I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manurewa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 17 May 2018

6.00pm

Manurewa Local Board Office
7 Hill Road
Manurewa

 

Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Angela Dalton

 

Deputy Chairperson

Rangi McLean

 

Members

Joseph Allan

 

 

Stella Cattle

 

 

Sarah Colcord

 

 

Angela Cunningham-Marino

 

 

Ken Penney

 

 

Dave Pizzini

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Sarah Butterfield

Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

 

10 May 2018

 

Contact Telephone: 021 195 8387

Email: sarah.butterfield@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Manurewa Youth Council Update                                                                                7

12        Manurewa Ward Councillors Update                                                                           9

13        Members' Update                                                                                                         11

14        Chairperson's Update                                                                                                 19

15        Auckland Transport Update to the Manurewa Local Board – May 2018               21

16        Manurewa Local Board Grant Round Two 2017/2018 Grant Allocations              47

17        Proposed Establishment of Auckland Food Alliance                                            169

18        Local Board approval for progression of the Randwick and Keith Park concept plans with Locally Driven Initiatives contribution FY2017/2018 capital funding.  185

19        Review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections                                                                                                                                      193

20        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for quarter three, 1 January - 31 March 2018                                                               221

21        Further reprioritisation of Manurewa Local Board 2017/2018 budget                 269

22        Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - May 2018         273

23        Manurewa Local Board Achievements Register 2016-2019 Political Term        281

24        Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records                                                           291  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

The meeting will begin with a Karakia (prayer).

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 10 May 2018, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Manurewa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 


 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Manurewa Youth Council Update

 

File No.: CP2018/05582

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Youth Council to update the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Verbal update from the Manurewa Youth Council.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update from the Manurewa Youth Council regarding:

i)        youth week sausage sizzles

ii)       Manurewa Youth Council’s 6th birthday

iii)      end of term outing

iv)      ANZAC day

v)      youth space update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sarah Butterfield - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Manurewa Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2018/05583

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manurewa-Papakura Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Manurewa Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from:

i)        Councillor Daniel Newman regarding:

ii)       Councillor Sir John Walker regarding:

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sarah Butterfield - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Members' Update

 

File No.: CP2018/05584

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing an opportunity for members to update the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the written updates from Members K Penney, S Cattle and S Colcord.

b)      receive the verbal updates from:

i)

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member Ken Penney's Written Update

13

b

Member Sarah Colcord's Written Update

15

c

Member Stella Cattle's Written Update

17

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sarah Butterfield - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Member Ken Penney’s Written report

 

Attended. Citizens Ceremony.

Adam Bryce book launch.

Met with council about Weymouth boat ramp.

Attended Manurewa Transport Event.

Attended Manurewa Business Association monthly meeting


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Member Stella Cattle’s Written Update April 2018

9 April 2018 CMDHB 2hrs

11 April 2018 CAB 1hr

11 April 2018 Farewell CEO and welcome to new CEO of Vodafone Events Centre 1 ½ hrs

11 April 2018 Workshop

12 April 2018 Consumer Council – Middlemore Hospital 2 – 4:16pm

13 April 2018  Manurewa Central School – placing of crosses with pupils ¾ hour

14 – 20th April – sick

24 April 2018   Clendon Park Business Assn 8 – 9:15 am

24 April 2018  Guest speaker at Erin Park ANZAC Day commemorations 10:30 – 12:30

25 April 2018  ANZAC Day commemorations

26 April 2018  Senior Network meeting with Age Concern and others 1 ½ hours

26 April 2018  Safe Man Safe Family 1 ¼ hours

30 April 2018 Consultation re LTP Review 1

1 May 2018  Meeting with Kaye Denison CMDHB re Youth Council involvement 2 hours

1 May2018 Clendon Community – meeting with Melissa ¾ hour

1 May2018 Consultation feedback – Review 2 – 1 ½ hours

3 May2018 Local Board workshop

4 May2018 Ladies Luncheon – Totara Hospice Fund raising

5 May2018 Photo Exhibition

 

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Chairperson's Update

 

File No.: CP2018/05585

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing an opportunity for the chairperson to update the local board on issues she has been involved in.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal report from the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson regarding:

i)       

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sarah Butterfield - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to the Manurewa Local Board – May 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/07126

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to respond to resolutions and requests on transport-related matters; provide an update on the current status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF); request approval for new LBTCF projects; provide a summary of consultation material sent to the board; and provide information on transport-related matters of specific interest and application to the Manurewa Local Board and its community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

a)      current status of Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

b)      approval for a new Local Board Transport Capital Fund project to purchase poppy sign blades in support of the Places of Remembrance Project

c)      bus service changes from 21 May – being reduction in some local evening services in Manurewa and removal of the route 360x Papakura-CBD express service

d)      progress of improvements at the Manurewa bus/train station

e)      installation of hatching on Great South Road opposite Station Road

f)       Auckland Transport’s Quarterly Report for the January to March 2018 quarter

g)      Regional Land Transport Plan 2018.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport Update to the Manurewa Local Board – May 2018’.

b)      approve the purchase of XX poppy sign blades in order to identify the roads listed below for the Places of Remembrance Project, based on the design and quote shown at Attachment A, of $50 per blade and therefore totalling $XXX, to be funded from the Manurewa Local Board Transport Capital Fund:

c)      approve the implementation of poppy sign blades on the following roads as part of the Places of Remembrance Project  (list road names concerned below)

 

 

 

Horopaki / Context

3.       This report addresses transport-related matters in the local board area and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and LBTCF projects.

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways.  Auckland Transport reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan.  This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport.  Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.

6.       Any LBTCF projects selected must be safe, must not impede network efficiency, and must be located in the road corridor or on land controlled by Auckland Transport (though projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) update

 

7.       The Manurewa Local Board’s transport capital fund to date is summarised below.

Manurewa Local Board transport capital fund summary:

Total Funds Available in current political term (includes 2019/20 FY)

$3,068,375

Amount committed to date on projects approved for detailed design and/or construction

$568,142

Capped contribution amount to joint Te Mahia station upgrade project

$2,000,000

Remaining budget left available to allocate by the end of the current political term

$500,233

 

8.       The Board’s current LBTCF projects are included in the table below (in which ROC = rough order of costs, and FEC = firm estimate of cost):

 

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

353

Hill Road pedestrian link:

A project to improve pedestrian links on Hill Road between Great South Road and the Botanic Gardens

·    FEC = $525,000

·    Spend to date = $422,820

·    Construction approved in Nov-15 based on FEC of $575,000 (later reduced to $525,000).

·    Project completed except for one remaining site at the Hillcrest Grove intersection.  Public consultation will be repeated given the time passed.

 

Project update:

·    Public consultation letters for the remaining site are being sent out in the first week of May.  Contact has been made with the tenant of the corner property affected, who has provided details of their tenancy agent.  Contact will be made with the overseas owner via the agent.

·    Following consultation, the resolution report will be prepared and taken to the TCC for approval – expected in late May/early June.

·    Construction would be expected in June/July.

354

Manurewa covered walkway:

A project to improve connectivity between the Manurewa bus station, rail station, and Great South Road (through Southmall) by building a weather-proof canopy to link all three.

·    FEC = $1,172,000

·    Spend to date = $1,110,889

·    Project initiated in Oct-14 and construction approved in Nov-15.  FEC has changed a number of times due to scope changes.

·    Following a further request, ROCs were provided in Mar-17 for canopies over the station ramps – the ROC for a solid (metal) roof was $721,632 while the ROC for a structureflex roof was $795,072.

·    All requested AT physical works have now been completed.

·    The Board withheld making a decision on covering the ramps until potential opportunities relating to Te Mahia train station could be identified with AT.

 

Project update:

·    Council’s Public Arts team advises the iwi artist designed mesh panels are due in NZ on May 31.

·    Installation is being scheduled for mid-late June with completion by the end of June.  This is subject to the product arriving and clearing customs within the first few days of June.

545

Wattle Farm Road new central pedestrian refuge:

A project to improve pedestrian inter-connectivity between Acacia Cove Village and Bupa Retirement Village

·    FEC = $29,000 ($16,300 from LBTCF, $12,700 from Bupa)

·    Spend to date = $6,977

·    The Board approved construction on 14-Dec-17 based on the total project firm estimate of $29,000 and an agreed cost share of $16,300 from the Board and $12,700 from Bupa.

·    The resolution plan and report has been approved by the TCC committee.

·    AT is planning for works on the pedestrian refuge to be undertaken in conjunction with AT’s installation of footpaths in the immediate area.

 

Project update:

·    The project has been awarded to Downer, which is currently progressing with the CAR and TMP applications.

·    Construction will begin in mid-late May.

546

Te Mahia station upgrade:

A project to work in conjunction with AT to upgrade the station beyond the basic scope of works identified by AT

·    Capped allocation of $2m

·    Spend to date = $9,350

·    On 16-Nov-17, under confidential business, the Board considered and endorsed a package of works to be funded by the LBTCF, and approved a maximum allocation of $2 million.

 

Project update:

·    Construction work began at Easter and will run through to Queens Birthday weekend in June.

·    Night works have continued the excavations for the shelters.  The next BOL (block of line) is planned for 12/13 May and will see the excavations completed, ready for concrete pours.  A Queens Birthday BOL is planned to re-profile the platform.  All works are subject to weather.

·    The tender award included an optional second shelter on the station platform to be funded by the Board.  Given the Board’s confirmation, this contract is due for award in May.

·    On 19-Apr-18, the Board passed a resolution indicating its wish to include mana whenua signage at the station (to document the origin of the station’s name) as part of its $2M package of works.

·    The Board chair has approached a Te Akitai Waiohua representative to raise the request.

598

Manurewa town centre clock upgrade and refurbishment

A project to upgrade and return the clock to good working order

·    FEC = $36,436.60

·    On 19-Apr-18, the Board approved construction on a project to refurbish the Manurewa town centre clock and to upgrade with new clock case, dials, electrical and lighting, and replace glass viewing-panels at clock base.

·    The project will be managed through the existing maintenance contract.

 

Project update:

·    The work will be undertaken by Precision watch and clock repair specialists.

·    Weather permitting, the work is scheduled to commence on 18 June.  This is later than anticipated due to the unavailability of the case maker before that date.

NEW

Poppy places of remembrance project

A project to identify street names in Manurewa related to NZ’s overseas military history

·    FEC = $50 per poppy blade

·    See section immediately below.

·    A draft recommendation is provided for the Board’s consideration.

·    It is recommended that any resolution passed should specify the roads concerned.

 

 

Poppy ‘Places of Remembrance’ Project

9.       The Manurewa Local Board wishes to support the Places of Remembrance Project in its area, ahead of 100th year anniversary celebrations of Armistice Day in November this year.

10.     The Project is managed by the New Zealand Poppy Places Trust and is about identifying and recording street names and places that are directly related to people and events from New Zealand’s overseas military history.  Where the project is supported, that identification has been through the inclusion of a poppy logo on the place or road name blades concerned.

11.     However, the use of any type of logo on road name blades in Auckland is not acceptable under the Regional Signage Policy jointly developed and adopted by Auckland Transport and Auckland Council.  Auckland Transport alternatively proposed two designs for a supplementary white poppy sign blade that could be installed immediately beneath a road name blade.

12.     Auckland Transport was requested to provide a quote for the poppy sign blades, which has been received and is shown at Attachment A.  The quote is for $50 per poppy blade, so $400 for a suggested eight blades – which was the potential number of roads indicated during discussions with the Board.  The quantity can be adjusted as necessary should the Board wish to proceed and place an order.  Please note the quote does not include installation costs.

13.     A draft recommendation has been provided for the Board’s consideration, to fund the poppy blades using the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.  It is recommended that the roads concerned should be specified in any resolution passed.

 

 

Local projects and activities of interest to the board

 

Bus service changes from 21 May

14.     A Value for Money (VFM) review of New Network South bus services was undertaken by Auckland Transport in the first quarter of 2018.

15.     That VFM review identified bus trips where patronage was an average of two (2) passengers or less on weekdays and, where those trips were not the first or last trip of the day, proposed the services be discontinued.

16.     Following internal approvals, final review was undertaken by the Network Planning team from a network design and social impact perspective.  Following that final review, only a small number of trips have been agreed and approved for removal as part of the VFM review.

17.     There are still many trips that are not economical to continue from a financial perspective, but have been retained to maintain the principles of the New Network to promote the use of public transport, and meeting the social needs of local communities.

18.     For Manurewa, the final list of affected local services are shown in the table below.  The changes will take place from Monday 21 May:

Route

Route operation

Route name

Service reductions

361

7 days

Manurewa, Clendon, Manukau, Otara / MIT

Hourly instead of half-hourly service after 7 pm, weekdays

362

7 days

Weymouth, Manurewa, Manukau

Hourly instead of half-hourly service after 7 pm, weekdays

366

7 days

Manurewa, The Gardens, Manukau

Hourly instead of half-hourly service after 7 pm, weekdays

 

19.     The VFM review has also concluded that the peak-only 360X service from Papakura and Manurewa then via the motorway to Auckland City will be withdrawn completely, also from 21 May.

20.     Patronage on this 360X service is very limited, with an average of 12 boardings per trip (17 per trip in the morning and six per trip in the evening).  Because the route is very long, and operates only at peak times, each trip requires its own bus, which makes it a very expensive service to provide for such a small number of passengers.

21.     AT HOP information reveals the majority of trips on the route are to and from Manurewa, not Papakura, and most trips at the city end are to and from Symonds Street.  Some passengers are simply using the 360X bus for local trips along Great South Road between Manurewa and Takanini, which is also covered by route 33 running every 15 minutes.  At the city end of the route, there are also good alternative train/bus combination options for reaching Symonds Street from Papakura and Manurewa.

22.     Auckland Transport therefore cannot justify the high cost to provide this service for so few people when good alternatives exist.  It is a better use of public resources to invest in all-day services on other routes, which will benefit many more people.

23.     These upcoming changes on 21 May to routes 360X, 361, 362 and 366 will be communicated to customers using the following methods:

·    Posters on buses

·    Posters at bus stops

·    Bus drivers to hand out fliers to customers on board

·    Email to registered HOP cards for users of the specific services affected.

 

Manurewa bus/train station improvements

24.     The construction of the bus layovers within the Manurewa bus station area was completed in February.

25.     A temporary drivers’ portacom is expected to be delivered onsite by mid-May while a custom-built portacom is made.

26.     Installation of the Exeloos unit is expected to be completed by mid-June.  Once in operation, City Cleaning Services (CCS) will maintain daily cleans of the units 7 days per week, restock consumables, and deal with adhoc tagging and blockages.   The unit will have a contact number on the front panel that the public can use to raise complaints.  Typically, CCS will provide first response, while specialist tagging removal or line/pump blockages will be referred to Auckland Transport or Exeloos management.

27.     The Exeloos units are smart units that can be set to lock and unlock automatically at desired times.  The units also have sensors to ensure no one gets locked in and warnings can also be given to people who attempt to ‘overstay’ within them.

28.     The Exeloos operating hours will be programmed to synchronise with bus and rail timetables.  Outside of bus/rail running times, the units will be closed to discourage anti-social behaviour.  Operating times can be reviewed and re-programmed if necessary.

29.     For the planned lighting and CCTV improvements at the Station Road overflow park-and-ride (to mitigate the parking loss at the main park-and-ride), construction is ready to go following the arrival of the CCTV cameras in the country.

 

Installation of hatching on Great South Road opposite Station Road

30.     As previously reported, Auckland Transport reassessed the Manurewa Local Board’s request for criss-cross hatching on Great South Road between Hill and Station Roads to reinforce to motorists not to queue across the offset intersection.

31.     Following investigations, Auckland Transport proposed to install a new lane arrow marking and a short section of hatching on both southbound lanes of Great South Road, opposite the mouth of Station Road.  This should encourage motorists to allow a clear turning area for those turning right when exiting Station Road, which is the main movement affected.

32.     Installation of the hatching and new lane arrow has been completed.,Going forward, Auckland Transport will monitor the effectiveness of these markings.

 

Quarterly report for January–March 2018

33.     The following quarterly report material is attached to this monthly report:

·    Attachment A – report from Auckland Transport departments on their activities in the Manurewa Local Board area and regionally over the last quarter

·    Attachment B – report on Travelwise Schools activities in the Manurewa Local Board area over the last quarter

 

 

Other Auckland Transport news

 

Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2018

34.     On 1 May, the draft RLTP setting out the Auckland region’s land transport objectives and priorities for the next ten years was released for consultation.

35.     The draft RLTP includes a rapid transit network that gives priority to public transport, cycling and walking, as well as access to employment, education, business and recreation.

36.     Another priority is lowering the road toll with targeted interventions for the most vulnerable road users and transport options to enable economic growth and urban regeneration.

37.     The RLTP is required under legislation and includes the activities of Auckland Transport, the NZ Transport Agency, KiwiRail and City Rail Link.  The final document must be adopted by the end of June.

38.     The draft RLTP closely aligns with the recently released (draft) Government Policy Statement on Transport and the Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP).

39.     Key issues in the draft RLTP include:

·    managing unprecedented population growth, over the next 25 years Auckland’s population is expected to increase by more than the rest of New Zealand’s population growth combined

·    road safety, fewer deaths and serious injuries on the transport network

·    congestion, a less congested transport network with faster and more predictable travel times to keep congestion at 2016 levels

·    well-connected, easier access for people to places of employment, education, shopping, business, recreation and other activities throughout the transport network

·    freight, increased travel times and poor reliability have a severe impact on the freight industry

·    environmental impact of the transport system, more environmentally friendly transport network with reduced greenhouse emissions

·    delivering value for money to ratepayers and taxpayers.

 

40.     Public consultation on the draft RLTP runs until 14 May.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

 

Auckland Transport consultations

 

41.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Manurewa Local Board for its feedback.  Both the proposals and any feedback received are summarised below.

42.     Following consultation, Auckland Transport considers the feedback received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on or proceed with an amended proposal if changes are considered necessary.

43.     Proposed signalisation of Druces and Kerrs Road intersection, Wiri Auckland Transport is proposing to signalise the Druces Road and Kerrs Road intersection including removal of the slip lanes, the central traffic islands on Druces Road and the refuge islands at 73 Kerrs Road, and installation of signalised pedestrian crossings on the northern and eastern legs, a concrete splitter island on the southern leg and additional footpath on the south-eastern corner.  These changes are proposed to improve the safety of the intersection, which has been identified as a high risk.

44.     Board feedback supported the proposed signalisation on safety grounds.

 

Traffic Control Committee (TCC) report

45.     Decisions of the TCC during the month of April 2018 affecting the Manurewa Local Board area are shown in the table below.

Date

Street (Suburb)

Type of Report

Nature Of Restriction

Decision

6-April-18

Langley Road, Roscommon Road, Hautu Drive (Wiri)

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Lane Arrow Markings, Traffic Island, Traffic Signal Control, Give-Way, Flush Median

Carried

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

46.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Maori.  Specific engagement will be undertaken with Maori in relation to the proposed mana whenua signage for Te Mahia station.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

47.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

48.     No significant risks have been identified.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

49.     Auckland Transport provides the Manurewa Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

50.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Remembrance poppy sign blade – design and quote

31

b

Auckland Transport activities in the Manurewa Local Board area and regionally for the January-March 2018 quarter

33

c

Travelwise Schools activities in the Manurewa Local Board area for the January-March 2018 quarter

45

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Jenni Wild – Elected Member Relationship Manager (South); Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Grant Round Two 2017/2018 Grant Allocations

 

File No.: CP2018/06670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications for the Manurewa Local Board Grants, Round two 2017/2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for the Manurewa Local Board Grants, Round two 2017/2018. (see Attachment B).

3.       The Manurewa Local Board adopted the Manurewa Local Board Programme 2017/2018 on 20 April 2017 (see Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Manurewa Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $141,000 for the 2017/2018 financial year.

5.       The local board has allocated $73,108 for one local grant round and $36,225 for two quick response rounds. This leaves a total of $31,667 for the local board to allocate in one local grant round and one quick response round.

6.       A total of 34 applications were received, including seven multiboard applications, for Manurewa Local Board Grants Round Two 2017/2018, requesting a total amount of $242,175.34

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      Agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

Table One: Applications for the Manurewa Local Grant, Round Two 2017/2018

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1810-201

The Parenting Place

Delivering 25 mental health and life skills presentations to students attending four high schools in the Manurewa local board area plus a copy of “Hardwired”, a drug and alcohol education handbook.

 $3,700.00

Eligible

LG1810-202

New Zealand Kiribati National Council

Towards the National Kiribati youth dance competition in Otahuhu on 14 July 2018, including venue hire, artists and project manager fees, transport and catering.

 $2,520.00
 

Eligible

LG1810-203

Imitate me Dance Community Limited

Towards a free hip hop dance programme, including project management, sound and lighting hire, venue hire and certificates on 9 July.

 $5,359.00

Eligible

LG1810-205

Te Ara Poutama AEC Charitable Trust

Towards providing students with the opportunity to have 20 full day taekwon do sessions working towards gaining NCEA Level 1 & 2 credits in Physical Education. for NCEA Level 1 Sports Academy

$2,000.00

Ineligible as NCEA is core curriculum

LG1810-206

Kesa Edwards

Towards host a street BBQ to connect neighbours in the new subdivision of Waimahia Inlet.

$500.00

Eligible

LG1810-207

The Parenting Place Charitable Trust

Towards a fee subsidy and facilitator fees for the "Building Awesome Whanau" parenting courses, focusing on Maori and vulnerable families.

 $3,249.00

Eligible

LG1810-210

Auckland Action Against Poverty Incorporated

Towards operating costs and wages to run the advocacy service at the Manurewa and Clendon Work and Income.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1810-218

Mountfort Park Water Polo Club Incorporated

Towards the purchase and installation costs for a new score board and clock for Mountfort Park Swimming Pool

$12,000.00

Eligible

LG1810-220

The Rising Foundation Trust

Towards the delivery of the school based programme at Manurewa High School, specifically the wages of the programme coordinator, from June 2018 to September 2018

$9,375.00

Eligible

LG1810-222

Manukau Perfoming Arts Incorporated

Towards an upgrade of the sound and lighting at the Spotlight Theatre, Papatoetoe

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1810-224

Action Education Incorporated

Towards the cost of delivering 12 spoken word poetry workshops in schools in the Manurewa local board area.

$2,400.00

Eligible

LG1810-227

Babystart Charitable Trust

Towards providing 18 newborn baby care boxes for babies born into high risk situations in 2018

 $6,308.00

Eligible

LG1810-229

New Netball Team Limited

Towards the cost of hiring the Pulman Arena to host the Northern Stars and Central Pulse netball match.

 
$3,320.00

Eligible

LG1810-230

KidsCan Charitable Trust

Towards food for children in Manurewa schools

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1810-231

Royal New Zealand Coastguard Boating Education Limited

Towards the costs of life jackets, inflatable boats and administration to provide the Safe Boating training programme.

 $5,773.00

Eligible

LG1810-232

Reremoana School

 Towards the construction of a fence for the community garden

 $6,706.00

 Eligible

LG1810-233

Homai Primary School

Towards costs for construction of an integrated bike track around the Homai Primary School field.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG1810-239

Counties Manukau Sports Foundation

 Towards four community recreation and events coordinator wages.

$30,000.00

Eligible

LG1810-241

Mobility Assistance Dogs Trust

Towards the salary of a qualified senior trainer for the “Puppies in Prison” programme in the Auckland Region Women’s Correction Facility.

$11,666.00

Eligible

LG1810-242

Randwick Park Sports and Community Trust

Towards a Matariki event in Randwick Park for south Auckland, including advertising, entertainment, sound and stage event coordination and clean up for Matariki 2018

$8,880.00

Eligible

LG1810-243

What Hope Community Trust

Towards food costs, equipment, prizes and printing costs for the promotion for the youth leadership Tuesday night programme.

$4,837.00

Eligible

LG1810-244

The New Zealand Dance Advancement Trust

Towards venue hire, transport, project manager fees for the "Dancing Toward A Better Day, Youth Engagement” programme at the care and protection facility in Weymouth.

 $3,906.00

Eligible

LG1810-245

John Walker Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation

 Towards the community swim programme from 30 June 2018 onwards.

$20,000.00

 

LG1810-246

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust trading as Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Towards wages for the “Project K” programme coordinator at James Cook High School.

$3,500.00

Eligible

LG1810-247

Shunya Waste Solutions

Towards costs for the “Do it Yourself” holiday programme from 14 July to 23 December 2018.

 $4,000.00

 Eligible

LG1810-248

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards a contribution for the youth worker salary to support young people in Manurewa

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1810-249

Basketball Samoa New Zealand

Towards facilitator fees for basketball workshops at the Bruce Pulman Centre, for the “Above the Rim” programme

 $1,000.00

Eligible

 

 

Total

$169,505.60

 

 

Table Two: Manurewa Local grants Round Two 2017/2018 multiboard applications

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1813-212

Age Concern Counties Manukau Inc

Towards costs to provide counselling services to older adults in south Auckland.

$12,900.00

Eligible

LG1809-214

Kahurangi Newton under the umbrella of Nga Kaitiaki O Ihumatao Charitable Trust

Towards tutorial fees, food, tools, petrol, venue hire, health and safety kits for weaving workshops from 2 June to 2 July 2018.

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG1807-312

Manukau Orchestral Society Incorporated

Towards the rental fees at Te Tuhi Centre for rehearsals, storage and administration work.

$1,182.00

Eligible

LG1809-231

Chinese New Settlers Services Trust (CNSST)

Towards venue hire and promotion for the Migrant Branch Service Centre of CNSST at Friendship House Manukau.

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG1807-330

The Kids for Kids Charitable Trust

Towards venue hire and production costs of a youth choir performance.

$2,157.34

Eligible

LG1806-234

Kelly Group (NZ)

Towards coaching fees and resource kits to deliver a traditional Maori Games programme to 29 schools in Auckland.

$15,410.40

Eligible

LG1811-338

LifeKidz Trust

Towards support worker wages for the after school and school holiday programme for LifeKidz Trust.


$2,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

$72,669.74

 

 

 

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Manurewa Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2017/2018 on 20 April 2017 and will operate three quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11.     The Manurewa Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $141,000 for the 2017/2018 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Manurewa Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

12.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

13.     A summary of each application received through Manurewa Round two 2017/2108 is provided (see Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

14.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

16.     The Manurewa Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $141,000.00 The local board has allocated $73,108 for one local grant round and $36,225 for two quick response rounds. This leaves a total of $31,667 for the local board to allocate in local grant round and one quick response round.

17.     In Manurewa Local Board Round Two 2017/2018, 34 applications were received, including seven multiboard applications, requesting a total of $242,175.34.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

18.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

19.     Following the Manurewa Local Board allocating funding for local grants round two, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Grants Programme 2017/2018 grant applications

53

b

Manurewa Local Grants Round Two  2017/2018 grant appplications including multiboard applications.

55

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Helen Taimarangai - Senior Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Shane King - Operations Support Manager

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Proposed Establishment of Auckland Food Alliance

 

File No.: CP2018/06675

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement for the development and implementation of a pilot Auckland Food Alliance with an initial focus on five local board areas including the Manurewa Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Our existing food system is based on mass production and mass consumption, making it hard to access healthy, affordable and locally produced food. This often comes with unsustainable social, economic and environmental side effects including poor farming practices, small local enterprises unable to compete with large multinationals, high rates of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and obesity, food waste, and high levels of greenhouse gas emissions (19-29% of total emissions globally[1]).

3.       Meanwhile our ability to meet future demand is subject to a range of pressures including rapid population growth, a changing climate, and loss of productive soils to land development.   

4.       There is currently no holistic strategic direction for Auckland’s food system. However, its cross-cutting nature means that it is partially addressed in several council plans (Attachment A). The Chief Sustainability Office and The Southern Initiative have reviewed local, national and international best practice and feedback from internal and external stakeholders to identify options that address policy gaps and improve coordination, across these plans and the wider food system.

5.       Based on this analysis, staff propose to develop a pilot Food Policy for council called the Auckland Food Alliance. The Alliance would bring together 10-15 influential stakeholder organisations from across the food system (production, distribution, processing, consumption and waste) to address regional systemic issues and remove the road blocks that can sometimes impede the success and ‘scaling up’ of local initiatives.

6.       The Auckland Food Alliance will provide expert strategic advice to council and other stakeholders on inter-related regional food policy development and advocate on national food policy issues.

7.       It is proposed that the pilot focus in five local board areas; Waitakere Ranges, Henderson-Massey, Whau, Mangere-Otahuhu and Manurewa. These areas have been chosen to build on existing momentum of communities who are actively engaged in food initiatives, and because they are within the Healthy Families operational boundaries and therefore have a predetermined need.

8.       Workshops held in the pilot local board areas in March 2018 have provided valuable feedback that has informed the recommendations proposed and have established further context, needs and barriers for consideration by the Alliance.

9.       This top down policy approach will complement the grass-roots movement of local communities by considering systemic issues that are often difficult to address at a local level such as complex regulation, unsustainable business practices and loss of productive land. Local boards in the pilot area would further benefit from the highlighting of local issues.


 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      endorse establishment of a pilot Auckland Food Alliance for a period of two years from August 2018

b)      endorse the approach for the Auckland Food Alliance, once established, to focus on the Manurewa Local Board during the pilot phase

c)      request a minimum of six-monthly updates from the Alliance on progress. 

 

 

Horopaki / Context

Problem definition

1.       Research and consultation with local boards had identified significant issues with the food system that cut across economic, environment and social wellbeing.

2.       For example, in Auckland we have:

·   Poor access to affordable fresh and nutritious foods.  Research in New Zealand has found that those who are food insecure (i.e., a lack of access to safe, nutritious and affordable food) report higher levels of psychological distress, as well as wider impacts on nutrition and physical health.

·   Loss of productive soils to urbanisation – only one per cent of the Auckland Region’s soils are considered Class 1 (elite) and suitable for vegetable production. Approximately 86 per cent of this is in the Pukekohe area, a renowned powerhouse of outdoor vegetable production for New Zealand.[2] This is also an area under pressure from urban development where 14 per cent of Class 1 soils have been or will be encroached upon by 2040.

·   High volumes of food waste (45 per cent of household kerbside collection)[3] representing missed opportunity to feed people, animals and plants, and producing greenhouse gas emissions.

·   Health inequality - high rates of obesity (Auckland = 28 per cent; Asian = 13.4 per cent; European/other = 24.6 per cent; Maori = 44 per cent; Pasifika = 68 per cent)[4], non-communicable diseases such as diabetes (Auckland = 7.5 per cent; Mangere = 17.3 per cent)[5] and malnutrition.

·   Environmental degradation due to non-sustainable production methods, particularly water quality, with elevated levels of nitrates in surface and ground water[6], and nearly a third of Auckland’s rivers classified as poor on the swimmability scale[7].

3.       There are already a large number of successful, local activities being undertaken across Auckland by council, community groups, non-profit organisations and government agencies with the support of local boards. These activities are predominantly focused around urban production/community gardens, food waste and health education.

4.       However, engagement across stakeholders, including the Sustainable Business Network, EcoMatters, Kai Auckland, Auckland Regional Public Health Service, Healthy Families, Gardens4Health and C40’s global cities network, has highlighted a gap at the regional policy level, with missed opportunities to address regional systemic issues and further support local programmes.

5.       Additionally, there are significant and complex underlying issues (such as unsustainable business practices, complex regulation, lack of understanding of resilience across the system) that will require collaboration across stakeholders to address.

Food Policy Councils

6.       Internationally there is a growing number of successful food governance structures tackling these issues such as the Los Angeles Food Policy Council, Toronto Food Policy Council, Puget Sound Regional Council’s Regional Food Policy Council (Seattle), and Melbourne’s Food City. 

7.       These Food Policy Councils and others like them have been established to bring together stakeholders to examine how a local food system is functioning and develop opportunities to improve it.  The councils review and look at the system as a whole, influencing decision makers and remove the road blocks that can sometimes impede the success and ‘scaling up’ of local initiatives to deliver healthy, equitable and resilient outcomes.

8.       Based on this analysis, it is proposed that a Food Policy Council be created for Auckland called the Auckland Food Alliance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Auckland Food Alliance proposal

9.       The Alliance proposal is for an independent advisory group that provides expert, strategic advice to Auckland Council and other stakeholders, and advocates on national policy.

10.     It would operate on the following principles:

·   Foster collaboration and innovation among diverse stakeholders.

·   Operate on a strategic level, ensuring a holistic overview of regional issues.

·   Advise on interrelated policy-making to council and other stakeholders and advocate on national policy issues.

11.     Membership would comprise 10-15 member organisations representing a cross-section of Auckland’s food system across public, voluntary and private sectors. Member organisations would appoint a suitable senior representative to participate in Alliance activities.

12.     The Alliance would be supported by a smaller working group and secretariat services will be provided by Auckland Council through the Chief Sustainability Office and The Southern Initiative.

13.     Staff will initially support the Alliance to develop terms of reference, a food charter clearly stating its purpose and objectives to guide its work (in line with international best practice), and a preliminary action plan identifying a small number of discrete actions to focus Alliance efforts.

Pilot areas

14.     It is proposed that the initial focus of the Alliance be in five local board areas: Waitakere Ranges; Henderson-Massey; Whau; Mangere-Otahuhu; and Manurewa. These areas were chosen as they are all within the Healthy Families operational boundaries and therefore a predetermined need exists, and because these communities and local boards are actively engaged in local food initiatives.

15.     Healthy Families Waitakere is engaged in a programme of community food projects being rolled out across the western local boards including the My Backyard Garden Project, Fresh Choice (recipes and ingredient lists to feed a family of six for under $50), a Food Banks Network and are in the process of forming a Local Food Network group. In addition to these, there are a number of location specific projects led by various community stakeholders, for example:

·    Waitakere Ranges – Glen Eden Transition Towns Veggie Swap Meet and composting workshops; Hoani Waititi Marae Maara Kai (edible garden and workshops with a focus on Maramataka, the Maori lunar calendar)

·    Henderson-Massey – Vision West’s Social enterprise café, food bank and proposed food store; The Kitchen Project in Henderson; Triangle Park and Woodside Road Community Gardens.

·    Whau - Ecomatters community garden and educational workshops; Avondale Community Fridge; Generation Ignite Food Bank including cooking and nutrition training.

16.     The Southern Initiative in partnership with Healthy Families South are also involved in a programme of food projects across southern local boards including development of Food and Beverage Guidelines for public facilities, The Kitchen Project, a social supermarket and Fresh Choice South (recipes and ingredient lists to feed a family of six for under $50). There are also location specific projects being undertaken by various community stakeholders including: 

·    Mangere-Otahuhu – Old School Reserve Teaching Gardens; Cook Island Development Agency New Zealand community garden and community food enterprise support; Fale Kofi social enterprise café at Otahuhu Station

·    Manurewa – Manurewa Marae Para Kore and community garden; Manurewa Community Teaching Gardens; Clendon Pride Project Community House teaching gardens and Clendon Shopping Centre community fruit orchard.

17.     A targeted focus in the first instance will enable clear direction and an opportunity to deliver regional actions of importance to priority local board areas. However, the Alliance will be established with a clear remit for delivery on wider regional issues in the longer term.

18.     A short list of priority policy actions will be identified with the assistance of local stakeholders, ensuring a complementary top down approach that could assist the implementation or upscaling of local initiatives.

19.     If agreed, it is proposed that the Alliance will report to the Environment and Community Committee and that the committee is represented on the Alliance to maintain a strong link to decision makers.

Proposed method of communication with local boards

20.     Based on feedback from local board workshops, 6-monthly updates to local board business meetings are the proposed method of communication between local boards and the Alliance.

Options analysis

21.     From analysis of international and local food policy councils, a key learning has been that form and function vary widely but the most defining success factor is the relationship to a local government entity. That is, how structural ties or the level of support provided, bear on the perceived level of independence from decision makers, the ability to influence decision makers, and the sustainability of a food policy council.

22.     As many successful food policy councils have some link to a government entity, two of the options explored (2 & 3) have strong links to council with differing levels of independence. Table 1 provides a summary of options considered.

 

Table 1: Options Analysis Summary

Option

Description

Options 1: Do nothing

No costs or staff time required, but regional systemic issues are not addressed leading to reduced resilience, environmental, economic and social outcomes.

Option 2: Establish Auckland Food Alliance following the One Voice: Sports and Recreation model (recommended option)

Attachment B contains the One Voice terms of reference

This is an independent, voluntary group endorsed by council. The Alliance is accountable to the Environment and Community Committee (ECC) and has ECC representation on the group. It is based on an existing model with demonstrated successes.

Independence allows greater flexibility in its work programme and potential to apply for external funding in future.

 

Option 3: Establish Auckland Food Alliance as an Auckland Council Advisory Panel

This group is embedded within councils existing structure of advisory panels. As such it has a strong mandate from council and visibility of council work programme. The panel has elected member representation and funding is secured through the LTP from the next LTP review cycle.

The work programme is more directed, largely based on council’s work programme.

 

23.     Options were assessed against a set of criteria including the flexibility of the work programme, their accountability and reporting requirements, likely funding and administration support, flexibility of operational structure, attractiveness to prospective members and opportunity for community engagement.

24.     Option 2, the Auckland Food Alliance based on the One Voice model is recommended because it is independent of council’s structure, enabling more freedom in work plan development (e.g. to advise on regional policy gaps, advocate on national issues and partner with other stakeholders) and is likely to invoke a greater level of trust from the community. This option also includes the key benefits of Option 3 with strong links to decisions makers and support from council staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

25.     At the time of writing this report, workshops had been held with Waitakere Ranges, Henderson-Massey, Whau, Mangere-Otahuhu and Manurewa.

26.     The purpose of the workshops was to introduce the concept of food systems thinking, introduce the Auckland Food Alliance proposal and obtain feedback on local issues, potential regional of national policy solutions, local stakeholders and preferred method of communication with the Auckland Food Alliance.

27.     Feedback has informed this report and learning will also be integrated into the work programme of the Alliance.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

28.     At the time of writing this report, no official consultation with Māori had been undertaken, however, consultation is planned. 

29.     Initial review of available literature indicates that Māori and Pasifika groups are disproportionately impacted by an ill performing Auckland food system and that food is of significant cultural value.

30.     In response, the Auckland Food Alliance concept will be piloted in local board areas representative of high Māori and Pasifika occupancy and adverse food system impacts.

31.     Council is committed to working through any impacts of the proposal with Maori and involving Māori in development of the Auckland Food Alliance and in the membership.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

32.     The estimated cost to council will be met within existing budgets and primarily involve staff time and provision of secretariat support through the Chief Sustainability Office and The Southern Initiative.

33.     Ongoing operational costs and staff time will be approximately $1500 per annum and eight hours per month.

34.     Additional funds and staff time will be required during the implementation phase of the Alliance (first six months). Estimated costs are $3000 for two facilitated workshops and four days staff time per month.

35.     In terms of direct financial implications for local boards, no funding is requested. Broader local board funding decisions with food-related outcomes may benefit from being joined up and aligned with Alliance initiatives to better amplify local impact.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

36.     The proposed Alliance is a low risk initiative overall due to the small financial commitment required from council and measures incorporated in the design to support long-term sustainability.

37.     The key risk associated with the recommended Option 2 relates to the long-term sustainability of the Alliance due to its independent and largely voluntary structure. It is proposed that this risk be mitigated by adopting best practice and lessons learned from One Voice: Sports and Recreation model (that has been operating for more than 6 years) and analysis of international food policy councils, provision of staff support, and regular ‘fit for purpose’ reviews.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

38.     If endorsed, a proposal will be submitted to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2018 and pending approval, implementation will begin in August 2018.

 


 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Council Food Related Plans and Strategies

177

b

One Voice - Terms of Reference

181

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Lauren Simpson, Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

John Mauro – Chief Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Louise Mason – GM Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy – Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Local Board approval for progression of the Randwick and Keith Park concept plans with Locally Driven Initiatives contribution FY2017/2018 capital funding. 

 

File No.: CP2018/06849

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Manurewa Local Board for funding of additional scope of works associated with Randwick Park and Keith Park developments from their FY 2017/2018 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) capital funding and to be included as part of the FY 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 delivery work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Randwick Park concept plan was presented to the Manurewa Local Board in March 2018. The plan has been developed through an empowered community centric approach achieving the Local Board’s vision for Randwick Park.

3.       At a workshop on 10 April the local board indicated its support for the Randwick Park concept plan and a willingness to allocate LDI budget to help deliver the physical works.

4.       Randwick Park renewal budget of $80,000 is currently approved. This report seeks the allocation of $120,000 from the LDI 2017/2018 capital budget.

5.       An initial investigation for Keith Park has been completed. Council staff provided the local board with an update at a workshop on 16 March and outlined the next steps to progress the project, including public consultation and concept design.

6.       The local board indicated its willingness to allocate LDI budget to help deliver the physical works at Keith Park. This report seeks the allocation of $200,000 from the LDI 2017/2018 capital budget.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      approve the Randwick Park concept plan (Attachment A)

b)      approve $120,000 from the 2017/2018 LDI capital budget to support the delivery of the Randwick Park concept plan

c)      approve $200,000 from the 2017/2018 LDI capital budget to support the delivery of the Keith Park concept plan during the 2018/2019 financial year

d)      request staff develop a plan for Keith Park community consultation which includes  engagement with Weymouth Primary School and local residents.

 

Horopaki / Context

Randwick Park development

7.       The Randwick Park Community Centre has engaged with local children to provide their views, designs and models on what type of play space and which specific play items they would like to see at the development.

8.       The play items are specifically chosen from the children’s proposals. The design concept includes photos of some of the children’s drawings and models in the image sheet attached. There were some consistent items that were frequently requested by the children and the consultation has included as many of their requests as possible.

9.       Key design considerations include:

a.   design aesthetic that is linked to the community centre, skate park and courtyard area 

b.   strong lines and shapes in the courtyard which the design has picked up and used as the axis around the play space

c.   paths and play surface edges that will mimic these shapes, lines and colours

10.     The play items that were proposed are:

a.   rocktopus (spinner)

b.   2 seesaws (2 side by side increases the play alongside each other)

c.   swing – basket swing and 1 junior and 1 senior swing seat (caters for all – basket swing particularly good for special needs)

d.   flying fox – 20m (frequently requested by the kids)

e.   large module that specifically has slide and wide range of overhead/monkey bar type events 

f.    working on the exact layout of this item

g.   raised sand pit – contained by edge that doubles as seating.  Ramp into sand pit for all access

h.   sand play module with range of sieves, chutes and pullies to play with the sand

i.    central shaded seating area, “Kuzebo” as named by one of the local children.  This can be with shade sail or timber shade structure

j.    range of stepping stones throughout

k.   shade trees throughout

l.    all surfaces loose fill in ground for all access. If the budget allows some wet pour synthetic surface fingers to aid access for all.

11.     At a workshop on 10 April the local board indicated its support for the Randwick Park concept plan and a willingness to allocate LDI budget to help deliver the physical works.

12.     The local board agreed to provide the concept plan for Randwick Park for further discussion with the Randwick Park Sports and Neighbourhood Centre.

Keith Park development

13.     The initial investigation for Keith Park has been completed. Council staff provided the local board with an update at a workshop on 16 March and outlined the next steps to progress the project.

14.     The next steps agreed include community consultation, service level assessment and concept design.

15.     Staff will work with the Manurewa Local Board Engagement Advisor to develop a plan for community consultation which includes engagement with Weymouth Primary School, and holding a barbeque at Keith Park.

16.     The local board indicated a willingness to contribute up to $200,000 from the 2017/2018 LDI capital budget for Keith Park development.

17.     This report seeks formal approval of the budget allocation for Keith Park development.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

18.     Staff recommend that the Manurewa Local Board allocate $120,000 LDI funding to allow the agreed Randwick Park concept design to proceed as it aligns with the outcomes of the public consultation and the local board feedback.

19.     Staff recommend that the Manurewa Local Board allocate up to $200,000 LDI funding to enable the progression of the Keith Park community consultation and concept design planning as it aligns with the outcomes of the public consultation and the local board feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

20.     Local boards have the allocated decision-making authority on development plans for local capital works.

21.     These recommendations support the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2017 outcome 1: People in Manurewa are actively connecting everywhere, every day.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

22.     Parks and heritage is of fundamental importance to mana whenua. The development discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through increased access to recreational opportunities and improved connections between local communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

23.    

Stage

Funding Source

Required budget

Approval status

Randwick Park development

Renewals (capex)

$80,000

Approved

Randwick Park development

LDI

$120,000

Awaiting LB decision

 

Stage

Funding Source

Required budget

Approval status

Keith Park development

Renewals (capex)

$40,000 FY18

$400,000 FY19

Approved

Awaiting LB decision

Keith Park development

LDI

$200,000

Awaiting LB decision

 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

24.     If a decision is not made timely it may cause delays to the progression and delivery of the concept plans.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

25.     Upon approval of the required capital funding Randwick Park development will commence the delivery phase. A confirmed delivery programme will be confirmed to the Local Board and the community prior to physical works commencing.

26.     Upon approval of the required capital funding for Keith Park the next stage of public consultation and service level assessment can commence. Staff will seek a workshop approval of a public consultation plan with the Local Board before progressing.

27.     Updates will be provided at the monthly Community Facilities workshops and through quarterly reporting.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Randwick Park Concept Plan

189

   

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Katrina Morgan - Manager Community Led & LDI Projects

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan – General Manager Community Facilities

Manoj Ragupathy – Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections

 

File No.: CP2018/07321

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Manurewa Local Board an opportunity to give formal feedback on the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s representation arrangements have to be reviewed this year.  The outcome will apply at the 2019 elections.

3.       The Governing Body finalised the process for conducting the review in December 2017, following consultation with local boards.

4.       The Joint Governance Working Party established by the Mayor will develop a proposal for reporting to the Governing Body in July 2018.

5.       The local board is now invited to provide its formal feedback on the review, for consideration by the Joint Governance Working Party.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      endorse the general approach to the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections, which is to make changes on an issue-by-issue basis and to not seek significant change

b)      endorse the Joint Governance Working Party’s position on the following matters with respect to the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections:

i)        that all Governing Body members are to continue to be elected by ward as decided by the Governing Body

ii)       that the current number of members in each ward is retained

c)      endorse the following recommendations with respect to the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections, noting that they have yet to be considered by the Joint Governance Working Party:

i)        that the Manurewa-Papakura ward non-complying variance (population per member) should be retained on the basis that compliance would result in splitting communities of interest or joining disparate communities of interest

d)      provide any other feedback on the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections

e)      delegate authority to the Chair to represent the board’s views on the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections should the Joint Governance Working Party seek further engagement with and/or feedback from the board prior to reporting to the Governing Body with a proposal in July 2018, or during the consideration of submissions following public notification.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

There are statutory deadlines

6.       All councils must, under the Local Electoral Act 2001, review their representation arrangements at least every six years.  Auckland Council, under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, must conduct a review of its representation arrangements no earlier than the 2013 elections and no later than September 2018.

7.       The Governing Body considered conducting a review for the 2016 elections but resolved to defer this.

8.       The Local Electoral Act 2001 requires the following timeline and process:

·    public notice of the council’s proposals by 8 September 2018

·    consideration of submissions

·    public notice of the council’s final proposals within six weeks of the closing date for submissions. 

·    if there are no objections or appeals, the council’s proposals stand and are implemented

·    if there are objections or appeals, they are forwarded to the Local Government Commission for a decision.

9.       Staff are planning to report the Joint Governance Working Party’s proposals to the Governing Body meeting on 26 July 2018.

Role of the Joint Governance Working Party and the process for developing the Auckland Council proposal

10.     In 2017 the Governing Body endorsed a process for the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections that was then recommended to local boards.  Local board feedback, which was generally supportive of the proposed process, was reported back to the Governing Body in December 2017.  

11.     The Governing Body, after considering local board feedback, made the following decision:

“That the Governing Body:

a)  receive the feedback from local boards.

b)      note the mayor’s appointments to the Joint Governance Working Party as follows:

Cr Cathy Casey (Central), Cr Linda Cooper (West), Cr Daniel Newman (South), Cr Wayne Walker (North), Angela Dalton (South), Phelan Pirrie (Rural North), Richard Northey (Central) and Shane Henderson (West).

c)      approve the draft terms of reference for the Joint Governance Working Party for inclusion in the Auckland Council Committee Terms of Reference.

d)      approve the following process for conducting the review of representation arrangements:

i)        the Joint Governance Working Party will develop Auckland Council’s initial review of representation arrangements and present it to local boards and the Governing Body for comments before the Governing Body makes the statutory resolution for public notification for submissions.

ii)       the Joint Governance Working Party will conduct the hearing of submissions and report its findings to local boards and the Governing Body before the Governing Body makes the final statutory resolution on any representation changes, which will then be publicly notified for objections and appeals.

iii)      the Governing Body will review the process for hearing submissions under (ii) at the time the initial proposals for change are known.”

12.     The rationale for (d)(iii) in the decision was to respond to some local board feedback regarding the hearing of submissions.  The legislation requires a final proposal to be publicly notified within six weeks of the submission closing date. This may require a centralised process, however this will be reviewed once the nature of changes being proposed is known.

Representation arrangements that may be reviewed

13.     For the Governing Body it is possible to review, for members other than the mayor:

·    Whether members are elected by ward or at-large or by a mixture

·    If by ward, the number of wards, names, boundaries and number of members for each ward.

14.     For each local board it is possible to review:

·    Whether members are elected by subdivision or at-large or by a mixture

·    If by subdivision, the number of subdivisions, names, boundaries and number of members for each subdivision

·    The number of members for the local board

·    The name of the local board.

Matters that are required to be taken into account

15.     The Local Electoral Act 2001 (Act) requires the council to take into account:

·    The effective representation of communities of interest

·    Fairness of representation.

16.     Other requirements in the Act include:

·    Ward boundaries should align with local board boundaries as far as is practicable

·    Boundaries must align with mesh-block boundaries

·    When the council gives public notice of its proposal it needs to give reasons for any changes from the 2016 elections.

17.     The concept of effective representation of communities of interest can be explained by considering a single electorate which has two quite different communities and two elected representatives.  The outcome of each election might mean that both representatives are elected by one of the communities with the result that the other community will not be represented.  This might be solved by splitting the total electorate into smaller electoral areas, each having one representative.  In the case of territorial local authorities, those smaller electoral areas are known as “wards” and in the case of local boards, those smaller areas are known as “subdivisions”.

18.     The concept of fairness means that the ratio of population to elected member for wards, in the case of the Governing Body, and subdivisions, in the case of local boards, should not vary across the region or local board area respectively.  The legislation allows for a variance of up to 10 per cent.  It further allows the council to not comply if compliance would result in splitting communities of interest or joining disparate communities of interest.  The final decision on a proposal to not comply is made by the Local Government Commission.

19.     A practical consideration is the distribution of voting documents.  Each voter receives a pack of voting documents which is relevant to that voter (the pack contains voting papers for the governing body positions and local board positions relevant to that voter).  Misalignment of boundaries can create additional combinations of governing body and local board positions. This leads to additional cost in terms of voting documents.  This reinforces the legal requirement for ward and local board boundaries to align as far as is practicable.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

The general approach is to not make significant change

20.     The Local Government Commission determined the current arrangements in 2010 following 736 submissions on its first proposal.  There was a lot of public interest and the process was robust.   There are no significant issues with the current arrangements.

21.     There have been discussions at local board cluster meetings and by the Joint Governance Working Party.  Significant change has been considered (such as some Governing Body members being elected at large) but the outcome of these discussions to date is to basically retain the status quo except where changes are required.

22.     One significant issue, though, which has been considered by the Governing Body is the number of Governing Body members.  The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 sets this at 20 members in addition to the mayor. All other councils are able to review the number of councillors.

23.     The Governing Body, when it considered conducting a review of representation arrangements for the 2016 elections, decided instead to seek legislative change to allow it to review the number of Governing Body members.  It also sought provision for re-aligning local board boundaries with ward boundaries, should ward boundaries need to change and if there was support from local boards to keep boundaries aligned.

24.     This submission was not successful.  The Governing Body is not able to review the number of Governing Body members.  Local board boundaries are not able to be changed other than through the separate process of applying for a local government reorganisation.

25.     The council is continuing to advocate change, however any legislative change in the short term is unlikely to be effective for the 2019 elections.

Wards

Wards that do not comply with the 10 per cent rule

26.     Based on statistics provided by the Local Government Commission (being a 2017 estimate) population ratios are as follows:

Ward

Population

Members

Population per member

Difference from quota

% Difference

from quota

Rodney Ward

64,300

1

64,300

-18,560

-22.40

Albany Ward

169,800

2

84,900

2,040

2.46

North Shore Ward

156,800

2

78,400

-4,460

-5.38

Waitākere Ward

176,500

2

88,250

5,390

6.50

Waitematā and Gulf Ward

119,100

1

119,100

36,240

43.74

Whau Ward

84,700

1

84,700

1,840

2.22

Albert-Eden-Roskill Ward

172,200

2

86,100

3,240

3.91

Ōrākei Ward

91,500

1

91,500

8,640

10.43

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Ward

79,700

1

79,700

-3,160

-3.81

Howick Ward

150,200

2

75,100

-7,760

-9.37

Manukau Ward

168,900

2

84,450

1,590

1.92

Manurewa-Papakura Ward

148,900

2

74,450

-8,410

-10.15

Franklin Ward

74,600

1

74,600

-8,260

-9.97

Total

1,657,200

20

82,860

 

27.     Final statistics will eventually be based on data provided by Statistics NZ at meshblock level.  Staff expect that final statistics will be very close to those that have been used in the review to date.

28.     As stated above, one of the matters that must be taken into account in the review is fairness of representation.  The legislation requires that the ratio of population to member should not vary by more than 10 per cent unless there are reasons for not complying with this requirement (on the basis of splitting communities of interest or uniting disparate communities of interest). 

29.     There are four wards that do not comply:

·    Waitematā and Gulf ward

·    Rodney ward

·    Ōrākei ward

·    Manurewa-Papakura ward.

30.     At is workshop on 3 May the Board indicated that it did not wish to provide feedback on matters that affect other wards or local boards. Therefore this report focuses on matters directly relevant to the Manurewa Ward and Local board areas.

31.     The Joint Governance Working Party recommends Option 1.  The other options disrupt communities of interest to a greater extent. 

32.     For example, Option 2 takes areas around Ponsonby and Grey Lynn away from the central city into the Albert-Eden-Roskill ward.

Review of the Manurewa-Papakura ward

33.     The Joint Governance Working Party has not yet considered options for changing the Manurewa-Papakura ward boundaries. 

34.     In order to be only 10 per cent different to the average population to member ratio, the ward needs to gain a population of about 250.  The Franklin ward cannot lose population or it will become non-complying.  Any change to the ward boundary will need to be at the northern end.

35.     Staff have provided two options for local board comment back to the Joint Governance Working Party, in Attachment C:

·    Option 1: move the northern boundary of the ward on the western side of SH1 motorway up to Cavendish Drive

·    Option 2: move the northern boundary of the ward on eastern side of SH1 motorway northwards, just over the Redoubt Road ridge

·    Option 3: the status quo, which would need to be promoted to the Local Government Commission on the basis that it is not possible to achieve compliance without splitting communities of interest or uniting disparate communities of interest. 

36.     Staff recommend Option 3, given it is the least disruptive option, and that the degree of non-compliance is minimal.  It also means that the ward and local board boundaries remain aligned (the Local Electoral Act requires alignment as far as is practicable).

Review of the number of members in wards

37.     Wards are currently either single-member or double-member wards. 

38.     The Joint Governance Working Party has considered larger wards.  For example a southern ward based on the current Manukau, Howick and Manurewa-Papakura wards and having six members. Implications include:

·    The cost of a by-election across such a large ward if a vacancy occurs

·    Voter turnout – those elected will tend to be elected by areas with higher turnout, meaning there will not be as much a spread of representation as there is now

·    The cap on campaign expenditure is increased

·    Each of the six members will have the same large electorate to service.

39.     The Joint Governance Working Party also considered splitting current double-member wards into single-member wards.  If this was done using local board boundaries as defining communities of interest, only the Manukau ward, if split into two, would continue to comply.  The Joint Governance Working Party is recommending no change to current ward arrangements.

Local boards

Local board population

40.     The following table provides the population for each local board and the number of board members:

Board

Population

Members

Population per member

Rodney

       64,300

9

7,144

Hibiscus and Bays

     104,500

8

13,063

Upper Harbour

       65,300

6

10,883

Kaipātiki

       94,000

8

11,750

Devonport-Takapuna

       62,800

6

10,467

Henderson-Massey

     122,300

8

15,288

Waitākere Ranges

       54,200

6

9,033

Great Barrier

         1,000

5

200

Waiheke

         9,630

5

1,926

Waitematā

     108,500

7

15,500

Whau

       84,700

7

12,100

Albert-Eden

     109,200

8

13,650

Puketāpapa

       63,000

6

10,500

Ōrākei

       91,500

7

13,071

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

       79,700

7

11,386

Howick

     150,200

9

16,689

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

       81,100

7

11,586

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

       87,800

7

12,543

Manurewa

       94,500

8

11,813

Papakura

       54,500

6

9,083

Franklin

       74,600

9

8,289

Total

  1,657,330

 

41.     This table is provided for information.  There is no legal requirement that the number of members should reflect the size of population.  The 10 per cent rule only applies between internal boundaries of subdivisions.  Staff are not aware of any reasons for changing the existing number of board members.

Local board subdivisions that do not comply with the 10 per cent rule

42.     A table showing local board subdivisions in relation to the 10 per cent rule is in Attachment D.

43.     There are two subdivisions that do not comply:

·    Botany subdivision of the Howick Local Board (at 16.84 per cent, which needs to reduce its population)

·    Wellsford subdivision of the Rodney Local Board (at -10.69 per cent, which will be addressed in response to a suggestion to change the Warkworth subdivision).

44.     As the Manurewa local board is not affected by this issue, no further recommendations or analysis is offered.

Review of local board names

45.     At its workshop on 3 May the Board indicated that it did not wish to change the name of the local board.

46.     A name change has the potential to confuse the electorate and there are budgetary implications with changing associated stationary and signane.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

47.     The Auckland Council’s review of representation arrangements for the 2019 elections has implications for local boards.  These are discussed in the body of the report.  The report also provides comments on changes that affect the Governing Body, for local board information and feedback.

48.     Local boards have supported a process where a Joint Governance Working Party develops the Auckland Council proposal for presentation to the Governing Body.  The Joint Governance Working Party has joint local board and Governing Body representation.  The Governing Body will make the resolution required by the legislation which will be notified for public submissions. 

49.     Following the closing date for submissions the Governing Body must make the final statutory resolution within six weeks.  The Joint Governance Working Party will consider submissions.  So that the working party may liaise effectively with local boards, the local board is invited to delegate authority to the Chair or another member to represent the board’s views on the review should the Joint Governance Working Party seek further engagement with and/or feedback from the board prior to reporting to the Governing Body with a proposal in July 2018, or during the consideration of submissions following public notification. 

50.     There will be an opportunity for the Governing Body, when it makes its first resolution, to further consider a process for local board involvement in commenting on submissions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

51.     The Local Electoral Act 2001 provides for councils to establish Māori wards for electing governing body members.  There is no similar provision for local board elections.  The process for electing local board members is no different for Māori as for others. 

52.     The Auckland Council Governing Body has considered the possibility of creating a Māori ward.  A resolution to do so was required by 23 November 2017.  The Governing Body supported the creation of a Māori ward in principle but decided not to proceed further until the number of Governing Body members was able to be increased.

53.     When considering subdivisions and communities of interest within its area it may be relevant to take into account tribal rohe boundaries.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

54.     The review process is supported in-house.  There will be costs associated with public notices and a payment to the Local Government Commission for preparing plans of boundaries and having them certified by the Surveyor-General.  These costs are budgeted city-wide. 

55.     There are no financial implications for local boards.  There will be down-stream council costs if the total number of local board members is increased (salary and support costs) or if there are changes to local board names resulting in costs associated with changing signage and stationery. 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

56.     The legislation requires deadline dates for certain decisions and public notification.  Auckland Council has the greatest number of governance entities in the country (one governing body and twenty-one local boards) and there is a risk of not meeting these deadlines due to the need to involve all entities in the review.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

57.     The Joint Governance Working Party will consider local board feedback in June 2018 and develop proposals for consideration by the Governing Body at its July meeting, when it will make its statutory resolution for public notification.  This report provides the opportunity for local boards to have input. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā ward boundary options

201

b

Rodney ward boundary options

203

c

Manurewa - Papakura ward boundary options

205

d

Local board subdivisions and the 10 per cent rule

207

e

Botany subdivision boundary options

209

f

Rodney Local Board subdivision options

213

g

Waitematā Local Board subdivision option

217

h

Upper Harbour Local Board subdivision option

219

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for quarter three, 1 January - 31 March 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/06644

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Manurewa Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January - 31 March 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against local board key performance indicators, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2017/2018 work programme.

3.       Of significance this quarter, the Clendon Park Business Association was incorporated, the David Nathan Park Reserve Management Plan was adopted and development of a Conservation Plan for this park and the homestead was approved.

4.       Performance against the agreed 2017/2018 work programmes is tracking positively.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery (Attachments A and B). The majority of activities are reported with a status of green (on track) or amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·   Keith Park – renew toilet and playspace.

6.       Financial operating performance for the Manurewa Local Board area is unfavourable in the year to date. Operating expenditure is seven per cent over budget, mainly in the Rima facilities contract, however operating revenue is six per cent better than budget in facility hire and pool and leisure centres. Capital expenditure this last quarter has largely been a continuance of parks asset renewals plus further progress on the Waimahia playground and the Esplanade walkway development.

7.       An overview of the key performance indicators for the Manurewa Local Board show the year-end outlook is that 50 per cent of measures will not achieve target.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

1.         That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter ending 31 March 2018.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       The Manurewa Local Board has an approved 2017/2018 work programme for the following operating departments:

·   Arts, Community and Events; approved on 1 June 2017

·   Parks, Sport and Recreation; approved on 1 June 2017

·   Libraries and Information; approved on 1 June 2017

·   Local Economic Development; approved on 1 June 2017

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services; approved on 1 June 2017

·   Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew; approved on 15 June 2017

·   Community Leases; approved on 15 June 2017.

9.       The work programmes are aligned to the 2014 Manurewa Local Board Plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Key achievements for quarter three

10.     The Manurewa Local Board has a number of key achievements to report from the quarter three period, which include:

·   Clendon Park Business Association was incorporated with an executive committee of seven members plus one local board representative

·   The David Nathan Park Reserve Management Plan was adopted and development of a Conservation Plan for this park and the homestead was approved. Additional funding of $15,000 was transferred from budget line item #2042 to enable this to be completed.

Key project updates from the 2017/2018 work programme

11.     The following are progress updates against key projects identified in the Manurewa Local Board Plan and/or Local Board Agreement:

·    Manurewa has an attractive, prosperous town centre

The Manurewa town centre steering group has continued to make progress with the initiatives to support the Manurewa town centre and Te Mahia station. The group has also expanded its remit to support Clendon shopping centre and the newly established Business Association.

The Event Partnership Fund has been fully allocated and all funds have been paid out to the organisations. Accountability documentation will be provided in quarter four.

Staff organised for the Community Social Policy and Bylaws team to meet with the Clendon shopping centre manager and agree on the implementation plan for improving signage in the Homai Safety Corridor Alcohol Ban Area.

CCTV maintenance is tracking favourably with an estimated $9,000 remaining for quarter four. To date three cameras have been upgraded as well as the server recorder to add additional recording storage capacity.

·    All people are valued and encouraged

The Manurewa Community Network recruited new steering group members and an administrator. The network is identifying any capacity building needs that can be supported in the next quarter. Staff hosted a Lifelong Learning and Seniors Network workshop in February 2018. From this the Manurewa Seniors Network was established. The network will meet regularly, with the next scheduled meeting in quarter four.

The Clendon Libraries team is collaborating with the Clendon Pride hikoi team and will be providing bi-lingual activities in the library for participants on the day. One staff member has joined the Clendon Park Business Association which aims to uplift the Clendon shopping centre and associated areas.

·    Our natural heritage and resources are preserved and nurtured for future generations

As part of the Puhinui Stream restoration, contractors have carried out the second round of plant maintenance and some targeted weed control this quarter. A fish survey will also be carried out at the end of this quarter to target areas for planting. Over the next two months the contractors will be clearing patches of gorse and preparing the site prior to a second round of planting in May 2018.

The upcycling of unwanted clothes into cloth bags and cushions has resulted in the diversion of up to 100 kilograms of fabric from landfill. In this quarter, there were four upcycling workshops to learn different art and crafts approaches to using old clothes and five pop up workshops on how to make items using old pallet wood with ten ideas being shared on social media. Six tonnes of reusable inorganic products have been diverted from landfill and donated to local Manurewa organisations and residents who have then on sold, upcycled or repurposed them. Four pop up repair events resulted in the repair of weed eaters, lawn mowers and re-upholstery of furniture. Three workshops attended by 15 women covered how to make and sell beeswax wraps from home. Two residents are being supported to develop social enterprises using waste as a resource.

·    Spaces and places that people use and enjoy

Nathan Homestead received a total of 10,508 visitors, delivered 28 programmes with 273 participants, and delivered four programmes that were attended by 699 people. Highlights included the opening of the AwhiWorld Water Tower pilot project that activated the iconic water tower and surrounding bush area in the David Nathan Park, and the Fringe Festival Programme that attracted local and regional audiences.

The development of the 2018/2019 work plans for Te Whare Awhina, Clendon Park and Randwick Park Community Houses got underway, aligning with the 2017 local board outcomes. These will be finalised in the next quarter.  "More successful and sustainable community led places" workshops are underway with working groups to discuss the key themes that were identified from the initial six hui held in quarter two.

Movies in Parks, 'Cars 3' screened in January at Keith Park, Weymouth. Approximately 1,200 attendees enjoyed the evening with pre-movie entertainment included. The event was delivered as zero waste, smoke and alcohol free.

The Eugenia Rise Reserve neighbourhood playground and the Waimahia Reserve play space have been under construction during quarter three. Wet weather has made an impact on time frames, but they will be completed before the end of the financial year.

 

·    A healthy local economy

Clendon Park Business Association was incorporated with an executive committee of seven members plus one local board representative. A list of projects in line with the CPTED report and visuals audit of the Clendon Business area is being developed. In all, 24 areas of work have been identified by the businesses.

The Youth Connections team are partnering with The Southern Initiative to deliver a pilot project that will train local job coaches, who will provide pastoral coaching and support to local young people, with a view to support them into employment. Work is set to begin in the next quarter on a project plan for delivery. The project will link directly to the Youth Employer Pledge Partners and the next JobFest event.

The Rangatahi Youth Scholarship Assessment Panel met in quarter three and awarded $22,300 to 14 Manurewa rangatahi. The successful applicants will provide a report and/or a presentation to the board, on how the scholarship has supported their educational journey.

Key performance indicators

12.     The local board agreements include level of service statements and associated performance measures to guide and monitor the delivery of local services. This report provides information on the performance measure year-end outlook for Manurewa Local Board’s measures, showing how we are tracking after the third quarter of FY18.

13.     The year-end outlook is that 50 per cent of measures will not achieve target.

14.     Currently all performance measures are being reviewed as part of the development of the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan.

15.     Planning and development is on track. The key areas of below-target performance are related to Parks, Sport and Recreation, Community Services and Environmental management activity (see Table 1 below). These are the same as the previous quarter.

Table 1

1.      

1.      

1.      

1.      

1.      

1.      

1.      

Activity

Not on track to achieve target

Parks, Sport and Recreation

·    Percentage of residents satisfied with the provision (quality, location and distribution) of local parks and reserves

·    Percentage of residents who visited a local park or reserve in the last 12 months
·    Percentage of residents satisfied with the provision (quality, location and distribution) of sports fields

Community Services

·    Number of visits to library facilities per capita

·    Percentage of Aucklanders that feel connected to their neighbourhood and local community
·    Percentage of attendees satisfied with council delivered and funded local events
·    Percentage of Aucklanders that feel their local town centre is safe (night)
·    Facility Utilisation - utilisation at peak times and off-peak times for council managed community centres and venues for hire (off peak)
·    Number of visitors to community centres and venues for hire

Environmental management

·    Proportion of local programmes that deliver intended environmental actions and/or outcomes

 

16.     Further information can be found in Attachment D which provides an overview of the key performance indicators for the Manurewa Local Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report informs the Manurewa Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 31 March 2018.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

18.     As part of the Māori responsiveness budget line, staff have scoped opportunities to provide additional support/resources to existing projects that are addressing Māori aspirations. This has included meeting with Otara Health for an update on Te Ora o Manukau, and TSI staff about Māori engagement work in the Puhinui Stream restoration project and other existing projects. A meeting has been scheduled with Manurewa Marae in the next quarter.

19.     Manurewa Marae has viewed proposed concepts for the waka ama access to the Puhinui Stream and endorsed these concepts. Community Facilities staff will progress detailed designs and costings for a timber launching structure. The marae is supportive, in principle, of the development of a community volunteer-led initiative to manage the consented mangrove removal area adjacent to the marae. Staff are continuing to work with the marae on a mangrove and seedling removal plan.

20.     The Libraries Kōhanga Reo Reading Programme has commenced for the year with staff from both branches delivering the service. As a result of Kia Maia te Whai / Summer Reading Programme, two staff are involved in holding whanau interviews to gain insights into Māori involvement in the programme as part of an evaluation study. One staff member was an active member of Auckland Libraries Treaty of Waitangi and Tāmaki Herenga Waka celebrations working group promoting Māori services at these events.

Financial performance

21.     Operating expenditure in Asset Based Services (ABS) has exceeded budget as the Rima contract has overspent by $708,000. Increased administration and materials costs in leisure-based expenditure has been largely mitigated by increased revenues in this area.  Early Childhood Education costs have also reduced as attendance has dropped considerably overall and despite revenue losses, is operating better than overall net budget. Operating expenditure in Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI Opex) has an underspend of $51,000 year to date with some projects extending into quarter four.

22.     Operating Revenue is above budget by six per cent. In Community Services, revenue has continued to trend upwards for user charges at Wiri Hall, Weymouth Hall and Nathan Homestead. Te Matariki Clendon, Manurewa Leisure Centre and Manurewa Pool revenues have all exceeded budget. 

23.     Capital Expenditure of $1.89 million is $1.37 million behind budget year to date. Delivery against budget for the full year is 52 per cent.  Spend this last quarter of $600,000 was mostly a continuance of parks asset renewals plus further progress on the Waimahia playground and the Esplanade walkway development.

24.     There is $688,000 of Locally Driven Initiative Capex funding still to be allocated by the local board and most of this fund has been deferred into Y19, as project options are still being discussed.

25.     The Manurewa Local Board Financial Performance report is in Attachment C.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

26.     This report is for information only therefore has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

27.     The following risks have been identified by operating departments where the progress and performance indicator has been reported as red – significantly behind budget/time or achievement of outcomes:

·    Keith Park – renew toilet and playspace

   This project has been deferred from FY18 to FY19. Community Services have a review of service provision programmed for early FY19 and recommend that this be deferred until this review has been completed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

28.     The Manurewa Local Board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four, August 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Quarter Three Snapshot

227

b

Manurewa Quarter Three 2017/2018 Work Programme Update

229

c

Manurewa Quarter Three Financial Report

253

d

Manurewa Quarter Three Key Performance Indicator Report

261

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sarah McGhee - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 



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Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Further reprioritisation of Manurewa Local Board 2017/2018 budget

 

File No.: CP2018/06991

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report recommends options to the Manurewa Local Board for the further reallocation of its Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Through Auckland Council’s Long-term Plan, each local board receives an allocation of operational and capital funding to enable them to deliver local activities and projects aligned to their local board plan priorities.

3.       Following a reallocation process in April 2018, staff have identified some further Manurewa Local Board operational budget that will not be fully allocated as planned in this current financial year. The amount identified as currently available for reallocation is $61,945.

4.       During May local board members discussed projects they had identified for possible funding support.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      Note that it has $61,945 of its Locally Driven Initiatives funding available for reallocation.

b)      Allocate from the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget:

i)        $30,000 from the Town Centre revitalisation implementation budget line item 644 to the Totara Park Mountain Bike Club towards implementation of the Totara Park Masterplan.

ii)       $1,245 from the Event Partnership Fund - Manurewa (Movies in Parks) budget line item 17, $6,000 from the Planning for mangrove removal budget line item 2012, and $19,700 from the Town Centre revitalisation implementation budget line item 644, and $5,000 from the Community Response Operating Fund budget line item 321 to Community grants as a top up to the existing allocation.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       Auckland Council’s 21 local boards have decision making responsibility for local activities. Each local board is allocated operational funding in the council’s Long-term Plan which is used for the delivery of local activities, aligned to local board plan priorities, and allocated through the annual plan process each year.

6.       Each local board also receives an allocation of capital funding to enable them to deliver small, local asset-based projects, either directly, in partnership with the community, or through joint agreements between boards.

7.       During the course of the year, the council reports to the local board on the progress of projects and initiatives.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

8.       Following a reallocation process in April 2018, staff have identified some further Manurewa Local Board operational budgets that will not be fully allocated as planned in this current financial year. The amount identified as currently available for reallocation is $61,945. These include budgets allocated to Local Community Services ($6,245); Local Parks, Sport and Recreation ($6,000); and Local Planning and Development ($49,700).

9.       During April, members discussed projects they had identified for possible funding support. Staff provided advice and information to support members’ consideration of these. Each of these items is summarised below.

·     Totara Park - $30,000 to the Totara Park Mountain Bike Club towards volunteer activity that contributes to the upkeep of the tracks in Totara Park. These tracks are used by runners, walkers, dog walkers and marathon runners as well as the mountain bike club. The funding aligns to the implementation of the Totara Park Masterplan.

·     Community grants - $31,945 to the Community Grants scheme as a top up to the existing allocation. The final grant round has a significantly high number of applications and the remaining budget is limited. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

10.     Local board views have been sought and given at a workshop with staff on 5 April 2018. These views are reflected in the recommendations contained in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

11.     Several of the projects and initiatives considered by local board members for funding allocation have direct engagement with Māori. The Manurewa Local Board is actively engaged in fostering positive, meaningful relationships with mana whenua, mataawaka and the Manurewa Marae. The budget being reallocated was not tagged to specific projects so has not impacted on existing projects or initiatives.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

12.     The local board has $61,945 to distribute.  A total expenditure of $61,945 is recommended in this report.

13.     There are no financial issues with implementation foreseen at this stage.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     This reallocation does not present significant risks to the local board.  It is considered that the projects involving public participation will have adequate lead time to attain their outcomes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     Staff will initiate the implementation of the relevant new work programmes and payment of grants to the recipient organisations, as appropriate. It is anticipated that staff will report back to the local board on outcomes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Sarah McGhee - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - May 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/05586

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the six months Governance Forward Work Calendar to the Manurewa Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Governance Forward Work Calendar: a schedule of items that will come before local boards at business meetings and workshops over the next six months. The Governance Forward Work Calendar for the Manurewa Local Board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

i)    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)   clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month, be included on the agenda for business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar as at 10 May 2018.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       The council’s Quality Advice Programme aims to improve the focus, analysis, presentation and timeliness of staff advice to elected representatives. An initiative under this is to develop forward work calendars for governing body committees and local boards. These provide elected members with better visibility of the types of governance tasks they are being asked to undertake and when they are scheduled.

6.       Although the document is new, there are no new projects in the Governance Forward Work Calendar. The calendar brings together in one schedule reporting on all of the board’s projects and activities that have been previously approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes governing body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response.

7.       This initiative is intended to support the boards’ governance role. It will also help staff to support local boards, as an additional tool to manage workloads and track activities across council departments, and it will allow greater transparency for the public.

8.       The calendar is arranged in three columns, “Topic”, “Purpose” and “Governance Role”:

i)    Topic describes the items and may indicate how they fit in with broader processes such as the annual plan.

ii)   Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates

iii)   Governance role is a higher-level categorisation of the work local boards do. Examples of the seven governance categories are tabled below:

Governance role

Examples

Setting direction / priorities / budget

Capex projects, work programmes, annual plan

Local initiatives / specific decisions

Grants, road names, alcohol bans

Input into regional decision-making

Comments on regional bylaws, policies, plans

Oversight and monitoring

Local board agreement, quarterly performance reports, review projects

Accountability to the public

Annual report

Engagement

Community hui, submissions processes

Keeping informed

Briefings, cluster workshops

 

9.       Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar. The calendar will be updated and reported back every month to business meetings. Updates will also be distributed to relevant council staff.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     This report is an information report providing the governance forward work programme for the next six months.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     All local boards are being presented with Governance Forward Work Calendars for their consideration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The projects and processes referred to in the Governance Forward Work Calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     There are no financial implications relating to this report.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     This report is a point in time of the governance forward work calendar. It is a living document and updated month to month. It minimises the risk of the board being unaware of planned topics for their consideration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     Staff will review the calendar each month in consultation with board members and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Forward Governance Work Programme - May 2018

277

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Sarah McGhee - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Achievements Register 2016-2019 Political Term

 

File No.: CP2018/07499

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to record the achievements of the Manurewa Local Board for the 2016 – 2019 political term.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      request the following additions be added to the Manurewa Local Board Achievements Register for the 2016-2019 political term.

i)

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board 2016 - 2019 Achievements Register

283

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sarah Butterfield - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2018/07285

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Manurewa Local Board record for the workshops held in April 2018.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 1.4.2 and 2.15 workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of a workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received and nature of matters discussed.  Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

3.       This report attaches the record for workshops held on 5,11,12, and 26 April 2018.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Manurewa Local Board record for the workshops held on 5, 11, 12, and 26 April 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20180405 Workshop Record

293

b

20180411 Workshop Record

297

c

20180412 Workshop Record

299

d

20180426 Workshop Record

303

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Sarah Butterfield - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa and Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

Date of Workshop:            Thursday, 26 April 2018

Time:                                     4.30pm

Venue:                                  Manurewa Local Board Office meeting room, Shop 3-5, 7 Hill Road, Manurewa

Present:                               Angela Dalton (Chair)

                                               Stella Cattle

                                               Sarah Colcord

                                               Angela Cunningham-Marino

                                               Joseph Allan

                                               Rangi McLean

                                               Dave Pizzini

Apologies:                           Ken Penney

                                               Angela Cunningham-Marino

                                               Rangi McLean

 

Also Present:                      Councillor Daniel Newman

Workshop Item / Presenters

Governance Role

Summary of Discussion

Maintenance issues in Manurewa

Presenters:

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Mark Sabine - Senior Maintenance Delivery Coordinator

Trevor Hey - Maintenance Delivery Coordinator

Gwyn De-Arth - Area Manager Operational Management and Maintenance

Fraser Park - Contract Manager

Greg Hannah -Manager Project Delivery

Oversight and Monitoring

The board and Staff discussed a range of recent maintenance issues in Manurewa.

 

Changes to the Long-Term Plan and Annual Agreement Fees and Charge Update

Presenter:

Faithe Smith - Lead Financial Advisor 

Setting Direction / Budgets / Priorities

The board was updated on the changes to the fees and charges that will need to be taken into consideration when finalising the Manurewa Local Board 2018/2019 work programmes, and fees and charges schedules for the Long-Term Plan and Annual Agreement.

 

Changes to the Long-Term Plan and Annual Agreement Performance Measures Update

Presenter:

Faithe Smith - Lead Financial Advisor 

Setting Direction / Budgets / Priorities

The board was updated on the changes to the performance measures that they board will need into consideration when finalising the Manurewa Local Board 2018/2019 work programmes, fees and charges schedules and performance measures for the Long-Term Plan and Annual Agreement.

Workshop Six - Consider feedback received on local board priorities, LTP, Auckland Plan 2050 and draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018

Presenters:

Sarah McGhee - Senior Local Board Advisor  Manurewa

Jacqueline Pryor - Local Board Adviser Manurewa

Shelvin Munif-Imo - Engagement Advisor

Faithe Smith - Lead Financial Advisor 

Setting Direction / Budgets / Priorities

The board considered consultation feedback.

Local Board Time Catch Up / Check In With Board Members and Local Board Staff

N/A

Local Board Time Catch Up / Check In With Board Members and Local Board Staff

Workshop ended: 8:35pm

Next workshop/s: Thursday 3 May 2018 at 4.30pm, and Thursday 10 May 2018 at 4.30pm, Thursday 17 May 2018 at 4.30pm, Friday 18 May 2018 at  11.00am, Thursday 27 May 2018 at 4.30pm, and 31 May 2018 at 4:30pm.

 

Role of Workshop:

a)   Workshops do not have decision-making authority.

b)   Workshops are used to canvass issues, prepare local board members for upcoming decisions and to enable discussion between elected members and staff.

c)   Workshops are not open to the public as decisions will be made at a formal, public local board business meeting.

d)   Members are respectfully reminded of their Code of Conduct obligations with respect to conflicts of interest and confidentiality.

e)   Workshops for groups of local boards can be held giving local boards the chance to work together on common interests or topics.

 

 

    

    

 



[1] The Annual Review of Environment and Resources - environ.annualreviews.org

[2] Auckland’s Prime and Elite Soils 2013:TP2013/050, Auckland Council

[3] Most recent draft inventory, Waste Solutions, Auckland Council

[4] http://www.healthyaucklandtogether.org.nz/assets/Summary-Reports/HAT-Monitoring-Report-2017.pdf

[5] https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/read-the-journal/all-issues/2010-2019/2016/vol-129-no-1436-10-june-2016/6915

[6] Elevated Nitrate Concentrations in Franklin Surface and Groundwater: A Review: TP2016/015

[7] LAWA: http://www.mfe.govt.nz/fresh-water/about-freshwater/auckland