I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Community Development and Safety Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 5 July 2018

1:30pm

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Komiti Whanake Hapori me ōna Kaupapa Āhuru /

Community Development and Safety Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Dr Cathy Casey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

 

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

 

Cr Greg Sayers

 

 

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

 

Cr Wayne Walker

 

 

Cr John Watson

 

IMSB Members

Tony Kake

 

 

Dennis Kirkwood

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

 

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

 

 

(Quorum 7 members)

 

 

Sonja Tomovska

Governance Advisor

 

28 June 2018

 

Contact Telephone: 890 8022

Email: sonja.tomovska@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Terms of Reference

Responsibilities and key projects

 

The committee is responsible for regional community development and safety, including:

·         grants for regional events, arts and cultural organisations

·         arts, culture and heritage

·         alcohol harm reduction strategy (recommendation to Environment and Community Committee)

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities.

 

 

Except:

 

(a)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)        where the committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)        where a matter is the responsibility of another committee

(d)        the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(e)        the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million

(f)        the approval of final policy

(g)        deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest and which are controversial

(h)        the commissioning of reports on new policy where that policy programme of work has not been approved by the Environment and Community Committee

(i)         the power to establish sub-committees.

 

 


Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

05 July 2018

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                          8

9          Understanding the National Context and Progress on Gender Issues                  9

10        Sharing Perspectives on Gender Issues (panel discussion)                                 11

11        In Conversation with the Rt. Hon. Helen Clark on the International Context on Gender                                                                                                                                       13

12        Gender issues raised by the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women                                                                                                                          15  

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 13 June 2018, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

There were no notices of motion.

 

 

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

05 July 2018

 

Understanding the National Context and Progress on Gender Issues

 

File No.: CP2018/11730

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Dr Jackie Blue, Human Rights Commissioner, will present on the national context and progress on gender issues, including the Human Rights Commission’s report to the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Dr. Jackie Blue is a Human Rights Commissioner at the New Zealand Human Rights Commission and has the Equal Employment Opportunities and Women’s Rights portfolio. Dr. Blue has a strong commitment to advancing the participation of women in society and is the Commission's lead on stopping violence against women. In the Equal Employment Opportunities portfolio, Dr. Blue is committed to progressing human rights and issues of equity, particularly those that affect equal employment opportunities.

3.       The Human Rights Commission is New Zealand’s national human rights institution, the role of the commission is to:

·   advocate and promote respect for human rights in New Zealand,

·   encourage harmonious relations between individuals and among the diverse groups in New Zealand,

·   lead, evaluate, monitor and advise on equal employment opportunities,

·   provide information to the public about discrimination and to help resolve complaints about discrimination.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from Dr Jackie Blue, Human Rights Commissioner and thank her for her attendance.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sonja Tomovska - Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

05 July 2018

 

Sharing Perspectives on Gender Issues (panel discussion)

 

File No.: CP2018/11743

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present a diversity of views on New Zealand gender issues with representatives from Non-Government Organisations. The panel discussion will be facilitated by Fezeela Raza, Principal Advisor Diversity and Inclusion, Auckland Council.

2.       The following speakers will be in attendance:

·    Christine King, Pacific Women’s Watch;

·    Whitney Adam, Women in Urbanism;

·    Cinammon Whitlock, Te Ropu Wahine Maori Toko i te Ora Māori Women's Welfare League

·    Tagaloatele Professor Peggy Fairbairn-Dunlop, CNZM, P.A.C.I.F.I.C.A Incorporated

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

Christine King, Pacific Women’s Watch

3.       Christine trained as a Dietitian working mainly in community and public health dietetics and nutrition in New Zealand and overseas. As sports nutrition developed Christine was involved in establishing and teaching courses in sports nutrition at UNITEC, University of Samoa and AUT. After retiring, Christine became involved in community activities, including as President of Pacific Women’s Watch (PWW).

4.       PWW monitors, reviews and reports on the status of women and promotes equity and justice both for women and for the benefit of all.

Whitney Adam, Women in Urbanism

5.       Whitney Adam is a founding member of Women in Urbanism Aotearoa. Whitney is an urban planning and community engagement professional, currently working with Aurecon. She specialises in the assessment of social and equality impact of major infrastructure projects. Her experience is in Australia, New Zealand and most recently the United Kingdom with the UK Equality Act 2010.

6.       Women in Urbanism Aotearoa seeks to transform our cities into safe, accessible and equitable urban environments for all people by supporting and amplifying the voices and actions of all self-identifying women and girls.

Cinammon Whitlock, Te Ropu Wahine Maori Toko i te Ora Māori Women's Welfare League

7.       Cinnamon Whitlock (Ngapuhi Ngati Kahu ki Whangaroa) is a member of the Te Atatu Maori Women’s’ Welfare League branch and is the CEO of Thrive Teen Parent Support Trust.  She is a registered nurse and a solicitor and barrister of the High Court who has spent the last 10 years working in senior management positions in diverse community settings. She is passionate about addressing child poverty and improving early intervention and prevention based health services, with a strong passion for mental health.

8.       The Maori Women’s’ Welfare League aims to improve the wealth of Māori, including spiritual, social or economic wellbeing and has initiated many programmes and plans to assist Māori to reclaim their tino rangatiratanga (sovereignty) as a people taking control of their own destiny.

 


 

 

 Tagaloatele Professor Peggy Fairbairn-Dunlop, CNZM, P.A.C.I.F.I.C.A Incorporated

9.       Tagaloatele Professor Peggy Fairbairn Dunlop has been teaching and writing on issues of family security, gender and youth equity for many years.  Much of her research has involved critiquing global models for their appropriateness to Pacific and other indigenous communities. Her focus today is growing future Pacific leaders.

10.     P.A.C.I.F.I.C.A Incorporated is a national NGO for Pacific women living in Aotearoa New Zealand with a focus on supporting Pacific women to get involved in issues that affect them and their families. Tagaloatele was a founding member of P.A.C.I.F.I.C.A Newtown (1970s), a past president of P.A.C.I.F.I.C.A Incorporated and presently a member of the Auckland South branch.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the presentations from Christine King, Pacific Women’s Watch; Whitney Adam, Women in Urbanism; Cinammon Whitlock, Māori Women's Welfare League and Tagaloatele Professor Peggy Fairbairn-Dunlop, CNZM, P.A.C.I.F.I.C.A Incorporated and thank them for their attendance.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sonja Tomovska - Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

05 July 2018

 

In Conversation with the Rt. Hon. Helen Clark on the International Context on Gender

 

File No.: CP2018/11744

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A facilitated conversation with the Rt. Hon Helen Clark to provide a perspective on the international context and progress on gender issues. The conversation will be facilitated by Deborah James, Head of Diversity and Inclusion, Auckland Council.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Helen Clark was Prime Minister of New Zealand for three successive terms from 1999–2008.  She was the first woman to be elected as Prime Minister in New Zealand. She advocated strongly for New Zealand’s comprehensive program on sustainability and for tackling the problems of climate change. 

3.       In April 2009, Helen Clark became Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme. She was the first woman to lead the organisation, and served two terms there. At the same time, she was Chair of the United Nations Development Group, a committee consisting of all UN funds, programs, agencies, and departments working on development issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from Rt. Hon Helen Clark and thank her for her attendance.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sonja Tomovska - Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

05 July 2018

 

Gender issues raised by the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women

 

File No.: CP2018/11349

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report responds to the Governing Body resolution [GB/2015/117] that “a report on the gender issues raised by Cities for the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) be presented to the Community Development and Safety Committee”.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), is described as an international bill of rights for women. CEDAW was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 18 December 1979 and ratified by New Zealand in January 1985.

3.       The New Zealand (NZ) government, and several non-government organisations, will appear before the United Nations Committee for CEDAW on 12 July 2018 to provide a progress update on NZ’s CEDAW commitments.

4.       Auckland Council’s support for gender equity issues is expressed as part of its strong comittment to valuing Auckland’s diversity and fostering inclusion, belonging and participation for all Aucklanders.  This commitment is expressed in many of our strategies and work programmes, including: the Auckland Plan; Thriving Communities Action Plan;  Empowered Communities approach; and the Inclusive Auckland (diversity and inclusion) framework.

5.       In Novermber 2015, Pacific Women’s Watch (PWW) sought the Governing Body’s support for Council to adopt the Cities for CEDAW programme, which operates in countries where CEDAW has not been ratified nationally.

6.       Officers have considered this request and are not recommending this approach for the following reasons:

·      Council already has several strategies and work programmes which encompass key issues of importance to women and which broadly align with some of the CEDAW goals.  Appendix C sets these out.

·      CEDAW is ratified nationally in New Zealand and the CEDAW articles are designed for state parties to enact at the national level.

·      The NZ Treasury has recently begun to explore gender budgeting and it would be prudent to wait for their recommendations on this.

7.       Oversight of Council’s existing work programmes is through reports to Governing Body committees, Local boards and council’s Executive Leadership Team. However, to provide additional focus on Council’s work programmes that address issues for women, this report recommends that the Community Development and Safety Committee receives progress updates every two years on work programmes which align with CEDAW goals.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      note that the New Zealand Government ratified CEDAW in 1985 and will report to the United Nations on progress with the CEDAW goals on 12 July 2018, along with several non-government organisations;

b)      note that council has strategic commitments guiding work programmes which align with some of the CEDAW articles and goals;

c)      agree to receive progress updates to this committee every two years on work programmes which align with CEDAW goals.

 

Horopaki / Context

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women

8.       The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), is often described as an international bill of rights for women. CEDAW was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 18 December 1979 and was ratified by New Zealand in January 1985. 187 out of 193 United Nations member states have ratified CEDAW.

9.       CEDAW provides a universal standard for women's human rights and addresses discrimination in areas such as political and public life, economic and social life, education, employment, marriage and family life, health, finance and law. Appendix A provides a summary of the key elements of CEDAW.

10.     CEDAW’s provisions are designed for state parties to enact at the national level.  Countries that have ratified CEDAW are legally bound to put its provisions into practice and to submit national reports, at least every four years, on measures to comply with their obligations. The New Zealand government will appear before the United Nations Committee for CEDAW on 12 July 2018 to provide a progress update and respond to questions asked by the committee following our last report in 2016.

11.     The Human Rights Commission and a number of New Zealand non-governmental organisations (NGO’s)[1] will also report to the United Nations Committee for CEDAW in July. Appendix B attaches the CEDAW recommendations from the Human Rights Commission and the National Council of Women.

12.     Key issues noted in these reports include:

Gender based violence

§ NZ women experience the highest reported rate of intimate partner violence and the highest lifetime prevalence of sexual violence for any OECD country.

§ Māori, Pasifika and migrant women, disabled women, older women, lesbians, bisexual and transgender women, are the most likely to experience violence against women, most of which is not reported[2]


 

 

 

Gender pay gap

§ In 2017, the NZ gender pay gap was 9.4% (averaged across all women). The pay gap is worse for  Māori, Pasifika, Asian women and women with disabilities.

§ 80% of the pay gap is driven by unconscious and conscious bias which negatively affects the recruitment and promotion of women.

§ Women, on average, experience a 4.4% decrease in hourly wages upon becoming mothers[3].

Women in political and public life

§ Whilst three of our most senior constitutional roles are held by women (Prime Minister, Governor-general and Chief Justice) and women comprise 61% of public servants, only 42% of chief executives of public service departments are women.

§ In the private sector, only 19% of directors of companies listed on the New Zealand Stock Exchange were female and 56% of businesses have no women in senior roles.

§ The Government’s aspirational goal of 45% participation of women on state sector boards was met for the first time in December 2016[4].

Economic and social life

§ Vulnerability to poverty is still the major economic issue facing NZ women, particularly sole mothers, and is worst among Māor and Pasifika women.

§ Women are disproportionately affected by the growth of low-paid, insecure work.

§ Substantially more women than men are paid at or below the minimum wage

§ On average, graduate women earn less than men over their lifetime, making it  more difficult for women to repay student loans[5]

§ Half of those experiencing extreme housing deprivation are women. At the 2013 census, single parents with dependent children made up 43 percent of people without homes[6].

Data collection and resource allocation

§ There is a lack of robust data across key indicators making it difficult to accurately understand areas of multiple discrimination for women in relation to characteristics such as ethnicity, gender, and disability

§ There is no systematic robust collection of data across different government agencies on family violence.

§ The Government is not required to consider or report on gender impacts when making fiscal or resourcing decisions (gender budgeting).


 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Cities for CEDAW

13.     The NGO’s reporting to the United Nations on progress with CEDAW include Pacific Women’s Watch (PWW) who presented to the Governing Body in November 2015 on the Cities for CEDAW programme. The United States is one of only six countries not to ratify CEDAW at the national level. Cities for CEDAW was developed in America to implement the provisions of CEDAW at a local government level in the absence of ratification by the government.

14.     Pacific Women’s Watch sought the Governing Body’s support for Council to adopt the Cities for CEDAW programme. Cities for CEDAW has three key goals:

·   gender analysis and budgeting for city departments and operations;

·   an oversight body to monitor local CEDAW implementation;

·   funding to support implementation of CEDAW principles

15.     Gender budgeting is the analysis and reporting of gender impacts when making fiscal or resourcing decisions. Impacts can be positive or negative. Half of all OECD countries have introduced or are actively considering introducing gender budgeting. The NZ Treasury released a working paper in April 2018 exploring the potential application of gender budgeting principles to increase transparency around fiscal policy and to help inform debate on resource allocation[7].

16.     Council’s support for gender equity issues is expressed as part of its strong comittment to valueing Auckland’s diversity and fostering inclusion, belonging and participation for all Aucklanders. Since 2015, when PWW presented to the Governing Body, Council has implemented and refreshed several key strategies which address these issues, including:

§ The Auckland Plan’s ‘belonging and participation’ outcome  “ Te whai pānga me te whai wāhi atu /all Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential”.

§ Council’s Thriving Communities Action Plan supports communities to be connected, resilient and inclusive.

§ Empowered Communities approach - we define an empowered community as one where individuals, whānau and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their lives and communities. Council’s role is to support and enable empowered communities.

§ Council’s Inclusive Auckland (diversity and inclusion) framework  is our strategic approach to  responding to the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities and  leveraging the talents and insights of Auckland’s diverse peoples. The framework is strongly focused on inclusion and sets out change actions to address issues of access, equity and participation, for our staff and for Aucklanders.

17.     These strategies guide council’s work programmes to achieve key outcomes which align with some of the CEDAW articles. Appendix C provides examples of these.


 

18.     Officers have considered PWW’s request for Council to adopt the Cities for CEDAW programme and are not recommending this approach for the following reasons:

·      CEDAW is ratified nationally in New Zealand and the CEDAW articles are designed for state parties to enact at the national level. The Cities for CEDAW programme operates in countries where CEDAW has not been ratified nationally.

·      The NZ Treasury has recently begun to explore gender budgeting. It would be prudent to wait for their recommendations before considering this at the local government level.

·      Auckland Council already has several well developed strategies and work programmes which encompass key issues of importance to women and which broadly align with some of the CEDAW goals.

·      Funding for these work programmes is approved by the Governing Body, as part of the Long-term Plan process, and progress on actions and outcomes is reported to Governing Body committees, Local boards and council’s Executive Leadership Team, as appropriate.

19.     Council’s work programmes that align with CEDAW, and oversight of them, will continue as planned. However, we recommend that, in addition, officers provide two yearly updates to the Community Safety and Development committee on progress with committments and work programmes that broadly align with CEDAW goals including (for example) those set out in Appendix C. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

20.     This report provides a summary of key Auckland Council work programmes, including some with a particular focus on Māori outcomes, that align with some of the CEDAW articles.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

21.     There are no financial implications arising from staff recommendations.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

22.     There are no risks arising from staff recommendations.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

23.     Provide progress updates to this committee every two years on work programmes which align with CEDAW goals.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women (in brief)

21

b

Recommendations from Alternative CEDAW Reports

23

c

Summary of Auckland Council strategic commitments and work programmes that align with CEDAW articles

33

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Deborah James – Head of Diversity and Inclusion

Authoriser

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


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[1] Pacific Women’s Watch (New Zealand); Shakti; National Council of Women NZ; NZ Prostitutes Collective; Business and Professional Women NZ; NZ Human Rights Committee

 

[2] Women experiencing discrimination (2016) National Council of Women NZ; July 2017

[3] Women’s Rights in New Zealand; submission of the NZ Human Rights Commission; 11 June 2018

[4] Gender Stocktake of State Sector Boards and Committees; Ministry for Women; April 2017.

[5] Women experiencing discrimination (2016) National Council of Women NZ; July 2017

[6] Mana Wahine, the invisible homelessness of mothers; Tess McClure; Sept 2017

[7] Gender Budgetting: A Useful Approach for Aotearoa New Zealand (WP 18/02). NZ Treasury April 2018