I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 26 September 2018

3:00pm

Room 1, Level 26

135 Albert Street, Auckland

Te Poari Kaitohutohu mō te Pokapū o te Tāone

Nui o Tāmaki Makaurau /

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Ms Viv Beck

Business Improvement District

Deputy Chair

Mr Andrew Gaukrodger

Corporate sector

Members

Ms Noelene Buckland

City Centre Residents Group

 

Member Shale Chambers

Waitematā Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Mr Greg Cohen

Tourism/Travel

 

Mr Ben Corban

Arts and Cultural Sector

 

Mr Terry Cornelius, JP

Retail sector

 

Mr George Crawford

Property Council of NZ

 

Cr Chris Darby

Auckland Council (Mayor’s alternate)

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Auckland Council

 

Mr Dane Grey/ Mr Ngarimu Blair

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

 

Mr Mark Kingsford

Corporate sector

 

Cr Mike Lee

Liaison councillor, Auckland Council

 

Ms Amy Malcolm

Tertiary Education (University of Auckland & Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr James Mooney

Urban design/institute of architects

 

Mr Nigel Murphy

Tertiary Education (University of Auckland & Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr Adam Parkinson

City Centre Residents Group

 

Mr Patrick Reynolds

Transport representative

 

Mr Michael Richardson

Business Improvement District

 

(Quorum 10 members)

 

 

 

Tam White, Senior Governance Advisor

21 September 2018

Contact Telephone: 09 8908156

Email: tam.white@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Terms of Reference

 

(Excerpt –full terms of reference available as a separate document)

 

1.       These terms of reference set out the roles, responsibilities and working arrangements for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

2.       The board is a key advisory body, with no decision-making or autonomous budgetary authority.

3.       The board will assist the Auckland Council, specifically the Governing Body and the Waitematā Local Board and Auckland Council Controlled Organisations to oversee and be a key advisor to the Auckland Council on achieving the vision and strategic outcomes of the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan, the expenditure of the city centre targeted rate and city centre issues.

 

Membership:

Includes one councillor and one local board member.

 

The board should include members who can provide expert advice on many areas including transport, landscape, environment and youth sectors. The membership includes a position for Mana Whenua. Representatives from CCOs may be board members without voting rights. The number of the board members should be between 16 and 21 at any time.

 

The new panel’s term should end one month prior to the next local government elections in 2019. The membership of the panel may be rolled over for more than one electoral term of three years.

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

5          Update on the process for reviewing the city centre targeted rate TR7 portfolio 7

6          Regional Facilities Auckland overview and update                                                 17

7          Road safety in the city centre                                                                                     43

8          City centre update for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board – September 2018 51

9          Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme - September 2018 69 

10        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

Apologies have been received from Members Patrick Reynolds and Amy Malcolm.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 22 August 2018, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

Update on the process for reviewing the city centre targeted rate TR7 portfolio

 

File No.: CP2018/17769

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on the city centre targeted rate portfolio (known as TR7) and the process for the TR7 portfolio review.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The city centre targeted rate was established by Auckland City Council in the 2004/2005 financial year to help fund the development and revitalisation of the city centre. The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board was formed to advise the council on expenditure and revenue raised by the targeted rate.

3.       The city centre targeted rate budget has been fully allocated under the current portfolio of works (TR7) until 2025.

4.       A number of TR7 projects have not yet started and most of the budget for these projects is forecast to be spent in the next long-term plan period (2021-2024).

5.       Auckland Council’s Investment Delivery Framework and the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board’s assessment criteria will be used to assess projects in the existing city centre portfolio if they have not yet started. The first step in this process is to undertake strategic assessments. A list of projects prioritised for strategic assessment will be presented to the board for feedback in November 2018. The strategic assessments to begin thereafter.

6.       The process will result in recommendations as to whether projects that have not yet started should remain in the portfolio or whether their budgets should be reallocated towards other city centre projects or initiatives. Funding reallocations will also be subject to the board’s endorsement and Finance and Performance Committee approval.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the update on the city centre targeted rate portfolio (TR7) and the process for the TR7 portfolio review.

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       On 29 November 2017, the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board received a report on the city centre targeted rate-funded portfolio of works (TR7) 2015- 2025, and resolved as follows:

Resolution number CEN/2017/81

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson A Gaukrodger, seconded by Mr S Chambers:

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)   received the current City Centre Targeted Rate funded programme of works 2015-2025 and look forward to in principle discussions in concert with the LTP.

b)   endorsed the updated City Centre Targeted Rate funded programme of works for 2017/2018.

8.       The TR7 portfolio fully allocates the city centre targeted rate funding until 2025. The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 was approved by the Governing Body in June 2018, which included the adoption of the city centre targeted rate (resolution GB/2018/1).

9.       Since the April 2018, staff have worked alongside members of the Auckland City Advisory Board to update the city centre targeted rate assessment criteria to assist the board with their advice on city centre targeted rate investment. The updated assessment criteria were endorsed by the board at its 22 August 2018 meeting (resolution CEN/2018/48).

10.     The updated assessment criteria will be submitted to the Finance and Performance Committee for approval. Subject to approval, the updated assessment criteria will be used by the council when proposing or assessing a portfolio of works for city centre targeted rate spend.

11.     A summary of city centre targeted rate spend from 2010 to 2018 is included in Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Planning context

12.     The city centre is currently experiencing a period of increased investment, public and private construction is moving at pace and scale, making the city centre a complex and changing environment to build, work, visit and live in.

13.     Auckland Council’s 10-year budget (Long-term Plan) allocates over $1 billion of capital investment to the city centre between 2018-2028 in addition to private commercial and residential investment, university campus development, City Rail Link and Light Rail projects. The city centre targeted rate makes up 17 per cent of the total capital investment to the city centre between 2018-2028 as represented in the chart below:

Capital investment planned for the city centre 2018-2028

CCTR – city centre targeted rate

LTP – Long-term Plan

RLTP - Regional Land Transport Plan

14.     The council group is developing a construction schedule for city centre projects, which includes identifying the impacts and opportunities of construction and the response to construction in the city centre over the next ten years.

15.     The construction schedule will be presented to the board in October 2018, following Planning Committee and Waitematā Local Board workshops in late 2018.

16.     The review of the targeted rate portfolio of works will consider the delivery schedule of the city centre work programmes to ensure that the city centre continues to operate effectively during heavy construction times.

Review process

17.     The following process is proposed for the review and update of the targeted rate portfolio of works.

18.     Within the city centre targeted rate portfolio (TR7), there are projects that have started and projects that have not yet started. The project status for the current portfolio (TR7) is summarised in Attachment B.

19.     For projects that have commenced or are in delivery - staff will update the project forecast or cost estimates. It is noted that some of the project budgets were established a number of years ago and there have been significant cost escalations. These projects will remain in the portfolio as part of the review process.

20.     The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board’s endorsed project assessment criteria, once approved by the Finance and Performance Committee, will be applied by staff as part of the strategic assessment.

21.     For projects that have not started - staff will undertake a prioritisation based on their contribution to the Auckland Plan outcomes, the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board’s project assessment criteria and achievability within the construction context of the city centre over the next ten years. The prioritised list of projects will be presented to the board for feedback in November 2018.

22.     Following the board’s feedback and in order of priority, staff will progress with a strategic assessment of these projects in accordance with the council’s mandatory Investment Delivery Framework which was introduced in 2017.

23.     Following the strategic assessment for each project, a recommendation for the reallocation of funds will be put to the board and feedback sought. Council internal processes will be followed by staff in making the recommendations.

After feedback has been sought from the board, recommendations for reallocation of funding will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee for final approval.

24.     Summary of the process has been included below:

·    Project forecast / cost estimates updated for projects that have started

·    For projects not started, a list of prioritised strategic assessments will be given to the board for feedback to progress specific project assessments

·    Strategic assessments will be completed for projects not started, in accordance with priority list

·    Recommendation to the board for project to proceed or to reallocate funding

·    Process undertaken to reallocate funding to a new initiative

·    Finance and Performance Committee approval for reallocation of funding.

Council Investment Delivery Framework

25.     The diagram in Attachment C demonstrates the council process that staff are required to follow for all programmes and projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

26.     Auckland’s city centre falls within the Waitematā Local Board boundaries. The local board was consulted on the projects funded through the city centre targeted rate, as part of the normal consultative process.

27.     A Waitematā Local Board representative sits on the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

28.     Feedback will be sought from the local board prior to reporting to Finance and Performance Committee for approval.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

29.     The city centre targeted rate can be used to fund development projects that contribute to Māori outcomes by enabling manaakitanga (hospitality), kaitiakitanga (environmental guardianship), and highlighting our unique cultural heritage by incorporating Māori design elements.

30.     Mana whenua consultation occurs as part of all city centre projects, via the monthly Infrastructure and Environmental Services mana whenua hui and other site or project specific hui.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

31.     The portfolio review process will have implications on the investment portfolio that is funded by the city centre targeted rate, which has a value of $22.26 million per annum from 2018/2019.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

32.     Some of the project budgets in the current targeted rate funded portfolio were established a number of years ago and there have been significant cost escalations. There is a risk that there are insufficient funds to deliver the current portfolio of work.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

33.     Staff will provide a revised TR7 portfolio in November 2018 based on updated forecasts for the projects.

34.     Staff will recommend a prioritised list of projects to progress through strategic assessment in accordance with council’s mandatory Investment Delivery Framework process and the board’s assessment criteria.

35.     Following the strategic assessment for each project, recommendation will be presented to the board to further progress with the project or to reallocate funding.

36.     Following the board’s endorsement, reallocation of funding will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee for final approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of city centre targeted rate spend 2010-2018

11

b

Project status for current city centre targeted rate portfolio (TR7)

13

c

Auckland Council’s Investment Delivery Framework

15

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Nicholls – Senior Programme Lead, Investment

Jenny Larking – Head of City Centre Programmes

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

PDF Creator



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland overview and update

 

File No.: CP2018/17761

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an overview presentation from Regional Facilities Auckland staff, and updates on:

·    the Aotea Centre refurbishment and Aotea Studios

·    Auckland Live - Aotea Square and wider city centre programming

·    future thinking for the Aotea Quarter.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Regional Facilities Auckland staff will attend the meeting to present an overview of and update on Regional Facilities activities, including activities in the Aotea Quarter.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the overview and update from Regional Facilities Auckland.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Facilities Auckland presentation to Auckland City Centre Advisory Board - September 2018

19

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Maree Laurent – Director Partnerships, Regional Facilities Auckland

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

Road safety in the city centre

 

File No.: CP2018/17763

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on Auckland’s road safety crisis.

2.       To endorse Auckland Transport’s programme to reduce the high rates of death and serious injury in the city centre.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

3.       In 2017, 64 people died and 749 others were seriously injured on Auckland’s roads.

4.       Road safety performance in Auckland’s city centre has worsened over the last five years due to various factors. The road environment and safety system have not kept up with population growth, new demands on the road network, and growth in people walking, cycling and motorcycling.

5.       The Tāmaki Makaurau Road Safety Governance Group has been established to provide leadership for improving safety and reducing the high number of death and serious injuries on the Auckland road network. This group has a strong national and regional mandate to drive safety outcomes and the partners include Auckland Transport, New Zealand Police, the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA), Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), Auckland Council, the Auckland Regional Public Health Service, and Ministry of Transport.

6.       Auckland Transport’s long-term goal of Vision Zero emphasises that no loss of life on our road network is acceptable. It is a proven approach from jurisdictions where road designers and operators take greater responsibility in creating forgiving infrastructure that prevents road trauma.

7.       The Vision Zero approach also accepts that road users are people who make mistakes and therefore all parts of the transport system need to be strengthened through a safe road environment, safe speeds, safe vehicles and safe road use, so that when mistakes occur, it does not lead to deaths or serious injuries.

8.       As Auckland Transport moves to the Vision Zero approach, it is fast-tracking implementation of a speed management plan, developing a strategic road safety plan and delivering an ambitious 10-year $700 million safety infrastructure programme. The combined impact of these programmes is estimated to reduce death and serious injury (DSi) by 60 per cent over ten years from the 2017 baseline, as well as contribute towards additional congestion reduction benefits and increased health and environment benefits (the initial three-year target is to reduce deaths and serious injuries by up to 18 per cent). The Regional Fuel Tax will enable this investment and improve a larger number of high-risk intersections and routes.

9.       Auckland Transport is working with the Ministry of Transport who are developing a new national road safety strategy due for release in 2019. They are exploring Vision Zero principles for the strategy. The Auckland strategy and a programme business case for longer-term investment in road safety will be informed by the national strategy. Auckland Transport has received endorsement from Auckland Council’s Planning Committee on its Safety and Speed Management programme, and will continue to engage with the Waitematā Local Board.

10.     One of the fastest and most cost effective ways to reduce road trauma is to implement speed reduction measures. Auckland Transport is currently working to identify areas and roads around the Auckland region to set safe and appropriate speed limits. The city centre is a high priority for investigation, as it has one of the region’s highest levels of foot traffic and people cycling. As detailed later in this report, 84 per cent of all city centre DSi involve vulnerable road users (making up 2.2 per cent of all DSi in Auckland), and a large proportion of streets record a high level of risk for road users.  

11.     City centre and roads across the region will be added to the Schedule of Speed Limits and drafted into the bylaw. The bylaw will be consulted on Auckland-wide (planned to be held in November 2018). Consultation will cover the entire programme of works for the Auckland region at a strategic level. Post-consultation, the bylaw will need to be approved by the Auckland Transport Board, after which the new lower speed limits will become legally enforceable.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the update on Auckland’s road safety crisis

b)      endorse Auckland Transport’s programme to reduce the high rates of death and serious injury in the city centre.

Horopaki / Context

12.     Auckland’s rapid growth has resulted in a number of challenges including housing, transport and public health. The recent increase in road trauma is both a transport and public health issue for the region with significant economic and social costs. More importantly, the after-effects of road trauma on the victims’ whānau, friends and community are devastating.

13.     In the three years from 2014 to 2017 Aucklanders experienced a 78% increase in road deaths and a 68 per cent increase in serious injuries, with deaths rising from 36 to 64 and serious injuries from 447 to 749.

14.     In light of these tragic results road safety has been identified by the government as a priority in the Policy Statement on Transport and in turn by Auckland Transport and Auckland Council as a strategic priority for planning and investment.

15.     Setting safe and survivable speed limits, and moving towards a vision zero approach, aligns with the vision of the City Centre Masterplan and the Auckland Plan.

16.     In November 2017, the Auckland Transport Board commissioned an independent road safety Business Improvement Review that made 45 recommendations, which the board adopted in full. One of the key recommendations was setting evidence based, safe and appropriate speeds for Auckland as a first priority.

17.     In June 2018, the Auckland Transport Board endorsed an accelerated Speed Management Programme that proposes a $24 million investment over the next three years.

18.     Speed management is a central part of the Vision Zero approach for reducing speeds to survivable levels for road users, particularly in Auckland’s city centre streets where there are large numbers of vulnerable road users (people not in cars – people walking, cycling and motorcycling).

19.     Speed determines both the likelihood of a crash occurring and the severity of the outcome. Regardless of what causes a crash, whether someone walks away or is carried away will depend on the speed vehicles are travelling. For example if a person is hit by a vehicle travelling at 30km/h, they have a 90 per chance of surviving, compared with only a 20 per cent chance of surviving at 50km/hr. Cities around the world that have committed to Vision Zero have changed their city centre speed limits to 30km/h as a result.

20.     There is good evidence that setting 30km/h speed limits in city centres has a positive impact on keeping people safe. Christchurch City reduced the city centre limit to 30km/h in 2016. Analysis has shown a 17 per cent reduction in crashes and a 22 per cent reduction in all injuries. New York City introduced a Vision Zero Plan in 2014 and has reduced crash-risk through a combination of lowered speed limits (20-25mph) across the city, street design, safety cameras and on-street enforcement which has resulted in a 28 per cent reduction in all road deaths and 48 per cent reduction pedestrian deaths. 

21.     Whilst some people fear that reducing the speed limit in urban areas will dramatically increase journey times, research indicates this is not the case. In Christchurch journey times have not reduced significantly and business concerns about drop-off in trade have also not occurred. In New York journey times for all road users have improved.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

22.     Auckland’s death and serious injury rates have increased by 67 per cent from 486 in 2013 to 813 in 2017 as outlined in the table below.

Auckland region

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Deaths

48

36

52

46

64

Serious injuries

438

447

568

618

749

 

23.     The city centre represents 2.2 per cent of all DSi in Auckland, and 84 per cent of city centre DSi involved vulnerable road users.

24.     Road crashes are investigated by New Zealand Police and then mapped by NZTA. The map below highlights locations of the Auckland city centre’s DSi from 2013 to 2017. Red indicates deaths, while orange indicates serious injuries.

25.     Road death and serious injury locations are also analysed to identify high-risk intersections and routes that have a high collective crash–risk (number of deaths and serious injuries per kilometre or intersection) and personal crash-risk (rate of deaths and serious injuries per vehicle kilometres travelled). This methodology identifies a small percentage of the network carrying a large percentage of the road trauma.

High risk intersections in the city centre 

Ranked in the top 100 high risk intersections in the Auckland Region  (2012-2016 data)

Regional Ranking

Route Name

[1]Collective Crash Risk

[2]Active Road User Collective Crash Risk

Motorcycle Collective Crash Risk

2

Karangahape Road / Mercury Lane

High

High

Medium

3

Upper Queen Street / Karangahape Road

High

High

High

13

Tangihua Street / Tinley Street

High

Medium High

Medium High

18

Symonds Street / Grafton Bridge

High

High

Medium

28

Gundry Street / Karangahape Road

Actual High

Low Medium

High

32

Fanshawe Street / Halsey Street

High

Low Medium

High

33

Short Street / Anzac Avenue

Actual High

High

Low

48

Symonds Street / Wellesley St East

High

High

Medium High

49

Symonds Street / City Road

High

Medium High

Medium High

55

Symonds Street / St Martins Lane

High

Medium High

Medium High

63

Vincent Street / Hopetoun Street

High

Medium High

Low Medium

64

Cook Street / Hobson Street

High

Medium High

Low Medium

74

Victoria Street West / Hardinge Street

High

Medium High

Medium High

83

Wellesley Street West / Sale Street

Actual High

Medium High

Medium High

84

Wellesley Street West / Albert Street

Medium High

Medium High

Low Medium

85

Vincent Street / Cook Street

Medium High

Medium High

Medium

87

Cook Street / Nelson Street

Medium High

Medium

Medium High

92

East Street / Karangahape Road

Medium High

Medium High

Medium

98

Victoria Street West / Queen Street

Medium High

High

Low

 

High risk routes in the city centre

Ranked in the top 100 high risk routes in the Auckland Region (2012-2016 data)

Regional Ranking

Location

[3]Collective Crash Risk

[4]Active Road User Collective Crash Risk

Motorcycle Collective Crash Risk

1

Karangahape Road

High

High

High

3

Queen Street

High

High

High

4

Symonds Street

High

High

High

7

Hobson Street

High

High

Medium High

11

Victoria Street West

High

High

High

18

Beach Road

High

High

High

21

Albert Street

High

High

High

24

Wellesley Street West

High

High

High

41

Nelson Street

High

Medium High

High

44

Anzac Avenue

Medium High

High

High

61

Symonds Street

Medium High

High

Medium

65

Kitchener Road

Medium High

Medium

High

81

Grafton Road

Medium High

Medium

High

84

Quay Street

Medium High

Medium

High

 

26.     Auckland Transport has embarked on a programme to reduce the incidence of death and serious injury by 60 per cent in a 10-year period. The initial three-year target is to reduce the incidence of death and serious injury by up to 18 per cent from the 2018/2019 financial year.

27.     The tables below highlight some of the engineering improvements, speed management changes, and behaviour change activities that will be delivered in the city centre as part of the 2018-2021 Auckland Transport programme.

 

Minor safety improvement projects 2018/2019

Princes Street - Eden Crescent intersection

New raised zebra crossings with kerb build-outs.

 

 

Pedestrian safety and cycling network expansion 2018-2021

Wellesley Street East footpath

New footpath from Princes Street to Grafton Road.

Karangahape Road Upgrade

Construction programmed to begin in February 2019.

Victoria Street Cycleway

Construction programmed to begin in 2019.

Cook Street

Pedestrian crossing facilites (including Drake Street, Sale Street and Cook Street).

Hobson Street between Wellseley and Cook

Signalised mid-block crossing for pedestrians.

 

Speed management investigations 2018/2019

 

City centre – 30km/hr within an area approximately bounded by the motorways

 

Road safety and school travel behaviour activities 2018-19

Travelwise school programme

Driver distraction campaign and checkpoints with New Zealand Police.

Motorcycle and scooter safety workshops.

Safe speed awareness campaign.

Red light running campaign and Educational events with New Zealand Police.

Deliver a learner license community programme.

Cycle training and bikes in schools.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

28.     Auckland Transport staff presented to the Waitematā Local Board on road safety, and the speed management programme for the city centre in July and September 2018. 

29.     The programme will provide significant benefit to local people, in setting survivable speed limits for the city centre.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

30.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

31.     Māori residents in Auckland experience a much higher risk of road traffic injury than other ethnicities, across all age groups.

32.     Māori are also over-represented in road deaths and serious injuries related to speed, making up 22 per cent of all speed-related DSi.

 

33.     The Te Ara Haepapa Road Safety programme is Auckland Transport’s response to reduce death and serious injuries involving Māori and Rangatahi Māori. The programme is intended to focus delivery through whānau, hapū, iwi, and marae, kohanga reo, kura kaupapa Māori and Māori communities.

34.     Currently, Te Ara Haepapa focus on high-risk areas in south and west Auckland.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

35.     Two projects in Auckland Transport’s programme or aligned to it receive investment by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board, these are the Karangahape Road streetscape upgrade and the TUI programme.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

36.     Reducing speed limits is a sensitive topic, with expectations from some stakeholders that Auckland Transport should deliver rapid changes to speed limits across Auckland, while others in the community may not like the speed limit reductions and speed calming measures. For individuals, the risks of a severe crash might seem small, but from a societal point of view there are substantial safety gains from reducing average speeds on streets.

37.     Auckland Transport looks to the support of the advisory board to implement safety and speed management projects that could reduce community road trauma.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

38.     Auckland Transport welcomes input from the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board to help address the road safety challenge that is generating such a significant burden on road users and their families.

39.     Auckland Transport will continue delivery of safety interventions in the city centre, including the speed management programme. Speed limits will be changed through a bylaw process.  This will be consulted on Auckland-wide in November 2018 (consultation on the entire programme of works for the Auckland region at a strategic level). Once the bylaw has been approved by Auckland Transport’s Board, then the speed limits become legally enforceable.

40.     Auckland Transport will launch a comprehensive communication and engagement plan to support the road safety programme. This will include running campaign aiming to change the road safety conversation by educating Aucklanders that lower speeds provide survivable crash outcomes, as well as enabling our kids to travel safely, creating a more liveable street environment, and many health and environmental benefits.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Kathryn King - Walking, Cycling and Safety Manager

Authorisers

Randhir Karma - Group Manager Network Management and Safety

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

City centre update for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board – September 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/17709

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the progress of city centre projects and initiatives to 10 September 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       City centre programmes of work are on track as shown in Attachment A to this report.

3.       Key highlights achieved during the update period include:

·    the parklets and on-street graphics have been completed on St Paul Street behind Auckland University of Technology

·    Light Weight O by artist Catherine Griffiths, commissioned as part of the O’Connell laneway upgrade, was officially unveiled at a civic event on 1 August 2018.

4.       Please note this report is for information only. However, if any members have follow up questions and or queries on the city centre programme, staff welcome questions directly.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the update on city centre projects and initiatives to 10 September 2018.

Horopaki / Context

5.       This monthly report provides a high-level overview of progress on projects and initiatives in the city centre between 1 August 2018 and 10 September 2018.

6.       Detail on individual projects is provided in Attachment A, including project status and which part of the council family group is delivering each project.

7.       Some key achievements during the update period are outlined below in the analysis and advice section.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

8.       The resource consent applications for the first section of seawall work in the Downtown Programme (from Queens Wharf to Marsden Wharf) and for the Queens Wharf dolphin have been publicly notified.

9.       A temporary tactical urban intervention solution has been installed on Alfred Street. A university-led planting day was successfully completed in August.

10.     Wynyard Central: Construction work on the last two stages of this Willis Bond residential development, comprising eight townhouses and 80 apartments, is now complete. 

11.     Pā Rongorongo hosted content until the end of August produced by the Auckland Central Library for Suffrage 125.

12.     The Poynton Terrace project is currently under construction and, weather permitting, is anticipated to be completed at the end of September 2018.

 

13.     The Karangahape Road enhancements project has had a design change to the section between Pitt Street and Queen Street. This block previously had an ‘interim’ design solution. It has been proposed to extend the permanent design to this block, which will benefit from a design solution that delivers a more robust, high-quality, greened streetscape, consistent with the design along the remainder of Karangahape Road. The new design is achievable within the current budget.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

14.     All project teams managing city centre projects and initiatives engage with the Waitematā Local Board. Plans for individual projects include specific engagement with the local board and affected stakeholders.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

15.     As part of the infrastructure and Environmental Services monthly kaitiaki hui, mana whenua considered some of the city centre programme items. Input to the scoping and design of city centre projects and initiatives is sought and applied to projects where possible.

16.     The City Rail Link has an independent mana whenua engagement process as do some of the other programmes.

17.     Project teams managing each individual project will engage with iwi to ensure mana whenua input and opportunities for Māori responsiveness are achieved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

18.     All projects are being delivered within budgets approved through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 or through the city centre targeted rate programme of works.

19.     At this stage all projects are expected to be completed within allocated budgets. Any significant financial changes or risks arising will be bought to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board as required.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

20.     Any risks associated with delivering (or not) of projects and initiatives in the city centre will be discussed by individual project teams managing these projects and initiatives.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

21.     Prior to the implementation of city centre projects and initiatives, regular meetings and workshops are held with the Waitematā Local Board, iwi, and stakeholders including Heart of the City, Karangahape Road Business Association, Learning Quarter representatives, and the appropriate Auckland Council committees.

22.     A further update report will be provided to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in October 2018.

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

City centre project update for September 2018

55

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Elisabeth Laird – Development Programmes Analyst

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme - September 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/17684

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meets monthly from February through November.  To utilise these meetings fully and to enable the board to advise on council projects, staff propose that a high-level planning document is endorsed by the board (see Attachment A).  

3.       The forward work programme will be updated each month to reflect the upcoming items that will be reported to the board for feedback or endorsement, including city centre targeted rate-funded projects.

4.       A copy of the city centre targeted rate programme of works (known as TR7) has been included as Attachment B for the board’s information.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      endorse the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board 2018 forward work programme, as per Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme - September 2018

71

b

City Centre Targeted Rate Programme of Works (TR7)

73

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Elisabeth Laird – Development Programmes Analyst

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

26 September 2018

 

 

PDF Creator    

    

 



[1] Collective Crash Risk = total number of fatal and serious crashes or estimated deaths and serious injuries within 50metres of an intersection or within 1kilometre of a corridor in a 5-year crash period

[2] Active Road Users (ARU) = Pedestrians and Cyclists

[3] Collective Crash Risk = total number of fatal and serious crashes or estimated deaths and serious injuries within 50metres of an intersection or within 1kilometre of a corridor in a 5-year crash period

[4] Active Road Users (ARU) = Pedestrians and Cyclists