I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 18 July 2018

3:00pm

Room 1, Level 26
135 Albert Street
Auckland

Te Poari Kaitohutohu mō te Pokapū o te Tāone

Nui o Tāmaki Makaurau /

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

OPEN AGENDA

 MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Ms Viv Beck

Business Improvement District

Deputy Chair

Mr Andrew Gaukrodger

Corporate sector

Members

Ms Noelene Buckland

City Centre Residents Group

 

Member Shale Chambers

Waitemata Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Mr Greg Cohen

Tourism/Travel

 

Mr Ben Corban

Arts and Cultural Sector

 

Mr Terry Cornelius, JP

Retail sector

 

Mr George Crawford

Property Council of NZ

 

Cr Chris Darby

Auckland Council (Mayor’s alternate)

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Auckland Council

 

Mr Dane Grey/ Mr Ngarimu Blair

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

 

Mr Mark Kingsford

Corporate sector

 

Cr Mike Lee

Liaison councillor, Auckland Council

 

Ms Amy Malcolm

Tertiary Education (University of Auckland & Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr James Mooney

Urban design/institute of architects

 

Mr Nigel Murphy

Tertiary Education (University of Auckland & Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr Adam  Parkinson

City Centre Residents Group

 

Mr Patrick Reynolds

Transport representative

 

Mr Michael Richardson

Business Improvement District

 

(Quorum 10 members)

 

Sonja Tomovska

Governance Advisor

11 July 2018

 

Contact Telephone: 021 615 961

Email: sonja.tomovska@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


Terms of Reference

 

(Excerpt –full terms of reference available as a separate document)

 

1.       These terms of reference set out the roles, responsibilities and working arrangements for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

2.       The board is a key advisory body, with no decision-making or autonomous budgetary authority.

3.       The board will assist the Auckland Council, specifically the Governing Body and the Waitematā Local Board and Auckland Council Controlled Organisations to oversee and be a key advisor to the Auckland Council on achieving the vision and strategic outcomes of the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan, the expenditure of the city centre targeted rate and city centre issues.

 

Membership:

Includes one councillor and one local board member.

 

The board should include members who can provide expert advice on many areas including transport, landscape, environment and youth sectors. The membership includes a position for Mana Whenua. Representatives from CCOs may be board members without voting rights. The number of the board members should be between 16 and 21 at any time.

 

The new panel’s term should end one month prior to the next local government elections in 2019. The membership of the panel may be rolled over for more than one electoral term of three years.

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

5          Update on the midtown stakeholder workshop - 22 June 2018                               7

6          Update on the Downtown Infrastructure Development Programme                    25

7          Update on Quay Street traffic planning                                                                    41

8          City centre update for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board - July 2018     47

9          Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme - July 2018    57 

10        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 27 June 2018, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

Update on the midtown stakeholder workshop - 22 June 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/12342

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on the midtown stakeholder workshop discussions held on 22 June 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       A midtown stakeholder workshop was held on 22 June 2018 to identify problems, opportunities and benefits to inform future investment in the midtown area. For the purposes of the workshop, midtown was defined as the area between Halsey Drive in the north, Fanshawe Street in the east, Symonds Street in the south and Union Street in west.

3.       This report provides a summary of the workshop process and key themes that emerged (see Attachment A).

4.       The key problems and opportunities discussed included safety, homelessness and a need for additional public spaces. The benefits of addressing these were lower crime, improved economic performance, a more ‘lively’ city, inclusiveness and diversity.

5.       The outputs from the workshop will be used by the council to help identify key issues from a stakeholder perspective that could be addressed by investment through both existing and future programmes. 

6.       Feedback on key problems, opportunities and benefits identified at the stakeholder workshop should be provided by members via email by 17 August 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the update on the midtown stakeholder workshop held on 22 June 2018

b)      provide feedback via email by 17 August 2018 on the key problems, opportunities and benefits that were identified by stakeholders in the midtown workshop.

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       On 22 June 2018, Development Programmes Office staff held a half-day midtown stakeholder workshop at the Auckland Town Hall. The purpose of the workshop was to engage stakeholders to identify problems, opportunities and benefits in the midtown area (defined on the map in Attachment B to this report).

8.       Approximately 40 people attended the workshop, with representation from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Auckland Police, SkyCity, the Auckland City Centre Residents’ Group, Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development, University of Auckland, Heart of the City, CCS Disability Action, City Rail Link, and the New Zealand Transport Agency.  Participation was by direct invitation and was sent to a broad list of organisations.

9.       The workshop did not look at the existing programmes of work or projects in the city centre that have been committed to, however the outputs from the workshop will be used to inform future business cases for projects in the midtown area.

10.     The outputs from the workshop will be used to inform decisions on future city centre investment.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

11.     The midtown stakeholder workshop was divided into two sessions. The first session considered the problems and opportunities in midtown.

12.     For the purposes of the workshop, a ‘problem’ was defined as an issue that should be addressed, and an ‘opportunity’ as a combination of factors that makes change in the midtown area possible. 

13.     The problems and opportunities identified were grouped under the six outcomes in the draft Auckland Plan 2050. These are:

·    belonging and participation

·    Māori identity and well-being

·    homes and places

·    transport and access

·    environment and cultural heritage

·    opportunity and prosperity.

14.     At the end of the session, groups prioritised the three most important problems and opportunities under each of the six outcomes. Key problems and opportunities that emerged across the categories included safety, homelessness and a need for public spaces. 

15.     The second session focussed on the benefits that would be realised by addressing these problems or opportunities. A benefit in a business case is considered to be a measurable improvement as the result of our investment.

16.     The benefits of addressing these problems and opportunities included lowering crime, improving economic performance, creating a more lively city, inclusiveness and diversity.

17.     All raw data from the workshop discussions was recorded, and a summary of the prioritised problems and benefits has been included in Attachment A. 

18.     A significant discussion point in the workshop was that the problems, opportunities and benefits identified apply to the wider city centre, rather than just midtown.

19.     Future programmes for investment will look at whether the geographical boundaries of the midtown area are an appropriate way to structure business cases.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

20.     The midtown area falls within the Waitematā Local Board boundaries. The local board will have the opportunity in July 2018 to provide feedback on the workshop findings.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

21.     As council partners, mana whenua were offered three options to be involved in the conversation about midtown. Through council liaison they were invited to attend the workshop, to have a separate workshop or to be engaged through the city centre kaitiaki forum.

22.     The response was that engagement on midtown was preferable through the City Centre Masterplan refresh through the kaitiaki forum.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

23.     The feedback received at this stakeholder workshop will be used to inform future investment in the city centre.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

24.     Council staff consulted with a number of parties prior to the workshop to identify key stakeholders to ensure that good representation was achieved. As not all stakeholders invited to the workshop were able to attend there is a risk that feedback captured was not representative of all stakeholder views. However, staff believe that enough representation was achieved to cover all of the key stakeholder issues.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

25.     Feedback on the key problems, opportunities and benefits identified at the stakeholder workshop should be provided via email to Liz.Nicholls@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz by 17 August 2018. Feedback will also be sought from the Waitematā Local Board.

26.     This feedback, in addition to the outputs from the stakeholder workshop, will be used to inform future investment in the midtown area.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of feedback from 22 June 2018 midtown stakeholder workshop

11

b

Midtown map

23

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Liz Nicholls – Senior Programme Lead – Investment

Authoriser

Shane Cook – Acting General Manager, Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

PDF Creator



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

Update on the Downtown Infrastructure Development Programme

 

File No.: CP2018/12324

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on the progress and next steps for the Downtown Infrastructure Development Programme, and provide feedback on the conceptual designs for the Quay Street upgrade and the Downtown public spaces project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Downtown programme is progressing at pace, with multiple workstreams underway and at varying stages of design, with the Quay Street seawall the most advanced of these workstreams.

3.       The streetscapes components of the programme are at the concept design phase. The Downtown programme team is considering options which address design and operational challenges at both a project level, and at a wider network level.

4.       Auckland Council’s development response team is undertaking a range of activities that will inform the development response plan to mitigate the impacts of construction on the Downtown precinct and the wider city centre.

5.       Preparation is underway for wider public engagement. The first concept designs for Quay Street West will be made public by early August 2018, and public feedback will be invited.

6.       Funding for the delivery of the Downtown programme was confirmed through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and Regional Land Transport Plan 2018 processes.

7.       This report provides the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board with an update on the progress and next steps for the Downtown programme (see Attachment A). Feedback on the conceptual designs for the Quay Street upgrade and the Downtown public spaces will be sought from the board at its 18 July 2018 meeting. A further update will be provided to the board in September 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the update on the progress and next steps for the Downtown programme

b)      provide feedback on the conceptual design of Quay Street and the Downtown public spaces project.

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       The Downtown programme will deliver transformational outcomes within Auckland’s Downtown waterfront precinct. It is a collaborative effort between Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and Panuku Development Agency, and is one of several transformational programmes across the city centre. The programme focuses on delivering key transport and urban realm outcomes in a highly integrated and aligned manner.

9.       The America’s Cup 2021 and APEC 2021 events are key milestones in this development programme. The council family has committed to delivering key outcomes ahead of these events.

10.     The programme was workshopped with the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in March 2018, where feedback was sought on the strategic outcomes the programme was aiming to achieve.

11.     The board received a further update from the programme team in May 2018, introducing the streetscapes project components and seeking feedback on the on the strategic outcomes of these projects. At this meeting, the board resolved to:

Resolution number CEN/2018/1

MOVED by Mr N Murphy, seconded by Mr Reynolds: 

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)  receive the Downtown Infrastructure Development Programme update.

b)      support in principal the conceptual direction and design outcomes for Quay Street presented to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board at the 23 May 2018 meeting and note the following feedback:

·           Consider the traffic network function for Quay Street will function going forward, including how traffic approaching from the east of Quay Street can be reduced and diverted.

·           Consider the function of the Princes Wharf intersection and Hobson Street/ Viaduct.

·           Consider the management of interactions for general traffic, bus, pedestrian and active modes in the Britomart east bus interchange area.

·           Consider Quay Street East interface with the Port Master Plan

·           Consider the integration of Queens Wharf future plan for in the overall plan for the Downtown precinct

·           Explore potential Precinct properties financial contribution to Quay Street.

12.     The programme is rapidly progressing to enable the delivery of an agreed scope by December 2020. This report provides the board with an update on the progress and next steps for the Downtown Infrastructure Development Programme, including communication and engagement with affected communities and businesses, and updates on development response and the streetscapes workstream.

13.     At its 23 May 2018 meeting, the board also requested clarity on the allocation of city centre targeted rate funding to the programme and how this fits within the overall programme funding profile.

14.     A separate report is also provided as part of the board’s 18 July 2018 meeting agenda addressing the queries around the traffic network function for Quay Street.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

15.     A summary update on the programme is provided below. A more detailed update on the Downtown programme workstreams included as Attachment A. This includes further details on the concept designs for the Quay Street West upgrade and the Downtown public spaces project. Feedback on these conceptual designs will be sought from the board at its 18 July 2018 meeting.

Programme update

16.     Highlights since the previous update provided in May 2018 include:

·        funding for the programme has been confirmed through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and Regional Land Transport Plan 2018 processes. There is approximately $380 million of investment planned over the next 10 years within the Downtown precinct, of which $62.9 million will come from the city centre targeted rate

·        within the next three years, approximately $268 million of investment is planned for the Downtown precinct, with the city centre targeted rate contributing around $40 million over this period

·        the development response team are currently developing and implementing a series of initiatives to inform the development response action plan for the Downtown programme

·        preparation is underway for wider public engagement to commence by early August 2018. This follows engagement with key waterfront stakeholders, including developers, businesses and residents between October 2017 through to May 2018

·        the Quay Street West project is nearing the completion of the concept design phase. The project team is investigating solutions to two critical issues which have the potential to impact the design outcomes for Quay Street. In particular these issues relate to:

the clash between the desired landscaping outcomes and underground services in many locations.

the need to cater for significant overland flow paths along Quay Street.

·        the concept design for the Britomart East Bus Interchange is progressing in line with programme. Options developed through the design phase are being refined, and the Downtown programme team is engaging with key stakeholders to work through design considerations and challenges

·        the Downtown public spaces project is nearing the end of the concept design phase. The design team has developed a unique and exciting vision for the space in terms of urban design, functionality and accessibility

·        the concept design for stage three of the Galway Street improvements (Commerce Street to Gore Street section) is about to commence. The design team is engaging with Cooper and Company to align design and delivery aspirations for the Britomart streetscapes with development planning, in particular the completion of a new hotel on the corner of Gore and Galway Streets

·        construction on the first elements of the programme, likely to be the seawall, will commence at the end of 2018 or early 2019, pending resource consent finalisation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

17.     The local impacts of the programme are considerable and will include construction impacts to the existing traffic functions of Quay Street. This will require traffic modification for the construction phase (which will be required as part of the seawall), however the reduction in capacity will be permanent as it is in-line with the agreed outcomes for Quay Street. 

18.     In addition, the re-configuration of Quay Street from four general traffic lanes to two will necessitate behaviour change by motorists who drive through the city centre.

19.     Construction activities are programmed to start in late 2018 or early 2019, and will continue through to the end of 2020.

20.     The Downtown programme area falls within the Waitematā Local Board area. To date, there has been engagement with the local boards whose constituents are likely to be directly impacted by the programme of works. This includes Waitematā, Ōrākei and Waiheke Local Boards. A workshop with the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board has been scheduled for August 2018. There has also been programme level engagement with the remaining local boards through the local board cluster meetings.

21.     There will be a regular programme of engagement with the Waitematā, Ōrākei, Devonport-Takapuna and Waiheke Local Boards going forward to ensure transparency is provided throughout the entirety of the programme.

22.     The Waitematā Local Board has indicated support in principle for the programme, but has requested further detail on:

·        programme engagement with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, the sustainability of the programme, and how both construction practices and future use will facilitate carbon-free needs

·        whether The Strand can take additional vehicle volumes following the re-configuration of Quay Street

·        the opportunity for the local board to be involved in the public engagement process.

23.     A follow-on workshop to update the local board on these points is scheduled for 24 July 2018.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

24.     The Downtown programme team has been working with the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Governance Forum to establish mechanisms for mana whenua engagement at the governance, strategic and operational levels across the city centre and the Downtown programme. The key principles agreed by the forum are:

·        Governance – setting outcomes and accountability:

the forum sets and owns Māori outcomes

two forum representatives sit on the executive steering group for the programme to ensure influence within council’s governance and strategic level

·        Strategic (programme level) – definition of outputs:

the forum’s workgroups work alongside relevant staff and programme teams to provide leadership and translate the outcomes into outputs

ensures there is integration between governance and operations

·        Operational – delivery of outcomes/outputs:

kaitiaki attend the operational meetings on behalf of their entities and work via the Auckland Transport Central forum, Panuku Development forum and City Rail Link design group to ensure delivery of outputs

this includes reviewing and inputting into resource consents.

25.     Through this process, a Māori Outcomes Framework has been developed with the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Governance Forum. The outcomes are focused around the five key outcome areas that have been identified by the forum and were signed off at their April 2018 hui.

26.     Through the framework, opportunities to deliver on these outcomes have been identified and agreed to in conjunction with the forum. The operating framework set out above, will be used to deliver these outcomes. The Downtown programme is seeking representation from the forum workgroups to assist the design teams ensure definitive and specific measures that adhere to Te Aranga Design Principles, and achieve the goal of ‘Auckland to Tāmaki’.

27.     In line with the partnership established through the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, the programme has initiated engagement through the Auckland Transport Central hui to work through design and operational requirements. Monthly hui have been scheduled and the programme is currently working with mana whenua partners to identify the best approach for more future collaboration.

28.     The marine structures and streetscapes teams have also started engagement with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei on a project basis, with ongoing hui also planned in parallel to the Auckland Transport forum.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

29.     The budget for the Downtown programme has been agreed through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 process. Funding sources in addition to Long-term Plan funding include Regional Land Transport Plan funding (including New Zealand Transport Authority funding), city centre targeted rate funding, and third party funding from the sale of Queen Elizabeth Square in the case of the Downtown public spaces project.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

30.     Key risks are associated with delays to the delivery programme, and interdependencies with other projects within the programme of works.

31.     The timeframes for design are constrained, so any delay to receiving feedback on the concept designs could impact the overall programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

32.     Following the feedback from the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on the Quay Street concept design, the programme team will finalise the designs ahead of lodging resource consent in September 2018.

33.     Open days for public stakeholders will be held from late July, pending the finalisation of concept designs.

34.     Resource consents for the constituent projects will progressively be lodged over the next three to four months, and construction will begin by the end of 2018.

35.     A further update on the Downtown programme will be provided to the board in September 2018.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Downtown programme update - July 2018

31

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Simon Oddie – Principal Programme Manager

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

Update on Quay Street traffic planning

 

File No.: CP2018/12325

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on planning for traffic movements around Quay Street and the Downtown area, in relation to planned transport upgrades.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have a long-term strategic goal to progressively reduce traffic volumes on Quay Street in the Downtown area, as part of enabling a more pedestrian-focused waterfront.

3.       Projects within the Downtown programme are some of the first to deliver upon this vision. To maximise the benefits, the programme will rely on the implementation of efficient and high quality public transport facilities in close proximity.

4.       Auckland Transport, in conjunction with other Auckland Council groups, has been planning an ongoing series of changes to continue to support the growth and operation of the city centre during and after the delivery of the Downtown programme, including changes to ensure Customs Street and Grafton Gully can better support traffic flows.

5.       This report provides an update on plans for managing traffic around this area while these changes are progressed. A further update will be provided to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in late 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the update on planning for traffic movements around Quay Street and the Downtown area, in relation to planned transport upgrades.

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have a long-term strategic goal to progressively reduce traffic volumes on Quay Street in the Downtown area, with an aim to enable a more pedestrian-focused waterfront. This is outlined in the City Centre Masterplan, Waterfront Plan and Downtown Framework.

7.       This focus allows for an increased quantity and quality of public space in the city centre, as well as safer and more pleasant spaces for the increasing number of people expected to visit Auckland’s waterfront in the coming years. In particular, there will be a pedestrian focused core between Lower Albert Street and Commerce Street where the highest volumes of pedestrians are expected.

8.       A critical component of traffic planning is the delivery of high quality bus facilities on Lower Albert Street and Quay Street East to allow major bus services to bring people to the Downtown area, improving connectivity with other public transport services (including trains and ferries) without entering the pedestrian focused core.

9.       This bus arrangement has the added benefit of increasing resilience during major events using Lower Queen Street or central Quay Street. The two bus facilities will also allow for the removal of buses and bus infrastructure from Customs Street and the numerous narrow roads in the Britomart precinct. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     As primary east-west connections, both Quay Street and Customs Street have historically catered for approximately 24,000 vehicles per day. Over time it is envisaged that only traffic that is accessing inner city centre locations will use these routes.

11.     Through-traffic would be encouraged to bypass the city centre using the motorway network. An indicative diagram for East Auckland traffic affected by the Downtown programme is shown in Attachment A.

12.     It is recognised that some traffic have no alternative route and local vehicle access is required for servicing needs. As such, Quay Street will remain open to traffic but would be reduced to a single lane in each direction from Lower Hobson Street to Britomart Place, with additional lanes where required for buses.

13.     Auckland Transport, in conjunction with other Auckland Council departments, has been working on an ongoing series of changes to continue to support the growth and operation of the city centre during and after the delivery of the Downtown programme.

14.     With the removal of bus services, it is expected that Customs Street will be able to better support traffic flows, and changes are planned around Tangihua Street to better direct Quay Street traffic to Customs Street. Similarly, Auckland Transport is working with the New Zealand Transport Agency and Ports of Auckland on opportunities to improve the operation of The Strand and Grafton Gully, to encourage this as a route for through-traffic.

15.     Overall it is expected that no more than 14,000 vehicles per day would use the two-lane sections of Quay Street, with additional traffic on either Customs Street, Grafton Gully or another alternative route. It is expected that the remaining Quay Street traffic will be travelling slower, which is appropriate for the busy pedestrian-focused location.

16.     In addition to continued local vehicular access, Quay Street will also support safer pedestrian movements, such as a reconfigured Eastern Viaduct and Princess Wharf intersection, which will be designed and delivered as part of the Downtown programme.

17.     The intention is to give greater space and priority to pedestrians, reduce crossing delays, and to safely provide for the movement of people on bikes through the area. Further changes are anticipated in the future as part of major network changes resulting from the delivery of light rail on Customs Street, which may include changing the Hobson Street flyover to a lane in either direction.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

18.     The Waitematā Local Board has received updates on city centre planning and the Downtown programme over a number of years. The Ōrākei Local Board has been briefed in relation to the impact on traffic from East Auckland.

19.     The local impacts of the programme are considerable and will include construction impacts to the existing traffic function of Quay Street. This will require traffic modification for the construction phase (which will be required as part of the seawall). However the reduction in capacity will be permanent as it is in-line with the outcomes agreed by the council family for Quay Street.

20.     The re-configuration of Quay Street from four general traffic lanes to two will necessitate behavior change by motorists who drive through the city centre.

21.     To date, there has been engagement with the local boards whose constituents are likely to be directly impacted by the programme of works. This includes Waitematā, Ōrākei, Waiheke Local Boards . A workshop with the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is scheduled for August 2018. There has also been programme level engagement with the remaining local boards through the local board cluster meetings.

22.     As part of the downtown programme, there will be ongoing engagement with the Waitematā, Ōrākei, Devonport-Takapuna, and Waiheke Local Boards to ensure that adequate transparency is provided throughout the entirety of the programme.

23.     The Waitematā Local Board has indicated its support for the Downtown programme in principle, but has requested more information around whether The Strand can support additional vehicle movements following the re-configuration of Quay Street.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

24.     Engagement with mana whenua is being undertaken at the governance level through the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and at the operational level through the Auckland Transport Central hui as part of the wider downtown programme.

25.     Monthly hui have been scheduled with the Auckland Transport Central hui and the programme is currently working with mana whenua partners to identify the best approach for more collaboration. Through this forum, mana whenua have requested a specific update on the wider traffic network impacts resulting from the downtown programme. This is planned for the August 2018 hui.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

26.     Funding for the projects contained within the Downtown programme has been confirmed through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and Regional Land Transport Plan 2018 processes. The Quay Street upgrade project in particular is partly funded through the city centre targeted rate.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

27.     With a significant amount of construction required in the Downtown area for multiple projects, there is the risk that the traffic planning takes some time to settle in or is disrupted by construction elsewhere in the city. This is a matter under constant monitoring by Auckland Transport’s traffic operations team.

28.     As part of the Downtown programme, the development response team is actively working with stakeholders, including businesses, to mitigate the impacts of the construction disruption.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

29.     Auckland Transport and Auckland Council will continue to work together to support the growth and operation of the city centre during and after the delivery of the Downtown programme. This will include changes to ensure Customs Street and Grafton Gully can better support traffic flows, as Quay Street becomes a more pedestrian-focused waterfront space.

30.     A further update on the Downtown programme can be provided to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in late 2018.

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Downtown programme traffic map

45

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Simon Oddie – Principal Programme Manager

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

City centre update for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board - July 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/12327

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on the progress of city centre projects and initiatives to 29 June 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       City centre programmes of work are on track as shown in Attachment A to this report.

3.       Key highlights achieved during the update period include:

·        the installation of the O’Connell Street artwork, marking the completion of the O’Connell Street streetscape project

·        work commencing on the upgrade of the James Liston Hostel

·        the completion of work to improve the safety and public amenity around the Chris Booth sculpture on Victoria Street.

4.       Please note this report is for information only. However, if any members have follow-up questions and or queries on the city centre programme, staff welcome questions directly.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the update on city centre projects and initiatives to 29 June 2018.

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       This monthly report provides a high-level overview of progress on projects and initiatives in the city centre. Detail on individual projects is provided in Attachment A.

6.       Some key achievements during the update period are outlined below.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

7.       Attachment A to this report outlines progress made on city centre projects and initiatives between 2 June 2018 and 29 June 2018. Details on the current status and details of the council family group delivering these projects and initiatives are included in this attachment.

8.       Resource consents for the Quay Street Seawall are on track for public notification on 16 July 2018. This is the first major consent for the programme.

9.       Work has been completed around the Chris Booth sculpture on Victoria Street, creating significant safety improvements as the secluded seating area has been replaced with planting. The site will soon be re-opened to the public.

10.     The new east-west pedestrian laneway between Halsey and Daldy Streets in Wynyard Quarter have been completed. Tiramarama Way was formally opened on 29 June 2018.

11.     The physical work to redevelop the James Liston Hostel commenced on 28 June 2018.

12.     The St Paul Street tactical urban intervention is being installed. Turf was laid at the end of June 2018. Furniture pieces will be installed, and ground graphics painted by the end of July 2018.

13.     The Karangahape Road Enhancement Project pop-up space was a success (12-18 June 2018). There were over 400 visitors representing the full range of views on the enhancement project. The pop-up space was back in business for First Thursdays ‘A celebration of Karangahape Road’ on 4 and 5 July 2018.

14.     The O’Connell Street streetscape project is now complete, following the installation of Catherine Griffith’s ‘O’ sculpture on 28 June 2018.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

15.     All project teams managing city centre projects and initiatives engage with the Waitematā Local Board. Plans for individual projects include specific engagement with the local board and affected stakeholders.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     As part of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services monthly kaitiaki hui, mana whenua considered some of the city centre programme items. Input to the scoping and design of city centre projects and initiatives is sought and applied to projects where possible.

17.     The City Rail Link has an independent mana whenua engagement process as do some of the other programmes.

18.     Project teams managing these projects will engage with iwi as required.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

19.     All projects are being delivered within budgets approved through the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Regional Land Transport Plan or the city centre targeted rate programme of works.

20.     At this stage all projects are expected to be completed within allocated budgets. Any significant financial changes or risks arising will be bought to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board as required.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

21.     Any risks associated with delivering (or not) of projects and initiatives in the city centre will be discussed by individual project teams managing these projects and initiatives.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

22.     Prior to the implementation of city centre projects and initiatives, regular meetings and workshops are held with the Waitematā Local Board and iwi, and stakeholders including Heart of the City, Karangahape Road Business Association, Learning Quarter representatives, and the appropriate Auckland Council committees.

23.     A further update report will be provided to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in August 2018.

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

City centre update to 29 June 2018

49

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Emma Taylor – Development Programmes Senior Lead

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme - July 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/12329

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meets monthly from February through November.  To utilise these meetings fully and to enable the board to advise on council projects, staff propose that a high-level planning document is endorsed by the board (see Attachment A).  

3.       The forward work programme will be updated each month to reflect the upcoming items that will be reported to the board for feedback or endorsement, including city centre targeted rate-funded projects.

4.       A copy of the city centre targeted rate programme of works (known as TR7) has been included as Attachment B for the board’s information.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      endorse the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board 2018 forward work programme, as per Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme - July 2018

59

b

City Centre Targeted Rate Programme of Works (TR7)

61

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Emma Taylor – Development Programmes Senior Lead

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

18 July 2018

 

 

PDF Creator