I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 July 2018

4pm

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Chamber
Takapuna Service Centre
Level 3
1 The Strand
Takapuna

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

George Wood, CNZM

 

Deputy Chairperson

Dr Grant Gillon

 

Members

Mike Cohen, QSM, JP

 

 

Jennifer McKenzie

 

 

Jan O'Connor

 

 

Mike Sheehy

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Heather Skinner

Democracy Advisor

 

11 July 2018

 

Contact Telephone:  021 190 5687

Email: heather.skinner@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        New community lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated, Takapuna Beach Reserve, The Promenade, Takapuna                                                                                          7

12        Public notification and proposed granting of a new community lease to North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust at Killarney Park, 2a Manurere Road, Takapuna.           15

13        Key Moves for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Open Space Network Plan 27

14        Auckland Transport monthly update - July 2018                                                     33

15        Local Board Services monthly report - July 2018                                                    47

16        Seaweed Management Matrix                                                                                  301

17        Approval of the  2018/2019 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme                                                                                                                 317

18        New Road Name for Subdivision at 10 Purchas Road, Hauraki                          337

19        Regional Facilities Auckland - Third Quarter 2017/18 Report                              343

20        Chairpersons' Report                                                                                                369

21        Elected Members' Reports                                                                                       371

22        Ward Councillors Update                                                                                         373

23        Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops June 2018              375

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     383  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

 

i)              A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

 

ii)             A non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 19 June 2018, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

New community lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated, Takapuna Beach Reserve, The Promenade, Takapuna

 

File No.: CP2018/11788

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated, for part of Takapuna Beach Reserve, The Promenade, Takapuna.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       North Shore Waka Ama is an Incorporated society that has been storing waka ama at the northern end of Takapuna Beach Reserve on an informal basis for over ten years. 

3.       The site is described as Part Lot 3 DP18501 Takapuna. It is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

4.       Retaining waka storage at this location on a traditional taurangawaewae waka site (landing place of waka) within the reserve considers and recognises the significant relationship Māori have with their ancestral lands, waters, wāhi tapu and other taonga.

5.       Hui were held in 2017-2018 to discuss support for a lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated at this location. This culminated in a hui on 1 May 2018 with iwi representatives associated with the site that confirmed collective agreement for the club to receive a lease. This is considered to be in the best interests of the growing sport of waka ama and to meet the needs of its members.

6.       Public notification and iwi engagement are not required as the Takapuna Beach Reserve Management Plan adopted in 2013 contemplates a lease for waka ama activities.

7.       This report recommends that the board grant a new community lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated for the site it occupies on Takapuna Beach Reserve. The recommended term is 10 years with one 10 year right of renewal in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and as specified in the reserve management plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated for approximately 234m2 being part of Takapuna Beach Reserve described as Part Lot 3 DP18501 Takapuna as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term: 10 years commencing 17July 2018 with one 10 year right of renewal

ii)       rent: $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested

iii)      the North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan as approved is attached to the community lease document as set out in Attachment B of this agenda report

iv)      that all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated

8.       North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated occupies approximately 234m2  of the grassed area along the bank beneath Alison Avenue at the northern end of Takapuna Beach Reserve between the Takapuna Beach Holiday Park and the Takapuna Boating Club as set out in Attachment A.  

9.       In August 2016, the club applied for a ground lease to formalise its occupation of this part of the reserve where it has storage racks for waka ama.

Takapuna Beach Reserve

10.     Takapuna Beach Reserve is contained in several separate titles. North Shore Waka Ama occupies part of Lot 3 DP18501. This is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve and, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. This classification supports the activities of the club.

11.     The operative reserve management plan for Takapuna Beach Reserve adopted in 2013 contemplates a lease for waka ama and tauranga waka ama facilities on the reserve. This means public notification and iwi engagement prior to any new lease being granted is not required in accordance with the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated

12.     The club has filed a comprehensive application in support of its application for a new community lease. The club has the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

13.     North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated was registered as an Incorporated Society on 29 September 2014 (No. 2613687).

14.     The club is a collective of three North Shore based waka ama clubs: Taniwha, Akarana Dragons Sports Club and Aratika. The collective membership of all three clubs is around 290 members of which approximately 100 are under 21 years of age.

15.     The club’s purpose is:

·        the establishment, maintenance and management of long term waka storage facilities at Takapuna Beach

·        to provide the development, practice and promotion of waka ama in the North Shore areas for the enjoyment of its members and the wider community.

16.     The club is affiliated to Waka Ama New Zealand and the Auckland Regional Outrigger Canoe Association. Member clubs have been paddling from and storing their waka on this site for over 10 years.

17.     The Takapuna Beach Cup is an international waka race event over three days which has been held in Takapuna for the last 10 years. It is hosted by one of the member clubs. This event brings crews from other parts of New Zealand together, along with an international contingent. The event draws large crowds and adds to Takapuna’s economy and vibrancy.

The Northern Activity Zone

18.     The proposed lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated is within the area identified in the reserve management plan as the Northern Activity Zone on Takapuna Beach Reserve. This is an area bounded by The Promenade, Alison Avenue, Earnoch Avenue and the coast. The zone currently contains the Takapuna Beach Holiday Park, a storage building for the Takapuna Boating Club, the Takapuna Beach Café, a small area of open space for unstructured recreation activities and a coastal walkway.

The Waka Ama Site 

19.     The site is a grassed area along the bank beneath Alison Avenue. It provides compact waka storage. Public toilets and other amenities are a short walk from the site adjacent to the proposed leased area.

20.     The club maintains the site, keeping it clear of weeds and debris on a regular basis. There is currently limited storage but at site visit on 1 May 2018 the club confirmed that the site would benefit from investment to facilitate better storage and tomake it easier and safer to manoeuvre waka and limit the impact on the general public that uses the unstructured open space area on the reserve.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

21.     The local board has allocated decision-making authority to approve community leases and licences. Workshops were held with the local board on 7 June and 13 July 2016.

22.     The local board was updated on proceedings at a workshop on 14 November 2017 where North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated and representatives from its member clubs gave a presentation.

23.     An update on discussions with local iwi was provided to the local board on 3 April 2018. The local board was informed that letters of support for the proposed lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated had been received from Ngati Whatua Orākei Trust and Ngati Paoa.

24.     On 1 May 2018 a hui was held at Takapuna Beach with iwi representatives associated with the site to discuss the proposed lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated and its future purpose. There were no concerns raised and mana whenua support for the North Shore Waka Ama club to formalise a lease for the existing site has now been provided.

25.     The proposal is contemplated in the operative reserve management plan. There is no requirement to undertake an expression of interest process.

26.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated and agreed with club. The plan aligns with the 2017 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan outcomes of:

·    quality parks, beaches and open spaces that everyone can enjoy

·    our communities are empowered, engaged and inclusive.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

27.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, the Unitary Plan and Local Board Plans.

28.     Iwi with historic and cultural links to Takapuna Beach and waka ama groups were key stakeholders in the development of the Takapuna Beach Reserve Management Plan. A range of specific outcomes were identified, and feedback was incorporated into the reserve management plan. 

29.     An objective of the reserve management plan is to work collaboratively with mana whenua representatives on issues of importance to Māori in the management of Takapuna Beach Reserve. The supporting policy states that mana whenua representatives, facilitated through council’s Te Waka Angamua (Māori Strategy and Relations) department, will participate in decision-making on management issues of importance to Māori.

30.     The reserve management plan contemplates a local waka ama presence on the reserve, stating:

“Having waka storage facilities on a traditional tauranga waka site (landing place of waka) within the reserve takes into account and recognises the significance of the relationship that Māori have with their ancestral lands, waters, wāhi tapu and other taonga.”

31.     Additional iwi engagement prior to any new lease being granted is not required in accordance with section 54 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 as it was undertaken as part of the management plan direction.

32.     Ensuring community facilities are well maintained and accessible for all members of the community, will be of benefit to all, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

33.     There are no known financial implications associated with granting a new lease to the club. 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

34.     Should the club not receive a formal lease arrangement and have security of tenure for this site, it will have limited ability to attract investment and to grow the sport. Local people would have to travel further afield to find opportunities to participate in the sport of waka ama, an activity recognised as appropriate at this location in the operative reserve management plan. There are no alternative sites for the club to store their craft along the beach.

35.     The North Shore Waka Ama group is delivering community outcomes for Māori that are consistent with the 2017 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan. Without a lease the special relationship that Māori have with their ancestral lands will not be acknowledged.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan for lease to North Shore Waka Ama Incorporated

11

b

North Shore Waka Ama Inc Community Outcomes Plan

13

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Wendy Zapart – Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

Public notification and proposed granting of a new community lease to North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust at Killarney Park, 2a Manurere Road, Takapuna.

 

File No.: CP2018/11776

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve engaging with iwi and public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant the North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust a new community lease. The lease will contain a provision for a licence to occupy to French Rendez-Vous Limited for the Green Shed at Killarney Park, 2a Manurere Road, Takapuna.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust has an existing lease for the council-owned Pumphouse Theatre complex at Killarney Park issued by the former North Shore City Council. The lease commenced 8 August 2003 for one term of 10 years with one right of renewal of 10 years. The trust has exercised its first right of renewal, and the final expiry date of the lease is 7 August 2023.

3.       One of the buildings within the complex is the Green Shed café that is currently occupied by French Rendez -Vous Limited under the terms of a licence to occupy granted by the Trust. 

4.       To provide certainty of tenure to the trust and the café operator and improve the services available to visitors to the site the trust has applied for an early surrender of its current lease and requested the issue of a new community lease. The lease will provide for a licence to occupy to be granted to the café operator

5.       The Lake Pupuke-Pupukemoana Reserve Management Plan currently restricts the opening hours of the café to 7.30am-4.30pm on weekdays and 8.30am-4.30pm on weekends.

6.       The trust has requested that the café hours be extended to 8:00am until 10:00pm Monday - Sunday. 

7.       The amendment can be incorporated in the new lease and any licence to occupy provided this is publicly notified in accordance with the terms of the Reserves Act 1977 and the Conservation Act 1987.

8.       The amendment sought is to improve services to visitors to the site and will allow for the sale of food and alcohol to theatre and café customers during events.

9.       Killarney Park is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and is made up of several parcels of land. The Pumphouse Theatre is part sited within Lot 1 DP84317 which is classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve. This classification permits the trust’s activities. A new community lease can be issued for this area occupied under section 61 (2A) (a) of the Reserves Act 1977.

10.     The remaining area on which the cafe, public toilets and amphitheatre are sited, is within the boundaries of SO 69461 that includes Part Lots 7 and 8 DP 1128 and Part Lots 2 and 3 DP 1558. These lots are classified as recreation reserve. The trust’s activities do not align with this classification and before a new community lease is issued, iwi engagement and public notification pursuant to the provisions of the Reserves and Conservation Acts is required.

11.     Subject to there being no objections to the proposal the lease of this part of the site can be issued under section 73(3) of the Reserves Act.

12.     One lease for the entire site will be issued and it will contain a reference that it is authorised under two sections of the Reserves Act 1977.

13.     The Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 recommend that the term for a lease of a council-owned building is five years with one five year right of renewal.

14.     There is a long-standing agreement between Auckland Council and the trust. The trust has made a significant investment to improve the complex during its tenure and wishes to continue this investment. The French Rendez-Vous café is very popular and adds to visitors experience and the sustainability of the complex.

15.     This report recommends that the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board approve:

·    engagement with iwi and public notification of the proposed new community lease to the trust with the provision for a licence to occupy arrangement for the café

·    public notification of the proposal to increase the hours of operation of the café from the Green Shed

·    granting a new community lease for the pumphouse complex on the terms recommended.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve engagement with iwi and public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease with provision for a licence to occupy for the café to the North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust for the Pumphouse complex at Killarney Park 2a Manurere Road Takapuna sited on Lot 1 DP 84317 and portions of Part Lots 7 and 8 DP 1128 and Part Lots 2 and 3 DP 1558 (Attachment A to the agenda report) based on the following terms and conditions:

i)        term - five years with one five year right of renewal

ii)       rent -  $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      subsidised operational fee - $500.00 plus GST per annum

iv)      the term of the café licence being concurrent with the term of the lease

v)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with Lake Pupuke- Pupukemoana Reserve Management Plan as adopted July 2005 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

b)      approve the public notification of the proposal to amend the hours of operation of the café as follows:

·    Current hours

Monday – Friday: 7.30am – 4.30pm

Weekends: 8.00am - 4.30pm

·    Proposed hours

Monday – Sunday: 8.00am -10.00pm.

c)      nominate a hearings panel consisting of the Chairperson, Deputy Chairperson and one other member of the Devonport -Takapuna Local Board to consider any submissions or objections received following the public notification process.

d)      request that council staff report back to the local board following the public notification process. 

e)      grant (subject to there being no adverse submissions) a new community lease with the provision for a licence to occupy for the café to North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust for the Pumphouse complex at Killarney Park, 2a Manurere Road, Takapuna sited on Lot 1 DP 84317 and portions of Part Lots 7 and 8 DP 1128 and Part Lots 2 and 3 DP 1558 on the terms and conditions publicly notified.

 

f)       surrender the existing deed of lease between the former North Shore City Council and North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust dated 8 August 2003 and subsequent deed of renewal and variation dated 31 October 2013, effective on execution of the proposed new community lease.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

16.     This report considers leasing and licensing issues with respect to the trust’s occupation of a portion of Killarney Park, Takapuna.

17.     The board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Killarney Park

18.     Killarney Park at Lake Pupuke covers 4.8 hectares and comprises 18 parcels of land within SO 69461. This proposal concerns the part of the reserve leased to the North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust which occupies two separate parcels of land (Attachment A).

19.     Killarney Park is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. The Pumphouse Theatre is sited within Lot 1 DP84317 which is classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve. This classification supports the trust’s activities, so no public notification or iwi engagement is required. A new community lease may be issued for the area occupied under section 61(2A) (a) of the Act.

20.     The remaining areas of the complex are sited within the boundaries of SO 69461 which includes Part Lot 3 DP1558 which is classified as recreation reserve. The trust’s activities do not align with the classification, but a lease can be issued for this area under section 73(3) of the Act. Before doing so, engagement with iwi and public notification pursuant to the provisions of the Conservation and Reserves Acts is required.

21.     The Lake Pupuke- Pupukemoana Reserve Management Plan adopted July 2005 describes the trust’s various activities. The trust’s lease is also contemplated in the plan, including the licence to occupy to the café operator

The Pumphouse complex

22.     The complex includes a 192-seat theatre, changing rooms, a small box office and an administration office for the trust. The other buildings on the site comprise toilet facilities and the green shed cafe.

23.     The trust has developed an outdoor amphitheatre that can accommodate approximately 200 patrons. The amphitheatre is used for the popular Shakespeare in the Park programme and by a number of other groups over the summer months. The Lake Pupuke- Pupukemoana Reserve Management Plan adopted July 2005 describes the trust’s various activities in some detail.  The trust’s lease is contemplated in the plan.

24.     The trust has occupied and administered Auckland Council’s Pumphouse complex since 1977. The current lease to the Trust was granted on 8 August 2003 for ten years pursuant to the Section 601 of the Local Government Act 1974 with the right of a further ten-year term. A renewal was granted on 6 November 2012 and reaches final expiry on 7 August 2023.

25.     In October 2001, council permitted the trust to operate a café from the Green Shed building located within the complex. French Rendez-Vous Café Limited currently operates the café through a licence to occupy. This is a permitted use of the trust’s premises in accordance with Clause 1.10 of its lease.

26.     A lease renewal granted in 2012 included a variation to allow the trust to negotiate a licence to occupy with the operator of the café for four years with one right of renewal for a further four years. The current licence to occupy expires in November 2020. This was to give the café operator greater security of tenure.

Trust’s request for a new lease

27.     The trust submitted a letter to Auckland Council on 6 October 2017 requesting changes to its current lease (Attachment B) to provide additional services to patrons. This included a request for permission for the café to operate and serve alcohol) for extended hours outside the hours allowed by the management plan. The new hours being from 8:00am until 10:00pm Monday to Sunday.

28.     The Pumphouse Theatre complex is well maintained, and the café is well supported by the local community.

29.     A community outcomes plan is not required to be attached to the deed of a proposed new community lease. This is because the trust is required to submit annual reports to council relating to its funding agreement with the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for service provision.

North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust

30.     The North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 24 May 1971 (No. 212060).

31.     The primary purpose the Trust was established is in order to promote the preservation, protection and development of The Pumphouse on Lake Pupuke. With the centre used to promote and encourage the arts including all forms of theatre arts, music, drama, poetry and the visual, arts applied, crafts, the art of film and ballet and the study of the arts.

French Rendez-Vous Café Limited

32.     As the trust does not operate the café business, approval for the trust to enter into a licence to occupy arrangement is required.  The trust must obtain the prior approval from council of the proposed operator before entering into the licence arrangement. The proposed new licence to occupy shall be for a term concurrent with the new lease.

33.     The Lake Pupuke- Pupukemoana Reserve Management Plan adopted July 2005, restricts the café’s hours of operation to 7.30am-4.30pm on weekdays and 8.30am-4.30pm on weekends. Functions may be catered on-site only during these hours and must directly relate to the objectives and aims of the trust. These restrictions were put in place in response to residents’ concerns regarding the impact of late night openings or an increase in the use of the complex.

34.     The new lease and licence arrangement proposes to change the operating hours to 8:00am to 10:00pm Monday to Sunday. This allows patrons of the Pumphouse to be served during events at the theatre. The current hours are restrictive and do not align with the current use of the facility.

35.     French Rendez-Vous Limited operates the café business. At the most recent inspection by Auckland Council on 29 September 2017 the operator was awarded an ‘A’ grade for food safety.  The French Rendez-Vous Café has since transitioned to operate under the Food Act 2014 with a verification (reassessment) date of 29 September 2018.

 

 

 

 

Public notification

36.     Prior to approving a new community lease for the portion of land occupied by the amphitheatre, toilets and Green Shed (with provision for a licence to occupy for the café operator) engagement with iwi is required under section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.  Public notification of council’s intention is also required under section 73(4) of the Reserves Act 1977.

37.     As the reserve management plan restricts the café’s hours of operation, the proposed extended hours can be authorised with a provision in the lease that will be publicly notified as a variation to the management plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

38.     Council staff sought input at a local board workshop on 3 April 2018 regarding the proposed new community lease to the trust and approval to enter into a licence to occupy. The local board provided positive feedback. 

39.     The local board is the allocated authority to approve public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease, a licence to occupy and the amendment of the reserve management plan.

40.     The trust’s activities and café service align with the 2017 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan outcomes:

·    quality parks, beaches and open spaces that everyone can enjoy

·    a place of natural beauty and rich culture.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

41.     Engagement with mana whenua on this proposal is required under the provisions of the Conservation Act 1987 and the Reserves Act 1977 for the proposed new lease to the trust for the portion of its complex sited on the land classified as recreation reserve.

42.     Engagement will involve:

·     email contact containing detailed information and inviting iwi representatives to hui and if requested a Kaitiaki site visit to comment on any spiritual, cultural or environmental impact with respect to the proposal

·     a presentation to iwi representatives at a scheduled mana whenua forum.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

43.     The cost involved in public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease and amend the Lake Pupuke Reserve Management Plan will be borne by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities Department.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

44.     Should the local board resolve not to approve engagement with iwi and public notification of the proposals, this may materially affect the trust’s ability to operate the Pumphouse Theatre complex and undertake its art and cultural activities. Similarly, the French Rendez-Vous Limited may be restricted in its ability to provide hospitality services that complement the trust’s art and cultural activities.

45.     Council is required by the Sale and Supply of Liquor Act 2012 to be a responsible landlord. The issuing of any special concessions is contingent on meeting the requirements of this Act.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

46.     Subject to the board’s approval on engaging with iwi, public notification and to granting a new community lease, staff will undertake the work to administer the boards’ decision as required.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust

21

b

Letter to Auckland Council from NS Theatre and Arts Trust (6102017)

23

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Wendy Zapart – Community Lease Advisor  

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

Key Moves for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Open Space Network Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/06669

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt key moves for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Open Space Network Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Agreement on the key moves will inform the development of an open space network plan.

3.       Staff recommend four key moves that focus on improving the quality of, and access to, open space in the Devonport-Takapuna local board area.

4.       The plan will assist decision-making and provide a framework for the development of open space over the next 10 years.

5.       No additional funding is allocated to implement projects in the plan, however, the document can be used to advocate for new funding as part of the annual and long-term plan processes.

6.       A draft plan will be presented to the local board for adoption in August 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve four key moves to guide the development of the Devonport-Takapuna Open Space Network Plan, as follows:

i.        treasuring our natural and cultural areas

ii.       connecting and sharing open spaces

iii.      optimising and increasing utilisation

iv.      sport and recreation for the enjoyment of all.

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       A 10-year open space network plan is being prepared for the Devonport-Takapuna local board area.

8.       The plan will inform local board decision-making and expenditure across the park network as the area grows and changes over time.

9.       The plan will set out key moves for the development of open space network. The key moves respond to the following findings from the current state analysis.

 

The Devonport-Takapuna population is diverse

10.     Staff have researched population demographics and growth projections for the Devonport-Takapuna area.

·     The 2013 Census recorded 55,470 residents - this represented an increase of 2814 people, or 5.3 per cent, since the 2006 Census.

·     The demographic profile of the area is:

·   74.7% European

·   17.5% Asian

·   5.4% Māori

·   2.2% Pasifika

·   1.6% Middle Eastern Latin American African

·   1.5% Other.

·     39.5 per cent of residents were born overseas, compared with 39.1 per cent of Aucklanders and 25.2 per cent of New Zealanders.

·     The median age is 39.7 years of age, compared with 35.1 across Auckland and 38 for New Zealand.

·     15.3 per cent of residents are aged 65 years of age or over, compared with 11.5 per cent of Aucklanders and 14.3 per cent of New Zealanders.

·     18.5 per cent of residents are under 15 years of age, compared with 20.9 per cent of Aucklanders and 20.4 per cent of New Zealanders.

Devonport-Takapuna is anticipated to change and grow

11.     The current population is approximately 62,663. This represents a 12 per cent increase since 2013. The projected annual population growth rate is 2.23 per cent per annum.

12.     Growth will be more pronounced along the Unitary Plan growth corridor, which includes almost 50 per cent of the local board area.

13.     Growth will put pressure on parks and open space and a range of existing community and sports facilities.

14.     Residents of European decent are forecast to decline. The Asian population is forecast to increase and, to lesser extent, so will Māori and Pasifika.

15.     The median age of residents will increase.

There are good levels of open space provision, with some gaps in the network

16.     There are 124 open spaces, totaling 216 hectares, across the local board area. A total of 30 reserves have reserve management plans; but many are outdated.

17.     There is a shortfall of neighbourhood and suburb parks within the following areas:

·   Sunnynook

·   Forrest Hill (Forrest Hill Road)

·     Belmont

·     Westlake

·     Lake Pupuke

·   Takapuna Central

·   Hauraki (Lake Road)

·     Narrowneck

·     Crown Hill

·     Bayswater.

18.     Many of these are growth areas, which may lead to opportunities to acquire new open space.

19.     The council is not the only provider of open space. The Ministry of Education has a significant investment across 22 local schools. Most of these schools are in the above areas where there are gaps in the network.

20.     There are 40 existing play facilities and demand from the public to build more.

21.     A survey of residents found that 98 per cent highly value open space. It also found that:

·     79 per cent are satisfied with the provision of local parks and reserves

·     92 per cent visited a local park or reserve in the last 12 months.

·     47 per cent wanted improved facilities, including better and or more toilets, more rubbish bins, more picnic tables, seating, water fountains, shade and more parking

·     19 per cent wanted more maintenance, including better paths, improved drainage, tree cutting and regular park cleaning

·     17 per cent wanted improvements to playgrounds and more play facilities for older children.

There is increasing pressure on existing open space

22.     There are 30 leases over parks and open space. This equates to just over 20 per cent of open space. These leases often provide exclusive use of open space.

23.     By 2025, there will be a forecast shortfall of 115 hours for winter sports fields.

24.     Twenty reserves (16 per cent) are subject to storm surges and coastal inundation.

 

Residents are most active walking and jogging

25.     Walking (50.2 per cent) and jogging (24.6 per cent) are the most popular recreation activities of residents.

26.     The Devonport-Takapuna Local Greenways Plan 2015 seeks to increase North-South walking and cycling connections. There are also opportunities to improve East-West connections in the following areas:

·   Sunnynook to Cambells Bay

·   Forrest Hill to Castor Bay

·   Westlake to Milford

·    Hauraki

·    Bayswater to Belmont

·    Narrowneck

·    Stanley Bay to Mt Victoria.

27.     Participation in outdoor and indoor sports are lower in comparison to the rest of Auckland.

28.     There is a shortfall of indoor court facilities to support growth in sports including table tennis, badminton, futsal, volleyball and basketball.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

 

Four key moves are proposed that focus on improving the quality of, and access to, open space

29.     The goal of the plan is to achieve a sustainable high quality open space network.

30.     Key moves are developed to inform the open space network plan. Staff recommend the four key moves as below:

·     treasuring our natural and cultural areas

·     connecting and sharing open spaces

·     optimising and increasing utilisation

·     sport and recreation for the enjoyment of all.

31.     Table 1 below outlines how these key moves respond to the current state and anticipated growth in the area.

32.     They also respond to the following objectives of the local board:

·      developing relationships with mana whenua and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority

·      protecting and conserving the environment and improving water quality

·      recognising the importance of walking and cycling

·      recognising the importance of sport and recreation

·      valuing open space, civic spaces and events.


 

 

Table 1. Proposed key moves and focus areas

Key move

which responds to…

and aligns with the local board’s focus areas

Treasuring our natural and cultural areas

 

·     Open space, culture and heritage sites are highly valued

·     Opportunities to integrate and extend connections

·     Opportunities to improve ecology, water quality and increase tree planting

·     Storm surges and coastal inundation

·     Developing relationships with mana whenua and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority

·     Protecting and conserving the environment and improving water quality

 

Connecting and sharing open spaces

 

·     Provision gaps in high growth areas

·     Connect to school fields

·     Opportunities to connect the East to West open space network

·    Recognising the importance of walking and cycling

·    Valuing open space, civic spaces and events

Optimising and increasing utilisation

·     Uneven distribution of parks and open spaces

·     Good use of its seaside parks by locals and residents from outside the area

·     30 community leases

·     Outdated reserve management plans

·    Valuing open space, civic spaces and events.

Sport and recreation for the enjoyment of all

·     Changing demographic and sports participation trends

·     Sports field provision gap

·     Demand for more playgrounds

·    Recognising the importance of sport and recreation

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and Local board views

33.     The current state analysis and proposed key moves have been discussed at two local board workshops on 27 February 2018 and 10 April 2018.

34.     A draft plan was presented to local board members at a drop-in session on 29 June 2018. Feedback from local board members is reflected in the ‘focus areas’ presented in Table 1.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

35.     Mana whenua were engaged at the North-West Mana Whenua Engagement Forum on 6 December 2017, and 4 April 2018.

36.     Mana whenua want to work alongside the local board and they have suggested ongoing engagement. They would also like to share best practice management, conservation, promotion and preservation methodologies to support Māori heritage.

37.     The final plan could include opportunities to working closely with both mana whenua and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

38.     Actions identified in the plan will have to be accommodated within existing budgets. However, the local board could advocate for additional funding through annual or long-term plan processes.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

39.     There is a low reputational risk arising from the fact that public has not had the opportunity to provide input into the development of the network plan. This is mitigated by public consultation on individual park developments and opportunities to participate in the development of the local board plan every three years.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

40.     Staff will prepare a draft open space network plan based on the key moves and feedback from local board members and mana whenua. The final plan will be reported to the local board in August 2018.   

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sam Noon - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Ruth Woodward - Manager Parks & Recreation Policy

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly update - July 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/12070

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the July 2018 Auckland Transport monthly update.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport July 2018 monthly update report and thank Marilyn Nicholls, Elected Member Relationship Manager, for her presentation and attendance.

b)      allocate $180,000 from the boards Local Board Transport Capital Fund towards the investigation of cycleway/walkway connections from Devonport to Esmonde Road that include, Francis Street – Esmonde Road link, Francis Street to Lowe Street link, St Leonards Road to Gair Point Lookout link.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport July 2018 report

35

     

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17 July 2018

 

 

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17 July 2018

 

 

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17 July 2018

 

 

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17 July 2018

 

 

Local Board Services monthly report - July 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/12730

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report requests the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board (the local board) consider:

·    allocating $180,000 from its 2017/2018 local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) to the investigative work for three new cycling and walking routes in the Devonport peninsula;

·    allocating a total of $1,400,000 million towards the Patuone Reserve Walkway enhanced renewal from the following budget sources:

$292,000 from the 2015–2018 locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital fund

$13,958 from the 2017/2018 local board transport capital fund

$729,318 from the 2018/2019 local board transport capital fund

$364,724 from the 2019/2020 local board transport capital fund.

·    allocating $130,000 from the 2018–2021 LDI capital fund to deliver the Lyford Reserve Track project;

·    a land owner consent application for a donated park bench at Sylvan Park, Milford; and

·    providing feedback on Ports of Auckland’s 30-year Masterplan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      allocate $180,000 from the 2017/2018 local board transport capital fund to the investigative work for four new cycling and walking routes in the Devonport Peninsular.

b)      allocate a total of $1,400,000 towards the Patuone Reserve Walkway enhanced renewal from the following budget sources:

i)        $292,000 from the 2015–2018 locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital fund

ii)       $13,958 from the 2017/2018 local board transport capital fund

iii)      $729,318 from the 2018/2019 local board transport capital fund

iv)      $364,724 from the 2019/2020 local board transport capital fund.

c)      allocate $130,000 from the 2018–2021 locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital fund to deliver the Lyford Reserve Track project.

d)      grant land owner consent for a park bench at Sylvan Park, Milford.

e)      provides the following feedback on Ports of Auckland 30-year Masterplan:

i)        support the overarching principles guiding the 30-year Masterplan

ii)       support the six key transformative projects, which include:

·        Berth and channel deepening and responsible disposal of dredged materials to accommodate larger container ships and cruise ships

·        Automating our container terminal and rail grid facilities to increase capacity and reduce our environmental impact

·        Improving the look of the port by developing a new head office building and engineering workshop

·        Developing Bledisloe Wharf to accommodate larger ships to help support Auckland’s growth

·        Creating a car handling building to increase capacity and hide most cars from view on the waterfront

·        Opening additional areas of the port to provide more public access to the waterfront, including a public park and a ‘hotel-type’ complex.

iii)      support opportunities to collaborate with Ports of Auckland to inform and engage the community where projects will impact or benefit the local area. 

 

Horopaki / Context

 

Investigative work towards new cycling and walking routes in the Devonport Peninsular

2.       Through major planning processes (e.g. the 10-year Budget and local board plan development), the local board has expressed a vision to build on the existing cycling and walking network in the Devonport peninsula, and create a complete route that starts in Devonport, runs up the peninsula via Bayswater, Belmont and Hauraki and finishes in Takapuna.  This route would also connect to the proposed SeaPath and SkyPaths and ultimately create a complete link from Devonport to Westhaven Marina.  Building on the existing network will provide a safe and accessible route for both commuting and recreational purposes and be a high-quality alternative to cycling along Lake Road.

3.       To deliver this vision, the local board has also indicated that the majority of its’ local board transport capital fund should be used towards projects that support and align to Auckland Transport’s (AT) Lake Road Improvements Project, and contribute towards the overarching objective of addressing congestion issues on Lake Road.

4.       As part of the 10-year Budget public consultation, the local board sought the community’s views on whether the board should prioritise its capital budgets towards new and upgraded cycle and walkway routes that provide an alternative to using Lake Road.  Analysis of feedback highlighted that two-thirds of all respondents supported the proposal, where they noted:

·      “Getting cars off Lake Rd is a priority.  I am often out walking in the morning and see so many parents dropping children off at the local secondary school.  Encouraging these kids to walk with improved walkways and cycle lanes would help”.

·      “Taking the pressure off Lake Road can only be achieved if alternatives are developed”. 

·      “Giving people safe places to walk and cycle provides that option other than driving and helps to get cars off our roads”.

5.       The local board has identified four new connections to create a complete route along the Devonport peninsula.  These include connections between:

·    Esmonde Road, Takapuna and Francis Street, Hauraki;

·    Francis and Lowe streets, Hauraki;

·    Creamer Avenue, Hauraki to Bayswater Avenue, Bayswater; and

·    St. Leonard’s Road, Takapuna to George Gair Reserve, Belmont.

6.       At its April 2018 business meeting, the local board requested (DT/2018/47) that AT scope and provide a rough order of costs to investigate the four new connections. 

7.       AT staff have considered the local board’s request and advise:

·    they support the proposed connections as they will enhance the existing cycling and walking network and provide a safe off-road route along the peninsular;

·    the connections complement and enhance the routes proposed as part of AT’s Devonport Belmont Area Cycle Network Review;

·    the proposal meets the transport capital fund criteria; and

·    the investigative work for all four connections will cost approximately $180,000. 

8.       The $180,000 to undertake the investigative work can be funded by the local board’s 2017/2018 transport capital fund allocation, where $193,958 is available.  If the local board supports the investigate work, $13,958 remains available in the 2017/2018 budget to allocate towards eligible projects.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board allocate funds towards the investigative work, as the project aligns to the local board’s strategic documents (e.g. the Local Board Plan and Greenways Plan), and delivery can be considered alongside projects being delivered as part of AT’s Lake Road Improvements Project.

 

Enhanced renewal for Patuone Reserve Walkway

10.     Council’s Community Facilities department is currently undertaking a renewal of the Patuone Reserve Walkway, Takapuna as part of the local board’s 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 work programmes.

11.     This walkway has been identified as a priority route in the local board’s Greenways Plan, as it provides an alternative pedestrian and cycle route from central Takapuna to Esmonde and Barry’s Point roads.  This route also provides an important link to the:

·    Akoranga Bus Station

·    proposed SeaPath and SkyPaths

·    local board’s proposed connection from Esmonde Road to Francis Street.

12.     The renewal and its concept designs outline the realignment and improvement to adjacent ecology to meet the recommendations set out in the Greenways Plan.

13.     It is proposed that the walkway that runs through Patuone Reserve is widened to 2.5m to form a shared path from its starting point at Esmonde Road to the south of the site through to its exiting point to the north at Auburn Reserve.  The realignment will utilise the existing topography and navigate its way through existing trees and vegetation whilst trying to minimise the need for tree removal.  Detail regarding the proposed pathway is outlined in the concept plan at Attachment A.

14.     A combination of concrete pathway and timber boardwalk will be used to form the walkway depending on the existing topography and ground conditions.  The walkway improvement and suggested alignment will also provide the opportunity for the inclusion of a number viewing platforms to take advantage of the visual amenity of the site and provide the base for educational signage that relates to the surrounding environment.

15.     Improvements to the two reserve access points from Esmonde Road and Auburn Reserve have also been proposed.  This includes widening and formalisation of an entry point from Esmonde Road and the rearrangement of existing parking spaces along Auburn Reserve to provide a consistent 2.5m wide access route to the reserves northern entry from Auburn Street.

16.     Planting will also be improved throughout the site with a strong focus on planting native species that support existing birdlife.  Throughout the site, planting is proposed along estuary edge and below existing trees to improve the existing environment, mitigate tree or shrub loss during construction and enhance the amenity value of the walkway.

17.     The walkway improvement works will also provide opportunity for further improvement to existing storm water infrastructure with the possible inclusion of gross pollutant traps to the north end of the site to reduce scouring and contamination of the upper estuary.  Existing storm water outlets will also be cleared of any contamination and overgrown/invasive species will be removed and replanted with suitable riparian planting.  The inlets will also be lined with rip rap to slow further contaminants from entering the estuary.  Additional grass swales are also proposed to the base of existing steep batters to reduce surface water runoff.

18.     The budget to undertake the renewal is $800,000, which would enable a like-for-like refurbishment of the walkway.  In April 2018, the local board informally indicated support to enhance the renewal so that it can be upgraded to greenways standard. 

19.     To progress this renewal, three options have been developed for the local board to consider:

Option

Project budget

Additional budget required

Benefits

Risks / opportunity cost

Option one: Upgrade to greenways standard (2.5m wide)

Recommended option

$2,200,000

$1,400,000

·      Will enable cycling and walking along the reserve.

·      Provides an off-road link to public transport hubs and other cycling / walking routes.

·      Most of the transport capital fund will be allocated to this project, which will limit the local board’s ability to undertake other transport projects.

Option two: Standard upgrade (1.8m wide)

$1,800,000

$1,000,000

·      Will provide a walking track along the reserve that links Auburn Reserve to Barry’s Point and Esmonde roads.

·      The width of the path will limit the accessibility and availability of cycling along the reserve.

·      Most of the transport capital fund will be allocated to this project, which will limit the local board’s ability to undertake other transport projects.

Option three: Like-for-like renewal (1.2m wide)

$800,000

$0

·      No cost to the local board, as no additional budget required.

·      Will not provide cycling and walking outcomes as outlined in the Greenways Plan.

 

20.     Through their capital budgets, the local board could fully fund the $1,400,000 to upgrade the renewal to greenways standard.  This amount is derived from the following capital budget sources:

·    $292,000 from the 2015-2018 LDI capital fund allocation

·    $1,108,000 from 2017/2018, 2018/2019 and 2019/2020 local board transport capital fund allocations.

Note: this is calculated based on the following budget sources: 2017/2018: $13,958, 2018/2019: $729,318and 2019/2020: $364,724.

21.     Staff recommended the local board approve option one: upgrade to greenways standard as the route aligns to their Greenways Plan, and it will provide a safe and accessible walking and cycling route from Takapuna to the Akoranga Bus Station, and the proposed SeaPath and SkyPaths.

22.     It is important to note that the local board will still have $364,594 in their 2019/2020 transport capital fund to allocate towards other eligible projects.

23.     Please refer to Attachment A for a concept design for the Patuone Reserve walkway renewal.

 

Additional budget for Lyford Reserve Track project

24.     Council was approached by the Sunnynook Community Association (the association) requesting funding to enable construction of a new 1.2m wide by 640m long walking track through Lyford Reserve.  The association has progressed the project to developed design and have been granted resource consent for physical works primarily through voluntary and donated services.

25.     The purpose of the walking track is to provide linkages to the surrounding streets including Sunnynook Primary School and will also greatly assist in the community led Environmental Weed Control programme by allowing greater access throughout the site.  It comprises of bridges to creek crossing and timber walkways as well as the removal of large dangerous trees that are of significant risk and represent a potential hazard to track users.

26.     The proposed track alignment has been determined by the natural contours of the site.  This and the track design making use of timber edging allows flexibility in the alignment to avoid large canopy trees by raising the track above the existing ground level minimizing excavation required.  This is critical at this site, as physical works will be undertaken primarily using hand tools due to very limited access for large machinery.

27.     The Sunnynook Community Association volunteers have been operating in the reserve for several years focusing resources on weed control and native restoration.  This is currently funded by council’s Volunteering and Programmes unit.

28.     The Devonport Takapuna Local Board have previously approved $224,500 to fund the delivery of Lyford Reserve Track project. (resolution number DT/2017/97 - $124,500 and resolution number DT/2017/199 - $100,000).

29.     The works have now been tendered and council staff are in a position to award the contract and begin works in September 2018 when the conditions improve.  The most suitable tender has come in above budget and the total cost to deliver the project is $354,000, which is an increase of $129,500.

30.     The increase in budget has come about for the following reasons:

·    tree removal methodology.  Due to difficulties accessing the site the contractors will now use Sunnynook school fields for contractor access and debris removal. This change provides a better outcome and ease of construction and less destruction of natural site features

·    additional arborist monitoring requirements

·    there is a large amount of this type of work being undertaken in the current market, and the more difficult sites are either not being taken up when called for tender or contractors are allowing large contingencies.  This price is the best result and has only been achieved after going out to tender three times.

31.     Staff recommend the local board approve the additional $130,000 from its 2018–2021 LDI capital fund to ensure the Lyford Reserve Track project can start in September 2018 and be delivered.

 

Park bench donation with plaque at Sylvan Park, Milford

32.     Council’s Parks and Places team has received an application from Rebekah Jaung of the Korean New Zealanders for a Better Future for a new park bench with memorial plaque at Sylvan Park, Milford.  The bench and plaque will commemorate the 2014 Sewol Ferry tragedy, and the 304 lives that were lost.

33.     The proposed location of the bench is in the centre of the park, down from the public toilets and overlooking Lake Pupuke. Attachment C provides a detailed location of the park bench.

34.     The application has been assessed and meets the council’s Plaques and Memorials on Parks Interim Guidelines criteria.

35.     Staff recommend that the local board grant land owner consent so that installation of the bench and plaque can be undertaken.  The applicant will also be covering the cost of purchasing the bench, plaque and its installation.

36.     Refer to Attachments B through F for full details of the land owner consent application.

 

Ports of Auckland’s 30-year Masterplan

37.     Ports of Auckland (PoA) is developing a new 30-year Masterplan (the plan) which will guide both the port, and Auckland’s economic, social and environmental needs.  The plan aims to create space for freight and gives Auckland the time it needs to make a sound decision on where, when and how to move the port.

38.     The starting point for the plan was the outcome of the Port Future Study, which was an independent and collaborative study commissioned by Auckland Council to look at long term options for managing Auckland's port.  PoA then used feedback from Aucklanders and information from importers, exporters and shippers to shape a plan to meet the needs of Aucklanders, both today and tomorrow.  PoA also used this feedback to develop a set of planning principles that have shaped the plan’s projects, which include:

·    Be open and honest

·    No more reclamation

·    Handle freight efficiently

·    Make the port look better

·    Only build what’s needed, when it's needed

·    Include more public access to the waterfront

·    Ensure that our activities are environmentally friendly

·    Build stronger relationships

·    Create a legacy for the city.

39.     The Plan includes six key transformational projects:

·    creating a car handling building to increase capacity and hide most cars from view on the waterfront

·    automating Fergusson Container Terminal and rail grid facilities to increase capacity and reduce our environmental impact

·    developing Bledisloe Wharf to accommodate larger ships to help support Auckland’s growth

·    opening additional areas of the port to provide more public access to the waterfront, including a public park and a ‘hotel-type’ complex

·    berth and channel deepening and responsible disposal of dredged materials to accommodate larger container ships and cruise ships

·    improving the look of the port by developing a new head office building and engineering workshops.

40.     Other projects in the Plan include a new container terminal, an extension and new cranes for Fergusson North Wharf, developing the network of inland freight hubs and supporting the cruise industry.

41.     Staff presented the Plan to the local board at a workshop in March 2018.

42.     The local board is requested to provide feedback on the six key transformational projects, and any other feedback relating to the Plan.

43.     Further information, including timings on the proposed projects is available at http://www.masterplan.poal.co.nz.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

44.     Local board views and preferences are sought through the proposed recommendations in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

45.     There are no implications for Māori associated with this report

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

46.     Financial implications have been detailed in the respective sections of this report. 

47.     The following table provides a summary of the available budgets for the local board transport capital and LDI capital funds:

Budget source

Total allocation

Available budget at 1 July 2018

Available budget after July 2018 decisions

2015-2018 LDI capital fund

$1,089,000

$292,000

$0 (fully allocated)

2018-2020 LDI capital fund

$1,147,000

$1,147,000

$817,000*

2017/2018 transport capital fund

$417,067

$193,958

$0 (fully allocated)

2018/2019 transport capital fund

$729,318

$729,318

$0 (fully allocated)

2019/2020 transport capital fund

$729,318

$729,318

$364,594

 

* Note: this figure includes the $200,000 capital budget allocation considered as part of the 2018/2019 Community Facilities work programme, which will be reported to the local board in July 2018.

 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

48.     All risks have been detailed in the respective sections of this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

49.     The local board will have oversight and input of these projects through the Transport and Community Facilities work programmes, and ongoing engagement though workshops.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Patuone Reserve walkway renewal - concept design

55

b

Park bench donation at Sylvan Park - application form

87

c

Park bench donation at Sylvan Park - proposed location

91

d

Park bench donation at Sylvan Park - staff memo

93

e

Park bench donation at Sylvan Park - Sewol memorial bench petition

95

f

Park bench donation at Sylvan Park - Petition (translated)

299

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tristan Coulson - Senior Local Board Advisor Devonport-Takapuna

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Seaweed Management Matrix

 

File No.: CP2018/09295

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to adopt and implement the Seaweed Management Matrix to manage seaweed on Takapuna Beach and Cheltenham Beach.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Large deposits of seaweed on beaches within the Devonport-Takapuna local board area, particularly Takapuna Beach and Cheltenham Beach, can cause a nuisance to beach users prior to public events or periods of high usage.

3.       The ongoing removal of seaweed from the local board beaches would result in adverse effects on marine ecology and the surrounding environment, has operational constraints, and would have financial implications.

4.       Seaweed is an important contributor to the marine food chain of the Hauraki Gulf. Seaweed also supports a range of species (such as snapper, crayfish and kina and shellfish) treasured for their ecological, commercial, recreational and cultural value. International research indicates that drift weed can provide up to 25 per cent of the energy available to marine ecosystems.

5.       Seaweed also contributes to protecting the physical properties of the beach and is beneficial to the beach front. International studies indicate that once seaweed accumulates on the beach it acts like a sponge during subsequent storm events by absorbing wave energy. This protects the sand from wave erosion.

6.       Monitoring deposits of seaweed has shown the bulk of the deposited seaweed is removed by natural tidal processes within a relatively short time frame (two - four weeks) depending on the size, volume and location.

7.       This report recommends a tool to respond to seaweed deposition. Community education may be required to help residents understand the ecological and beach sand stability value of leaving deposited seaweed on the beach and the value of allowing seaweed to be dispersed via natural coastal processes.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      adopt and implement the proposed Seaweed Management Matrix,  as set out in Attachment B of the agenda report,  to inform operational responses to seaweed deposition events.

b)      note that community level communications highlighting the adopted approach to seaweed, and the ecological reasons for it, will be developed across appropriate media channels with the local board’s input.

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       This report addresses guidance sought by the local board to an operational response to deposition of seaweed on local beaches.

9.       The deposition of large volumes of seaweed on local beaches typically occurs because of extreme weather events producing strong onshore winds and significant wave heights or following periods of sustained onshore winds.  Elevated water levels resulting from king tides or storm surge can transport seaweed onto the upper beach face.  The frequency of such events varies in response to weather patterns, with significant seaweed deposition events anticipated to occur three to four times per year.     

10.     Monitoring to date has shown that the bulk of deposited seaweed is removed by natural processes within a relatively short time frame (two - four weeks), as seen in photographic monitoring records in Attachment A.

11.     Concerns have been raised by the community about the nuisance caused by seaweed deposition on local beaches.  These include aesthetics and visual impact, effects on public access and amenity values, and odours resulting from decomposing seaweed. 

12.     Such nuisances can be elevated when significant seaweed deposition occurs prior to public events on these beaches, or prior to a long weekend over summer, when increased levels of beach usage are anticipated.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

13.     The removal of seaweed from local beaches can result in adverse effects to the environment, has operational constraints, and has financial implications, as detailed below.

Potential for associated removal of sand

14.     Beaches in the local board area, particularly Takapuna and Cheltenham beaches, have a wide intertidal (wet) foreshore area.  This makes the sieving or removal of fine sands from seaweed difficult.  As a result, sand could be removed from the beach along with the seaweed.

15.     The beaches have a relatively thin veneer of fine sand and are therefore vulnerable to sand removal. Seaweed also contributes to protecting the physical properties of the beach and is beneficial to the beach front. International studies indicate that once seaweed accumulates on the beach it acts like a sponge during subsequent storm events by absorbing wave energy. This protects the sand from wave erosion.

16.     As seaweeds help prevent loss of finer sediments to wind, removal of seaweed can result in coarser grain size and texture on beaches.

Ecology

17.     Seaweed is an important contributor to the marine food chain of the Hauraki Gulf. Seaweed also supports a range of species (such as snapper, crayfish and kina and shellfish) treasured for their ecological, commercial, recreational and cultural value. International research indicates that drift weed can provide up to 25 per cent of the energy available to marine ecosystems out to 1-2km offshore, dependent on a range of factors.

18.     The majority of seaweed grow attached to underwater rock reefs. During storms seaweed in shallow areas can be torn off the reef and transported by tidal currents as floating and drift seaweed. Once the seaweed is washed onto a beach, this seaweed provides an important habitat and a critical food source for marine species that inhabit sandy habitats both on the beach and immediately seaward of the beach.

19.     The organic matter in the seaweed and the seaweed itself provides food and habitat for small crustaceans and a number of other species, which then provide food for crabs and nationally vulnerable shore birds such as the red-billed gull.  As the incoming tide remobilises seaweed accumulations, the buildup of sand hoppers and other small crustaceans become available to juvenile predatory fish species, such as kahawai, that are too young to actively hunt for swimming fish.

20.     Floating and drift seaweed are important sources of food and nutrients for sessile (non-mobile) marine species as these types of species rely on seaweed to come to them.  Several rocky reef based species (e.g. kina) rely on drift seaweed as a direct source of food which assists in the overall growth and reproduction. Kina also ulitise drift seaweed as cover to shelter from predators and during periods of increased sediment deposition. Some shellfish species (e.g. oysters and mussels) also rely on fine seaweed particles as a food source. Research in the Hauraki Gulf has demonstrated that seaweed contribute to 34 per cent and 57 per cent of oyster and mussel diets respectively.

21.     Seaweed typically live attached to rock reefs and therefore rely on drifting on tidal currents and storm surges to encounter new areas to colonise, reproduce and grow. Seaweed depend on beach bound seaweed accumulations to be released from the upper sand beaches during natural coastal processes to redistribute seeds and reproductive fragments to regenerate the population and replace lost individuals after large storms.

22.     Seaweed also contributes to protecting the physical properties of the beach and are beneficial to the beach front. International studies indicate that once seaweed accumulate on the beach, seaweed acts like a sponge during subsequent storm events by absorbing wave energy. This protects the sand from wave erosion. Seaweed cover can trap sand reducing wind erosion effects. Studies indicate removal of seaweed can increase the loss of sand from wave-induced erosion and wind erosion by removing the initial barrier that accumulates sand. Since erosion can cause destruction of nearby property and important infrastructure, removal of seaweed could also have adverse and unintended social and economic impacts.

Community education

23.     To assist the local community in understanding the value of seaweed depositing on the beach and the implementation of the Seaweed Management Matrix, communication using hard copy and digital signage may be required. These communications (content, design and media channels) will be developed with the local board’s input. The intention of this engagement would be to raise the level of awareness about the value of seaweed on beaches and how this process is ecologically important in context of the wider Hauraki Gulf.

Operation issues

24.     Due to the typically wide intertidal zones of these beaches, seaweed removal would need to occur over a large area of foreshore.  A narrow dry beach area would restrict the hours over which seaweed removal could take place, therefore, duration of works could be over several days.

25.     Currently there is no proven or preferred mechanical method of seaweed removal suitable for beaches in the local board area. 

26.     Removal would need to occur under overhanging pohutukawa trees, with limited clearance for machinery.

27.     Given the high usage levels on the beaches in the local board area, significant health and safety standards would need to be met.  This includes fencing off working areas, and deployment of spotters.  This would add significant cost, and result in temporary restrictions on beach access.

28.     There are no known health and safety concerns associated with seaweed being left on the beach to be dispersed via natural coastal processes.

29.     In places, private property titles extend onto the upper beach where seaweed tends to accumulate.  Approval of property owners may be required.

30.     Consultation would be required with tangata whenua with regards to removal activities under the Takapuna beach ‘sacred grove’ pohutukawa trees.

 

Financial considerations

31.     Seaweed removal costs are anticipated to be high, and include:

·    use of machinery and associated man hours

·    disposal of seaweed

·    meeting health and safety requirements.

32.     It is noted that further seaweed deposition events could occur within a short time period following removal.  

33.     It is recommended that to inform the response to seaweed deposition events the proposed Seaweed Management Matrix be implemented.

34.     The proposed matrix:

·    assesses the extent of seaweed deposition following an event against an agreed rating scale

·    factors in a timeframe for deposited seaweed to be removed by natural processes

·    recommends a trigger in terms of whether seaweed removal should be initiated.

35.     Council staff will monitor post storm seaweed deposition events to document:

 

·    the extent of seaweed deposition across a beach

·    residence time (how long it takes before seaweed is removed from a beach by natural processes).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

36.     Seaweed deposition on Takapuna beach has received considerable media coverage and is a topical issue for some residents. Associated with this media coverage the board receives feedback and is lobbied to remove seaweed from the beach. This report and associated matrix will allow the board to provide robust guidance and advice to residents and council staff in respect to seaweed management at high profile beaches.

37.     The council has received a letter from one Takapuna resident who expressed a desire to leave the seaweed on the beach and understands the important role seaweed plays in the supporting ecological values of the beach and the surrounding ecosystem.

38.     A workshop was held with the board on 5 December 2017 to discuss the implementation of the seaweed management matrix. The board is familiar with the matrix and the associated issues (operational and ecological) with removing seaweed from beaches.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

39.     The council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

40.     No specific impacts to Māori were identified, therefore iwi were not directly engaged in regards to this matrix.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

41.     The implementation of the matrix will have low financial implications. The monitoring component of the seaweed management matrix will be undertaken by the Coastal and Geotechnical Services team as required.

42.     Signage may be required to be installed (occasionally) to inform the public of the council’s response to seaweed deposition on the beach. Signs may need to be installed at beach access points other than The Strand, Takapuna where the electronic safe swim sign is located.

43.     Community Facilities may require funding to produce and erect these educational signs due to significant events. 

44.     While the desirable ecological outcome and baseline level of service is leaving seaweeds to naturally leave the beach. Manual removal within the seaweed matrix will still incur costs to the local board. (i.e. in advance of the World Masters Games, the organiser for the event spent $50,000 on a one-off manual beach clean). Advice given from the Coastal and Geotechnical Services team is that we should anticipate three events over a year that would trigger the matrix. Estimating $150,000 for the board to budget for removal.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

45.     Without clear guidance from the board and council about managing seaweed deposition on beaches, further debate may be held via the media. To support the implementation of the matrix, community education (via signage) will be undertaken to educate the community about the positive aspects of seaweed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

46.     Upon the local board approving and implementing the seaweed management matrix the Coastal and Geotechnical Services team will be available to assess and monitor seaweed deposition events, update the board and advise operational requirements if needed.

47.     The Coastal and Geotechnical Services team are also available to assist in the development of signage to facilitate community level communications where the local board approves such action.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Seaweed Deposition Event – Photographic Monitoring Record

307

b

Seaweed Management Matrix

313

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Marcel Morgan – Operational Management and Maintenance Manager  

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


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17 July 2018

 

 

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Approval of the  2018/2019 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme

 

File No.: CP2018/11850

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, including all physical works, leasing and operational maintenance projects delivered by Community Facilities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing of all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

3.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme was developed using a combination of local board feedback, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input.

4.       The following indicative costs have been identified in the 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme:

i)        $5,439,000 of asset-based services capital funding

ii)       $200,000 of local board initiative capital funding

iii)      $0 of local board initiative operational funding.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of iterative workshops between key staff and local boards since October 2017. The programme provided in Attachment A and B reflects the agreed projects that were presented in the last local board workshop. This report recommends that the board approves the 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme and associated budget.

6.       Once approved by the board, new work will commence from July 2018. Regular updates on the line items will be provided by the Community Facilities’ Stakeholder Advisors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme as detailed in Attachment A and B of the agenda report. 

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of Auckland. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art, and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

8.       The 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme detailed in Attachment A and B contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Capital works programme

9.       Investment in the capital programme will ensure that council facilities and parks open spaces in the board area remain valuable and well-maintained community assets that continue to meet the agreed levels of service. Asset-based services capital works includes Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI), renewals and growth and development projects.

 

Locally Driven Initiative

Renewal

Growth and development

Coastal Renewals

Basis for amount of budget allocated to each local board

As per the local board funding policy:

·     90% population

·     5% deprivation

·     5% land.

In proportion to assets in very poor and poor condition requiring renewal, limited to funding available.

To specific projects identified as priority projects to meet the needs of new and future residents.

To specific projects identified as priorities by the coastal specialist team.

Type of projects that can be paid for

Any projects that deliver a council owned asset or as a capital grant to an asset made available for public use.

Renewal of existing assets on a “like for like” basis, taking into account current service standards where applicable.

Development budgets are used for specific projects approved by the Governing Body.

Growth budgets can only be used for specific projects that are required by and benefit new and future residents.

Renewal of and enhancement where required, to existing coastal structures

Degree of local board discretion on allocation to projects

Full discretion

Broad discretion - can be allocated to any renewal project

Limited discretion – must be allocated to the specific project.

Local board discretion on scope and design of project within available budget.

Limited discretion – must be allocated to the specific project for the purpose of protecting our coastal assets.

Please note that coastal renewals projects are allocated regionally.

 

10.     The 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme has been created following a series of workshops with elected members from October 2017 to May 2018. All feedback gathered from the workshops has been taken into consideration throughout the process. The proposed work programme in Attachment A and B contains:

·    Number of projects: 53

·    Indicative cost for proposed projects: $8,693,544.

Leasing work programme

11.     Community leases are a valuable way in which the council provides support to community organisations across the region, commonly on public parks and reserves. These groups provide a wide range of community activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities and are a key part of the mosaic of community activity and infrastructure in Auckland.

12.     The draft work programme provides a detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2018/2019 financial year. It also includes the additional leases and licences that will be deferred from the 2017/2018 financial year to the 2018/2019 financial year.

13.     Once the 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme is approved, staff will be able to consolidate reporting on routine matters or use the streamlined process for straight forward renewals without variations whilst focusing attention on those community leases that are more complex.

Operational maintenance work programme

14.     The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

·    increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets

·    improving the safety of Community Facilities assets

·    ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users.

15.     Community Facilities launched ‘Project 17’ in July 2017 which created new bundled maintenance contracts across the Auckland region for full facility, ecological restoration and arboriculture maintenance contracts.  The Finance and Performance Committee approved these contracts on 30 March 2017.

16.     In the 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme, there are three line items dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area:

·    Full Facilities Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, coastal management and storm damage

·    Arboriculture Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all tree management and maintenance

·    Ecological Restoration Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include pest plant and animal pest management within ecologically significant parks and reserves.

17.     Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly report. Community Facilities is also providing additional weekly updates to all elected members on contractor performance.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

18.     The Community Facilities Work Programme has been created through a combination of local board feedback, asset condition assessments and agreed levels of service.

19.     The draft 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2017 to May 2018. The views expressed by local board members during the workshop have been adopted in Attachment A and B.

20.     The Community Facilities work programme supports the achievement of the following 2017 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan outcome:

·      Quality parks, beaches and open spaces that everyone can enjoy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

21.     The 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

22.     Staff are also attending mana whenua fora monthly to receive feedback on the 2018/2019 Community Facilities Work Programme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

23.     The proposed 2018/2019 Community Facilities work programme will see the allocation of $200,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives capital budget, $5,439,000 of the board’s asset based services capital budget, and $3,054,544 of the board’s asset based operational budget. These amounts can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2018/2019. As such, the board’s approval will not have significant financial implications unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend. Regular updates on projects will be provided to the board tracking expenditure and identifying any projects at risk of non-delivery, over or underspend.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

24.     If the proposed Community Facilities Work Programme is not approved at the business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be able to be delivered within the 2018/2019 financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

25.     The work programme will be implemented as part of Community Facilities’ usual business practice.

26.     Work programme implementation will be reported regularly by stakeholder advisors and quarterly through the performance report to the local board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Community Leases Work Programme 18_19

323

b

Devonport-Takapuna Community Facilities Work Programme 18_19

325

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Cherie Veza - Stakeholder Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

New Road Name for Subdivision at 10 Purchas Road, Hauraki

 

File No.: CP2018/11628

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for a road name for the private road constructed for the subdivision and unit development being undertaken by Solution Street Limited (the applicant), at 10 Purchas Road, Hauraki.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       The applicant has submitted the following names in order of preference:

·    Tuaone Court

·    Paketai Close

·    Porutu Close.                

4.       All of the names are considered suitable and meet the road naming guidelines.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the road name Tuaone Court, Paketai Close or Porutu Close for the private road constructed for the subdivision and unit development being undertaken by Solution Street Limited at 10 Purchas Road, Hauraki in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       The six-lot residential subdivision and associated six residential units, (council reference BUN60314471), was approved on 26 March 2018 and is currently under construction.

6.       The council and Land Information New Zealand, (LINZ), require that private roads servicing six or more lots or units be named.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

7.       The council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·    a historical or ancestral linkage to an area

·    a particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature

·    an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area

·    the use of Māori names is also encouraged. 
  

8.       The applicant’s names, Tuaone Place, Paketai Close and Porutu Close are of Māori origin.

9.       The english translation of the names are:

·    Tuaone – beach or foreshore

·    Paketai – driftwood or debris cast up on a beach

·    Porutu – to break (of waves on the shore) surge (of the sea).            

10.     The names reflect the applicants desire to use names that generally encompass a beach setting due to the developments close proximity to Takapuna Beach.

11.     LINZ has confirmed that the names are acceptable as no duplicates exist in the wider Auckland region.

12.     The applicant has consulted with 13 local iwi groups and received six replies with no objections received to the names.

13.     The proposed names meet the council’s road naming guidelines in that they generally reflect the wider environment and encompass the council’s policy of encouraging the use of the Māori language where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

14.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

15.     The applicant has consulted with 13 local iwi groups and received six replies. Of the responses three supported the names, two deferred to other iwi and one sought payment for undertaking an assessment. The applicant chose not to take up that offer considering it to be inappropriate in the context of the consultation being undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

16.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

17.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

18.    Approved road names are notified to LINZ who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

10 Purchas Road

341

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

John Benefield – Senior Subdivision Advisor  

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland - Third Quarter 2017/18 Report

 

File No.: CP2018/12083

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) Third Quarter 2017/18 report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The appended report in Attachment A outlines the RFA’s third quarter work programme, covering the period ending 31 March 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the Regional Facilities Auckland Third Quarter 2017/18 report.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Facilities Auckland Third Quarter 2017/2018 report

345

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Heather Skinner - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

Chairpersons' Report

 

File No.: CP2018/12073

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues relevant to the board. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank Chairperson G Wood for his verbal report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Heather Skinner - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

Elected Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2018/12074

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the members of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues they have been involved in since the June meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank members for their verbal reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Heather Skinner - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2018/12076

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board allocates a period of time for Ward Councillors, Chris Darby and Richard Hills, to update the board on activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      thank Cr Chris Darby and Cr Richard Hills for their verbal update to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Heather Skinner - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops June 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/12080

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a record of Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshops held during June 2018. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on 5 June 2018, the board was briefed on:

· 2 The Strand, Takapuna

· 2017/2018 PSR Work Programme

· Performance Measures.

 

3.       At the workshop held on 12 June 2018, the board was briefed on:

· North Shore bus network

· Movies in the Park debrief

· 2017/2018 ACE Work Programme

· Cross-sectoral homelessness strategy for Auckland

· Low carbon Auckland and addressing climate impacts.

 

4.       Records of these workshops are attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the workshops held in June 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Record - 5 June 2018

377

b

Workshop Record - 12 June 2018

379

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Heather Skinner - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/12085

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2018. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by the local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance to staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The July 2018 governance forward work calendar for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is provided as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board governance forward work calendar for July 2018, as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report. 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calender - July 2018

385

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Heather Skinner - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 July 2018

 

 

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