 22nd and 29th November 2017.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 1st, 8th, 22nd and 29th November 2017.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Notes 1 November

273

b

Workshop Notes 8 November

275

c

Workshop Notes 22 November

277

d

Workshop Notes 29 November

279

    

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Workshop record of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board held in the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Office, Wednesday 1 November 2017, commencing at 1.00pm

PRESENT

Chairperson:                Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Deputy Chairperson:    Walter Togiamua (until 5.20pm)

Members:                     Nick Bakulich (from 2.10pm)

                                    Makalita Kolo (from 3.23pm)

                                    Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

                                    Christine O’Brien (from 1.10pm)

 

Apologies:                Carrol Elliott

 

Also present:             Neil Taylor, Daniel Poe, Janette McKain

 

Member Togiamua opened the meeting in prayer

Timeslot

Topic

Presenter

Governance Role

Purpose

 

1.00- 3.00pm

Local Board Agreement Planning Process Workshop 2

 

 

 Daniel Poe, Faithe Smith, Agnes McCormack,  Kim Taunga, Shirley Samuels, Jessica Morris, Dollie Shah, Greg Hannah

Keeping Informed

The board discuss the following and provided their feedback on:
• Asset information
• Fees and Charges
• Feedback to Regional priority workshops.

 

3.00 - 3.30pm

Quick Response Funding Round

 

Catherine Bolinga

Local initiatives and specific decisions

 The board discussed the Quick Response Funding Round prior to the report coming to a business meeting on 15 November 2017.

 

3.30 - 4.00pm

Parks Sports & Rec
- Maori Naming of Reserves #1173 Creating a Maori Identity

Jacky Bartley, Steve Owens, Martin Te Moni from Ngati Whanaunga

Keeping Informed/ Feedback

The board had a powerpoint presentation on the Maori Naming of Reserves work programme and gave feedback. The board would like community consultation prior to the name changes.

 

4.00 - 4.30pm

Mangere Mountain Education Trust Request for Additional Funding

Ella Kay – Senior Advisor, CCO Governance and External Partnerships
Alastair Cameron – Manager, CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Monitoring/oversight

The board discussed the following and gave feedback:

(i) how MMET’s work has been delivering against their Funding Agreement KPIs for the last funding period and
(ii) give context to a report that will be coming to the 15 November 2017 business meeting to request additional funding for MMET.

 

4.30 - 4.45pm

Relationship Manager Update

Neil Taylor

Keeping Informed

To update the board on upcoming issues.

 

4.45 - 5.15pm

Vacancy at 31R Jordan Rd, Mangere -  ex Royal NZ Plunket, Line 1667 on Community Leases Sharepoint WP

Tai Stirling

Setting Direction

The board discussed the vacancy of 31R Jordan Road, Mangere.

Action: Officer to send a list through to the board of the applicants.

Member Lauese closed the meeting in prayer.


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Workshop record of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board held in the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Office, Wednesday 8 November 2017, commencing at 1.00pm

PRESENT

Chairperson:                Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Members:                     Carrol Elliott (until 3.00pm)

                                    Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese (until 2.00pm then from 3.18pm)

                                    Christine O’Brien (from 1.26pm)

 

Apologies:                Nick Bakulich, Makalita Kolo, Walter Togiamua and Neil Taylor for absence and Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese and Carrol Elliott for leaving early.

 

Also present:             Janette McKain, Daniel Poe, Rina Tagore

 

Member Lauese opened the meeting in prayer

 

Topic

Presenter

Governance Role

Purpose

 

Infrastructure & Environmental Services (I&ES)
- Development of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018

Desiree Tukutama, , Michael Backhurst, Jenny Chilcott

Input into regional decision-making policies, plans and strategies

To board had a powerpoint presentation on the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 and gave feedback.
Timeline:
A formal resolution from the local board containing feedback on the draft plan must be received by 20 November 2017, to ensure approval of the draft plan for consultation by the Environment and Community Committee on 5 December 2017.

 

Infrastructure & Environmental Services (I&ES)
- Illegal dumping campaign
- debrief on red bin rollout

Desiree Tukutama, James Young, Chantal Nicholas

Keeping Informed

The board had a debrief on the illegal dumping campaign and an opportunity to debrief on the red bin rollout and gave feedback.

 

Infrastructure & Environmental Services (I&ES)

- Pest Free Auckland

Desiree Tukutama, Brett Butland, Cr Alf Filipaina

Keeping informed

The board discussed the Pest Free Auckland programme, including councils’ role to increase and support community-led conservation on private and public land and gave feedback.

 

Quarter 1 Work Programme

 

 

Daniel Poe, Audrey Gran, Rina Tagore

 Keeping Informed

The board discussed the Quarter 1 work programme.

This report will be on the 15 November 2017 business meeting.

 

Arts Broker Annual Report

 

Sarah Edwards –Bronwyn Bent – Arts Brokers FY16/17
Renee Tanner – Arts Broker FY17/18

Keeping Informed/Oversite/

Approval

The board had a presentation on the Arts Broker Annual Report.

 

The Portage Route

 

Tim Keat, Philip Whongi

Setting Direction

The board provided direction on the Portage Project Steering Group and Terms of Reference.
Action:
A report will be on the December 2017 business meeting.

 

Relationship Manager Update
Summary of information memos:

Safe swimming maps and signs

 

Regulatory Committee EPB Amendment Act

 

Earthquake Prone Building Amendment Act 2016

 

Neil Taylor

Keeping Informed

The board discussed upcoming issues.
Summary of information memos that have been sent to the board members.

 

Member Sosene closed the meeting with prayer.


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

 

Workshop record of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board held in the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Office, Wednesday 22 November 2017, commencing at 1.00pm

PRESENT

Chairperson:                Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Deputy Chairperson:    Walter Togiamua

Members:                     Nick Bakulich

                                    Carrol Elliott (until 5.10pm)

                                    Makalita Kolo

                                    Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese (until 4.45pm)

                                    Christine O’Brien (until 4.00pm)

 

Apologies:                Christine O’Brien for leaving early.

 

Also present:             Neil Taylor, Janette McKain, Daniel Poe, Rina Tagore, Shirley Samuels, Audrey Gan

 

Member Togiamua opened the meeting in prayer

 

Timeslot

Topic

Presenter

Governance Role

Purpose

 

1.00 - 4.00pm

Local Board Agreement Planning Process Workshop 3

Rina Tagore, Daniel Poe, Audrey Gan

Kim Taunga

Simon Randall

Debra Langton

Tracey Williams

Shirley Samuels

Emma Joyce

Paul Robinson

Luo Lei

Setting Direction

The board discussed Key projects and areas of focus for 2018/19 and performance information.

 

4.00 - 4.45pm

Mangere Community Initiatives 

Sophie Bell, Shirley Samuels, Steve Owens, Debra Langton

Keeping Informed/Feedback

The board had a powerpoint presentation on  the Mangere Community Initiatives work and gave feedback on the potential options.

Action:

A report will come back to the board in March 2018.

 

Member Kolo closed the meeting in prayer

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

 

Workshop record of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board held in the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Office, Wednesday 29 November 2017, commencing at 1.00pm

PRESENT

Chairperson:                Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Deputy Chairperson:    Walter Togiamua (until 5.15pm)

Members:                     Nick Bakulich (from 1.08pm)

                                    Carrol Elliott (from 1.28pm)

                                    Makalita Kolo

                                    Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

                                    Christine O’Brien (from 1.13pm)

 

Also present:             Neil Taylor, Janette McKain, Daniel Poe, Rina Tagore, Shirley Samuels, Zack Fonoti

 

Member Togiamua opened the meeting in prayer

 

Timeslot

Topic

Presenter

Governance Role

Purpose

 

1.00 - 1.30pm

Community Services/Arts, Community & Events/Parks Sports & Recreation/Community Facilities

Tony Hart, Katrina Morgan

Setting direction

The board discussed the preliminary scoping of LDI project ideas in business areas of Community Services/Arts, Community & Events/Parks Sports & Recreation/Community Facilities.

The new flagpole in Otahuhu will be installed prior to ANZAC 2018.

Action:

A report to come back to the board in February 2018 regarding the concepts and costings of the LDI projects.

 

1.30 - 2.00pm

Auckland Transport
- Public Transport to the Airport

 

Luke Elliott, Himanshu Chopra, Edward Newbigin

 

The board had a presentation on the changes to Auckland Transport’s 380 and  Airporter bus services and gave feedback.



 

2.00 - 2.15pm

Auckland Transport
 
- Mangere Bridge Safer Communities

Winston,

Jonathan Anyon

Keeping Informed

The board discussed the Mangere Bridge Safer Community.
Action:

A report on the Mangere Bridge Safer Community analysis feedback will come back to the board in 2018.

 

2-15 - 2.45pm

Auckland Transport
- Route 32 Update

Yana Averianova, Leong Cheah

Keeping Informed

The board had a presentation on the Southern Connections FN32 and gave feedback.

Action:

Officers to arrange a site visit of Church Street and Avenue Road on a Thursday afternoon 1pm onwards.

 

2.45 - 3.30pm

A New Approach to Open Space Management Planning

Dafydd Pettigrew, Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Keeping Informed

The board discussed the omnibus open space management plans and gave feedback on  the Open Space Management framework particularly:
- Structure, content and delivery omnibus management plans
- Identification of key open space issues for the local board
- Further discussion and input to open space management issues requiring a regional approach.

Action:

Officers to send a list of all the parks and address in the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Area.

Officers to book a workshop in February 2018 for further discussion.

 

3.30 - 4.00pm

Infrastructure & Environmental Services (I&ES)

- National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

 Cliff Wilton, Emma Joyce

Keeping Informed/Feedback

The board had a powerpoint presentation to introduce Auckland Council’s integrated watershed planning process and current state of water quality in the local watershed and gave feedback on the freshwater values and proposed next steps.

 

4.00 - 4.30pm

The Southern Initiative (TSI)
- Work Overview

Anna-Jane Jacob, David Rameka

Keeping Informed

The board discussed the TSI work overview and gave feedback.

Action:

Officers to arrange a site visit at the TSI office with the board members. Thursday afternoon 1.00pm onwards.

 

4.30 - 5.00pm

SPA Town Centre Work Stream 12-16 High Street, Otahuhu

 

Marian Webb - Pānuku, Justine Haves - Community Services

Keeping Informed

The board discussed the optimisation options and gave feedback.

Action:

Officers to arrange a site visit of the options for the MOLB Board.

Officers to book a workshop in February 2018.

 

5.00 - 5.30pm

SPA Town Centre Streetscape Upgrade

 

 

 Lisa Spasic, Richard Firth - Auckland Transport

Keeping Informed

The board discussed the Streetscape upgrade and gave feedback.

 

5.30 – 5.35pm

Relationship Manager Update
Summary of information memos:

Political working party appointments – Auckland Governance Working Party

Neil Taylor

Keeping Informed

To update the board on upcoming issues.
Summary of information memos that have been sent to the board members.

 

Member Sosene closed the meeting in prayer


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Local board feedback on rates remission and postponement policy review

 

File No.: CP2017/25978

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Seek preliminary feedback from local boards on the review of the rates remission and postponement policy and in particular the legacy schemes. Feedback will be considered by Finance and Performance Committee when agreeing a rates remission and postponement policy, and any options, for consultation.

Executive Summary

2.       The council is required to review its rates remission and postponement policy every six years.

3.       Rates remissions are a reduction in rates, usually by a set percentage. Rates postponement defers the payment of rates to a future point in time, usually the sale of the property.

4.       The current policy includes six regional schemes and eleven legacy schemes inherited from the former councils that are only available within the former districts. Only minor changes are proposed to the regional schemes.

5.       Officers recommend Option 1 that the legacy schemes (excluding the postponement for Manukau sports clubs) be replaced with grants because:

·     funding decisions are more transparent

·     spending for each activity is within an annual budget

·     level of support for each organisation is more visible.

6.       A three-year transition is proposed for current recipients during which they will receive their current funding via a grant. At the end of transition, they would need to apply for renewal.

7.       Current legacy remissions and postponements funding would move to grant budgets:

a)   regional grants programmes: remissions for natural heritage and community/sporting remissions for regional/sub-regional facilities

b)   local board grants programmes: all other legacy remissions in the relevant area and the Great Barrier Island postponements.

8.       Each board will be funded to provide the same level of grants as is presently provided in b) above. After three years, boards can choose to continue the grants if they wish. While some boards will get more funding than others, this will be smoothed over time by the local board funding policy.

Alternative options

9.       The other three options were considered and rejected because:

·     Option 2: keeping the current remissions schemes is inequitable

·     Option 3: extending the remissions in their current form is costly and does not provide the same level of transparency and oversight as is achieved with grants

·     Option 4: removing the schemes with no replacement could present some ratepayers/community groups with affordability issues.

10.     Local boards feedback on the review will be included in the report to the Finance and Performance Committee in February 2018. Public consultation on the proposed Rates remission and postponement policy and any options will occur in April 2018. Local boards will be able to consider public feedback, and provide their formal views on the proposed policy at their May 2018 meetings. Local board and public feedback will be reported to the 31 May 2018 meeting of the Finance and Performance Committee when the adoption of the policy will be considered.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      resolves feedback on the options to address the legacy council remission and postponement schemes.

 

 

Comments

Background

11.     The current Rates remission and postponement policy includes:

·     six regional schemes available to all ratepayers with the objectives to:

provide ratepayers with some financial or other assistance where they might otherwise have difficulty meeting their obligations

address circumstances where the rating system results in anomalies in the incidence of rates.

·     eleven legacy schemes supporting community objectives set by the former councils and only available in some areas:

five remission schemes for natural and in some cases historic heritage

six remission schemes for community and sporting organisations

a rates postponement scheme for sports clubs in Manukau

a rates postponement scheme for businesses on Great Barrier Island.

12.     A summary of the regional and legacy schemes and the amount of remission or postponement granted in 2016/2017 is in Attachment A. The full rates remission and postponement policy is in Attachment B.

Assessment of Regional Schemes

13.     Officers have reviewed the regional schemes and identified that the schemes are operating in accordance with expectations. The only amendment proposed to the regional schemes is to simplify the remission scheme for rates penalties. This amendment will be designed to maintain ratepayers’ existing level of access to penalty remissions. 

Assessment of Legacy Schemes

14.     Four options were considered for the legacy schemes:

·     Option 1: integrate with grants schemes with three-year transition for current recipients

·     Option 2: retain the status quo

·     Option 3: extend to entire region

·     Option 4: remove.

15.     A summary of the options can be found in Table 1 at the end of this report.

16.     The following criteria were used to assess options for the legacy remissions and postponements policies.

·     equity – same treatment for all ratepayers in all areas across Auckland

·     transparency

·     cost

·     minimise the effects of change

·     administrative simplicity.

Option 1: Integrate remissions and postponements with grants schemes with three-year transition (excluding the Manukau postponement scheme for sports clubs)

17.     This option would remove the present remission and postponement schemes.  Up to the current amount equivalent of the 2018/2019 remission would be transferred to grants expenditure in the relevant areas over the next three years.  The amount of grants will be adjusted for the increase in rates in the subsequent two years.

18.     This option will increase the council’s grants and other budget lines by $900,000. This increase is offset by the increase in rates revenue of $900,000 resulting from remissions no longer being applied. There is no net cost to ratepayers of converting rates remissions to grants.

Allocating grants

19.     Integration of remissions into wider regional, or local, grants schemes is preferable because:

·     allocation of rates expenditure will be transparent

·     spending via grants is public and assessed against other comparable demands on public money in terms of efficacy. Value for money is regularly assessed.

·     administrative systems for grants are already in place although there will be a change in volume

·     proposed transition will result in no change for recipients over the three years

·     regional equity will be achieved over time as the legacy grants are integrated into the wider grants programme

·     enables equity between community organisations that own land and those that do not.

20.     Legacy schemes have been assessed against local and regional responsibilities. From this it is proposed that grants budgets be allocated as follows:

Remission/Postponement for

Aligns with

Grant allocates to

Natural heritage

Regional

Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grants Programme 

Historic Heritage

Regional

Regional Historic Heritage Grants Programme

Regional or sub-regional sports facilities

Regional

Regional Sports and Recreation Grants Programme

Local sports clubs and facilities

Local

Local Board where property receiving remission is located

Regional or sub-regional community facilities

Regional

Regional Community Development Grants programmes  

Local community organisations and facilities

Local

Local Board where property receiving remission is located

Great Barrier businesses

Local

Great Barrier Local Board

21.     Remissions for community and sporting organisations have been split between Regional and Local based on the area served by the property receiving the remission. For example, Eden Park, St John’s ambulance stations, IHC care homes and the SPCA have been classed as regional. Remissions for the Scouts Association and Plunket NZ have been classed as local because they relate to local scout halls and Plunket centres.

22.     The value of remissions by local board area can be found in Attachment C. A list of all community and sporting remissions by local board showing the ratepayer and amount of remission, can be found in Attachment D.

Three-year transition

23.     The relevant decision maker, e.g. the Governing Body Committee for regional grants, and local boards for local grants, would be required to provide a grant to the level of the existing remission for a period of three years. The present recipient would therefore be protected from any change to their current funding for that period. At the end of the three years the decision maker can then decide whether to continue the grants on the existing basis or release the funds to the wider grants pool.

Option 2: Retain the status quo

24.     This option would retain the remissions and postponement schemes in their current form in the former council areas. Properties in other parts of the region would not be able to apply for them

25.     This option is administratively simple for the council and recipients. It minimises change. Costs will depend on applications but have been relatively stable over time. The options is not equitable because the schemes are only available to ratepayers in some areas.

26.     Rates remissions and postponements are not a transparent mechanism for supporting wider council goals because they:

·     are recorded as a charge against revenue

·     do not appear as a cost in the council’s accounts

·     do not increase the rates requirement and hence do not impact the headline rates increase[3] (They still increase the rates burden on other ratepayers)

·     are not prioritised against other expenditure proposals or subject to the same value for money scrutiny.

Option 3: Extend to entire region

27.     This option would extend the current policies to apply to the entire Auckland Council area. Extending the policies in their current form is equitable, and simplifies administration. However, this option:

·     increases costs to ratepayers without being compared to other council proposals that may offer greater benefits

·     lacks evidence as to how much benefit will be returned by this investment

·     is not transparent as described in Option 2 above.

28.     The cost of extending existing legacy remission schemes regionally will depend on the criteria for eligibility. Costs for extending the current remission schemes have been estimated at $4.5-$6 million as follows:

·     extending remission for natural heritage to properties with a covenant managed by the Queen Elizabeth the Second Trust: $40,000. There are just over 100 properties in Auckland with a QEII covenant. If the criteria are extended to include other types of covenant, such as a covenant with a council, then the number of eligible properties will increase significantly. For example, there are 4,500 properties with a bush-lot covenant from Rodney Council.

·     extending remissions for historic heritage: $3 million. This is derived from the rates for properties that are scheduled Category A in the Auckland Unitary Plan, where the status is associated with a building. This ignores archaeological sites such as middens and pa, but will capture the whole value of properties where the heritage status only applies to part of the property.

·     extending remissions for community and sporting organisations: $1.5 million for 50 per cent remission to $3 million for 100 per cent remission. This is estimated by applying a full remission to properties currently receiving a five per cent remission for the Auckland Regional Council scheme for community and sporting organisations. This is likely to under estimate the value of remissions, as offering a more generous remission is likely to significantly increase the number of applicants.

Option 4: Remove the schemes

29.     Removing the schemes would lead to immediate financial impacts for a number of organisations presently receiving support from council.  While the sums remitted are in many cases small, it is not clear that all the current recipients would be able to adequately accommodate change in a short time period. 

Postponement for sports clubs in the district of the previous Manukau City Council

30.     It is not recommended that the rates postponements for Manukau Sports clubs be converted to remission. This is because the postponement is currently set to be cost neutral. This is achieved by interest being charged, and by the postponement being secured against the title of the property. The council can require the full amount of postponed rates and interest be paid before any sale of the property can proceed. It would not be effective or efficient to try and replicate the postponement through a grants process.

31.     The clubs are accruing a major liability against their land under this scheme. The total current liability including interest is $880,000. If the policy is not changed then rates will continue to accrue as the rates are never remitted. While the postponements are cost-neutral when they end, in the meantime they represent a significant debt liability at a time when the council is debt constrained. For this reason, officers prefer that the schemes be removed after a suitable transition period. (The outstanding liability at the time the scheme is removed would remain a liability on the land until its sale or transfer of ownership.)

32.     The two clubs receiving the postponement are zoned for residential development. Both clubs have significant (around 240 per cent) increases in capital valuation following changes in zoning under the unitary plan. One club has repaid a portion of its liability following the sale of part of the property, and has chosen to pay rather than postpone the current year’s rates.

33.     Officers propose to do further work to understand the individual circumstances of these two golf courses before developing formal recommendation and options for addressing this postponement scheme. Next steps and a timeline for actions will be included in the report to the February Finance and Performance Committee.

Next steps

34.     Preliminary feedback from local boards will be attached to the report to the February Finance and Performance Committee. The committee will agree a Rates remission and postponement policy, and any options, for consultation.

35.     Public consultation will occur in April. All current recipients of the legacy rates remission and postponement schemes will be notified of any proposed changes to enable them to submit feedback.

36.     Local boards will be able to consider the results of the public consultation, and provide formal feedback on the proposed policy, at their May meetings. 

37.     The Finance and Performance Committee will consider feedback from the public and local boards and adopt a final Rates remission and postponement policy by 31 May 2018. This enables the council’s budgets to be updated for the adoption of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

Review of the rates remission and postponement policy: Options for legacy remission and postponement schemes

Option

Description

Pros

Cons

Implementation

Option 1: Integrate with grants schemes

 

· Legacy remission and postponements schemes (excluding MCC postponement for sports clubs) transfer to regional or local grants schemes.

· Three-year transition – same level of support given as provided in remission or postponement

· Increased transparency and accountability – grants assessed for value for money

· Can cap costs

· No change for three years for current recipients – time to adjust

· Greater flexibility in application – not restricted to organisations that own land, level of support can reflect outcomes not property rates

· Reduced rates administration

· Increased grants administration

· Administrative systems already in place for grants

· Increase in grants volume

Option 2: Retain the status quo

 

·    Legacy remission and postponements schemes continue unchanged

· Minimises change

· Inequitable – only available in some areas, and only available to groups that own land

· Lacks transparency – spending not reviewed against other council priorities

· No cap on costs

· No change to current processes

Option 3: Extend to entire region

 

· Schemes expanded to regional schemes. Costs will depend on the criteria applied

· Increases equity across the region

· Cost – estimated at $4.5m to $6m

· No cap on costs

· Lacks transparency – spending not reviewed against other council priorities

· Lack of evidence this would improve outcomes

· Only available to groups that own property

· Increases volume of remissions to process

Option 4: Remove the schemes

· Legacy schemes removed without transition

· $700,000 reduction in cost of rates for 2018/2019

· No time for recipients to adjust

· Reduces rates administration

Consideration

Local board views and implications

38.     Implications for local boards are set out in the report. Under the proposal boards will be provided with additional funding to maintain the existing level of support for local community and sports groups in their board area that currently receive remissions.  However, local boards will have more grant applications to appraise in the future and potentially more decisions to make at the end of the three-year transition.

39.     This report seeks feedback from local boards to inform the consideration of this issue by the Finance and Performance Committee in February.

Māori impact statement                          

40.     None of the properties presently receiving remissions or postponements under the legacy schemes are known to be Māori owned or operated.

41.     The only reference to Māori in the legacy remission and postponement schemes is the provision for remissions for Māori reservations in the Rodney District. No properties applied under this criterion. Such properties would be eligible for remission under the council’s Māori freehold land rates remission and postponement policy. The council is not required to review its MFL rates remission and postponement policy until 2019. No changes are proposed for this policy.

42.     Under the principles for the Community Grants Policy, all grants programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori outcomes.

Implementation

43.     Differences in implementation for each of the options are set out in the table above.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of Auckland Council Rates remission and postponement policy scheme

291

b

Rates remission and postponement policy

297

c

Value of legacy schemes by local board area Remissions for communitysporting are split by regional and local

315

d

All community and sporting remissions by local board area (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Beth Sullivan - Principal Advisor Policy

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - Acting Group Chief Financial Officer

Carol McKenzie-Rex – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

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13 December 2017

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

13 December 2017

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

i)                                            

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

31        Local board feedback on rates remission and postponement policy review - Attachment d - All community and sporting remissions by local board area

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

In particular, the report contains information about arrears, remissions, or postponed rates that are not available for public inspection in accordance with the Local Government Rating Act 2002  Section 38(1)(e).

n/a

s48(1)(b)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information which would be contrary to a specified enactment or constitute contempt of court or contempt of the House of Representatives.

 

   



[1] The Governing Body resolved to delegate this power to local boards. However, this was in error, as it was always intended that the power should be allocated to local boards by Governing Body and it was discussed by the Political Working Party in this context.

[2] Sections 14 and 81.

[3] The headline rates increase in an annual plan, or long-term plan, is a comparison of the annual rates requirement to the previous years budgeted rates requirement.  Moving a charge against revenue to an expenditure item like grants will increase the council’s costs and inflate the apparent rates increase.  However, remissions and postponements are a cost already borne by those ratepayers not receiving them.  Therefore an adjustment will be made to the 2014/2015 budgeted rates requirement for the purpose of calculating the rates increase proposed for 2015/2016.