I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 17 May 2018

3.00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kit Parkinson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Carmel Claridge

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Toni Millar, QSM, JP

 

 

Ros Rundle

 

 

David Wong

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim  Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

11 May 2018

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: Kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Police update for the Ōrākei Local Board area                          5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Low Carbon Action Plan                                                           6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                           7

12        Rescind resolution OR/2016/124 and grant a new lease to the Ōrākei Tennis Club Incorporated, Kupe Reserve, 146 Kepa Road, Ōrākei                                               9

13        Business Improvement District (BID) Programme Compliance Report to Ōrākei Local Board for Financial Year 2016/2017                                                                13

14        Request for an alcohol ban at Gollan Road, Mt Wellington                                    17

15        Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two 2017/2018 Grant Allocations                             23

16        Auckland Transport Update to the Ōrākei Local Board – May 2018                     29

17        Review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections                                                                                                                                        35

18        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter three, 1 January - 31 March 2018                                                                               47

19        Chairman's report - Colin Davis                                                                                 53

20        Board Member Report – Kit Parkinson                                                                     67

21        Board Member Report - Troy Churton                                                                      83

22        Board Member Report – Carmel Claridge                                                                 85

23        Board Member Report – Ros Rundle                                                                         91

24        Board Member Report – David Wong                                                                        97

25        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      101

26        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Notes                                                                      107

27        Resolutions Pending Action                                                                                     117  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the minutes of the Ōrākei Local Board meeting, held on Thursday, 19 April 2018 and the minutes of its extraordinary meeting, held on Thursday, 10 May 2018, be confirmed as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Police update for the Ōrākei Local Board area

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To brief the Board on crime, prevention and trends within the local board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      thank Sergeant Rhys Smith for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Low Carbon Action Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the Public Forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Sarah Thomson will be in attendance to discuss low carbon action plans with the Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      thank Sarah Thomson for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

There were no notices of motion.

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Rescind resolution OR/2016/124 and grant a new lease to the Ōrākei Tennis Club Incorporated, Kupe Reserve, 146 Kepa Road, Ōrākei

 

File No.: CP2018/05670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To rescind an earlier resolution to grant a new lease to the Ōrākei Tennis Club Incorporated and replace it with a new resolution to reduce the lease area to encompass only the courts and clubroom.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       At the 1 September 2016 business meeting the Ōrākei  Local Board resolved to grant a new lease to the Ōrākei Tennis Club Incorporated (resolution OR/2016/124).

3.       The site plan that was attached to the new lease was copied from the former lease and included the reserve driveway and grassed area.

4.       Current practice is to exclude parking or driveway grassed areas in community leases. These areas should be available to all reserve users.

5.       Removing the driveway and grassed area does not impact on club activities.

6.       This report recommends that resolution OR/2016/124 be rescinded and replaced with a new resolution to reduce the lease area to include only the club’s courts and buildings.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      rescind resolution OR/2016/124 passed at the Ōrākei Local Board business meeting on 1 September 2016.

b)      grant a new community lease to Ōrākei Tennis Club Incorporated for part of Kupe Reserve, 146 Kepa Road, Ōrākei (Attachment C) on the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – 10 years commencing 19 April 2018 with one 10-year right of renewal

ii)       rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested

iii)      the Ōrākei Tennis Club Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the leased document.

c)      agree that all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Reserves
         Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

d)      note that there is a plan to reconfigure the activities on the reserve as a result of
         Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) concerns.

e)      note that the lease will need a variation to reflect CPTED concerns as noted in
         resolution c).

 

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       At the business meeting on 1 September 2016, the Ōrākei Local Board passed the resolution shown in attachment A.

8.       The plan attached to the report was copied from the former lease to the club that commenced in December 1999 and expired in December 2014. The lease area in that plan included adjacent areas of driveway and grass that are used by the club for parking during club activities (attachment B).

9.       Attachments B and C are aerial photos that describe the current approved lease area (B) and the proposed lease area (C). Attachment C shows an area that encompasses the clubs courts and building and allows the club to continue to carry out its activities in the usual way

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     Current practice is to exclude parking or driveway and grassed areas in community leases. This allows the area to be used by all users of the reserve.

11.     The Local Board could choose to allow the original resolution to stand and include the driveway and grassed areas in the lease. That means these areas would be for the exclusive occupation by the club which could exclude other reserve users from crossing these areas.

12.     It also means that the club is responsible for the maintenance of these areas with council responsible for the remaining areas of the reserve. This could lead to an inconsistent maintenance standard and make renewal and regular maintenance difficult.

13.     Providing a lease area that coincides with the extent of the club’s building and courts does not disadvantage the club. They are still able to use areas outside the lease area for parking during club activities. Excluding the driveway and grassed area also relieves the club from the maintenance responsibility and cost.

14.     The club has occupied their premises since 1947 and currently has a strong membership of 160 players of all age groups. Hours of operations are 8am to 10pm Monday to Sunday.

15.     The club has a resident coach and assistant that runs a comprehensive junior coaching programme. The club also runs the Tennis NZ Hot Shots program in the local St Joseph’s and Ōrākei Primary Schools. It offers two annual scholarships to junior players selected from the after school program run by Ngāti Whātua-o-Ōrākei.

16.     The club plans to continue building on local in-school coaching that they fund.

17.     The club was recently voted Tennis Auckland Club of the Year, and has significantly increased its membership and coaching programme over the last 18 months.

18.     The club’s facility is also used by Bodylight Pilates for two hours per week.

19.     The club has a refurbishment programme for the clubrooms and playing surfaces. To date the toilets and changing facilities have been upgraded and the roof replaced. Funding is now being sought to continue with the building upgrade and improvements to the courts and floodlights.

20.     The club was registered as an incorporated society on 26 October 1949 and is affiliated to Tennis Auckland. The club’s objective is “the development, enjoyment, promotion and playing of the sport of tennis and such other complimentary or ancillary sporting activities”.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

21.     Reconsidering the lease area has been discussed with the Local Board at several recent workshops. The members present supported approving a lease area to coincide with the court and building areas.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

22.     There is no reserve management plan for Kupe Reserve so at the time of the consideration of the 2016 report both public notification and iwi consultation was carried out. Fifteen mana whenua groups with an interest in the area were contacted and six responses were received none of which were opposed to granting the lease.

23.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan, the Auckland Unitary Plan and local board plans.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

24.     There are no financial implications or cost to the board relating to the proposed granting of a new community lease.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

25.     There is risk the club may challenge a new decision by the board. Staff attempted to revise the lease area with the club informally subsequent to the 2016 decision without success.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

26.     If the board approves the recommendations contained in this report staff will prepare a revised lease deed for sending to the club.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolution OR/2016/124 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Current lease area (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Recommended lease area (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Ron Johnson - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Business Improvement District (BID) Programme Compliance Report to Ōrākei Local Board for Financial Year 2016/2017

 

File No.: CP2018/06460

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide information to the Ōrākei Local Board on compliance with Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy 2016 (Hōtaka ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) by Ellerslie, Remuera, and St Heliers Business Associations in the Ōrākei Local Board area for the financial year ending June 2017.  

2.       To provide information which the Ōrākei Local Board can consider when deciding whether to recommend to the Governing Body to strike the targeted rate for these BID programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

3.       Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District programme supports business associations by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area.  The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a grant to the relevant business association (BID).

4.       The BIDs are incorporated societies that are independent of the council.  For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BIDs are being used appropriately, council requires the BIDs to comply with The Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Hōtaka ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

5.       The BID Policy was developed to encourage improved governance of BID committees and staff to improve financial management, programme delivery and transparency to their members. 

6.       The BID programmes covered by this report are operated by the Ellerslie, Remuera, and St Heliers Business Associations in the Ōrākei Local Board area.  Information presented in this report is based on documents submitted by these business associations to the council’s BID programme team to date. 

7.       Staff recommends that the Local Board should recommend to the Governing Body to strike the targeted rate sought by Ellerslie, Remuera, and St Heliers Business Associations in the Ōrākei Local Board area, as these BIDs have complied with the BID policy.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body to strike the targeted rates for inclusion in the 2018-19 Annual Plan/Budget for the following BIDs:

·        $152,000 for the Ellerslie Business Association

·        $242,564 for the Remuera Business Association

·        $138,484 for the St Heliers Business Association.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       Council adopted the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (Hōtaka ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) in 2016.  This policy outlines the principles behind the council BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, and terminating BIDs; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.  Please see Attachment A for a review of key elements of the BID programme.

9.       BID targeted rates are applied to all commercially-rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct. Those funds are transferred to the business association operating the BID programme.

10.     There are currently 48 BID programmes throughout Auckland which serve more than 25,000 businesses and represent a combined $17.5 million in targeted rates investment.  Please see Attachment B for current and proposed targeted rates budgets for all BIDs.

11.     Under Auckland Council co-governance arrangements, local boards have several decision-making responsibilities. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body. 

12.     Recommendations of this report are put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the 2018-2019 Annual Plan/Budget and striking of the targeted rates.

13.     This report is a requirement of the Auckland Council BID Policy (2016).

Compliance with BID Policy

14.     The BID Policy is the means for the council to ensure accountability for targeted rate funding, and encourage good governance, by requiring regular reporting specifically by providing to the council the following documents, and staying in touch with their local board at least once a year:

·   Current Strategic Plan – evidence of achievable medium to long-term opportunities.

·   Audited accounts -  assurance that the BID is managing its members’ targeted rates funds responsibly.

·   Annual Report on the year just completed. – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit ratepayers.

·   Business Plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the Strategic Plan, to be achieved and resourced.

·   Indicative budget for the following year - the Council Annual Plan requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Plan process which sets all rates.

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

·   Annual Accountability Form – certification that these requirements have been met.

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID and the council that embodies basic parameters of the council/ BID relationship.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

15.     The council’s BID team monitors compliance with the BID policy on an on-going basis, and provides governance advice to BIDs as needed or requested.

16.     As BIDs are operated by private independent societies, their programmes and services are provided according to members’ stated priorities.  In recognition of their independent corporate status, the policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness.  Officers, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

17.     The recommendation of this report is supported by evidence of full compliance with the policy by the Ellerslie and Remuera Business Associations in the Ōrākei Local Board area. Please see Attachments C and D for details of compliance for these BIDs.

18.     As the Ellerslie and Remuera Business Associations in the Ōrākei Local Board area have complied with the BID policy for the year ending June 2017, staff advice is that the Local Board should recommend the striking of the targeted rate for these BIDs.

19.     Whilst the St Heliers Business Association in the Ōrākei Local Board area failed to submit their accountability form by the deadline set in the policy (12 March), it was submitted on 20 April.  Please see Attachment E for details of compliance for this BID.

20.     The late submission of this document is not considered grounds to justify not recommending to strike the targeted rate for this BID, and staff advice is that the Local Board should recommend the striking of the targeted rate for these BIDs, as the BID has substantially complied with the BID policy.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

21.     Recommending that the Governing Body strike the targeted rate for the Ellerslie, Remuera, and St Heliers Business Associations in the Ōrākei Local Board area means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their districts, and will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their Strategic Plans.

22.     By continuing these services and programmes, the Ellerslie, Remuera, and St Heliers town centres should better serve residents and visitors, and support business growth.

23.     The Ōrākei Local Board approved a similar recommendation for these BIDs last year, as did the seventeen other local boards that have BIDs in their areas.  (Resolution OR/2017/52)

24.     A number of local boards provide additional funding to local BIDs but accountability for that funding is set by funding agreements between the local board and the BID.  Those requirements are apart from the requirements of the BID policy so are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

25.     This decision will have no adverse effects on, or particular benefits to, the Maori population.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that district.  The Council’s financial role is only to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association on a quarterly basis.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

27.     There is the possibility of reputational risks to the council if ratepayer funds are misused, but this is rare.  Otherwise, there are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to approve the targeted rates. 

28.     The requirements of the BID policy are intended to help minimise the potential for BIDs to misuse funds by requiring the BIDs to plan for the intended use of funds, report on its activities to its members, and to have its accounts audited. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

29.     If the Local Board accepts the recommendation of this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the targeted rates for this BID be struck as stated in the recommendations as part of its approval of the 2018-2019 Annual Plan/Budget.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key Elements of BID Programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

BID Rates 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 Comparison (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Ellerslie BID Compliance Summary Table (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Remuera BID Compliance Summary Table (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

St Heliers BID Compliance Summary Table (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Steven Branca - BID Partnership Advisor  

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Request for an alcohol ban at Gollan Road, Mt Wellington

 

File No.: CP2018/06967

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To decide whether to adopt an alcohol ban on the car parking area at the end of the Gollan Road cul-de-sac, Mount Wellington.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       To enable a decision about whether to adopt an alcohol ban on the car parking area at the end of the Gollan Road cul-de-sac, Mount Wellington, staff assessed three options:

·   Option one: Status quo - no alcohol ban

·   Option two: 5pm to 7am daily alcohol ban

·   Option three: 24 hours, 7 days a week alcohol ban.

3.       Staff recommend that the Ōrākei Local Board adopt a 5pm- 7am alcohol ban (Option two). Taking this approach could reduce alcohol-related disorder in the area during the times where there is evidence it occurs.

4.       If the local board adopts a 5pm- 7am daily alcohol ban (Option two), there are risks that the alcohol ban will not prevent non-alcohol related incidents, or that incidents will occur outside the alcohol ban hours.

5.       These risks could be mitigated through continued New Zealand Police (Police) responses using powers under the Summary Offences Act 1981 and Crimes Act 1961, and Auckland Council responses to noise and litter complaints. The local board could also consider community-focused solutions such as lighting or CCTV in the location to discourage disorder.

6.       If a 5pm- 7am alcohol ban is adopted (Option two), Auckland Council will notify affected residents of the decision, install new alcohol ban signage and update the council website. The Police are responsible for enforcing the ban.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt a 5pm- 7am daily alcohol ban on the car parking area at the end of the Gollan Road cul-de-sac, Mount Wellington (as in Attachment A).

b)      authorise the Manager Social Policy and Bylaws to make any minor edits or amendments to the alcohol ban in Attachment A to correct any identified errors or typographical edits.

c)      allocate up to $1,000 from the Ōrākei Local Board budget to cover the installation cost of signage at the end of Gollan Road.

 

Horopaki / Context

Residents requested an alcohol ban on the car parking area at the end of Gollan Road

7.       On 13 February 2018, a resident representing the neighbourhood community surrounding Gollan Road, Mount Wellington requested a 24/7 alcohol ban (Attachment B).

8.       The request concerns the car parking spaces for eight vehicles at the end of the Gollan Road cul-de-sac.

9.       The end of the cul-de-sac is located beside Maungarei / Mt Wellington and above a cliff with a view overlooking the suburb of Stonefields. An accessway at the end of the cul-de-sac provides a link between walking tracks on Maungarei / Mt Wellington and the Stonefields Heritage Trail.

10.     The request was made in response to alcohol-related incidents in the car parking area.

Alcohol bans prohibit alcohol, are adopted by local boards and enforced by Police

11.     Alcohol bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places (areas) during specified times.

12.     The Ōrākei Local Board has delegated authority to make alcohol bans under the Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 (Bylaw) (GB/2014/121).

13.     Local Government Act 2002 and Bylaw criteria (Attachment C) include that:

·    the alcohol ban responds to documented evidence of a high level of crime or disorder caused or made worse by alcohol consumption in the area

·    the alcohol ban be an appropriate and proportionate response to the evidence

·    the alcohol ban be a justifiable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms.

14.     The Police enforce alcohol bans using powers of search, seizure, arrest, and $250 infringement fees.[1] Police also have powers to address incidents of crime or disorder under the Summary Offences Act 1981 and Crimes Act 1961, whether or not alcohol is involved.

The requester and Police provided evidence of alcohol-related disorder

15.     Evidence from the requester and Police shows alcohol-related disorder (nuisance and threatening behaviour) is occurring in the area, mainly during the evenings and late at night. The frequency of incidents has increased to about four incidents a month. The evidence is summarised below, including in Tables 1 and 2.

Table 1: Summary of alcohol-related crime or disorder evidence from requestor

Key: afternoon = 12pm-4pm; evening = 5pm-7pm; night = 7pm-10pm; late night = after 10pm

Time period

Type and no. of incidents

Year and month

Time

February 2014 to March 2017

(3 years)

Nuisance (19)

·  2014: February, March, August

·     Late night (3) to mid-morning (1)

·  2015: September, October, November

·     Late night (1) to noon (1)

·     Unknown (2)

·  2016: January, March, May, June, October

·     Late night (1)

·     Evening (1)

·     Afternoon and evening (1) to late night (1)

·     Unknown (6)

·  2017: January

·     Evening/night (1)

Threatening behaviour (2)

·  2015: April, August

·     Afternoon (2)

April 2017 to March 2018

(1 year)

Nuisance (10)

·  2017: April, May, July

·     Late night (1)

·     Evening (1)

·     Afternoon (1)

·     Unknown (1)

·  2018: February, March

·     Late night (1)

·     Night/late night (2)

·     Evening (1)

·     Afternoon and evening (1)

·     Unknown (1)

Threatening behaviour (4)

·  2017: June, October, November

·     Evening (2)

·     Afternoon (1)

·     Unknown- daytime (1)

 

Table 2: Summary of police evidence

Time period

Type and no. of incidents

20 Dec 2017 to 3 April 2018

(3 months)

Nuisance (13), threatening behaviour (10), drugs related (1)

Note: Unknown how many incidents are alcohol-related. Police note that nuisance is likely to be associated with alcohol consumption.

16.     Evidence from the requestor includes 39 incidents in the car parking area from February 2014 to March 2018. Thirty-five of those could be linked to alcohol.

17.     There was about one incident every two months in the three years from February 2014 to March 2017. Incidents increased to one to two incidents a month during the 12 months from April 2017 to March 2018.

18.     Incidents of nuisance included loud music and yelling, litter, graffiti, public urination onto private property, bottles and rocks thrown onto the bank and the roofs of houses in Stonefields. Incidents of threatening behaviour included physical assault between intoxicated people, trespass onto private property, road burnouts and a crash into a parked car, aggressive behaviour.

19.     The request notes residents recently ceased mowing the berm due to the large amounts of unsafe rubbish (broken glass, used condoms, human faeces, and syringes) left.

20.     Police have received about eight calls per month about incidents at the end of Gollan Road in the three months since 20 December 2017 (24 incidents in total). Incidents included noise involving car loads of people drinking, suspicious behaviour, fighting/disorder and drug use.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

21.     Staff identified the following three options in response to the alcohol ban request:

·    Option one: Status quo - no alcohol ban

·    Option two: 5pm to 7am daily alcohol ban

·    Option three: 24 hours, 7 days a week alcohol ban.

22.     Table 3 below provides a comparative assessment of the three options against the legislative criteria in paragraph 14. An assessment of the advantages, disadvantages and risks of each option is provided in Attachment D.

Table 3: Comparative assessment of options to respond to alcohol ban request

Criteria

Option one: Status quo

Option two:

5pm-7am ban

Option three:

24/7 ban

Summary

Alcohol ban responds to documented evidence of a high level of crime or disorder

û

ü

û

·    Option one would rely on existing Police powers which to date have not reduced incidents of disorder.

·    Option two responds to evidence of recent high levels of disorder during the evening and night.

·    There is insufficient evidence of a high level of disorder occurring from alcohol being consumed there during the day to support Option three.

Alcohol ban is appropriate and proportionate response to the evidence

 

û

ü

û

·    Option one relies on existing systems which have not reduced incidents of disorder.

·    Option two is appropriate as it addresses the most common times that there is evidence of incidents. The proposed alcohol ban area is small and proportionate to the evidence.

·    Option three is not appropriate or proportionate with little evidence of incidents during the daytime.

Alcohol ban is a justifiable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms.

 

ü

ü

û

·    Option one imposes no limitations on people’s rights and freedoms.

·    Option two imposes limitations on people’s rights which are justified by evidence, and because the area is not intended to be used as recreational space, but as a carpark to access recreational space.

·    Option three imposes limitations on people’s rights and freedoms which are not justified because there is limited evidence of daytime alcohol consumption and disorder.

Staff recommend Option two: 5pm to 7am daily alcohol ban

23.     Based on the legislative and bylaw criteria, staff recommend adopting a 5pm to 7am daily alcohol ban (Option two):

·    an alcohol ban may assist in reducing alcohol-related disorder and improving perceptions of safety in the area

·    there is sufficient evidence of alcohol-related disorder in the area during the evenings and late at night

·    the alcohol ban area is small and proportionate based on the evidence

·    the alcohol ban is a justified limitation on people’s rights and freedoms in light of the evidence

·    there is support for the alcohol ban from Police and members of the neighbourhood community.

24.     Option one would rely on existing Police powers which to date have not reduced incidents of disorder.

25.     Option three is not an appropriate or proportionate response as there is not sufficient evidence of a high level of alcohol-related disorder during the daytime.

Police views

26.     Police consider 24 incidents in one small street to be a large amount. Police would expect to attend less than four incidents in a four-month period for a street the size of Gollan Road. An alcohol ban could have a preventative effect and give them stronger tools when responding to people drinking in the area.

27.     Police would actively patrol the area with an alcohol ban in place and enforce the alcohol ban when called. Police note that they would not necessarily be able to proactively patrol the area during peak times (for example Saturday nights).

28.     Police consider that an alcohol ban may not prevent other non-alcohol related nuisance such as smoking or sex in public but it will make the environment less appealing to those visitors.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

29.     An alcohol ban would support Outcome Two of the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2017- “Our residents are proud of their community facilities and public places”. The plan notes antisocial behaviour that impacts public places and neighbouring residents, especially late at night, is a challenge to this outcome.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

30.     Managing alcohol-related harm increases opportunities for health and wellbeing and is consistent with the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. Iwi have been widely consulted on the use of alcohol bans and have to date been supportive of their use.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

31.     The local board will incur the cost of signage (estimated at $500 for installation and $100 per sign). Police are responsible for compliance and enforcement costs. Staff recommend allocating a budget of up to $1,000 to allow for at least two signs and contingency costs.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

32.     If the local board adopts a 5pm- 7am daily alcohol ban (Option two), there is a risk that non-alcohol related incidents will still occur. There is also the risk that some incidents will occur outside the ban hours.

33.     These risks could be mitigated through continued Police responses using powers under the Summary Offences Act 1981 and Crimes Act 1961, and Auckland Council responses to noise and litter complaints. The local board could also consider community-focused solutions such as lighting or CCTV in the location to discourage disorder.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

34.     If the local board adopts a 5pm - 7am daily alcohol ban (Option two), staff will:

·    notify affected residents of the decision

·    notify Auckland Council Community Facilities to install new alcohol ban signage

·    update the council website.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed alcohol ban area (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Alcohol ban request (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Legislative and bylaw requirements (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Options assessment of advantages, disadvantages and risks (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Osborne - Policy Analyst

Bonnie Apps - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Wilson - Team Leader Bylaws

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two 2017/2018 Grant Allocations

 

File No.: CP2018/06382

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two 2017/2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two 2017/2018 (see Attachment B).

3.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Ōrākei Local Grants Programme 2017/2018 on 20 April 2017 (see Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants.

4.       The Ōrākei Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $220,000 for the 2017/2018 financial year. A total of $121,101 was allocated between Local Grants Round One, Quick Response Round One and Quick Response Round two, leaving a total of $98,899 to be allocated in Local Grants Round Two.

5.       Twenty-two applications were received for Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two 2017/2018, including four multiboard applications, requesting a total of $213,866.76.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two, listed in Table One.   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1812-211

Bach Musica NZ Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards weekly venue hire at Somervell Church for rehearsals.

$3,900.00

Eligible

LG1812-218

Ellerslie Theatrical Society

Arts and culture

Towards the venue hire of Ellerslie War Memorial Hall for rehearsals and performances.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-208

Remuera Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire at the Somervell Presbyterian Church for twice weekly meetings for retired Chinese immigrants.

$9,620.00

Eligible

LG1812-209

St Heliers and Community Support Trust

Community

Towards the architect and project leader fees to obtain a funding plan, architect drawings and scale costs.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-212

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the wages of clinical counsellor staff to train the helpline volunteers and provide immediate support.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-216

Mission Bay Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards maintenance costs of the Selwyn Reserve tree lights, fitness park signage and security cameras.

$20,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-222

Eastern Bays Toy Library

Community

Towards the annual rental costs of Glendowie Community Centre.

$1,300.00

Ineligible

LG1812-224

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards programme facilitation, supervision for the art therapists, administration and equipment for the "Arts 4 Us" workshops.

$4,181.56

Eligible

LG1812-228

Kids Safe With Dogs Charitable Trust

Community

Towards instructor wages, administration and printing of activity booklets.

$9,500.00

Eligible

LG1812-229

Ellerslie Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards ongoing operational expenses, including printing, accountancy, booking and website costs.

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-205

Eastern Bays Songbird Project Incorporated

Environment

Towards the programme manager fee for coordinating the 'Bringing back songbirds to the Eastern Bays through community action' project.

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-203

Ellerslie Business Association

Events

Towards costs for the Ellerslie Fairy Festival, Ellerslie Santa Parade and ARTerslie 2019 events.

$20,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-226

The Remuera Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards the overall costs of the Paws and Santa, Chinese New Year and Bastille Day events, specifically promotion, entertainment and production.

$25,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-219

Parish of Ellerslie

Historic Heritage

Towards the secondary glazing installation and the belfry repairs of the church.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-207

The Auckland Table Tennis Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the wages of the development coach, who will teach table tennis to students in Ōrākei schools.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-210

Kohimarama Bowling Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost to sand and varnish existing floors.

$8,400.00

Eligible

LG1812-213

Meadowbank Pony Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the installation of a watering system in the arena.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1812-215

Glendowie Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of hedge trimming on the club grounds.

$2,500.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$162,401.56

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each multiboard application in Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two, listed in Table Two.   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1820-219

Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Arts and culture

Towards advertising and tutor fees for dance, painting, Kungfu and chess sessions.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG1805-226

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the provision of health promotion, accredited visitor service and field social support services across West and Central Auckland.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1815-212

Project Litefoot Trust

Environment

Towards the overall cost of the LiteClub project, specifically salaries, materials, equipment, advertising and promotion.

$3,170.00

Eligible

LG1806-234

Kelly Group NZ Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards coaching fees and resources kits to deliver a traditional Maori games programme to 29 schools in Auckland.

$36,295.20

Eligible

Total

$51,465.20

 

 

 

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2017/2018 on 20 April 2017 and will operate two quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

12.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Ōrākei Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or deadline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

13.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

14.     A summary of each application received through Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two 2017/2018 is provided (see Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

15.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes. One organisation applying in this round has indicated their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

16.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015 -2025 and local board agreements.

17.     The Ōrākei Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $220,000 for the 2017/2018 financial year. A total of $121,101 was allocated between Local Grants Round One, Quick Response Round One and Quick Response Round Two, leaving a total of $98,899 to be allocated to Local Grants Round Two.

18.     For Ōrākei Local Grants Round Two 2017/2018, twenty-two applications were received, requesting a total of $213,866.76.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

19.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

20.     Following the Ōrākei Local Board allocating funding for local grants round two, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Grants Programme 2017/2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Ōrākei Local Grants Round Two 2017/2018 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Makenzie Hirz - Senior Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Shane King - Operations Support Manager

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to the Ōrākei Local Board – May 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/07181

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report:

a)      responds to Ōrākei Local Board (the Board) resolutions.

b)      provides updates to the Board on the status of its transport capital fund projects and brief updates on other Auckland Transport (AT) projects of interest to the Board.

c)      provides general information on AT’s activities in the Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In particular, this report:

a)      provides a progress update to the Board on its current transport capital fund projects, along with financial information indicating how much budget the board has remaining in this political term.

b)      provides updates to the Board on how the Board can provide input into the Regional Land Transport Plan.

c)      responds to Board resolution regarding Kohimarama Road, Kohimarama.

d)      notes consultation information sent to the Board for feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Transport’s May 2018 update report.

 

Horopaki / Context

3.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. They report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in their Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

4.       Auckland Transport continues to deliver a number of strategic projects in the Board area and they are discussed below.

Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP)

5.       The most important strategic project at this time is the development of the RLTP.  It is a plan for how transport delivery agencies (Auckland Transport, New Zealand Transport Agency, and Kiwi Rail) intend to respond to growth and other challenges facing Auckland over the next 10 years.  It includes a 10-year prioritized delivery programme of transport services and activities.  Essentially, it is a budget for Auckland’s transport expenditure.

6.       It is a statutory plan describing how these agencies intend to respond to growth and other challenges facing Auckland over the next ten years.  It will include a ten-year, prioritised, delivery programme of transport services and activities. Auckland Transport prepares the draft RLTP jointly with the New Zealand Transport Agency and Kiwi Rail. 

7.       RLTP consultation has changed, now being scheduled for early May 2018.  AT seek local board feedback on the plan.

8.       Details of the process are as follows:

·        RLTP consultation begins on Tuesday 1 May 2018 and closes on Monday 14 May 2018

·        Members from all 21 local boards were invited to an information, question and answer session on Monday 30 April 2018

·        Each local board will have an opportunity to give verbal feedback on the plan to representatives of the Regional Transport Committee (the decision makers for RLTP) on Monday 7 May 2018

·        There were also a number of public information sessions which local board members may also attend:

o   Monday 7 May 6pm – 8pm: Takapuna War Memorial Hall, 7 The Strand, Takapuna

o   Tuesday 8 May 6pm – 8pm: Manurewa Intermediate School, 76 Russell Road, Manurewa

o   Saturday 12 May 10am – 12 pm: New Lynn Community Centre, Main Hall 45 Totara Avenue, New Lynn

o   Saturday 12 May 2pm – 4pm:  Grey Lynn Library Hall, 474 Great North Road, Grey Lynn.

Quarterly report on Auckland Transport projects and activities

9.       Information about Auckland Transport’s activities over the past quarter (January – March 2018). Is included as Attachment’s A and B:

·        Attachment A – Ōrākei Local Board - Auckland Transport Activity Report

·        Attachment B – Ōrākei Local Board - School Community Transport Report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

10.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·        Be safe

·        Not impede network efficiency

·        Be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

11.     The Board has discretionary funding available for transport related capital projects of approximately $600,000 per annum.

12.     The Board’s current Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects are summarised in the table below. Anything in italics is an update on last month:

Project Name

Description

Status

Projected Cost

Shared path - Gowing Drive and Ōrākei Spine

Connect the community to the Glen Innes to Tamaki Shared Path. Currently no direct north and south link across the Shared Path to local schools, shopping and community facilities

 

The Board approved up to $2,000,000 of capital funding to the project.

 

The feasibility study commissioned found the link to be technically feasible with a total project cost estimate of $9,770,000.


The feasibility study was presented by the Board to the Governing Body on 2 November 2017. This was well received.

The Draft RLTP proposed funded capital program includes 5 million dollars for “a cycling and pedestrian feeder link from Gowing Drive area to the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Path.

Note:  As no formal resolution requesting $2 million of funding through the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), it is not taken into account in the Board Financial Summary below.

 

$9,770,000

Walkway Connection -Wilsons Beach to Shore Road Reserve

 

Walkway connection between Wilsons Beach and Shore Road Reserve

The Board allocated $30,000 to enable the development of the concept plans.

 

Community Facilities advise that they are completing this project using LDI funding and reporting directly to the Board.

 

From AT’s point of view, the project will be closed off in the LBTCF at a final cost of $17,775 and the remaining allocation returned to the Board for use elsewhere.

 

$30,000

Elwood Place Footpath Extension

 

Connect the existing footpaths at Elwood Place and the park

 

 

A resolution was approved in August 2017 requesting AT to proceed to detailed design and construction. This allows for a two metre wide path, removal of trees, installation of a fence and replanting. It does not allow for relocation of underground services as none are known at this stage.

 

Community Facilities are well advanced with design, consultation with adjacent owner and consent application.

 

$63,000

537 Selwyn Reserve Walkway

Close the gap in the current walking network in Selwyn Reserve

A resolution was approved in August 2017 requesting AT to proceed to detailed design and construction.

 

Auckland Council Community Facilities advise they have completed procurement of design services and are entering the investigation phase.

 

$148,000

Selwyn Reserve Cycle Racks

Improve amenities for cyclists in the park

The Firm Estimate of Cost (FEC) for two bike racks in Selwyn Reserve is $5,000.

 

Auckland Council Community Facilities advise installation has been delayed but should be completed by the end of June.

 

 $5,000

The Landing Entrance Upgrade

 

Improved entrance way to “The Landing” on Tamaki Drive

The design for The Landing has been completed and has a Firm Estimate of Cost (FEC) of $140,000.

 

Construction work for a new marine sports centre at the marina has started with completion due in 2018.

 

The Landing entrance construction will need to be delayed until completion of these works.

 

on-hold

 

Responding to Resolutions

13.     The ‘Resolution’ is recorded below in bold. Auckland Transport’s response is below the ‘Resolution’ in normal font.

Resolution number OR/2018/65

14.     That the Ōrākei Local Board requests Auckland Transport to provide an urgent update and explanation about the delayed work outside 35 Kohimarama Road, Kohimarama which is having an adverse effect on pedestrian safety in this area.

15.     Completion of works has been delayed as AT works through easement issues with the property owners.

16.     While legal issues are being worked though, AT intends on removing barriers, cones and general construction material from site to make the footpath more useable.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

Consultation Items

17.     The Board’s views are considered during consultation on proposed project schemes. The following project proposals were consulted and feedback sought by the Board in April 2018:

·        Implement new clearways along St. Johns Road near St. Heliers Bay Road

·        Signalise and upgrade the intersection of St. Johns Road and Felton Mathew Avenue, Meadowbank

·        Intersection improvements on Tamaki Drive and Watene Crescent, Ōrākei.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

18.     No specific issues with regard to impacts on Maori are triggered by this report and any engagement with Maori will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

19.     With regards to transport the Ōrākei Local Board’s only budget implications are related to the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.  The current financial status of the Local Transport Capital Fund is recorded below:

Ōrākei Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,385,895

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$809,625

Remaining Budget left

$1,576,270

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

20.     The “Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications” section of this report summarised the Boards LBTCF financial situation. This situation creates a risk that if the $ 1,576,270 currently unallocated, is not allocated quickly, and you wish to undertake new projects (ie: not Gowing Drive) then it may be difficult to deliver before the end of the current electoral term.

21.     It is suggested that this risk could be mitigated by:

·        Confirming allocation to Gowing Drive Project out of the LBTCF

·        Workshopping other options for the LBTCF spend.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board - Auckland Transport Activity Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Ōrākei Local Board - School Community Transport Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Felicity Merrington, Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections

 

File No.: CP2018/07373

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board an opportunity to give formal feedback on the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s representation arrangements have to be reviewed this year. The outcome will apply at the 2019 elections.

3.       The Governing Body finalised the process for conducting the review in December 2017, following consultation with local boards.

4.       The Joint Governance Working Party established by the mayor will develop a proposal for reporting to the Governing Body in July 2018.

5.       The local board is now invited to provide its formal feedback on the review, for consideration by the Joint Governance Working Party.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      endorse the general approach to the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections, which is to make changes on an issue-by-issue basis and to not seek significant change.

b)      endorse the Joint Governance Working Party’s position on the following matters with respect to the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections:

i.        that all Governing Body members are to continue to be elected by ward as decided by the Governing Body

ii.       that the current number of members in each ward is retained

iii.      that the Waitematā and Gulf ward non-complying variance (population per member) should be addressed by reducing the size of the isthmus part of the ward on both the east and the west of the ward as in ‘Option 1’, with the resulting changes for neighbouring wards as set out in that option

iv.      that the Rodney ward non-complying variance (population per member) should be retained on the basis that compliance would result in splitting communities of interest or joining disparate communities of interest

v.       that the area alongside the Kaipara Harbour does not have a community of interest with Warkworth, and that the Rodney Local Board is invited to provide feedback on the alternative options for subdivision arrangements.

c)      endorse the following recommendations with respect to the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections, noting that they have yet to be considered by the Joint Governance Working Party:

i.        that the Botany subdivision non-complying variance (population per member) should be addressed by moving the southern boundary of the Howick ward southwards and that the Howick Local Board is invited to provide feedback on the two alternative options

ii.       that the Manurewa-Papakura ward non-complying variance (population per member) should be retained on the basis that compliance would result in splitting communities of interest or joining disparate communities of interest

iii.      that the Waitematā Local Board consider whether subdivisions within the board area are appropriate

iv.      that the Upper Harbour Local Board consider whether subdivisions within the Board area are appropriate.

d)      provide any other feedback on the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections.

e)      delegate authority to the Chairperson to represent the board’s views on the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections should the Joint Governance Working Party seek further engagement with and/or feedback from the board prior to reporting to the Governing Body with a proposal in July 2018, or during the consideration of submissions following public notification.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

There are statutory deadlines

6.       All councils must, under the Local Electoral Act 2001, review their representation arrangements at least every six years. Auckland Council, under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, must conduct a review of its representation arrangements no earlier than the 2013 elections and no later than September 2018.

7.       The Governing Body considered conducting a review for the 2016 elections but resolved to defer this.

8.       The Local Electoral Act 2001 requires the following timeline and process:

·        public notice of the council’s proposals by 8 September 2018

·        consideration of submissions

·        public notice of the council’s final proposals within six weeks of the closing date for submissions. 

·        if there are no objections or appeals, the council’s proposals stand and are implemented

·        if there are objections or appeals, they are forwarded to the Local Government Commission for a decision.

9.       Staff are planning to report the Joint Governance Working Party’s proposals to the Governing Body meeting on 26 July 2018.

Role of the Joint Governance Working Party and the process for developing the Auckland Council proposal

10.     In 2017, the Governing Body endorsed a process for the review of Auckland Council’s representation arrangements for the 2019 elections that was then recommended to local boards. Local board feedback, which was generally supportive of the proposed process, was reported back to the Governing Body in December 2017.  

11.     The Governing Body, after considering local board feedback, made the following decision:

That the Governing Body:

a)  receive the feedback from local boards.

b)      note the mayor’s appointments to the Joint Governance Working Party as follows:

Cr Cathy Casey (Central), Cr Linda Cooper (West), Cr Daniel Newman (South), Cr Wayne Walker (North), Angela Dalton (South), Phelan Pirrie (Rural North), Richard Northey (Central) and Shane Henderson (West).

c)      approve the draft terms of reference for the Joint Governance Working Party for inclusion in the Auckland Council Committee Terms of Reference.

d)      approve the following process for conducting the review of representation arrangements:

i)        the Joint Governance Working Party will develop Auckland Council’s initial review of representation arrangements and present it to local boards and the Governing Body for comments before the Governing Body makes the statutory resolution for public notification for submissions.

ii)       the Joint Governance Working Party will conduct the hearing of submissions and report its findings to local boards and the Governing Body before the Governing Body makes the final statutory resolution on any representation changes, which will then be publicly notified for objections and appeals.

iii)      the Governing Body will review the process for hearing submissions under (ii) at the time the initial proposals for change are known.

12.     The rationale for (d)(iii) in the decision was to respond to some local board feedback regarding the hearing of submissions. The legislation requires a final proposal to be publicly notified within six weeks of the submission closing date. This may require a centralised process. However, this will be reviewed once the nature of changes being proposed is known.

Representation arrangements that may be reviewed

13.     For the Governing Body, it is possible to review for members other than the mayor:

·        whether members are elected by ward or at-large or by a mixture

·        if by ward, the number of wards, names, boundaries and number of members for each ward.

14.     For each local board it is possible to review:

·    whether members are elected by subdivision or at-large or by a mixture

·    if by subdivision, the number of subdivisions, names, boundaries and number of members for each subdivision

·    the number of members for the local board

·    the name of the local board.

Matters that are required to be taken into account

15.     The Local Electoral Act 2001 (Act) requires the council to take into account:

·    the effective representation of communities of interest

·    fairness of representation.

16.     Other requirements in the Act include:

·    ward boundaries should align with local board boundaries as far as is practicable

·    boundaries must align with mesh-block boundaries

·    when the council gives public notice of its proposal, it needs to give reasons for any changes from the 2016 elections.

17.     The concept of effective representation of communities of interest can be explained by considering a single electorate which has two quite different communities and two elected representatives. The outcome of each election might mean that both representatives are elected by one of the communities with the result that the other community will not be represented. This might be solved by splitting the total electorate into smaller electoral areas, each having one representative. In the case of territorial local authorities, those smaller electoral areas are known as ‘wards’ and in the case of local boards, those smaller areas are known as ‘subdivisions’.

18.     The concept of fairness means that the ratio of population to elected member for wards, in the case of the Governing Body, and subdivisions, in the case of local boards, should not vary across the region or local board area respectively. The legislation allows for a variance of up to 10 per cent. It further allows the council to not comply if compliance would result in splitting communities of interest or joining disparate communities of interest. The final decision on a proposal to not comply is made by the Local Government Commission.

19.     A practical consideration is the distribution of voting documents. Each voter receives a pack of voting documents which is relevant to that voter (the pack contains voting papers for the Governing Body positions and local board positions relevant to that voter). Misalignment of boundaries can create additional combinations of Governing Body and local board positions. This leads to additional cost in terms of voting documents. This reinforces the legal requirement for ward and local board boundaries to align as far as is practicable.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

The general approach is to not make significant change

20.     The Local Government Commission determined the current arrangements in 2010, following 736 submissions on its first proposal. There was a lot of public interest and the process was robust. There are no significant issues with the current arrangements.

21.     There have been discussions at local board cluster meetings and by the Joint Governance Working Party. Significant change has been considered (such as some Governing Body members being elected at large) but the outcome of these discussions to date is to basically retain the status quo except where changes are required.

22.     One significant issue though, which has been considered by the Governing Body, is the number of Governing Body members. The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 sets this at 20 members, in addition to the mayor. All other councils are able to review the number of councillors.

23.     The Governing Body, when it considered conducting a review of representation arrangements for the 2016 elections, decided instead to seek legislative change to allow it to review the number of Governing Body members. It also sought provision for re-aligning local board boundaries with ward boundaries, should ward boundaries need to change, and if there was support from local boards to keep boundaries aligned.

24.     This submission was not successful. The Governing Body is not able to review the number of Governing Body members. Local board boundaries are not able to be changed other than through the separate process of applying for a local government reorganisation.

25.     The council is continuing to advocate change, however any legislative change in the short term is unlikely to be effective for the 2019 elections.


 


Wards

Wards that do not comply with the 10 per cent rule

26.     Based on statistics provided by the Local Government Commission (being a 2017 estimate) population ratios are as follows:

Ward

Population

Members

Population per member

Difference from quota

% Difference

from

quota

Rodney Ward

64,300

1

64,300

-18,560

-22.40

Albany Ward

169,800

2

84,900

2,040

2.46

North Shore Ward

156,800

2

78,400

-4,460

-5.38

Waitākere Ward

176,500

2

88,250

5,390

6.50

Waitematā and Gulf Ward

119,100

1

119,100

36,240

43.74

Whau Ward

84,700

1

84,700

1,840

2.22

Albert-Eden-Roskill Ward

172,200

2

86,100

3,240

3.91

Ōrākei Ward

91,500

1

91,500

8,640

10.43

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Ward

79,700

1

79,700

-3,160

-3.81

Howick Ward

150,200

2

75,100

-7,760

-9.37

Manukau Ward

168,900

2

84,450

1,590

1.92

Manurewa-Papakura Ward

148,900

2

74,450

-8,410

-10.15

Franklin Ward

74,600

1

74,600

-8,260

-9.97

Total

1,657,200

20

82,860

 

27.     Final statistics will eventually be based on data provided by Statistics New Zealand at mesh-block level. Staff expect that final statistics will be very close to those that have been used in the review to date.

28.     As stated above, one of the matters that must be taken into account in the review is fairness of representation. The legislation requires that the ratio of population to member should not vary by more than 10 per cent unless there are reasons for not complying with this requirement (on the basis of splitting communities of interest or uniting disparate communities of interest). 

29.     There are four wards that do not comply:

·        Waitematā and Gulf ward

·        Rodney ward

·        Ōrākei ward

·        Manurewa-Papakura ward.

Review of the Waitematā and Gulf ward and neighbouring wards

30.     The Waitematā and Gulf ward has a population approximately 28,000 above the 10 per cent quota. The Joint Governance Working Party has considered three options to address this (maps are in Attachment A):

·    Option 1:  boundaries on both the east and west of Waitematā are moved

·    Option 2: the eastern boundary with the Ōrākei ward is not changed and there is substantial change on the western boundary with the Albert-Eden-Roskill ward

·    Option 3: the western boundary with the Albert-Eden-Roskill ward is not changed and there is substantial change on the eastern boundary with the Ōrākei ward.

31.     Each option has different flow-on effects to neighbouring wards.

32.     The Joint Governance Working Party recommends Option 1. The other options disrupt communities of interest to a greater extent. 

33.     For example, Option 2 takes areas around Ponsonby and Grey Lynn away from the central city into the Albert-Eden-Roskill ward.

34.     Option 3 places large areas of Ōrākei into Maungakiekie-Tāmaki. In the Local Government Commission’s first proposal for wards, Ōrākei and Maungakiekie-Tāmaki were combined.  Following submissions, the Local Government Commission determined that Ōrākei and Maungakiekie-Tāmaki were distinct communities of interest and created separate wards.  The commission took into account socio-economic differences and voting patterns. 

35.     The effect of Option 1 on the 10 per cent rule is as follows:

Ward

% Difference from quota

Whau

9.5%

Waitematā and Gulf

9.5%

Albert-Eden-Roskill

9.8%

Ōrākei

11.0%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

10.6%

Waitākere

6.5%

 

Review of the Rodney ward

36.     The Rodney ward needs to gain about 10,000 population to be only 10 per cent under the quota. The Joint Governance Working Party has considered three options (maps are in Attachment B):

·    Option1: the area north of the Whangaparaoa peninsula which is currently in the Albany ward is moved into Rodney (Orewa, Hatfields, Waiwera)

·    Option 2: the southern boundary of Rodney ward is moved southwards

·    Option 3: the council proposes the status quo, which is not complying, on the basis that any options to increase the population in the Rodney ward split communities of interest.

37.     The Joint Governance Working Party recommends Option 3. Both Option 1 and Option 2 split communities of interest. 

38.     In Option 1, the area from Orewa to Waiwera shares a community of interest with the Hibiscus Coast. 

39.     Option 2 is difficult to achieve without splitting a community of interest. Option 2 as shown, moves the Rodney ward boundary south to include Whenuapai and Paremoremo and it borders Ranui and Westgate. The Whenuapai area is assumed to be south-looking rather than north-looking; for example, residents in Whenuapai would tend to go south for key activities like retail shopping or business, rather than north. Another option for a boundary is along the Upper Harbour motorway. However, this splits the Hobsonville community.

40.     Further reasons for keeping the status quo include:

·    ward and local board boundaries remain aligned (the Local Electoral Act requires alignment as far as is practicable)

·    the current boundaries are the boundaries originally set by the Local Government Commission as representing communities of interest

·    population is increasing and will continue to increase over time.

Review of the Manurewa-Papakura ward

41.     The Joint Governance Working Party has not yet considered options for changing the Manurewa-Papakura ward boundaries. 

42.     In order to be only 10 per cent different to the average population to member ratio, the ward needs to gain a population of about 250. The Franklin ward cannot lose population, or it will become non-complying. Any change to the ward boundary will need to be at the northern end.

43.     Staff have provided two options for local board comment back to the Joint Governance Working Party, in Attachment C:

·    Option 1: move the northern boundary of the ward on the western side of SH1 motorway up to Cavendish Drive

·    Option 2: move the northern boundary of the ward on eastern side of SH1 motorway northwards, just over the Redoubt Road ridge

·    Option 3: the status quo, which would need to be promoted to the Local Government Commission on the basis that it is not possible to achieve compliance without splitting communities of interest or uniting disparate communities of interest. 

44.     Staff recommend Option 3, given it is the least disruptive option, and that the degree of non-compliance is minimal. It also means that the ward and local board boundaries remain aligned (the Local Electoral Act requires alignment as far as is practicable).

Review of the number of members in wards

45.     Wards are currently either single-member or double-member wards. 

46.     The Joint Governance Working Party has considered larger wards; for example, a southern ward based on the current Manukau, Howick and Manurewa-Papakura wards and having six members. Implications include:

·    the cost of a by-election across such a large ward if a vacancy occurs

·    voter turnout – those elected will tend to be elected by areas with higher turnout, meaning there will not be as much a spread of representation as there is now

·    the cap on campaign expenditure is increased

·    each of the six members will have the same large electorate to service.

47.     The Joint Governance Working Party also considered splitting current double-member wards into single-member wards. If this was done using local board boundaries as defining communities of interest, only the Manukau ward, if split into two, would continue to comply.  The Joint Governance Working Party is recommending no change to current ward arrangements.

Local boards

Local board population

48.     The following table provides the population for each local board and the number of board members:

Board

Population

Members

Population per member

Rodney

       64,300

9

7,144

Hibiscus and Bays

     104,500

8

13,063

Upper Harbour

       65,300

6

10,883

Kaipātiki

       94,000

8

11,750

Devonport-Takapuna

       62,800

6

10,467

Henderson-Massey

     122,300

8

15,288

Waitākere Ranges

       54,200

6

9,033

Great Barrier

         1,000

5

200

Waiheke

         9,630

5

1,926

Waitematā

     108,500

7

15,500

Whau

       84,700

7

12,100

Albert-Eden

     109,200

8

13,650

Puketāpapa

       63,000

6

10,500

Ōrākei

       91,500

7

13,071

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

       79,700

7

11,386

Howick

     150,200

9

16,689

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

       81,100

7

11,586

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

       87,800

7

12,543

Manurewa

       94,500

8

11,813

Papakura

       54,500

6

9,083

Franklin

       74,600

9

8,289

Total

  1,657,330

 

49.     This table is provided for information. There is no legal requirement that the number of members should reflect the size of population. The 10 per cent rule only applies between internal boundaries of subdivisions. Staff are not aware of any reasons for changing the existing number of board members.

Local board subdivisions that do not comply with the 10 per cent rule

50.     A table showing local board subdivisions in relation to the 10 per cent rule is in Attachment D.

51.     There are two subdivisions that do not comply:

·        Botany subdivision of the Howick Local Board (at 16.84 per cent, which needs to reduce its population)

·        Wellsford subdivision of the Rodney Local Board (at -10.69 per cent, which will be addressed in response to a suggestion to change the Warkworth subdivision).

Review of the Botany subdivision in the Howick Local Board area

52.     Maps showing the current subdivision boundaries and two alternative options are contained in Attachment E.

53.     It is clear that the only way for the Botany subdivision to lose population is through the Howick subdivision extending southwards. There are two options proposed for consideration by local boards.

54.     One option expands the Howick subdivision southwards on the eastern side of Botany Road only, while the second option expands the Howick subdivision southwards on both sides of Botany Road. Each option results in subdivisions that comply with the 10 per cent rule. 

55.     The Howick Local Board is invited to indicate its preferred option. This would be the option which has the least disruptive effect on existing communities of interest.

Review of the subdivisions in the Rodney Local Board area

56.     A submission has been received from a resident, Mr Grant Kirby, living near the Kaipara Harbour, pointing out that the Warkworth subdivision extends from coast to coast. Mr Kirby was a former chair of the Local Government Commission. The submission states that the area alongside the Kaipara Harbour does not share a community of interest with Warkworth and suggests extending the Kumeu subdivision boundary northwards, to follow the Helensville electoral boundary.

57.     Maps showing current subdivisions, the option of extending the Kumeu subdivision northwards and an option of extending the Wellsford subdivision southwards, are contained in Attachment F. Both options result in subdivisions that comply with the 10 per cent rule.

58.     The Joint Governance Working Party agrees that those near the Kaipara Harbour do not share a community of interest with Warkworth and invites the Rodney Local Board to recommend its preferred option in view of its knowledge of current communities of interest.

Waitematā Local Board subdivisions

59.     A suggestion has been received that the Waitematā Local Board should have a central subdivision. A map is contained in Attachment G showing what this might look like.

60.     The Waitematā Local Board is invited to recommend whether subdivisions should be created in order to promote more effective representation of communities of interest and, if so, whether it supports the proposed option.

Upper Harbour Local Board subdivisions

61.     A suggestion has been received that the Upper Harbour Local Board should have subdivisions to ensure there was representation from the western end of the local board area. A map is contained in Attachment H showing an arrangement of three subdivisions that complies with the 10 per cent rule.

62.     The Upper Harbour Local Board is invited to recommend whether subdivisions should be created to improve effective representation of communities of interest and if so, whether it supports the proposed option.

Review of local board names

63.     Staff noted comments at local board cluster meetings and other meetings that some current names may not be appropriate. These include:

(i)         Howick Local Board and Ward: ‘Howick’ is only part of the local board area

(ii)        Waitematā Local Board and Ward: Some people associate ‘Waitematā’ with a different area (for example the area of the Waitematā District Health Board)

(iii)       Ōrākei Local Board and Ward: ‘Ōrākei’ is only part of the local board area

(iv)       Albany Ward: ‘Albany’ is only part of the ward area.

64.     The Great Barrier Local Board has recommended adding ‘Aotea’ to its name. This acknowledges a recent Treaty of Waitangi settlement with Ngati Rehua - Ngatiwai ki Aotea.

65.     Apart from the Great Barrier Local Board proposal, staff are not aware of any other specific proposals and are not researching alternative names. Local boards should note that a name change has the potential to confuse the electorate and there are budgetary implications with changing associated stationery and signage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

66.     The Auckland Council’s review of representation arrangements for the 2019 elections has implications for local boards. These are discussed in the body of the report. The report also provides comments on changes that affect the Governing Body, for local board information and feedback.

67.     Local boards have supported a process where a Joint Governance Working Party develops the Auckland Council proposal for presentation to the Governing Body. The Joint Governance Working Party has joint local board and Governing Body representation. The Governing Body will make the resolution required by the legislation which will be notified for public submissions. 

68.     Following the closing date for submissions, the Governing Body must make the final statutory resolution within six weeks. The Joint Governance Working Party will consider submissions. So that the working party may liaise effectively with local boards, the local board is invited to delegate authority to the Chairperson or another member to represent the board’s views on the review. This is in the event that the Joint Governance Working Party seek further engagement with and/or feedback from the board prior to reporting to the Governing Body with a proposal in July 2018, or during consideration of submissions following public notification. 

69.     There will be an opportunity for the Governing Body, when it makes its first resolution, to further consider a process for local board involvement in commenting on submissions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

70.     The Local Electoral Act 2001 provides for councils to establish Māori wards for electing Governing Body members. There is no similar provision for local board elections. The process for electing local board members is no different for Māori as for others. 

71.     The Auckland Council Governing Body has considered the possibility of creating a Māori ward. A resolution to do so was required by 23 November 2017. The Governing Body supported the creation of a Māori ward in principle but decided not to proceed further until the number of Governing Body members was able to be increased.

72.     When considering subdivisions and communities of interest within its area, it may be relevant to take into account tribal rohe boundaries.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

73.     The review process is supported in-house. There will be costs associated with public notices and a payment to the Local Government Commission for preparing plans of boundaries and having them certified by the Surveyor-General. These costs are budgeted city-wide. 

74.     There are no financial implications for local boards. There will be down-stream council costs if the total number of local board members is increased (salary and support costs) or if there are changes to local board names resulting in costs associated with changing signage and stationery. 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

75.     The legislation requires deadline dates for certain decisions and public notification.  Auckland Council has the greatest number of governance entities in the country (one Governing Body and 21 local boards) and there is a risk of not meeting these deadlines due to the need to involve all entities in the review.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

76.     The Joint Governance Working Party will consider local board feedback in June 2018 and develop proposals for consideration by the Governing Body at its July meeting, when it will make its statutory resolution for public notification. This report provides the opportunity for local boards to have input. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā ward boundary options (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Rodney ward boundary options (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Manurewa-Papakura ward boundary options (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Local board subdivisions and the 10 per cent rule (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Botany subdivision boundary options (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Rodney Local Board subdivision options (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Waitematā Local Board subdivision option (Under Separate Cover)

 

h

Upper Harbour Local Board subdivision option (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter three, 1 January - 31 March 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/07216

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January - 31 March 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report covers financial performance, progress against local board key performance indicators, progress against work programmes, key challenges the Local Board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2017/2018 work programme.

3.       Of significance this quarter are:

·        The signing of a new lease for former works depot buildings on Waiatarua Reserve by the Men’s Shed Auckland East Incorporated

·        Successful meetings with the four business associations in the Ōrākei Local Board area and with a group of Lunn Ave businesses

·        Approval of the Tamaki Drive Precinct Event Guidelines, and

·        Completion of the Ōrākei Local Board Progress and Achievements Report (1 July 2016 - 31 December 2017).

4.       Performance against the agreed 2017/2018 work programmes is tracking positively.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. The majority of activities are reported with a status of green (on track) or amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        Mangrove Removal in Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve, and

·        Mangrove Removal in Hobson Bay.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2017/2018 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note.

7.       Overall results show:

·        Operating result is 21 per cent below the budget due to lower operating revenue and expenditure. 

·        Revenue is 29 per cent below budget mainly due to sports field charges which were waived for this financial year, offset by higher revenue from community centres. 

·        Operating expenditure is 21 per cent behind budget mainly in full facility parks contract.

·        Capital expenditure is 55 per cent behind budget in local library renewals, parks and coastal asset renewals and development projects.

 

8.       The key performance indicators show a trend of delivery that is meeting some indicators, with the exceptions being in the areas of:

·        Percentage of residents visiting local parks

·        Satisfaction level for the provision of sports fields

·        Percentage of residents feeling connected to their neighbourhood or local community, and

·        Satisfaction levels for council-delivered and/or funded local events.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter ending 31 March 2018

Horopaki / Context

9.       The Ōrākei Local Board has an approved 2017/2018 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events: approved on 15 June 2017

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation: approved on 15 June 2017

·        Libraries and Information: approved on 15 June 2017

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services: approved on 15 June 2017

·        Local Economic Development: approved on 15 June 2017

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew; approved on 3 August 2017

·        Community Leases: approved on 3 August 2017.

10.     The work programmes are aligned to the 2014 Ōrākei Local Board Plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Key achievements for quarter three

11.     The Ōrākei Local Board has a number of key achievements to report from the quarter three period, which include:

·        A new lease of the former works depot buildings in Waitatarua Reserve to the Men’s Shed Auckland East Incorporated.

·        More than $13,000 was allocated, in addition to nearly $120, 000 in the previous quarter, to a variety of community and interest groups through the local contestable grants and quick response funding rounds.

·        Undertaking a number of events with good attendance by local residents as part of consultation process for the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and other strategic plans.

·        Approval of the concept plan for Tahapa Reserve which includes a basketball court and new play area.

·        Approval of the Tamaki Drive Precinct Event Guidelines.

·        Completion of the Ōrākei Local Board Progress and Achievements Report (1 July 2016 - 31 December 2017).

Key project updates from the 2017/2018 work programme

12.     A number of line items in the work programme have been aggregated, such as the four upgrade line items for St Heliers Library.

13.     The Activity Name for line item ID 3449 is incorrect and should be renamed as it does not relate to the Watercare pump station at Hobson Bay but to the pump station at Riddell Road.

14.     The following are progress updates on key projects identified in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan and/or Local Board Agreement:

Projects Identified as Amber

15.     A number of projects or work programme items have been delayed. They are:

·        St Heliers Library comprehensive renewal and other upgrades (ID 2612, 2613, 2614 and 3195). These projects have been bundled together and are dependent on seismic assessments being undertaken on all council buildings across Auckland.

·        Tamaki Drive Searchlight Emplacements (ID 2805). Emplacement three will be restored first and design is underway. In the meantime, an interpretation board for all emplacements has been approved and will be installed on the waterfront in April.

·        Michaels Ave Reserve playground (ID 3411). The upgrade of the playground is on hold as staff advised it should wait until the construction of changing rooms and public toilets (ID2602). They are now assessing whether it can go ahead, as it may still be some time before the changing rooms are built.

·        Colin Maiden Park new hockey turf (ID2598). Auckland Hockey needs to apply for resource consent for the two proposed hockey fields before the double turf can be constructed. The area that will subject to a new lease (ID 2865) also needs to be agreed. The project is likely to be deferred to 2018/2019

·        Colin Maiden Park development stage 2 (ID 2816) includes the installation of sand fields and renewal or installation of new lighting on fields 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. This work has been deferred to 2018/2019 while an implementation and project management programme for the park is determined.

·        Kupe South Reserve Playground Renewal (ID 3045). The development plan has been adopted and components of the plan itemised and costed.

·        Ōrākei Park Signage – new signs and renewals (ID 3137, 3138). After some delay, signs will be installed in late May.

·        Wairua Reserve Playground Renewal (ID 3242). This project involves students from Saint Kentigern Girls’ School and is being tendered. Construction is likely in July.

·        Ladies Bay Steps (ID 3439). Current funding ($75 000) is insufficient but due to the need to address the associated safety issues, the project is recommended to proceed with additional funding in 2018/2019.

·        Seven lease contracts are awaiting agreement from or further negotiations with the clubs: Oceania Football Club (ID 1791), Ōrākei Tennis Club (ID 1792), Outboard Boating Club (1793), Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust (ID 1794), Auckland University Cricket Club (ID 2863), Eastern Bays Gymnastics (ID 2864) and the Ellerslie Sports Trust (1788).

Projects Completed in this Quarter

16.     In addition to projects that were completed in the previous quarter, the following projects or programmes have been successfully delivered:

·        Waitatarua Reserve renewal of structure and paths (ID 2616). Work has been completed on most assets. However, some of the walkway and bridge to the lookout point were still covered by water after heavy rainfall, so could not be completed.

·        Upgrade of fire alarm and switchboards at halls and community centres (ID 3139).

·        Young Enterprise Scheme (ID 1029). The events associated with this scheme took place between 19 - 23 February this year.

·        Men’s Shed Lease at Waiatarua Reserve (ID 2866). The lease arrangement was reported to the Local Board in February and the group has since signed the lease documents.

Key performance indicators

17.     The local board agreements include level of service statements and associated performance measures to guide and monitor the delivery of local services. This report provides information on the performance measure year-end outlook for Ōrākei i Local Board’s measures, showing how performance is tracking after the third quarter of 2017/2018.

18.     The year-end outlook is that 37 per cent of measures will not achieve target.

19.     The key performance indicators show a trend of delivery that is meeting the indicators in the areas of libraries, planning and development, environmental management and community grants

20.     Targets are not being met in the following areas:

·        The percentage of residents visiting local parks, although this is higher than the Auckland average.

·        Satisfaction levels for the provision of sports fields, possibly because of unavailability due to recent upgrades and the on-going shortfall of lit and week day fields.

·        The percentage of residents feeling connected to their neighbourhood or local community, which may also be related to a drop in the number of visits to council-run centres.

·        Satisfaction levels for council-delivered and/or funded local events.

21.     Currently all performance measures are being reviewed as part of the development of the 2018-2028 Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

22.     Attachment D contains further detailed Key Performance Indictor information.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

23.     This report informs the Ōrākei Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 31 March 2018.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

24.     A draft plan for Kepa Bush is almost complete. It shows how the reserve can be further enhance, integrating with the wider Pourewa Valley and the plan that Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei is preparing for Pourewa Reserve.

25.     Staff have consulted with Mana Whenua on a number of parks projects, including mangrove removal in Hobson Bay and Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve. The naming of the reserve at 3-5 Tamaki Drive, where the name “Hakumau” was suggested by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and will considered by the Ōrākei Local Board at its business meeting in April.

26.     On-going meetings between Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Trust Board representatives and kaumatua are occurring with a view to building a stronger relationship between the parties. Central to the meetings are a number of parks and environmental enhancement projects.  

27.     The projects and liaison with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei are aligned with the Ōrākei Local Board Plan’s initiative: “Work with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei on restorative projects to improve water quality, including in Ōkahu Bay and its inland catchment”.

Financial performance

28.     Revenue is behind budget by $82,000 due to sports field charges which are waived for this financial year.

29.     Expenditure is below budget by $2.0 million mainly in Asset Based Services - full facility parks contract. In locally driven initiatives (LDI), further discretionary funding will be allocated in the next quarter and some local parks initiatives are still in progress.

30.     Capital spend this quarter is $3.6 million under budget in asset renewals and development projects.  Projects in progress include the Waiatarua Reserve car park development, Michaels Ave Reserve acoustic wall, mesh fence and lighting, and Madills Farm Recreation Reserve sand carpet and lighting

31.     Attachment C contains further detailed financial information.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

32.     This report is for information only therefore has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

33.     The following risks have been identified by operating departments where the progress and performance indicator has been reported as red – significantly behind budget, completion date or achievement of outcomes:

·        Enhancing council-owned heritage features in Ōrākei area (ID 3343) $75,000. This is a duplicate of a similar line item (ID 2805).

·        Hobson Bay mangrove removal  (ID 3336) $64,000.

·        Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve mangrove removal (ID 3338) $60,000.

34.     The budgets for mangrove removal in both Hobson Bay and Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve will need to be carried forward to the 2018/2019 financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

35.     The Local Board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four, August 2018.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Q3 Attachment A Snapshot (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Ōrākei Q3 Attachment B WP Update (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Ōrākei Q3 Attachment C Financial Performance (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Ōrākei Q3 Attachment D Performance Measures Results (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Hayley King  - Local Board Advisor - Ōrākei

Authoriser

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Chairman's report - Colin Davis

 

File No.: CP2018/07424

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since last reported.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board Plaques and Memorials in Parks and Reserves Policy and Guidelines be adopted.

 

Portfolio Lead:  Arts, Events and Libraries; Heritage

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Resource Consenting and Regulatory; Civil Defence and Emergency Management

Change of Chairman

This is my last report as Chairman of the Ōrākei Local Board as my 18-month term expires on 16 May. It has been a privilege to have served in this role. I am conscious that I am leading a team. There have been many achievements by the Board; some of these have been listed in the recently approved Achievements Report. There are a number I have been particularly proud of, for example the Stonefields Heritage Trail which I helped to bring to fruition after some ten years or so, and the Board’s three year Plan. There are others which I have initiated such as the re-writing of the Ōrākei Basin Advisory Group’s Terms of Reference which has now enabled the Board to proceed positively with developing and funding the Ōrākei Basin Management Plan; the ANZAC youth public speaking prize; and the development of the Board’s ANZAC Day commemoration at St Heliers which continues to attract large crowds. In my portfolio roles I have devoted time to writing and sourcing photos for an inventory of sites which I consider to be of heritage significance, and artworks, in the Board’s area, and updated the Board’s World War One Roll of Honour. 

It is unfortunate that the recent article in Our Auckland has given quite a number of residents across the Board’s area the incorrect impression that the words “stepping down” means that I have retired from the Board (and presumably the impression that a by-election is looming with attendant costs to the ratepayers!). I hope the communications team will find ways to clarify this.       

Ōrākei Local Board Office

There has been no change to the estimated relocation date of July 2018 or later.

Reports in Progress

I have drafted a Revised Standing Orders of the Ōrākei Local Board of the Auckland Council. The current set the Board uses was drafted by the Transition Authority in 2010. The draft is presently with officers for review and I had hoped that it would be available by now for further review by Board members and adoption.

At relatively short notice, the Board made a submission to a Governing Body committee on the Council’s draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, which was recently consulted on.

The Board’s Plaques and Memorials in Parks and Reserves Policy and Guidelines document has been finalised, and is attached for adoption. 

The Board’s submission to Auckland Transport on the Auckland Regional Land Transport Plan is attached. The Board received the Plan on Monday 30 April and had less than a week to read the Plan document and prepare a submission before making the presentation on the following Monday, 7 May.

Arts

On 15 June 2017 the Board approved the arts, community and events work programme, which included $20,000 for a utility box artwork programme.

Draft designs have been done for four of the five boxes in the St Heliers Village, as a place-making project, and for a further site in Mission Bay.

There has still been no update by the Council’s heritage team on engaging contractors to restore the rare 90-year old heritage ventilation pipe in the St Heliers commercial area. It is hoped that this work will be done at the same time as the utility box artwork project.

Events

The Tamaki Drive Precinct Event Guidelines, adopted by the Board with amendments on 15 March 2018, is yet to be printed and will soon be available, with a copy posted on the Board’s web page.   

Heritage

(1)     Tamaki Drive Searchlights

I am pleased to report that the new sign has now been installed on the seawall in Tamaki Drive opposite the searchlight emplacements.   

(2)     Heritage Projects

Work is also progressing and will soon be completed on the revision of the Board’s WWI Roll of Honour which was compiled in 2014 at the start of the World War One centenary commemoration. The inventory of sites of heritage significance in the Board’s area has been completed and will be distributed to members, our two libraries and staff.

I am working with Watercare to erect an information sign on the local reserve at Whakatakataka Bay, Ngapipi Road, adjacent to the 20m sealed section of the former Hobson Bay pipeline, which was kept as a piece of engineering heritage.

There are opportunities for more informative signage to be installed and funding should be provided in the 2018/2019 budget.

The World Wars One and Two war memorial avenue of trees along Glover Road adjacent to Glover Park is being restored and the missing titoki trees will be planted; 63 titoki trees were originally planted in 1953 as a memorial for those from the district who were killed in the two wars.  

The revision of the Board’s WWI Roll of Honour has now been completed with the addition of new names and information. This will replace the present Roll on the Board’s website. Copies will be lodged in our two libraries.  

(3)     ANZAC Day

ANZAC Day commemorations were held at St Heliers, Ōrākei and College Rifles. The Board was represented at all three.

The ANZAC Day Service at St Heliers, which I organise on behalf of the Board, continues to attract large numbers. It is estimated that there was a crowd of between 2,500 and 3,000. As in the last two commemorations, there was strong emphasis on participation by youth in the Service: personnel from TS Achilles, the readers and guest speakers from Glendowie, Sacred Heart and Selwyn Colleges, the piper and trumpeter, scouts. The Board received much positive feedback on a very successful event. The address was given jointly by two senior Glendowie College students. To quote one correspondent to me their address was “a moving, penetrative, reflective and inspirational statement”.

During planning for the St Heliers service there was discussion on the quantity required of the Order of Service. The suggestion was made that as well as printed copies the programme should be available digitally for people to access on their phones. This suggestion was taken up by the Council’s Civic Events team and all Council-delivered ANZAC service programmes were uploaded to the Council’s website for people to access. It is understood 6,500 people across the Region accessed the service programmes online. As a first, initiated by the Board, and with little publicity, it was a success. 

Communications

The Board’s tenth (April) e-newsletter was published and the decisions digest from the Board’s April business meeting was also sent to those on the Board’s stakeholder list. The Board’s communications advisor is also using other media outlets to inform residents of the Board’s activities.

 

There was reference in The New Zealand Herald 4 May article headed “Council hits contractors in pocket”, to the Board’s initiative in reviewing the maintenance standards of all its parks and reserves earlier this year. 

Activities (since 8 April 2018)

As well as assisting with a range of citizens’ enquiries, attending meetings, and involvement with other community activities, I have also attended the following to date:

 

9 April the local boards chairs’ forum.

9 April the meeting of the St Heliers Village Association.

10 April the transport portfolio briefing.

11 April the event at the Civic Theatre hosted by the Regional Facilities Board, at which we had a conducted tour of the theatre.

12 April the Chair and Deputy Chair catch-up with staff.

12 April a briefing about Hakumau Reserve, Tamaki Drive.

12 April the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

16 April a meeting of the Auckland Library Heritage Trust, of which I am Chairman.

16 April on site meeting at the St Heliers war memorial, regarding preparations for ANZAC Day.

16 April the meeting of the St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association.

16 April the AGM of the Ellerslie Theatrical Society.

17 April a further briefing about Hakumau Reserve, Tamaki Drive.

17 April the community services monthly portfolio briefing.

17 April the community facilities monthly portfolio briefing.

18 April a meeting of the Stonefields Residents Association.

19 April a meeting with the executive of the Ellerslie Theatrical Society.

19 April the Ōrākei Local Board business meeting.

20 April on-site meeting re the installation of the searchlights information sign in Tamaki Drive.

23 April a further on-site meeting at the St Heliers war memorial with Ventia managers re cleaning of the area, repair of the flagpole halyards, the garden maintenance, the Brookfield memorial surrounds. Later in the day I put the memorial crosses in the garden and working with the Village Association, the ceramic poppies provided by the Association. I also needed to contact Auckland Transport re the cleaning of the streets and had to follow up to ensure this was done.

24 April a meeting with staff regarding signage for the Stonefields Heritage Trail.

25 April the St Heliers ANZAC Day commemoration.

27 April the meeting of St Heliers Probus at which I was guest speaker. Following this I removed the crosses and the ceramic poppies from the war memorial.

30 April the briefing by Auckland Transport staff on the yet to be released Auckland Regional Land Transport Plan.

1 May the AGM of the Mission Bay/Kohimarama Residents Association.

3 May presentation to Governing Body members on the Council’s draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.

3 May the presentation by the St Heliers Village Association on its present and future activities.

3 May the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

5 May the St Heliers Kiwanis 50th anniversary celebration. I am a past President.

6 May the Sacred Heart College ANZAC memorial service.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Plaques and Memorials in Parks and Reserves Policy and Guidelines

57

b

ANZAC Day Commemoration 2018, St Heliers

61

c

Photograph

65

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatory

Author

Colin Davis – Chairman (soon to be Chairman Emeritus), Ōrākei Local Board of the Auckland Council

 Date: 6 May 2018


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Board Member Report – Kit Parkinson

 

File No.: CP2018/07405

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendation

a)      That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead: Parks and Reserves and Community Leases

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Environment

Other Appointments (Lead): Friends of Madills Farm Incorporated, Friends of Tahuna Torea

Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board, Ōrākei Basin Advisory Group (Chair Oct 2017 to Oct 2018), Tāmaki Drive Protection Society, Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority

 

 

 

 

 

Other Appointments (Alternate): Mission Bay Business Association, Mission Bay-Kohimarama Residents Association Incorporated, East City Community Trust

Parks and Reserves

2.       We received our first 100% score in an audit of our Parks and open spaces under the new contractor Ventia, great to see and we look forward to seeing many more of these.

3.       AMST have met with me informally and supplied an option plan for the Landing, which involves a quite different approach than the agreed site concept plan for the area which has been signed off by the Board. Attached are the plans for information of the Board, and we will await a report by officers before the board will examine any options for change.

Leases

4.       Advance OBC lease negotiations via David Barker.

Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee

5.       Attended meetings for the period this report covers.

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board

6.       Attended meetings for the period this report covers.

Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority

7.       Attended meetings for the period this report covers.

Some Activities: 7 April 2018 to 4 May 2018

Date

Activities

7 April

Kepa Bush Weeding Day

10 April

Auckland Transport Update

11 April

Regional Facilities Auckland – update of RFA developments

12 April

Colin Maiden Park development

Chair / Deputy Chair meeting

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

16 April

Agenda run-through

Ellerslie Business Association

17 April

Parks Portfolio

Leases Portfolio

18 April

Meet with Ward Councillor

19 April

Ōrākei Local Board Business Meeting

25 April

College Rifles Anzac Day Service

St Heliers Anzac Service

26 April

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

Remuera Business Association

27 April

Site visit of playgrounds around Auckland Region

30 April

Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority Hui

RLTP Consultation Material Briefing

1 May

Mission Bay Business Association

2 May

Finance and Performance Committee Workshop

3 May

St Heliers Business Association presentation

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

4 May

Ōrākei Basin meeting

Mission Bay redevelopment meeting

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The Landing Concept Plan 2013

69

b

The Landing AMST option plan

71

c

Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority Hui 35 – 30 April 2018 Open Minutes

73

d

Photographs

77

     

Signatory

Author

Kit Parkinson - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 4 May 2018


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Board Member Report - Troy Churton

 

File No.: CP2018/07306

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since the last meeting.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

 

 

Portfolio Lead: Resource Consenting and Regulatory

2.       I have been away for a few weeks contactable only by phone hence a short memo.

Snapshot of Planning and Regulatory Matters

3.       Planning file enquiries and comments relating to a range of applications including; Building proposals at 16 Rangitoto Avenue, Remuera, Apihai Street St Heliers, 441 Tamaki Drive, 4A Dingle Road St Heliers

Parking and use of mobile phones

4.       Council issues mobile phones to elected representatives to facilitate text parking at metred spaces. Now Auckland Transport has taken away the option to text a parking space.

5.       There are administrative inefficiencies with the limitations at meters only using either coins or credit cards, and an additional consumer charge for using credit cards at meters (0.50 transaction fee) which seems no less than a transaction fee for using a text option.

6.       For an elected representative, using a private credit card generates a new additional administrative process for both the representative and council staff that was not necessary when using text a park. Elected representatives should be re-issued with the parking permit system that used to be available at the beginning of this term.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatory

Author

Troy Churton - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 28 March 2018


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Board Member Report – Carmel Claridge

 

File No.: CP2018/07397

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendation

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board formally endorse its feedback to Auckland Transport on the Meadowbank Rd / St Johns Rd intersection.

c)      That the Ōrākei Local Board request Auckland Transport to reassess the safety feasibility of the Ladies Mile Cycleway and provide advice to the Board on alternative routing.

d)      That the Ōrākei Local Board request Auckland Transport to provide the Board with options for a pedestrian refuge midway on the segment of St Johns Rd between Meadowbank Shopping Centre and the Truman St/ St Johns Rd intersection.

 

Portfolio Lead: Environment and Transport

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Parks and Reserves, Community Leases

Transport

OLB Feedback Provided for the following:

 

·        Meadowbank Rd/ St Johns Rd Intersection Improvements: (Attachment A to this report)

·        Meadowbank Train Station Bus Stop Update

An amended design by AT taking into account LB feedback at workshop and that from attendees at MSJRA meeting was shared with Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Association committee and Transport sub-committee. Reception from those community members was positive and although AT engineers offered to meet with those residents to explain the plans they were comfortable with this now simply proceeding to consultation. I had anticipated that consultation to be underway by the date of authoring this report.

·        Meadowbank Rd Pedestrian Crossing Update

Following public outrage at the removal of the painted zebra lines indicating a pedestrian crossing at a ‘safer crossing point’ (AT revisited to try to remove them entirely) and the Board’s resolution passed last month,  AT have now agreed to re-investigate this location as a potential formalized pedestrian cross-point. They have been advised that this is a route for the walking school bus.

·        Arthur St Resealing / Kerb & Channelling Renewals

A number of concerns have been raised by residents around this piece of work. Auckland Transport is dealing with them directly and to date has been providing them with timely responses explaining the need for the kerb/channelling and footpath work to take place to accommodate the road resealing. Unfortunately, the notice of resealing was not sent to the Business Association until 48hrs prior to works commencement and there has been considerable dissatisfaction with the tight timeframe.

·        Broken Yellow Lines Installation Hilltop St & Buttle St

Residents of these streets awaiting the installation of broken yellow lines have been in regular contact requesting advice as to when these changes may be expected.

·        Ladies Mile Cycleway

Public dissatisfaction with this stretch of cycleway has existed since its installation over ten years ago. Recently there has been a growing call from residents and business owners concerned with the ongoing safety issues posed by this cycleway which are now escalating due to increased congestion and heavy vehicle movements on the busy Ladies Mile which is the route to the Ellerslie Town Centre. There are two major issues. Firstly – the steep gradient of this hill makes this route untenable for all but the most capable and fittest of cyclists. Secondly – when the cycleway was established it was only possible to achieve the required width necessary to accommodate a bike land by narrowing the road and adjusting the median line accordingly. The effect has been to create a lane that cannot move wider vehicles down Ladies Mile towards the township without them crossing that median line and encroaching into the traffic heading in the opposite direction. Thirdly – This cycleway does not form part of a connection to any wider cycling/walking network and appears to be an inexplicable anomaly, serving little purpose other than to create a significant safety issue on a busy local road. The Board notes that it is extremely important at this stage that any parking be retained on Ladies Mile where possible as this provides an important facility for not only local residents but for staff and customers of businesses in the Ellerslie Town Centre. The Board would like to see an examination of the options to not only address the safety issues for motorists but to provide a more usable & accessible option for moving around this area of the Ward for cyclists.

·        St Johns Rd Pedestrian Refuge

There is a long stretch of St Johns Rd between the signalised lights at the Meadowbank Mall and the pedestrian crossing situated approximately 25metres east of Truman St where it is almost impossible to safely cross St Johns Rd at any time of the day let alone at peak travel times when students and commuters are needing to access the bus stops. It is important that the Board supports the uptake and usage of the more frequent bus network. Requests have been received from individual members of the community to investigate options to provide safer crossing facilities on this busy stretch of road.

Activities: 9th April – 7th May

Date

10th April

10th April

12th April

12th April

12th April

17th April

17th April

17th April

19th April

23rd April

23rd April

25th April

26th April

26th April

27th April

30th April

1st May

 

3rd May

 

 

Activities

Auckland Transport Meeting (regular meeting every 2 weeks)

Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Association Meeting

OBC Meeting

TEEF Meeting – Anchorage House

OLB Workshop

Parks Meeting

Community Facilities Meeting

Leases Meeting

OLB Business Meeting

Meeting with Kerry – to discuss Stonefields berm issues.

Ellerslie Business Association Meeting

ANZAC commemorative service attendance – St Heliers

Mosaic Pathway Opening attendance– Purewa Cemetery.

OLB Workshop

Trip to North Shore Playgrounds – Ideas for Future Designs

Attendance at Auckland Transport briefing on Regional Land Transport Plan

Onsite Meeting – Ellerslie Town Centre with AT engineer/EBA to discuss congestion issues.

OLB Workshop

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Feedback: Meadowbank Rd/Saint Johns Road Intersection – April 2018

89

     

Signatory

Author

Carmel Claridge - Ōrākei Local Board Member

 Date: 8 May 2018


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Board Member Report – Ros Rundle

 

File No.: CP2018/07226

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendation

a)      That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead: Economic Development

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Community

Economic Development

 

Ellerslie Business Association

Planning well underway for this May’s Arterslie event for Ellerslie.

The new branded Ellerslie flags are up on the power poles throughout Ellerslie.

The Ellerslie Make Give Learn initiative has been very well attended. It hosted a Beeswax wraps making event which was sold out.  Next event coming up is on Composting.

Plastic free July in Ellerslie is another initiative from EBA and they will be working closely with businesses and will run community events with Ellerslie Make, Give, Learn.

 

New businesses coming into Ellerslie are Aladdin Rugs and Barfoot and Thompson

EBA has resolved that they will upgrade the lighting in the village.

Auckland Transport projects still to be completed by Auckland Transport:

a.   Yellow lines on Ladies Mile next to Mexico Restaurant – Health and Safety issue

b.   The long awaited parking consultation for Ellerslie

Other concerns are the cycleway on Ladies Mile, the increased congestion in Ellerslie Village

 

Members Claridge and Rundle met with representatives from Auckland Transport and Megan Darrow Manager of EBA to discuss the possibility improving the congestion in the Village.

Mission Bay Business Association

There are several outstanding issues namely;

 

When the bike racks are going to be installed by AT/CF

When the parking consultation is going to start and how this is going to be done?

 

The Association has applied for a contestable grant from the OLB

Consideration is being given to having Mission Bay as straw free.

The Association would like to know if the half marathon is intended to be an annual event.

 

Remuera Business Association

The Association had a successful launch of the Live Life Local video.

Following on from the launch is the possibility for retailers to have access to cheap marketing packages as an on-going campaign.

The Remuera Prospectus is in final draft before going to print, this will be distributed amongst real estate agents, businesses and to target landlords.

The suggestion of Window posters for vacant sites was discussed.

The first Remuera Night Market starts on Wednesday 9 May

Forward planning for Bastille Day is continuing.

The Easter Bunny campaign for Easter was a great success.

The Remuera Visitor Strategy – The Remuera Loop planning is well underway and will be added to the Auckland Path network App very soon.

Hedgerow has opened up a Pop Up store at 319 Remuera Rd, operating through to mid May.

St Heliers Business Association

The Chairman, Treasurer, Manager and Social Media representative presented to the OLB as part of their BID agreement. 

We as the OLB members received a very good update as to where the Association is heading and how their plans fit in with the Strategic Plan.  Most of their emphasis regarding marketing for St Heliers is through the Website and this year will start working with the local businesses to offer specific hospitality around the events which already come to and through St Heliers. 

Community

 

 

Meeting with Community Places Susan Ropati, Kev Carter Strategic Broker and Member Wong to update us all on the Council led Community Centres.

Activities

As well as assisting many constituents I have attended the following:

Date           Activities

April

23                    Attended Ellerslie Business Association meeting

24                    Attended St David’s Memorial Church Anzac Light and Sound Show for  special night of remembrance

25                    Attended Dawn Service for Anzac Day

                        Attended the Ōrākei RSA Anzac Service on behalf of the OLB

26                    Attended the opening of the new area in Purewa for ‘Stillborn and young children’ memorial path

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

Attended Remuera Business Association latest initiative short video, “A Day in the Life of Remuera” – Live Life Local

27                    Tour to view different playgrounds on the North Shore with Members Parkinson and Claridge

May

1                      Attended Remuera Business Association meeting

Attended Community Places update meeting

Attended meeting in Ellerslie to consider congestion in the town centre

Attended Mission Bay Business Association

Attended Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association AGM

2                      St Heliers Business Association presentation to the OLB

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

3                      Attended an update on the Mission Bay redevelopment

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Photographs

95

     

Signatory

Author

Rosalind Rundle - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 7 May 2018


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Board Member Report – David Wong

 

File No.: CP2018/07194

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendation

a)      That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead: Community

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Economic Development

Key activity during the period 5 April 2018 to 10 May 2018

·        Finalise feedback on Regional Land Transport Plan and Have your Say – LTP consultation plans and submissions.

·        Attended Ellerslie Residents Association- positive response from Association on progress on Elwood Place access way to Michaels Avenue Reserve; still concerns over delay of decisioning/sequencing/funding of Ellerslie Football club changing rooms/club rooms/toilets. 

Community

·        Attended Community Centre update with Member Rundle, Council officers Ropati and Carter. Key discussion points on Glendowie Community Centre development of child centre and commercial business. There needed to be an independent “needs analysis” of all community offerings to ensure Council/OLB criteria for assessment and investment are met. Discussion also on Meadowbank Community Centre and the juxtaposition in terms of future capital development and timing of the Trust lease expiring.

·        Ongoing monitoring on the recent driveway modifications by the developer behind 4 Victoria Avenue.

·        Attended briefing session with newly appointed Youth Advisory Panel member Archer Buissink; with Council officer Carter. Key discussion points on aligning Youth Panel initiatives with Local Board Plan objectives and outcomes. Buissink was provided a strategy template to develop ideas to work with OLB and the youth connections in the ward area.

·        Attended Remuera Business Association promotion video release for Remuera shopping area; Laneway Bar 26 April 2018.

·        Attendance at MBKRA AGM 1 May 2018 – with keynote speaker Councillor Simpson and other environmental topic speakers (Eastern Songbird/Member Parkinson on Kepa Bush).

 

 

 

Activities: April – May 2018

Date

Activities

12 April 2018

OLB workshop – apologies tendered – attending Rotary D9920 Conference

16 April 2018

Ellerslie Residents Association

18 April 2018

Meeting with newly appointed Youth Advisory Panel member for Ōrākei – Archer Buissink

19 April 2018

OLB Business meeting

25 April 2018

ANZAC Day Civic Service – Auckland Domain

26 April 2018

OLB workshop; attendance at Remuera Residents Association promotion video launch – Laneway Bar (with Members Rundle/Parkinson; Councillor Simpson)

1 May 2018

Community Centres update – with Member Rundle; Council officers Ropati and Carter

 

Mission Bay Kohimarama AGM 2018

3 May 2018

OLB workshop

4 May 2018

Additional feedback on RLTP

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Photographs

99

     

Signatory

Author

David Wong - Ōrākei Local Board Member

 Date:  7 May 2018


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/07467

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar which is a schedule of items that will come before the Board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board draft Governance Forward Work Calendar be noted.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Governance Forward Work Calendar - May 2018

103

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2018/07469

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       Attached are copies of the Ōrākei Local Board workshop notes taken during workshops held on 5, 12 and 26 April 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board workshop notes for the workshops held on 5, 12 and 26 April 2018 be noted.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Proceedings: 5 April 2018

109

b

Workshop Proceedings: 12 April 2018

111

c

Workshop Proceedings: 26 April 2018

113

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action

 

File No.: CP2018/07503

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from officers.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report be noted.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolutions Pending Action - May 2018

119

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Suzanne Weld - Acting Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

17 May 2018

 

 

    

    



[1]        Section 169 of the Local Government Act 2002 and Local Government (Alcohol Ban Breaches) Regulations 2013