I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 12 December 2017

5.00pm

Totara Room, Level 1

Manukau Civic Annex
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lotu Fuli

 

Deputy Chairperson

Ross Robertson, QSO, JP

 

Members

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

 

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

 

Mary Gush

 

 

Donna Lee

 

 

Dawn Trenberth

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carmen Fernandes

Democracy Advisor

 

6 December 2017

 

Contact Telephone: 09 2618498

Email: carmen.fernandes@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Presentation - Papatoetoe Historical Society                                                   5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Presentation - Upper North Island Scouts New Zealand                                6

9.2     Presentation - Willie's Boxing Fitness                                                               6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Manukau Ward Councillors Update                                                                            7

13        Board Members' Report                                                                                               9

14        Chairperson's Announcements                                                                                 11

15        Auckland Transport Update – December 2017 to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board                                                                                                                                       13

16        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Round Two 2017/2018 grant applications   19

17        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Pal Construction 2014 Ltd at 18 Lambie Drive, Manukau Central                                                                            73

18        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Open Space Network Plan                                                          77

19        Hayman Park stage one development design                                                          81

20        10-year Budget 2018-2028 consultation                                                                    93

21        Eye on Nature- Manukau Beautification Trust                                                       101

22        Decision-making allocation update                                                                         103

23        LB feedback on Rates remission and postponement policy review                   121

24        Revising the Local Board Standing Orders                                                           155

25        Regional Facilities Auckland first quarter report for 2017/2018 financial year  233

26        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                                  255

27        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     271  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

29        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               275

23        LB feedback on Rates remission and postponement policy review

d.      List of all community and sporting remissions by local board area          275  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

An apology from Chairperson L Fuli has been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 November 2017,  as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Presentation - Papatoetoe Historical Society

Jenny Clark and Gary Troup of the Papapteotoe Historical Society will make a presentation to the Board which will include a brief update of the society’s activities this year and planning for the Papatoetoe Town Hall Centenary on 27 February 2018.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thank Jenny Clark and Gary Troup for their presentation on behalf of the Papatoetoe Historical Society.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Presentation - Upper North Island Scouts New Zealand

Carol Chamley, Regional Development Officer, Upper North Island Scouts NZ – One Team will make a presentation to the Board on South Auckland Growth Initiative 2017-18.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thank Carol Chamley, Regional Development Officer, Upper North Island Scouts NZ – One Team for her presentation.

 

9.2       Presentation - Willie's Boxing Fitness

Mets Matutu of Willie’s Boxing Otara wants to thank the Board for the grants received through the Community Grants and introduce Willie’s Boxing Otara and the work they do.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thank Mets Matutu of Willie’s Boxing Otara for his presentation.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

There were no notices of motion.

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Manukau Ward Councillors Update

File No.: CP2017/25823

 

  

 

Executive Summary

A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Board Members' Report

 

File No.: CP2017/25824

 

  

 

Purpose

Providing Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the Board Members’ written and verbal reports.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

File No.: CP2017/25825

 

  

 

Executive Summary

This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the Chairperson’s verbal update.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – December 2017 to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

File No.: CP2017/25906

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report:

a)      Provides an update on the current status of Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF),

b)      Responds to resolutions and requests on transport-related matters,

c)      Provides transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board (OPLB) and its community.

Executive summary

2.       In particular, this report covers:

a)   Progress on the current LBTCF projects: a streetscape upgrade of Hunters Corner, completion of the Rongomai walkway, a canopy for Ōtara Town Centre, ‘Welcome to Ōtara’ signage, Footpath upgrade on East Tāmaki Road, Ōtara Town Centre.

b)   Approval of the installation of an illuminated Welcome to Ōtara sign in East Tāmaki Road adjacent to the motorway off-ramp, and allocates $55,000 from its LBTCF for this purpose.

c)   Update on the progress of Manukau Bus Station

d)   Launch of New Network for East Auckland.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Transport update December 2017 report.

b)      approve the production and installation of an illuminated ‘Welcome to Otara’ sign and allocate $55,000 from its Local Board Transport Capital Fund for this purpose.

 

Comments

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) update:

 

Project Updates

 

Table 1: LBTCF – Current projects

Project Name

Problem or Opportunity Being Addressed

Current Status

Upgrade of Hunters Corner Streetscape

Upgrade of a degraded streetscape in Hunters Corner town centre, Papatoetoe.

‘Rough Order of Cost’ (‘ROC’) requested by the OPLB in August 2017 and currently under investigation.

A site visit was conducted on 21 November 2017 with OPLB, community members and staff to confirm scope of project.

Subject to that meeting, further work is being undertaken and findings will be reported back to the OPLB for their consideration whether to progress this project to the next stage.

Completion of Rongomai Walkway

Incomplete pathway through Rongomai Park connecting to Te Irirangi Road.

‘ROC’ requested by the OPLB in August 2017.

The estimate for this project is $180,000 thousand, which allows for a 3m wide concrete path approximately 200m long.

This estimate does not include any costs for consents if earthworks are required. The OPLB are investigating alternative sources of funding to deliver this project as a community local community initiative with existing partners.

Canopy for Ōtara Town Centre

Canopy for area between Ōtara Music and Arts Centre and Fresh Gallery Ōtara.

‘ROC’ requested by the OPLB in August 2017 and currently under investigation.

Works are underway to provide OPLB with 2 options to consider. One option will be similar to the recent ‘new’ canopy and an alternate ‘simpler’ version. This will be reported back to the OPLB to consider and to determine whether to progress to the next stage in the process.

Welcome to Ōtara sign

Lack of distinctive signage identifying entry into Ōtara suburb.

‘ROC’ requested by the OPLB in August 2017.

The estimate for a new welcome sign would cost between $25,000 to $55,000 thousand dollars depending on the type and size of sign.

 

A standard sign with no illumination would be approximately $25,000 thousand with an illuminated sign costing approximately $55,000 thousand. Costs allow for all consultation, design, consent and installation.

 

The OPLB may choose to progress this project. A resolution has been proposed for the OPLB to consider in this report.

 

Footpath upgrade on the East Tāmaki Road

Grade of footpath in this area does not match upgraded footpaths in Ōtara town centre.

‘ROC’ requested by the OPLB in August 2017 and currently under investigation.

Findings will be will be reported back to the OPLB to determine whether this project will be progressed.

Financials update: Table 2

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Transport Capital Fund financial summary

Total funds available in the current political term

$1,880,041

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$0

Remaining Budget left

$1,880,041

 

Upcoming projects and activities of interest to the board

Manukau Bus Station

Figure 1 – Manukau Bus Station – Interim bus stop locations from bus stops relocated from Davies Ave and Putney Way shown in orange.

3.       The project team recently hit another major milestone this month with the relocation of the bus stops on Davies Ave and Putney Way signaling the first use of the new bus station. This will coincide with launch of Auckland Transport’s (AT) new network for East Auckland on December 10, 2017. Thes stops will be in place until the completion of the station in the 2nd quarter of 2018 when the buses will use the facilities within the new station.

4.       As part of the preparation for the new station, the Osterley Way pedestrian crossing has been removed. This will be replaced at a later stage with the pedestrian crossing to the north of its previous location.

5.       A permanent access from the carpark alongside Wiri Station road will also begin construction shortly linking the car park to Osterley Way.

6.       The Canopy installation on Davies Ave between the new station and the Manukau Institute of Manukau building/Train station is near completion, and the Putney Way upgrade, which is a Panuku sponsored project delivered by AT is also set to begin shortly.

7.       As noted earlier in this report, this project is on target to be completed on schedule in the 2nd quarter of 2018.

 


 

Regional and sub-regional projects

New Network for East Auckland

 

8.       On December 10, 2017, the New Network for East Auckland launches and brings into alignment services, which serve Howick, Botany, Pakuranga, Maraetai and Whitford, with the rest of the regions public transport services. The Southern New Network which covers Ōtara-Papatoetoe was launched last year in October 2016. The New Network will connect many of the bus services which service east Auckland with train services at Middlemore, Papatoetoe and Manukau.

Figure 2: New Network East Map

9.       One of the key changes includes a new timetable for the 380 Airport Service which is increasing in frequency to every 15 minutes all day, every day. Connections for this service can be made from East Auckland at Manukau or Papatoetoe Stations. 

10.     A local change to the 314 bus service will change in destination from Papatoetoe Station to Middlemore Station, providing a half-hourly connection between Ōtara and Middlemore, 7 days a week, and every 20 minutes at peak times.


 

Consultation

11.     AT provides Local Boards with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in this OPLB area.

12.     In the reporting period for October 2017, no projects were put forward for comment by the OPLB.            

Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions

13.     TCC decisions within the OPLB area are reported on a monthly basis. The decisions for the previous month are listed in the table below:

Table 3: TCC Decisions in October 2017

Street name

Type of Report

Nature of Restriction

Committee Decision

Wallace Road, Fitzroy Street

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Island, Give-Way, Flush Median, Edge Line

Carried

Wallace Road, Puhinui Road

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

NSAAT, Bus Stop, Bus Shelter, Traffic Island, Give-Way, Edge Line, Flush Median

Carried

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

14.     The OPLB views will be taken into account during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Māori impact statement

15.     No specific issues with regard to impacts on Māori are triggered by this report and any engagement with Māori will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Health and safety implications

16.     Health and Safety is an inherent part of all Auckland Transport projects. Any specific concerns will be covered as part of individual project reporting.

Implementation

17.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Kenneth Tuai – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Round Two 2017/2018 grant applications

 

File No.: CP2017/23852

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present applications received for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round One 2017/2018. The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants Programme 2017/2018 on 18 April 2017. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

3.       The local board is required to allocate grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of becoming the world’s most liveable city.

4.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $204,000 for the 2017/2018 financial year. A total of $15,000 has been allocated to the Pursuit of Excellence Awards, in the Arts, Community and Events work programme (CP2017/05842). Therefore a total of $189,000 is available to be allocated to community grants.

5.       A total of $166,592 has been allocated to one local grant round and one quick response round. The grant to Manukau Hope Trust (LG1813-131), allocated in Otara-Papatoetoe Local Grants Round One 2017/218 (OP/2017/178), for $4,000, has been returned, due to their ChristmasFest event not proceeding. This leaves a total of $37,408 to be allocated to the remaining grant rounds.

6.       Eighteen applications were received in quick response round two, requesting a total of $28,046 (see Attachment B).

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a.   agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round, listed in Table One

Table One:  Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Round Two applications

Application No.

Organisation Name

Project

Total Requested

QR1813-200001

Inner Wheel of Howick

Purchase of wool, materials and toiletries for babies in Middlemore Hospital.

$1000.00

QR1813-200003

Peniamina Faimasasa

Towards the “Auckland Samoa Soccer 7s” tournament on 11 November 2018 in Pakuranga.

$2500.00

QR1813-200005

Aaron Taylor Afamasaga

Towards venue hire and “Zumba” instructor fees.

$1500.00

QR1813-200008

South East Auckland Senior Citizens Association Incorporated

Towards transport to the Waitangi Treaty Grounds and accommodation in the Bay of Islands

 

$2225.00

QR1813-200009

Pasifika Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Venue hire for the Otahuhu Town Hall and materials for the weekly workshops involving 10 to 20 Kiribati women in Papatoetoe

teaching skills on how to make tibuta, a national top for Kiribati women

$1845.00

QR1813-200011

Connect The Dots Charitable Trust

Towards the cost of printing postcards for our participants for the "Making Moments " programme.

$378.00

QR1813-200012

Te Hui Amporangi ki Te Tai Tokerau Trust Board

Make and install a bar gate at the entrance to the carpark of the Early Childhood Education Centre and the Epiphany Church carpark

$1552.00

QR1813-200014

World Council of Sikh Affairs Incorporated

Towards uniforms for the Otara Indian wardens

$2000.00

QR1813-200015

Papatoetoe Gymnastics Club Incorporated

Towards four excursions and replacement of equipment and arts and craft material for the GymCity Holiday Programme from 16 April to 20 July 2018.

$1900.00

QR1813-200016

Kolmar Charitable Trust

Marketing and promotions and

venue hire for the "Have a go Day" on 24 March 2018.

$1700.00

QR1813-200018

Chanting Wheel Culture Exchange and Buddhist Charitable Organisation

Towards costs for a gardening workshop for families at the Botanical Gardens on 17 February 2018

$544.00

QR1813-200019

Papatoetoe Adolescent Christian Trust Incorporated

Towards an upgrade of the play equipment for the church grounds.

$1800.00

QR1813-200021

Te Hui Amorangi Ki Te Tai Tokerau Trust Board

Towards floodlights for the Epiphany Church carpark

$1180.00

QR1813-200022

The Kindness Institute Charitable Trust

Towards a specialist youth stress management coach to work with three marginalised young people from Otara-Papatoetoe over six months in the "Atawhai" youth program.

$2000.00

QR1813-200023

Lijun Guan

Towards venue hire and purchasing of games for the “Games are Fun” Day on 3 February 2018

$1000.00

QR1813-200024

P F Bacino Moore

Towards paint and artist fees to paint three “Chorus” boxes in Otara and Papatoetoe for the “#IAMREAL Cabinet Painting Project”

$2022.00

QR1813-200025

Deaf Wellbeing Society Incorporated

Funding towards a coordinator for the art and craft lessons at the Melville Cricket Pavilion

$1400.00

QR1813-200026

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Towards "A PAT" (A Pull Apart Torso) to help deliver Life Education's preventative health messages in local schools

$1500.00

 

 

Total

$28,046

 

Comments

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme (see Attachment A).

8.         The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will operate three quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year.  The second quick response round closed on 3 November 2017.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $204,000 for the 2017/2018 financial year. The local board amended the Arts, Community and Events work programme as follows:

That the Otara- Papatoetoe Local Board: c) amend item 342 Community grants budget “Activity description” column by adding, “Includes Pursuit of Excellence Awards ($15k). (CP2017/05842). Therefore a total of $189,000 is available to be allocated to community grants.

12.     A total of $166,592 has been allocated to one local grant round and one quick response round. The grant to Manukau Hope Trust (LG1813-131), allocated in Otara-Papatoetoe Local Grants Round One 2017/2018 (OP/2017/178), for $4,000, has been returned, due to their ChristmasFest event not proceeding. This leaves a total of $37,408 to be allocated to the remaining grant rounds.

13.     Eighteen applications were received in quick response round one, requesting a total of $28,046 (see Attachment B).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or deadline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

15.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

16.     A summary of each application, received through Quick Response Round Two, is attached, see Attachment B.

Māori impact statement

17.     The provision of community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori. As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the new community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

18.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

19.     Following the local board allocating funding for round two quick response, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Otara-Papatoetoe Community Grant Programme 2017/2018

25

b

Otara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Round Two 2017/2018 grant applications

29

     

Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Authorisers

Shane King - Operations Support Manager

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Pal Construction 2014 Ltd at 18 Lambie Drive, Manukau Central

 

File No.: CP2017/25159

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board, for a new road name for a road created by way of subdivision at 18 Lambie Drive, Manukau Central.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Sohum Place (applicant’s preferred road name), and ‘Parkash Place’ (Alternative Name 1) and ‘Uttam Place’ (Alternative Name 2) were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria.

4.       Local iwi groups were consulted on all three names but only Ngaitai-ki-Tamaki responded that they have no issue, therefore have no objection to the proposed name put forward by the Applicant. Ngati Whanaunga has agreed to provide comments but has not been able to do so to date.

5.       The name ‘Sohum Place’( Applicant’s preferred Name) proposed by the Applicant and the names “Parkash Place” (Alternative Name 1) and “Uttam Place” (Alternative Name 2)  are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the road name “Sohum Place”, proposed by the Applicant, for the new road created by way of subdivision at 18 Lambie Drive, Manukau Central while noting that ‘Parkash Place’ and ‘Uttam Place’, also meet the road naming criteria.

 

 

Comments

 

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

7.       As part of the land use and subdivision consent P47212, a new Right of Way was created to service the proposed new Lot 1 to Lot 22(inclusive) and will be the new road for this development. 

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the road created as part of the development at 18 Lambie Drive, Manukau Central. 


 

 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Sohum Place

Cultural/spiritual name, blessing world for good wealth and health.

First Alternative

Parkash Place

This means light

Second Alternative

Uttam Place

Northern Indian cultural name and it means “above all”

 

Figure One: Location and Layout of new Road

 

Decision Making

8.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

9.       The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

10.     The Applicant’s preferred road names “Sohum Place , “Parkash Place” (alternative name 1) and “Uttam Place” (alternative name 2) meet the road naming criteria as there is no duplication of the names within the Auckland Region and consultation was carried out with the Local iwi and they have no objection to the proposed names.

11.     The Applicant has chosen the suffix “Place” and it is appropriate for the road layout. 

12.     As the Applicant’s preferred name (“Sohum Place”) meets the criteria, it is recommended for consideration for approval while noting that the names proposed by the iwi (“Parkash Place” and “Uttam Place”) are also appropriate as they comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

Consideration

 

Significance of Decision

 

13.     The decision sought from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Maori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

 

Consultation

15.     The Applicant have consulted all the local iwi groups for the area, which were 11 local iwi groups and only one responded with no objection to the preferred name “Sohum Place”, “Parkash Place” (alternative name 1) and “Uttam Place” (alternative name 2).

16.     The Applicant has also obtained approval from New Zealand Post. 

 

Financial and Resourcing Implications

17.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

18.     The decision sought from the Otara – Papatoetoe Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

19.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Toakase Akoteu-Tongotongo – Intermediate Planner

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Open Space Network Plan

 

File No.: CP2017/25167

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s approval of the development of an open space network plan.

Executive summary

2.       The key purpose of the open space network plan is to inform local board open space planning, resource allocation and advocacy over a 10-year period.

3.       The objective of the network plan is to increase use, and to improve the quality, of parks and open space.

4.       The scope of work includes:

·     identifying and analysing the current performance of the open space network

·     identifying the aspirations and key moves required to improve performance of the open space network

·     identifying and prioritising local place-based actions to achieve the key moves.

5.       The target date for completion of the open space network plan is April 2018.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the scope of work for the development of an open space network plan.

 

Comments

Background

6.       The vision for Auckland is to be “a world class city where talent wants to live”. The network of Auckland’s parks and open spaces will need to continually grow and improve to support this vision.

7.       An open space network plan documents the local board’s aspirations and priorities for the future development of local parks and open spaces in response to local diversity and preferences.

8.       The Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan 2013 recommends the development of an open space network plan for all local board areas based on current state analysis and a prioritised set of actions to improve the network.

Scope of work

9.       The process for the development of a network plan involves research, investigation and planning phases as outlined in Figure 1 below. 


 

Figure 1: Open space network planning process

10.     The scope of work includes:

·     identifying and analysing the current performance of the open space network

·     identifying the aspirations and key moves required to improve performance of the open space network

·     identifying and prioritising local place-based actions to achieve the key moves.

11.     Within scope are all local board controlled and managed outdoor public spaces including parks and open spaces, greenways and outdoor civic areas.

12.     Out of scope are reserve management plans, regional parks, maunga, recreation facilities including stadiums, pools, indoor courts and cemeteries.

13.     The target date for completion of the open space network plan is April 2018.

Financial Implications

14.     The budget for the above scope of work is funded by Community and Social Policy.

15.     No funding has been allocated for public consultation on the development of the network plan. This is because the plan informs local board decision-making and there is no statutory requirement to involve the public at this stage. Public consultation typically takes place prior to the development of any parks.

16.     Local Board funding will need to be allocated if public consultation is sought during the development of the network plan.

17.     No additional budget is provided for the implementation of the open space network plan. Local boards need to operate within existing budget allocations or advocate for additional funding through Annual and Long-term Plan processes.

Next steps

18.     Two workshops seeking the Local Board’s views have been arranged for February and April 2018.


 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

19.     Staff presented the current state of the open space network and draft key moves at a workshop with the Local Board on 5 December 2017.

20.     Staff will continue to engage with the Local Board on the development of the plan through further workshops.

Māori impact statement

21.     The provision of quality parks and open spaces help facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

22.     The first mana whenua engagement was undertaken on 27 September 2017. The key issues raised by iwi are outlined below.

·    Ngāti Maru recommends that urban intensification should be a high priority. Separate grounds should be allocated to sport clubs and community facilities. Further recommendations included the promotion of park utilisation through schools.

·    Ngāti Tamaoho expressed the need for vegetative swales and rain garden systems as sustainable methods for stormwater management. Carparks are the source of pollutants into our streams. All park maintenance activities should include budgets to install rain garden systems.

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua recommends signage for storytelling and to capture the cultural significance of the local board area. Parks plans and documents should attempt to incorporate the Te Aranga design process. Safety benchmarks should exist in the Southern Initiative area. Final recommendations included the development of multi-use parks with play provision that caters to all ages and abilities. 

23.     A second mana whenua workshop is scheduled for 20 February 2018.

Implementation

24.     Once the network plan has been completed, actions will be developed with identified resource requirements across a 10-year period.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Jacqueline  Faamatuainu - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Hayman Park stage one development design

 

File No.: CP2017/25410

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for the developed design for stage one of the development of Hayman Park and the removal of the existing tile maze. 

Executive summary

2.       The developed design for Hayman Park stage one is completed. It requires local board approval to enable the physical works phase of the project to commence.

3.       The design was presented and discussed at a workshop held on 28 November 2017 where the local board indicated their general support. 

4.       Staff recommend that the local board approve the developed design for Hayman Park stage one, including the removal of the existing tile maze, as it will enable the provision of play facilities to support growth and transformation in the Manukau area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the developed design (attachment A) for implementation of  stage one of the development of Hayman Park.

b)      approve the removal of the tile maze in Hayman Park.

Comments

5.       The development of Hayman Park, identified in Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2017, will provide a much improved public open space for the residential growth in the centre of Manukau.

6.       The provision of a new destination playground is consistent with the Open Space Network Provision Policy as it will provide an appropriate level of service to an area currently lacking in a wide variety of different types of play opportunities. The destination playground will cater for a wide range of age groups, abilities, and the accompanying families.

7.       The development of Hayman Park is based on the winning design in a national competition held in 2010. The competition concept plan was approved by the local board in 2011 (OP/2011/155).

8.       Hayman Park stage one development was approved by the local board in June 2017 as part of the 2017-2020 Community Facilities capital works programme (OP/2017/97).

9.       Due to the scale of the Hayman Park development project it will be completed in two stages. Stage one focuses on the active play areas and is itself split into two phases: 

i)    Phase one: The scope includes the shelter, kiosk and accessible toilets, plaza, play spaces for 0-4 year-olds, a half ball court, and related pathways.

ii)   Phase two: The scope includes the larger play spaces for 5-12 year olds, the hakari play tower, a double flying fox, the pump track, the flow bowl and completion of the path network.

10.     The earthworks for both phases will be completed at the same time. The scope will include the removal of the tile maze, as discussed at the local board workshops held on 24 August 2016 and 28 November 2017.

11.     Capital growth funding of $4 million will cover the cost of the detailed design and earthworks for both phases and the construction of phase one amenities.

12.     The completion of the phase two will require additional funding to be provided by Panuku. Panuku have indicated funding will be available in the next financial year subject to a favourable outcome from their internal business case process.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     The local board indicated their support for the developed design during a workshop held on 28 November 2017.

14.     Local boards have the allocated decision-making authority for development plans for local capital works.

15.     The recommendation supports the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Manukau Transformation.

Māori impact statement

16.     The design for the playground acknowledges its location in the heart of Manukau, a focus of Māori and Pasifika cultures. It features a bespoke tower structure based on the traditional hakiri and has an emphasis on natural play amongst the trees.

Implementation

17.     The developed design will be progressed to detailed design and tender documentation.

18.     The earthworks for both phases and the removal of the tile maze will be tendered at the same time.

19.     The construction contract for phase one and the earthworks is scheduled for award in April 2018.

PLEASE CHANGE AUTHOR TO: Lucy Ullrich - Growth Development Specialist

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hayman Park stage one development design presentation.

85

     

Signatories

Authors

Lucy Ullrich – Growth Development Specialist

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Community Relations

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

10-year Budget 2018-2028 consultation

 

File No.: CP2017/25897

 

  

Purpose

1.       To agree local engagement events, and adopt local content and supporting information for consultation as part of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 process.

Executive summary

2.       Consultation on the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 (long-term plan) will take place from 28 February – 28 March 2018. Local boards will be consulting on their areas of focus and advocacy for their 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. The Local Board Agreement is part of the budget setting process for the first year of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

3.       There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Plan Refresh (APR), Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP), Regional Pest Management Plan (RPMP) and the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP). 

4.       This report seeks agreement from local boards on spoken interaction events that will be held in their local board area during the consultation period and to adopt their local content and supporting information for consultation, including:

·    areas of focus for 2018/2019

·    the key advocacy project.

5.       The governing body will agree regional items for consultation on 11 December and local boards will agree their items by 14 December. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the consultation document and supporting information, which will be adopted by the governing body on 7 February 2018.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Agree, subject to approval by the governing body, to hold the following spoken interaction events during the consultation period:

i)        Have Your Say – Manukau 13 March 2018

ii)       Drop in Session – Papatoetoe 19 March 2018

iii)      Drop in Session  – Ōtara  21 March 2018

iv)      An additional drop in session, if required, date and details at the discretion of the Chair.

b)      Delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through “spoken/NZ sign language interaction” in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events during the consultation period for the 10-year Budget 2018-2028:

i)        Local Board Members and Chair

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Chief Financial Officer

c)      Adopt Attachment A local content for consultation and Attachment B local supporting information for consultation, including their key advocacy project.

d)      Propose to consult on funding of adult entry to swimming pools without charge, through a local targeted rate of $29.94 per household in 2018-2019.

e)      Delegate authority to the local board chair to approve any final minor changes required following review by council’s legal team and/or Audit NZ, of the local consultation content for the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 prior to publication, including online consultation content, and should any changes be made they are to be reported to the next business meeting.

Comments

6.       The 10-year Budget sets out the priorities and funding for council activities that are planned over a 10-year period. It includes financial and non-financial information for the whole Auckland Council group. The Long-term Plan is reviewed and consulted on every three years.

7.       As part of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 process, the council is required to produce a consultation document. This will cover any significant or important issues proposed to be included in the 10-year Budget 2018-2028. The consultation document and supporting information will also include information on local board issues and priorities. 

8.       As part of the consultation on the 10-year Budget 2018-2028, local boards will consider and be consulting on their areas of focus and advocacy for their 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. The Local Board Agreement is part of the budget setting process for the first year of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

9.       Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 will take place from 28 February – 28 March 2018.There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Plan Refresh (APR), Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP), Regional Pest Management Plan (RPMP) and the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP).   

10.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation process through a variety of channels which include verbal (or face to face), written, social media and digital. A report on how council will receive verbal feedback from the public was considered by the Finance and Performance Committee on 21 November 2017. At a high level, the report outlines several different types of events which are planned for specific audiences and communities as well as those planned for general Auckland residents. At that meeting, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to:

a)   approve the approach…to receive all feedback from Aucklanders on the Long-term Plan and Auckland Plan from 28 February 2018 to 28 March 2018 comprising of:

·    up to 25 Have Your Say events targeting general Auckland residents are held in local board areas across the region;

·    four regional stakeholder events (traditional hearing style);

·    an independently commissioned quantitative survey;

·    community specific events to collect feedback from different demographic and interest groups. Demographic events will target Youth, Seniors, Pacific, Ethnic, Rainbow and Disability communities;

·    hui with mana whenua and mataawaka.

and

c)   require the Mayor and Councillors to attend a minimum of three Have Your Say events each to hear the views of Aucklanders and all regional stakeholder events.

11.     The final consultation process for the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 will be approved by the governing body on 7 February 2018.

12.     Spoken interaction constitutes any opportunity where Aucklanders have a dialogue with decision makers or their official delegations on the themes relating to the consultation. The spoken interaction events recommended to be held in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area are:

·    Have Your Say – Manukau 13 March 2018

·    Drop in Session – Papatoetoe 19 March 2018

·    Drop in Session  – Ōtara  21 March 2018

·    An additional drop in session, if required, date and details at the discretion of the Chair.

 

13.     The possible additional drop in session was discussed by board members at a workshop on 6 December 2017.  It was considered that this might be needed if earlier engagement events proved to be unsuccessful.  Venues for an additional session suggested were Tuku library or Kolmar multisport facility, on a Saturday.  The session could target any communities that were under represented at earlier events.

14.     Local boards are requested to agree their key priorities and key advocacy project for 2018/2019 and adopt their local content and supporting information for consultation, as attached in Attachments A and B.

15.     Any new local BID targeted rates must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are therefore also requested to agree any new proposals for consultation.

16.     The board is proposing to continue its policy enabling adults to use the Ōtara and Papatoetoe swimming pools without charge.  The rationale is that the board considers that the use of swimming pools delivers important social and public health benefits.  As in the past two financial years, the board proposes to fund this policy through a targeted rate on residential properties.  This year the targeted rate is estimated to be $29.94 per household.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     Local board decisions are being sought in this report.

18.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as council progresses through the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 process.

Māori impact statement

19.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were adopted in September and October of 2017, form the basis for local priorities.

20.     Bespoke consultation materials for the Māori community are being developed. These materials will explain how the LTP and APR are relevant for them. Engagement advisors will have access to this collateral to support local engagement.

21.     Specific regionally supported local engagement with Māori is being targeted for south and west Auckland.

22.     An integrated approach to mana whenua engagement is being taken, with LTP and APR discussions already happening through the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.

23.     There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Implementation

24.     The governing body will approve the consultation document, supporting information and consultation process for the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 on 7 February 2018.

25.     Following consultation, the governing body and local boards will make decisions on the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 and Local Board Agreements 2018/19 respectively.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

OPLB Consultation document

99

b

OPLB Supporting Information

101

     

Signatories

Authors

Christie  McFayden - Graduate Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Consultation document

Local board priorities

1.            This section sets out the key local priorities, including the key advocacy project, for each local board area for 2018/2019. We are seeking your feedback on whether we have got these priorities right.

2.            For more information about the priorities for your local area, please see section XX of the supporting information for this consultation document.

3.              

Local Board

Key priorities

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

·    Advocating to Auckland Transport for construction of light rail from the airport to Manukau and on to Botany, commencing with immediate route protection

·    Investing in improved sports field playing surfaces and lighting in Ōtara and Papatoetoe parks, to deal with the growth in demand for sports fields in Ōtara-Papatoetoe

·    Developing public open space at Hunters Corner shopping centre, on Sutton Crescent, to provide places for people to rest and meet.

·    Delivering free adult entry to swimming pools to secure important social and public health benefits.  The board is proposing to continue to pay for this through a targeted rate, estimated at $29.94 per household in 2018-2019.

·    Key advocacy project:  advocating for Colin Dale Park to be recognised as a regional resource and becoming a regional park with the development costs spread across Auckland ratepayers.

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Supporting information - local board priorities

4.            Each year we plan the projects and initiatives we will deliver in your local board area. These are based on our 2017 Local Board Plan, which sets our three-year direction for the local board. We are seeking your input on our proposals for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.1 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

Message from the Chair

I am pleased to present our priorities for 2018/2019, which enables Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to continue to deliver on outcomes agreed in our 2017 Local Board Plan.

Three years ago the board made a major commitment to Colin Dale Park to complete construction of the earthworks, car-parks and driveways.  Six motorsport groups have now begun to construct their own facilities.  The board considers that it is now time for Colin Dale Park to become a regional park, funded by the whole of Auckland, recognising that with the motorsport activities established, it will be a key part of the region’s motorsport facilities. 

Our major local capital investment priorities are to develop the Ngati-Otara Park multisport complex, renew the Kingswood Reserve changing room/toilet block, and develop a new destination playground at Hayman Park.

We know that there is widespread support for these key projects.  We now want to focus feedback on some other ideas.  We want to provide public open space at Hunters Corner, on Sutton Crescent, as part of our ongoing support for our town centres.  Developing improved sports field playing surfaces and lighting is another of our goals. 

Our support for the health and wellbeing of our communities will remain strong including enabling adults to access Ōtara-Papatoetoe swimming pools at no charge, funded through a targeted rate.  We will advocate to Auckland Transport for light rail between the airport, Manukau and Botany become a reality. 

To help us set our priorities for the next few years, we need your thoughts.  Please give us you feedback to tell us if you think we are on the right track.

What we propose in your Local Board Area in 2018/2019

In 2018/2019 we plan to invest $9.71 million to renew and develop assets in your local board area and $21.06 million to maintain and operate these assets and provide other local initiatives.  We also want to promote these local initiatives:

o Advocating to Auckland Transport for construction of light rail from the airport to Manukau and on to Botany, commencing with immediate route protection

o Investing in improved sports field playing surfaces and lighting in ?tara and Papatoetoe parks, to deal with the growth in demand for sports fields in ?tara-Papatoetoe

o Developing public open space at Hunters Corner shopping centre, on Sutton Crescent, to provide places for people to rest and meet.

o Delivering free adult entry to swimming pools to secure important social and public health benefits.  The board is proposing to continue to pay for this through a targeted rate, estimated at $29.94 per household in 2018-2019.

Our key advocacy project

The local board is advocating to the governing body for Colin Dale Park to become a regional park.  Colin Dale Park is a regional resource, as a major venue for several motor sports and attracting competitors and fans from across Auckland.  It is appropriate for the costs of this facility to be spread across Auckland, rather than falling just on the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.  In practical terms, making Colin Dale Plan a regional park would mean relieving the board of future development and running costs, as well as ongoing liability for $2.8 million borrowed in the past.

What do you think?

Have we got our priorities right?

Do you support the board advocating to Auckland Transport for construction of light rail from the airport to Manukau and on to Botany, commencing with route protection?

Do you agree with investing in improved sports field playing surfaces and lighting, to deal with the growth in demand for sports fields in Ōtara-Papatoetoe?

Do you support the development of public open space at Hunters Corner shopping centre on Sutton Crescent?

Do you agree that free adult entry to swimming pools delivers important social and public health benefits?

Are there any other priorities that you would like us to consider?

Our key advocacy project: 

•           Do you support Colin Dale Park being recognised as a regional resource and becoming a regional park with the development costs spread across Auckland ratepayers?


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Eye on Nature- Manukau Beautification Trust

 

File No.: CP2017/25766

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek funding of $10,000 to go towards the 2018 Eye on Nature event.

Executive summary

2.       Eye on Nature (EON), organised by the Manukau Beatification Trust, is an annual event that the board has supported in the past. The event promotes sustainable practices in its activities and encourages it participants to make a lifestyle change towards sustainable behaviours at home and school.

3.       The theme for the 2018 EON is ‘Nurturing our Forests Together’ Whakatipuria to Tātou Waonui ā Tāne ngātahi ai, and explores the importance of the many life forms in the forest, the natural compost floor, healthy trees, native life, pests, predators and how it all intricately works together.

4.       The event will be held April 10th-12th April 2018 hosting around 500 students from 48 different schools. Ten of these schools are within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board area.

5.       Funding has been requested to cover three educational school days, infrastructure for the event, competition prizes and entertainment.

6.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is one of six local boards (Howick, Manurewa, Franklin, Papakura and Māngere-Ōtāhuhu) that will be contributing to EON. Financial contributions from other boards vary between $12000 and $5000 respectively.

7.       Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has supported EON for a number of years.  The Manukau Beatification Trust has regularly reported back to the board on the outcomes.  The trust is a CCO of council, so is unable to apply to the board for a community grant.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board approve $10,000 from the Community Response Fund to the Manukau Beatification Charitable Trust Eye on Nature event for 2018.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Albert Scott - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Decision-making allocation update

 

File No.: CP2017/25835

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report seeks local board input on the allocation of non-regulatory decision-making as part of the 10 Year Budget 2018-2028.

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires the Governing Body to allocate decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities either to the Governing Body or to local boards. This must be undertaken in accordance with certain legislative principles and after considering the views and preferences of each local board. There is a presumption that local boards will be responsible for making decisions on non-regulatory activities except where decision-making on a region-wide basis will better promote the wellbeing of communities across Auckland because certain criteria are satisfied.

3.       Each long-term plan and annual plan must identify the non-regulatory activities allocated to local boards.

4.       A significant review of this decision-making allocation was undertaken during the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan (LTP) cycle. The allocation was also recently considered during the Governance Framework Review over the period 2016-2017. A comprehensive review is thus not being undertaken this LTP cycle.

5.       One substantive change to the allocation is proposed in order to implement a policy decision from the Governance Framework Review: allocating certain local service property optimisation decisions to local boards. There are various other minor wording amendments in order to improve clarity and consistency.

6.       Local board feedback is sought on this proposed allocation. It will be considered by the Governing Body during its adoption of the 10 Year Budget 2018-2028.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      endorse the proposed allocation of non-regulatory decision-making as attached to this report.

Comments

Background

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 sets out the functions and powers of the Governing Body and local boards. Local board functions and powers come from three sources:

·        those directly conferred by the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009;

·        non-regulatory activities allocated by the Governing Body to local boards;

·        regulatory or non-regulatory functions and powers delegated by the Governing Body or Auckland Transport to the local boards.

8.       The Auckland Transition Agency (ATA) was given the task of determining the initial allocation of the council’s non-regulatory activities using the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 (the Auckland Council Act). In undertaking this exercise, the question considered by ATA was not “why should the activity be allocated to local boards?” but “why not?” This was in line with the Auckland Council Act.

9.       The non-regulatory decision-making allocation has been reviewed twice since the ATA first developed it, as part of the Long-term Plan 2012-2022 and the Long-term Plan 2015-2025.The current non-regulatory decision-making allocation was determined as part of the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan. It is written on an inclusive basis; it does not contain an exhaustive list of all elements that might make up an allocated activity.

10.     A significant review of the allocation was undertaken during the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan. The review concluded that a number of clarifications and text changes were required but no substantive changes were needed to the allocated responsibilities. The review also concluded that the then allocation had worked well and there had been a growing understanding and increasing sophistication of how to use it.

11.     The 2016 independent Governance Framework Review report also considered the decision-making allocation as part of the respective roles of the Governing Body and local boards, and what is working well and not working well in Auckland Council’s governance. As with the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 review the Governance Framework Review found that the current allocation is well understood, sensible, and generally works well. It did recommend that one minor technical change be made to the allocation to more accurately describe the current practical limitations of local board roles in park acquisitions. Further analysis and consultation demonstrated that this recommended change was not necessary.

12.     In responding to the Governance Framework Review report and considering how local boards could be further empowered, the Governing Body decided on a policy change that requires the allocation table to be amended. This is described below.

13.     Local boards were extensively consulted during the Governance Framework review.

14.     Due to the recent timing of the Governance Framework Review and the consideration of the allocation of non-regulatory decision-making as part of it, no comprehensive review of the allocation table is being undertaken this Long-term Plan cycle.

15.     The Governance Framework Review did identify other decision-making opportunities for local boards, e.g. around service levels. No change is required to the allocation table to provide for this; local boards already have the necessary responsibilities allocated to them. Rather the organisation needs to be in a position to provide local boards with quality advice when making those decisions.

Summary of proposed amendments

16.     The current allocation with proposed amendments is attached as Attachment A.

17.     The only substantive amendment to the allocation is to allocate decision-making for disposal of local service properties and reinvestment of sale proceeds to local boards where this falls within the service property optimisation policy. This policy was adopted in 2015 by the Governing Body and sets out the purpose and principles for optimisation of underperforming or underutilised service property. A key element is that sale proceeds from underperforming service property are locally reinvested to advance approved projects or activities on a cost neutral basis.

18.     Under the current allocation the Governing Body makes the final decision on disposal and acquisition of all property assets, including local service properties that may be optimised.  Through the Governance Framework Review process the Governing Body agreed that these local service property optimisation decisions should be made by local boards.[1] This amendment to the allocation implements this decision. This issue was canvassed with local boards during consultation on the Governance Framework Review and they were supportive of local boards holding this decision-making.

19.     The current allocation has one specific allocation for the Governing Body on acquisition and disposals - ‘acquisition and divestment of all park land, including the disposal of surplus parks.’ This was introduced to the allocation table in 2012 to provide clarity of decision-making responsibility in this space. This allocation would conflict with the new allocation given to local boards (disposal and reinvestment of property assets in line with the Service Property Optimisation Policy). In order to retain clarity an amendment has been made to the parks allocation to make it clear that the Governing Body’s responsibility for acquisition and divestment of parks does not apply in the case of the Service Property Optimisation Policy applying.

20.     Other minor changes to wording include:

·        Amending ‘Auckland-wide’ to ‘regional’ in several instances to maintain consistency throughout the allocation table.

·        Updating various names (such as Panuku Development Auckland and various parks and maunga) to bring them into line with Auckland Council style.

·        Updating descriptions of governance arrangements for several reserves to more accurately describe the current arrangements.

·        Renaming themes and activity groups to bring them in to line with the new LTP nomenclature.

·        Updating the planning language to bring it in line with Auckland Plan refresh nomenclature.

21.     Whilst not part of the allocation of decision-making, the preamble to the allocation table that describes what powers have been delegated to local boards has also been updated to note the recent decision to delegate certain Reserves Act powers to local boards. This delegation was an outcome of the Governance Framework Review.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

22.     Local board views on the proposed allocation are being sought via this report.

23.     There was extensive consultation with local boards about their decision-making roles and powers during the Governance Framework Review. This included:

·        workshops with each local board during the independent review phase;

·        workshops and one business meeting with each local board during the response phase.

24.     The review found that the allocation table was generally working well and no substantive changes to the allocation were recommended. This was specifically discussed with local boards during workshops. Feedback from local boards was generally supportive of this position.

Māori impact statement

25.     There are no particular impacts to Maori in relation to this report.

Implementation

26.     As the changes proposed to the decision-making allocation are not significant it is not necessary to publicly consult on them. Local board feedback will be reported to the Governing Body in 2018. Changes to the allocation would come into effect on 1 July 2018.


 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed Allocation of Decision-Making Responsibility for Non-Regulatory Activities

109

     

Signatories

Authors

James Liddell - Portfolio Manager

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

LB feedback on Rates remission and postponement policy review

 

File No.: CP2017/25867

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Seek preliminary feedback from local boards on the review of the rates remission and postponement policy and in particular the legacy schemes. Feedback will be considered by Finance and Performance Committee when agreeing a rates remission and postponement policy, and any options, for consultation.

Executive summary

2.       The council is required to review its rates remission and postponement policy every six years.

3.       Rates remissions are a reduction in rates, usually by a set percentage. Rates postponement defers the payment of rates to a future point in time, usually the sale of the property.

4.       The current policy includes six regional schemes and eleven legacy schemes inherited from the former councils that are only available within the former districts. Only minor changes are proposed to the regional schemes.

5.       Officers recommend Option 1 that the legacy schemes (excluding the postponement for Manukau sports clubs) be replaced with grants because:

·    funding decisions are more transparent

·    spending for each activity is within an annual budget

·    level of support for each organisation is more visible.

6.       A three year transition is proposed for current recipients during which they will receive their current funding via a grant. At the end of transition they would need to apply for renewal.

7.         Current legacy remissions and postponements funding would move to grant budgets:

a)   regional grants programmes: remissions for natural heritage and community/sporting remissions for regional/sub-regional facilities

b)   local board grants programmes: all other legacy remissions in the relevant area and the Great Barrier Island postponements.

8.       Each board will be funded to provide the same level of grants as is presently provided in b) above. After three years boards can choose to continue the grants if they wish. While some boards will get more funding than others, this will be smoothed over time by the local board funding policy.

Alternative options

9.         The other three options were considered and rejected because:

·    Option 2: keeping the current remissions schemes is inequitable

·    Option 3: extending the remissions in their current form is costly and does not provide the same level of transparency and oversight as is achieved with grants

·    Option 4: removing the schemes with no replacement could present some ratepayers/community groups with affordability issues.

10.     Local boards’ feedback on the review will be included in the report to the Finance and Performance Committee in February 2018. Public consultation on the proposed Rates remission and postponement policy and any options will occur in April 2018. Local boards will be able to consider public feedback, and provide their formal views on the proposed policy at their May meetings. Local board and public feedback will be reported to the 31 May 2018 meeting of the Finance and Performance Committee when the adoption of the policy will be considered.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      resolve feedback on the options to address the legacy council remission and postponement schemes.

 

 

Comments

11.       The current Rates remission and postponement policy includes:

·    6 regional schemes available to all ratepayers with the objectives to:

provide ratepayers with some financial or other assistance where they might otherwise have difficulty meeting their obligations

address circumstances where the rating system results in anomalies in the incidence of rates.

·    11 legacy schemes supporting community objectives set by the former councils and only available in some areas:

five remission schemes for natural and in some cases historic heritage

six remission schemes for community and sporting organisations

a rates postponement scheme for sports clubs in Manukau

a rates postponement scheme for businesses on Great Barrier Island.

12.     A summary of the regional and legacy schemes and the amount of remission or postponement granted in 2016/2017 is in Attachment A. The full rates remission and postponement policy is in Attachment B.

Assessment of Regional Schemes

13.     Officers have reviewed the regional schemes and identified that the schemes are operating in accordance with expectations. The only amendment proposed to the regional schemes is to simplify the remission scheme for rates penalties. This amendment will be designed to maintain ratepayers’ existing level of access to penalty remissions. 

Assessment of Legacy Schemes

14.       Four options were considered for the legacy schemes:

1.   integrate with grants schemes with three year transition for current recipients

2.   retain the status quo

3.   extend to entire region

4.   remove.

15.       A summary of the options can be found in Table 1 at the end of this report.

16.     The following criteria were used to assess options for the legacy remissions and postponements policies.

·    equity – same treatment for all ratepayers in all areas across Auckland

·    transparency

·    cost

·    minimise the effects of change

·    administrative simplicity.


 

 

Option 1: Integrate remissions and postponements with grants schemes with three year transition (excluding the Manukau postponement scheme for sports clubs)

17. This option would remove the present remission and postponement schemes.  Up to the current amount equivalent of the 2018/2019 remission would be transferred to grants expenditure in the relevant areas over the next three years.  The amount of grants will be adjusted for the increase in rates in the subsequent two years.

18. This option will increase the council’s grants and other budget lines by $900,000. This increase is offset by the increase in rates revenue of $900,000 resulting from remissions no longer being applied. There is no net cost to ratepayers of converting rates remissions to grants.

 

Allocating grants

19.       Integration of remissions into wider regional, or local, grants schemes is preferable because:

·    allocation of rates expenditure will be transparent

·    spending via grants is public and assessed against other comparable demands on public money in terms of efficacy. Value for money is regularly assessed.

·    administrative systems for grants are already in place although there will be a change in volume

·    proposed transition will result in no change for recipients over the three years

·    regional equity will be achieved over time as the legacy grants are integrated into the wider grants programme

·    enables equity between community organisations that own land and those that do not.

20.     Legacy schemes have been assessed against local and regional responsibilities. From this it is proposed that grants budgets be allocated as follows:

Remission/Postponement  For

Aligns with

Grant allocates to

Natural heritage

Regional

Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grants Programme 

Historic Heritage

Regional

Regional Historic Heritage Grants Programme

Regional or sub-regional sports facilities

Regional

Regional Sports and Recreation Grants Programme

Local sports clubs and facilities

Local

Local Board where property receiving remission is located

Regional or sub-regional community facilities

Regional

Regional Community Development Grants programmes  

Local community organisations and facilities

Local

Local Board where property receiving remission is located

Great Barrier businesses

Local

Great Barrier Local Board

21.     Remissions for community and sporting organisations have been split between Regional and Local based on the area served by the property receiving the remission. For example, Eden Park, St John’s ambulance stations, IHC care homes and the SPCA have been classed as regional. Remissions for the Scouts Association and Plunket NZ have been classed as local because they relate to local scout halls and Plunket centres.

22.     The value of remissions by local board area can be found in Attachment C. A list of all community and sporting remissions by local board showing the ratepayer and amount of remission, can be found in Attachment D.

Three Year Transition

23.     The relevant decision maker, e.g. the Governing Body Committee for regional grants, and local boards for local grants, would be required to provide a grant to the level of the existing remission for a period of three years. The present recipient would therefore be protected from any change to their current funding for that period. At the end of the three years the decision maker can then decide whether to continue the grants on the existing basis or release the funds to the wider grants pool.

Option 2: Retain the status quo

24.     This option would retain the remissions and postponement schemes in their current form in the former council areas. Properties in other parts of the region would not be able to apply for them

25.     This option is administratively simple for the council and recipients. It minimises change. Costs will depend on applications but have been relatively stable over time. The options is not equitable because the schemes are only available to ratepayers in some areas.

26.     Rates remissions and postponements are not a transparent mechanism for supporting wider council goals because they:

·    are recorded as a charge against revenue

·    do not appear as a cost in the councils accounts

·    do not increase the rates requirement and hence do not impact the headline rates increase[2] (They still increase the rates burden on other ratepayers)

·    are not prioritised against other expenditure proposals or subject to the same value for money scrutiny.

Option 3: Extend to entire region

27.     This option would extend the current policies to apply to the entire Auckland Council area. Extending the policies in their current form is equitable, and simplifies administration. However this option:

·    increases costs to ratepayers without being compared to other council proposals that may offer greater benefits

·    lacks evidence as to how much benefit will be returned by this investment

·    is not transparent as described in Option 2 above.

28.     The cost of extending existing legacy remission schemes regionally will depend on the criteria for eligibility. Costs for extending the current remission schemes have been estimated at $4.5 - $6 million as follows:

·    Extending remission for natural heritage to properties with a covenant managed by the Queen Elizabeth the Second Trust: $40,000. There are just over 100 properties in Auckland with a QEII covenant. If the criteria is extended to include other types of covenant, such as a covenant with a council, then the number of eligible properties will increase significantly. For example there are 4,500 properties with a bush-lot covenant from Rodney Council.

·    Extending remissions for historic heritage: $3 million. This is derived from the rates for properties that are scheduled Category A in the Auckland Unitary Plan, where the status is associated with a building. This ignores archaeological sites such as middens and pa, but will capture the whole value of properties where the heritage status only applies to part of the property.

·    Extending remissions for community and sporting organisations: $1.5 million for 50 per cent remission to $3 million for 100 per cent remission. This is estimated by applying a full remission to properties currently receiving a five per cent remission for the Auckland Regional Council scheme for community and sporting organisations. This is likely to under estimate the value of remissions, as offering a more generous remission is likely to significantly increase the number of applicants.

Option 4: Remove the schemes

29.     Removing the schemes would lead to immediate financial impacts for a number of organisations presently receiving support from council.  While the sums remitted are in many cases small, it is not clear that all the current recipients would be able to adequately accommodate change in a short time period. 

Postponement for sports clubs in the district of the previous Manukau City Council

30.     It is not recommended that the rates postponements for Manukau Sports clubs be converted to remission. This is because the postponement is currently set to be cost neutral. This is achieved by interest being charged, and by the postponement being secured against the title of the property. The council can require the full amount of postponed rates and interest be paid before any sale of the property can proceed. It would not be effective or efficient to try and replicate the postponement through a grants process.

31.     The clubs are accruing a major liability against their land under this scheme. The total current liability including interest is $880,000. If the policy is not changed then rates will continue to accrue as the rates are never remitted. While the postponements are cost-neutral when they end, in the meantime they represent a significant debt liability at a time when the council is debt constrained. For this reason officers prefer that the schemes be removed after a suitable transition period. (The outstanding liability at the time the scheme is removed would remain a liability on the land until its sale or transfer of ownership.)

32.     The two clubs receiving the postponement are zoned for residential development. Both clubs have significant (around 240%) increases in capital valuation following changes in zoning under the unitary plan. One club has repaid a portion of its liability following the sale of part of the property, and has chosen to pay rather than postpone the current year’s rates.

33.     Officers propose to do further work to understand the individual circumstances of these two golf courses before developing formal recommendation and options for addressing this postponement scheme. Next steps and a timeline for actions will be included in the report to the February Finance and Performance Committee.

Next Steps

34.     Preliminary feedback from local boards will be attached to the report to the February Finance and Performance Committee. The committee will agree a Rates remission and postponement policy, and any options, for consultation.

35.     Public consultation will occur in April. All current recipients of the legacy rates remission and postponement schemes will be notified of any proposed changes to enable them to submit feedback.

36.     Local boards will be able to consider the results of the public consultation, and provide formal feedback on the proposed policy, at their May meetings. 

37.     The Finance and Performance Committee will consider feedback from the public and local boards and adopt a final Rates remission and postponement policy by 31 May 2018. This enables the council’s budgets to be updated for the adoption of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

 


 

Table 1: Review of the rates remission and postponement policy: Options for legacy remission and postponement schemes

Option

Description

Pros

Cons

Implementation

Option 1: Integrate with grants schemes

 

·  Legacy remission and postponements schemes (excluding MCC postponement for sports clubs) transfer to regional or local grants schemes.

·  Three year transition – same level of support given as provided in remission or postponement

·  Increased transparency and accountability – grants assessed for value for money

·  Can cap costs

·  No change for three years for current recipients – time to adjust

·  Greater flexibility in application – not restricted to organisations that own land, level of support can reflect outcomes not property rates

·  Reduced rates administration

·  Increased grants administration

·  Administrative systems already in place for grants

·  Increase in grants volume

Option 2: Retain the status quo

 

·      Legacy remission and postponements schemes continue unchanged

·  Minimises change

·  Inequitable – only available in some areas, and only available to groups that own land

·  Lacks transparency – spending not reviewed against other council priorities

·  No cap on costs

·  No change to current processes

Option 3: Extend to entire region

 

·  Schemes expanded to regional schemes. Costs will depend on the criteria applied

·  Increases equity across the region

·  Cost – estimated at $4.5m to $6m

·  No cap on costs

·  Lacks transparency – spending not reviewed against other council priorities

·  Lack of evidence this would improve outcomes

·  Only available to groups that own property

·  Increases volume of remissions to process

Option 4: Remove the schemes

·  Legacy schemes removed without transition

·  $700,000 reduction in cost of rates for 2018/2019

·  No time for recipients to adjust

·  Reduces rates administration

Consideration

Local board views and implications

38.     Implications for local boards are set out in the report. Under the proposal boards will be provided with additional funding to maintain the existing level of support for local community and sports groups in their board area that currently receive remissions.  However, local boards will have more grant applications to appraise in the future and potentially more decisions to make at the end of the three year transition.

39.     This report seeks feedback from Local Boards to inform the consideration of this issue by the Finance and Performance Committee in February.

Māori impact statement                          

40.     None of the properties presently receiving remissions or postponements under the legacy schemes are known to be Māori owned or operated.

41.     The only reference to Māori in the legacy remission and postponement schemes is the provision for remissions for Māori reservations in the Rodney District. No properties applied under this criterion. Such properties would be eligible for remission under the Council’s Māori freehold land rates remission and postponement policy. The Council is not required to review its MFL rates remission and postponement policy until 2019. No changes are proposed for this policy.

42.     Under the principles for the Community Grants Policy, all grants programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori outcomes.

Implementation

43.     Differences in implementation for each of the options are set out in Table 1 above.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of Auckland Council Rates Remission and Postponement Policy Schemes

131

b

Rates Remission and Postponement Policy

137

c

Value of legacy schemes by local board area

155

d

List of all community and sporting remissions by local board area - Confidential

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Beth Sullivan - Principal Advisor Policy

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - Acting General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Revising the Local Board Standing Orders

 

File No.: CP2017/25596

 

  

Purpose

1.       To consider and adopt revised Standing Orders for local board meetings.

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders are the rules for conduct and procedure at meetings. They are used to help meetings run smoothly and in accordance with relevant legislation, to ensure the integrity of the decision-making process, and to help elected members and members of the public understand how they can participate.

3.       The current local board Standing Orders (SOs) were set by the Auckland Transition Agency on 27 October 2010. It is now timely to revise them to ensure they remain a clear, relevant and practical tool for local board meetings. 

4.       At its meeting on 28 May 2015, the Governing Body resolved to amend its Standing Orders on the basis of work undertaken by a political working party.

5.       The revised Standing Orders have a simplified layout, are written in a plain language style, and contain a summary and process diagram at the front for ease of reference during a meeting. 

6.       A working group of Democracy Advisors has assessed each provision of the current (generic) local board Standing Orders against the corresponding revised governing body Standing Orders. For each local board standing order they considered whether to retain the current wording, use the revised Governing Body wording or to have a combination of the two.

7.       A draft set of revised local board Standing Orders is set out in Attachment A for local boards’ consideration. It is based on the recommendations of the Democracy Advisor working group and follows the revised Governing Body Standing Orders in terms of style. 

8.       The more significant suggested changes include new provisions for electronic attendance at meetings, dealing with conflicts due to the non-financial interests of members, processes for Governing Body and Māori input and enabling use of New Zealand Sign Language at meetings.

9.       This report recommends that local boards consider and adopt the revised Standing Orders in Attachment A.

10.     Any changes to a boards Standing Orders requires a majority vote of not less than 75% of members present.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      adopt the standing orders detailed in Attachment A to the agenda report, entitled “Auckland Council Standing Orders of the Local Board”, in replacement of its current standing orders.

 


 

Comments

Background

11.     Standing Orders are the rules for conduct and procedure at meetings. They are used to help meetings run smoothly and in accordance with relevant legislation, to ensure the integrity of the decision-making process, and to help elected members and members of the public understand how they can participate.

12.     The Governing Body Standing Orders were compiled in 2010 by the Auckland Transition Agency from legacy council standing orders and the NZ Standards Model Standing Orders.

13.     Local Board Standing Orders were modelled on the Governing Body Standing Orders.

14.     A political working party was set up in November 2013 to review the Governing Body’s Standing Orders. The working party’s findings were reported back to the Governing Body at its 28 May 2015 meeting (Attachment B).

15.     Recent amendments to the Local Government Act 2002 (the Act) allowed additional changes to be considered by the working party. These changes included a provision to allow members to attend meetings via audio or audiovisual link.

16.     At its 28 May 2015 meeting, the Governing Body adopted an amended set of Standing Orders which have a simplified layout, are written in a plain language style, and contain a summary and process diagram at the front for ease of reference during a meeting.

17.     It was resolved at this meeting to forward the report to all local boards, drawing their attention to the suggestion to provide for councillor participation at local board meetings in their Standing Orders.

18.     Over the last 18 months, a working group of local board Democracy Advisors has assessed each provision of the current (generic) local board Standing Orders against the corresponding revised Governing Body Standing Orders. For each local board standing order they considered whether to retain the current wording, use the revised Governing Body wording or to have a combination of the two.

19.     A revised set of local board Standing Orders has been developed as an outcome of this work (Attachment A) which is in accordance with the recommendations of the Democracy Advisor working group. 

20.     The revised local board Standing Orders follow a similar format to the Governing Body Standing Orders with a simplified layout, a plain language style, and a summary and process diagram at the front for ease of reference during a meeting. 

21.     Key substantive changes from the current local board Standing Orders are summarised below. They aim to ensure the local board Standing Orders are up to date, fulfil Auckland Council’s legal obligations and are practical and useful for business meetings.

22.     Many standing orders reflect provisions in legislation. In some cases the wording of the standing order may have been changed to a plain language style but the intention of the standing order remains the same. These standing orders are usually indicated by a reference underneath to the relevant clause in legislation. These standing orders may not be suspended.


 

Key changes

23.     Key substantive suggested changes from the current local board Standing Orders are set out below. 

 

Issue

 

Suggested changes

Purpose of suggested change

Reference in the revised LB Standing Orders

Quorum

Provision for the Chairperson to extend the 30 minute waiting time for a quorum, at the start of a meeting, by another 10 minutes - where members are known to be travelling to the meeting but are delayed due to unusual weather or traffic congestion.

 

Change in the waiting time for a quorum to be reestablished (where, after a meeting starts, member(s) leave and there is no longer a quorum) from 20 minutes to 10 minutes.

 

Assists smooth running of meeting and ensures

consistency with GB Standing Orders

 

3.1.4 and 3.1.6

 

Record of a workshop

Deletion of the requirement for the chairperson to sign-off the record of a workshop.

 

Record of workshop proceedings will be circulated.

 

Assists smooth running of meeting

12.1.4

 

Public excluded business not to be disclosed

 

Clarification on situations where the duty of non-disclosure of information, at a meeting where the public were excluded, does not apply - namely where:

·      a meeting has resolved to make the information publically available

·      there are no grounds under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for withholding the information when requested

·      the information is no longer confidential.

 

Clarification and ensures consistency with GB Standing Orders

7.4.3

Languages

Amendments to allow New Zealand Sign Language (as well as English and Māori) to be used by members and in deputations, presentations and public forum.

 

Two clear working days’ notice must be provided when an address is not in English (this is the same as the notice period required under the current local board Standing Orders and the governing body Standing Orders). 

 

The Governing Body input and Māori input sections also provide for addressing the meeting in New Zealand Sign Language, English or Māori.

 

Recognition of NZ Sign Language as an official language

1.1.2, 5.1.5, 6.1.5, 7.6.1, 7.7.5 and 7.8.4. 

Minutes

Clarification of what meeting minutes are to record.

 

Clarification

8.1.2

Agendas

Clarification that agendas can be sent electronically, and that names of local board and committee members are to be on each agenda.

 

Clarification

2.4.1

7.3.3

Non-financial interests

Suggested new provision regarding procedure for dealing with non-financial interests of members. If a member considers that there is a conflict of interest for an item, they may not take part in the discussions about or vote on the relevant matter.

 

Helps ensure robust, legally defensible decisions and consistent with GB Standing Orders

1.3.8

Repeat Notices of Motion

Suggested amendment that a Notice of Motion that the local board or a committee has considered twice and rejected within the previous six months may be refused by the Chairperson. (There is no longer the option for a further notice - prior to the expiration of the original period of 6 months - where signed by a majority of all members.)

Assists smooth running of meetings and ensures

consistency with GB Standing Orders

 

2.5.8

Procedural motions

Suggested new provision that the Chairperson has discretion about whether to allow any other procedural motion that is not contained in these Standing Orders.

 

Assists smooth running of meeting and ensures

consistency with GB Standing Orders

 

1.7.12

Urgent items

Suggested change in title, from ‘Major items of business not on the agenda may be dealt with (extraordinary business)’ to ‘Urgent items of business not on the agenda may be dealt with (extraordinary business)’.  

 

This provision sets out when items not on an agenda may be considered. The suggested change in title aims to help clarify the types of issues that fall under this provision and better reflect the purpose of the provision.

 

Text has also been added clarifying that extraordinary business may be brought before a meeting by a report of the Chief Executive or Chairperson. Where the matter is so urgent a written report is not practical, the report may be verbal.

 

Clarification

2.4.5 and Appendix D

 

Governing body input

A proposed section on Governing Body input sets out that a Governing Body member may provide input at meetings via speaking rights on items at the discretion of the chair and a report on the agenda for a Governing Body member to provide a general update on matters of interest to the board. This can include reporting on regional matters of interest to the local board or any matter the Governing Body member wishes to raise. 

This section aims to be more flexible than the current local board SO 3.9.14, by applying to Governing Body members in general rather than ward councillors for the local board area.

Whilst the right for Governing Body members to speak as a deputation has also been retained, the Governing Body input section enables a more flexible/permissive option, given it does not require the authorisation of a governing body resolution. Use of the process for Governing Body deputations will be appropriate for more formal circumstances, where the Governing Body member is representing the views of the Governing Body as a whole. 

The suggested notice period is seven clear working days, to enable sufficient time for it to appear on the agenda.  However, this is at the discretion of the Chairperson and can be shortened if necessary.

The suggested speaking time is five minutes, in accordance with provisions in the Governing Body Standing Orders.

More permissive input provisions

Part 5

Order of business

Clarification that the order of business for an extraordinary meeting should be limited to items relevant to the purpose of the meeting. The Chairperson may allow governing body, Māori and public input that is relevant to the purpose of the meeting.

The items listed in this section have been amended to fit with the order of business generated by Infocouncil.

Clarification and ensures consistency with GB Standing Orders

2.4.2

References to working parties and briefings

These have been taken out, as these forums tend to be less formal and not covered by Standing Orders.

Relevance

 

Public forum

Suggested changes clarifying that:

·      public forum may not be required at the inaugural meeting, extraordinary meetings or a special consultative procedure

·      members may not debate any matter raised during the public forum session that is not on the agenda for the meeting, or take any action in relation to it, other than through the usual procedures for extraordinary business if the matter is urgent. The meeting may refer the matter to a future meeting, or to another committee, or to the Chief Executive for investigation

·      Māori or New Zealand Sign Language can be used at public forum, as long as two clear working days’ notice is provided. Where practical, council will arrange for a translator to be present

·      the Chairperson may direct a speaker to a different committee and prohibit a speaker from speaking if he or she is offensive, repetitious or vexatious, or otherwise breaches these standing orders.

 

Clarification

7.8

Suspension of standing orders

A provision has been included for a member to move a motion to suspend standing orders as a procedural motion. The member must name the standing orders to be suspended and provide a reason for suspension. If seconded, the chairperson must put it without debate. At least 75 per cent of the members present and voting must vote in favour of the suspension, and the resolution must state the reason why the SO was suspended.

 

It should be noted that some SOs reflect provisions in legislation so cannot be suspended. These are usually indicated by a reference underneath the SO to the relevant clause in legislation.

 

To assist the smooth running of meetings and ensure consistency with GB Standing Orders

1.7.11

Notice to be seconded

A notice of motion delivered to the Chief Executive must be signed by another member of the meeting as a seconder – unless member is giving notice of motion to revoke or alter a previous resolution.

Consistency with GB Standing Orders

2.5.2

Chairperson discretion

The discretion of the Chairperson has been clarified and made as consistent as possible in Standing Orders relating to Governing Body input, Māori input, public forum and deputations.

Clarification and consistency

Parts 5 and 6, 7.7 and 7.8

Māori responsiveness

Suggested provisions for representatives of Māori organisations to provide input at local board or committee meetings via speaking rights during relevant items. The main purpose of the provisions is to recognise the special status of Māori and increase the council’s responsiveness to Māori.. The provisions also provide more flexibility than the deputations process, which restricts the number of deputation members that may address the meeting. 

 

The suggested notice period is seven clear working days, to enable sufficient time for such an item to appear on the agenda.  However, this is at the discretion of the chair and can be shortened if need be.

Recognition of the special status of  Māori and IMSB’s role under section 85 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009

Part 6 and

4.2.2

Working days / clear working days

The term “clear working days” has been used throughout the document, to refer to the number of working days prescribed for giving notice. It excludes the date of service of that notice and the date of the meeting itself.  This is in accordance with legislation (Local Government Act 2002, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the Interpretation Act).

Clarification and consistency

 

Governing body input, Māori input, public forum, deputations

The provisions in these sections have been made as consistent as possible and, where appropriate, in accordance with the Governing Body Standing Orders. 

 

Legal advice has been followed regarding the subjects a speaker may not speak about and the questions which can be put to speakers. 

Clarification

 

New appendices

New appendices have been added, setting out who must leave the meeting when the public is excluded and how business is brought before a meeting. 

 

Provisions in the current local board Standing Orders relating to workshops have been placed in an appendix, given their exemption from Part seven of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1978.

Clarification

Appendices B-D

Electronic attendance at business meetings

Recent changes to the Local Government Act 2002 now allow members to attend meetings by audio or audio-visual means in certain situations.

There are a number of restrictions for this provision in the legislation including that relevant technology is available and of suitable quality, all those participating can hear each other and there is no reduction in accountability or accessibility of the member in relation to the meeting. Members attending meetings by electronic link may vote but are not counted as part of the quorum.

The revised Standing Orders contain provisions to enable members to attend meetings by electronic link, where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable, to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity or in emergencies.

This provision will only apply where the technology is available.

 

Allows members to attend meetings whilst away on council business, or during illness or other emergency.

3.3

Membership of committees

In accordance with section 85 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, a clause has been included acknowledging that the Independent Māori Statutory Board  must appoint a maximum of two people to sit as members of committees that deal with the management and stewardship of natural and physical resources.

Clarification

4.2.2

Powers of delegation

Clause 36D of schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002 identifies who a local board may delegate decision-making to,  and the powers a local board cannot delegate.

This clause does not include the power to delegate to other subordinate decision-making bodies or more than one member of a local board. Therefore references to subordinate decision-making bodies have been removed.

Clarification

Part 4

 

Key differences from the governing body standing orders

24.     The revised local board Standing Orders contain some points of difference with the governing body Standing Orders. Key points of difference are in the areas of refreshment breaks, petitions, notices of motion, and public input.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

25.     This report provides information and a revised set of Standing Orders for local board consideration and adoption.

Māori impact statement

26.     The local board Standing Orders deal with meeting procedure. They provide for Māori to be spoken at business meetings and for deputations, presentations and petitions to be in Māori. They also enable:

·        Māori to participate on local board committees, even if they are not members of the relevant local board. See current local board SO 2.9.2 which states: “members of a committee or subcommittee may, but need not be, elected members of the Local Board”. As such, non-members may be appointed to committees or subcommittees if they have relevant skills, attributes or knowledge.

·        the suspension of Standing Orders, which can be useful to flexibly incorporate tikanga at meetings.

27.     New suggested provisions relating to Māori in the revised Standing Orders include:

·        a section on Māori input, to recognise the special status of Māori and encourage their input at local board meetings. This is in accordance with advice from Te Waka Angamua and work being undertaken by some local boards on a co-design process with mana whenua to improve Māori input into local board decision-making

·        clarifying that the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) must appoint a maximum of two people to sit as members of committees that deal with the management and stewardship of natural and physical resources (in accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 85)

·        providing for Māori to be spoken at public forum, and by the governing body or Māori organisations providing input, as long as two clear working days’ notice is given of the intention to do so.

28.     Including these provisions recognises the special status of Māori under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Local Government Act 2002 requirements to provide opportunities and processes for Māori to contribute to decision-making processes.[3] It is also in accordance with the goals of council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework, Whiria Te Muka Tangata. In particular, to foster more positive and productive relationships between council and Māori, and contribute to Māori well-being by developing strong Māori communities.

Implementation

29.     Changes to Standing Orders requires a majority vote of not less than 75% of members present (s27(3) Schedule 7, Local Government Act 2002).

30.     If approved, the revised Standing Orders will come in to effect immediately.

31.     Copies of the revised Standing Orders will be provided to all local board members, where local boards choose to adopt changes.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Revised Local Board Standing Orders

165

b

Governing Body Political working party’s finding

225

     

Signatories

Authors

Blair Doherty - Kaipatiki Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex – Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Neil Taylor - Senior Local Board Advisor  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland first quarter report for 2017/2018 financial year

 

File No.: CP2017/25781

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) first quarter report for the 2017/2018 financial year.

Executive summary

2.       RFA normally presents their quarterly report to all the 21 Local Boards at the end of each quarter. This report presents the first quarter report for the 2017/18 financial year.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Regional Facilities Auckland first quarter report for the 2017/2018 financial year

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Facilities Auckland first quarter report for 2017/2018 financial year

237

     

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2017/25827

 

  

 

Executive Summary

Attached are the notes of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshops held on 7, 14 and 28 November 2017.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the workshop notes from 7, 14 and 28 November 2017.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Notes - 7 November 2017

259

b

Workshop Notes - 14 November 2017

263

c

Workshop Notes - 28 November 2017.

269

    

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2017/25826

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Executive Summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board notes the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - December 2017

275

     

Signatories

Authors

Carmen Fernandes - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Neil Taylor – Acting Relationship Manager  

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

    

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

12 December 2017

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

b)                                           

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the confidential status of Attachment D - All community and sporting remissions by local board area to item 23 Local board feedback on rates remission and postponement policy review -.

 

23        Local Board feedback on rates remission and postponement policy review - Attachment d - List of all community and sporting remissions by local board area

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

In particular, the report contains information about arrears, remissions, or postponed rates that are not available for public inspection in accordance with the Local Government Rating Act 2002 Section 38(i)(e).

n/a

s48(1)(b)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information which would be contrary to a specified enactment or constitute contempt of court or contempt of the House of Representatives.

 

   



[1] The Governing Body resolved to delegate this power to local boards. However, this was in error, as it was always intended that the power should be allocated to local boards by Governing Body and it was discussed by the Political Working Party in this context.

[2] The headline rates increase in an annual plan, or long-term plan, is a comparison of the annual rates requirement to the previous years budgeted rates requirement.  Moving a charge against revenue to an expenditure item like grants will increase the council’s costs and inflate the apparent rates increase.  However, remissions and postponements are a cost already borne by those ratepayers not receiving them.  Therefore an adjustment will be made to the 2014/2015 budgeted rates requirement for the purpose of calculating the rates increase proposed for 2015/2016.

 

[3] Sections 14 and 81.