I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 25 September 2018

9.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Deputy Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Brendon Crompton

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Hopkins

 

 

Murray Kay

 

 

Niko Kloeten

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise  Gunn

Democracy Advisor - Franklin

 

17 September 2018

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 295 3706

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Michael Nolan: slip repair, Pohutukawa Road Beachlands     5

8.2     Deputation- CM Sport                                                                                          6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Franklin Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019 grant allocations                             9

12        Franklin Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019 grant allocations                       17

13        Auckland Transport update to the Franklin Local Board - September 2018        21

14        Auckland Transport- Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund: Station Road parking improvements                                                                                                              31

15        New road and private way names in the subdivision at 40, 54 & 58 Whitford Park Road and 18, 24 & 30 Saleyard Road, Whitford by Coumat Limited                               37

16        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Latham Construction Limited at 90 Karaka Road, Beachlands                                                                   45

17        New road name in the subdivision at 185 Jutland Road, Pukekohe by Roy Developments Limited                                                                                                                          51

18        New road name in the subdivision at 34 McEldownie Road, Drury by Drury South Limited                                                                                                                                       59

19        New private way and road names in the subdivision at 600 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford by Maraetai Co Limited                                                                               67

20        Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar                                  75

21        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                  79  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 28 August 2018, as  true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

            That the Franklin Local Board:

a)            approve the request for leave of absence from Member Crompton for the period 16         April – 21 May 2019 inclusive.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

8.1       Deputation- Michael Nolan: slip repair, Pohutukawa Road Beachlands

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.         Michael Nolan will be in attendance to present on the slip repair at Pohutukawa Road, Beachlands.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.         Michael Nolan will be in attendance to present on the slip repair at Pohutukawa Road, Beachlands. Michael Nolan is presenting on the path chosen by the board since the August business meeting, where Rebecca Nolan attended via deputation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         receive the presentation from Michael Nolan and thank him for his attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - CM Sport

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Adam Chwesik, Counties District Coordinator and Russel Preston, Chief Executive, will be in attendance to present on CM Sport activities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Adam Chwesik, Counties District Coordinator and Russell Preston, Chief Executive, will be in attendance to present on CM Sport activities over the past year and will review the 2018/2019 plans.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from CM Sport and thank Adam Chwesik, Counties District Coordinator and Russell Preston, Chief Executive, for their attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Franklin Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019 grant allocations

 

File No.: CP2018/17460

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Franklin Local Board Local Grants Round One 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.   This report presents applications received in Franklin Local Board Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019 (refer to Attachment B).
 

3.   The Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Local Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 24 April 2018 (refer to Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.   The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $181,000.00 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

 

5.   A total of $11,667.00 has been allocated for one quick response round. This leaves a total of $169,333.00 to be allocated for 2018/2019.

 

6.   Thirty-two applications were received for Franklin Local Board Local Grants Round One 2018/2019, requesting a total of $405,830.00, and nine multi-board applications requesting a total of $35,393.00.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)   agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Franklin Local Grants, Round One, listed in table one and table two below.  

Table One:  Franklin Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1903-102

Lifeline Foundation Charitable Trust

Towards a portion of the costs for running the phone lines.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG1903-103

Baby On The Move, Pukekohe

umbrella’ed by One 4 One Limited

 

 

 

Towards the purchase of child car seats and accessories

$5,000.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1903-108

Whitford Playcentre

umbrella’ed by Tamaki Playcentres Association Incorporated

Toward the outdoor plumbing upgrade costs at the Whitford Playcentre.

$1,644.00

Eligible

LG1903-110

Adult Literacy Franklin Incorporated

Towards the costs of the driver license programme.

$6,046.00

Eligible

LG1903-111

John Walker Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation

Towards delivering eight sessions of the community swim programme for 550 children in the Waiuku area.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1903-112

Beachlands Community Trust

Towards the purchase of a heat pump for the Beachlands Memorial Hall.

$1,950.00

Eligible

LG1903-113

Beachlands Community Trust

Towards traffic management, toilet hire and clean up.

$3,053.00

Eligible

LG1903-114

Puni School Parent Teacher Association

Towards Franklin Multi-cultural Festival 2018 for stage, sound system, marquee and generator.

$7,100.00

Eligible

LG1903-120

Clarks Beach Playgroup

umbrella’ed by Waiau Pa Hockey Club Incorporated

Towards the purchase and installation of a shade-sail over Clark Beach Playgroup's sandpit.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG1903-121

Puni Rugby Football and Sports Club

Towards the Puni Football an Sports 75th Jubilee community event

 

$5,300.00

Eligible

LG1903-122

Ayrlies Garden and Wetlands Charitable Trust

Towards the upgrade and extension of the Ayrlies visitor car park.

$19,200.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1903-124

The Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust

Towards the costs of music therapy sessions at Te Akonga Early Learning Centre

$2,798.00

Eligible

LG1903-126

Kids Safe With Dogs Charitable Trust

Towards instructor wages, administration and printing of booklets.

$9,438.00

Eligible

LG1903-127

Waiuku Museum Society Incorporated

Towards the purchase and installation of a new Hydestor shelving system.

$10,813.00

Eligible

LG1903-128

Waiuku Search and Rescue Association

Towards Waiuku Search and Rescue training and boat enhancements

$26,700.00

Eligible

LG1903-129

Holly Norman

Towards the costs of equine therapy sessions over one school term.

$3,900.00

Eligible

LG1903-131

Waiuku Business and Development Association

Towards traffic management costs for the Waiuku Christmas Parade 2018

$3,287.00

Eligible

LG1903-132

Returned and Services Association Franklin Incorporated

Towards upgrade costs for the Returned and Services Association Franklin building and Town Hall access.

$100,000.00

Eligible

LG1903-137

Logan Moffat

Towards material costs for paintings

 

 

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG1903-138

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society New Zealand Incorporated

Towards costs related to pest control at the South-east Wildlink.

$15,865.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1903-139

Waiuku Lions Club Charitable Trust

Towards traffic management costs of the "Sand to Mud" fun run.

$4,500.00

Eligible

LG1903-141

Beachlands and Maraetai Community ANZAC Committee

umbrella’ed by Beachlands Community Trust

Towards the traffic management costs for the ANZAC parade 2019.

$3,025.00

Eligible

LG1903-142

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Towards the purchase and delivery of 576 native trees to Franklin schools and replacement costs of 150 classroom recycling bins.

$3,583.00

Eligible

LG1903-143

Waiuku Toy Library Incorporated

Towards librarian wages

$3,195.00

Eligible

LG1903-144

Reupena Kovati

Towards planting vegetables and the recording of a healthy eating video.

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG1903-150

Splore Dynamics Limited

Towards the Zero Waste Ambassador training programme and Zero Waste education campaign costs.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1903-151

Ramarama Residents and Ratepayers Association Incorporated

Towards maintenance and improvement costs of the Ramarama Community Hall.

$97,550.00

Eligible

LG1903-152

Kidz Social Services Charitable Trust

Towards a wheelchair access ramp for the building and website improvements.

$5,000.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1903-153

Counties Baseball Club Incorporated

Towards fencing materials for the baseball field.

$32,970.00

Eligible

LG1903-154

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards a contribution for the helpline coordinator salary

$3,042.00

Eligible

LG1903-155

Elvis in the Gardens Incorporated Society

Towards the overall operational costs of Elvis in the Gardens 2019.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG1903-159

Returned Services Association Franklin Incorporated

Towards costs related to the Returned Services Association Franklin commemoration weekend 2018

$1,871.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

$405,830.00

 

 

Table Two: Franklin Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 multi-board grant applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB1819-109

Pasifika Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Requesting costs towards venue costs for the four community workshops and operational administrative costs.

$1,080.00

Eligible


MB1819-118

Manukau Orchestral Society Incorporated

Towards the venue hire and technical costs for a musical performance at the Vodafone Events Centre.

$813.00

Eligible

MB1819-126

Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind

Towards a contribution to the new digital talking books for the Blind Foundation library.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB1819-145

Trust MYRIVR

Towards the project manager fees to advertise a free social and health services phone application (App).

$10,000.00

Eligible




Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB1819-151

New Zealand Dance Advancement Trust

Towards the costs of venue hire, studio hire and the artistic cost for a dance education coordinator, artistic executive, production manager, dancers and senior dance tutors for the "2019 Youth and Community Engagement Programme.

$2,500.00

Eligible








MB1819-161

ADFC Limited (Auckland Drum Festival Company)

Towards venue hire and sound and visual hire costs

$3,000.00

Eligible




MB1819-162

New Zealand Council of Victim Support Groups Incorporated

Towards the costs to recruit, train and supervise volunteer support workers.

$8,000.00

Eligible



MB1819-182

Counties Manukau Sports Foundation

Towards the costs for the, 2018 Counties Manukau Sporting Excellence Awards, including venue hire, event co-ordinator catering.

$3,000.00

Eligible




MB1819-190

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust

Towards wages for 14 Kiwi Can leaders who deliver the Kiwi Can programme across seven schools in seven local board areas.

$5,000.00

Eligible




Total

 

 

$35,393.00

 



 

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. Franklin Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2018/2019 on 24 April 2018 and will operate three quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities;

·        lower priorities for funding;

·        exclusions;

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close; and

·        any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Franklin Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

12.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

13.     A summary of each application received through Franklin Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019 is provided (refer to Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

14.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes. No organisations applying in this round identified themselves to be a Māori organisation, and seven organisations applying in this round have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups or individuals is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

16.     The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $181,000.00 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

17.     A total of $11,667.00 has been allocated for one quick response round. This leaves a total of $169,333.00 to be allocated for 2018/2019.

18.     Thirty two applications were received for Franklin Local Board Local Grants Round One 2018/2019, requesting a total of $405,830.00, and nine multi-board applications requesting a total of $35,393.00.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

20.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

21.     Following the Franklin Local Board allocating funding for round one local grants, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Franklin Local Grant Round One 2018/2019 applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Franklin Local Grant Round One multiboard applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Agus Castro Pons - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Shane King - Operations Support Manager

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Franklin Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019 grant allocations

 

File No.: CP2018/17505

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Franklin Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Franklin Local Board Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019 (refer to Attachment B).

3.       The Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Local Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 24 April 2018 (refer to Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Franklin Local Board has set a total budget, for the waterways protection fund, of $30,000.00 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

5.       Five applications were received for Franklin Local Board Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019, requesting a total of $40,028.22.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Franklin Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019, listed in table one and table two below.  

Table One:  Franklin Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019 grant applications

Application ID

Applicant

Project

Requested

Eligibility

FWPF18-03

Pukekohe Land Company Limited

Fultons Green Initiative - Stage Two

$13,541.08

Eligible

FWPF18-04

Roelf Schreuder

Planting the wet corner adjacent to Mauku stream

$900.00

Eligible

FWPF18-08

St. Brides Mauku Church

St Brides Mauku Stream Biodiversity Enhancement

$14,250.00

Eligible

FWPF18-10

Wendy Clark

Clark's Paddock One planting

$7,948.00

Eligible

FWPF18-14

W R Howe Farms Limited

Mauku Stream planting adjacent to Patullo Road

$3,389.14

Eligible

 

 

Total requested:

$40,028.22

 

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. Franklin Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2018/2019 on 24 April 2018 and will operate three quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities;

·        lower priorities for funding;

·        exclusions;

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close; and

·        any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Franklin Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

12.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

13.     A summary of each application received through Franklin Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019 is provided (refer to Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

14.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups or individuals is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

16.     The Franklin Local Board has set a total budget, for the waterways protection fund, of $30,000.00 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

17.     Five applications were received for Franklin Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019, requesting a total of $40,028.22.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

18.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

19.     Following the Franklin Local Board allocating funding for waterways protection fund, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Community Grants Programme 2018/2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Franklin Waterways Protection Fund 2018/2019 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Agus Castro Pons - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Shane King - Operations Support Manager

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport update to the Franklin Local Board - September 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/17492

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Franklin Local Board on transport-related matters in their area, including Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) project updates.  A separate decision report relating to the LBTCF is also on this agenda.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board currently has four active LBTCF proposals, of which three are completed and awaiting the reporting of final costs.  A new proposal for parking improvements on Station Road in Pukekohe is the subject of a separate decision report.

3.       There remains $1,196,104 available in the current political term for new LBTCF projects in the Franklin area.

4.       Auckland Transport is adapting an existing GO Metro campaign promoting bus-train combos and improved bus-train connections at Pukekohe station for use on bus backs in the Pukekohe area.

5.       Remedial works following an independent peer review and safety audit of recently installed warning signage along 12 rural roads in Franklin are expected to be completed by 14 September.

6.       On 7 September a dawn unveiling ceremony was held for a mana whenua timber carving newly installed near the Station Road entrance to Pukekohe station.

7.       The northern section of the Redoubt Road-Mill Road corridor has been passed to the Supporting Growth Alliance, so that the entire corridor can be assessed as a whole, and the most appropriate staging and priority across the entire corridor can be determined.  In the interim, Auckland Transport is planning to undertake capacity upgrades on Redoubt Road in the latter half of 2019, involving the provision of ‘dynamic lanes’ similar to Whangaparaoa Road and Panmure Bridge.

8.       Consultation is open for land use and transport plans being investigated in Auckland's southern future urban growth areas. Joint public information days are being held from mid-September to early October and consultation closes on 10 October.

9.       Auckland Transport consulted the Franklin Local Board on two proposals in its area over the last month, in Beachlands and Pukekohe.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport update to the Franklin Local Board – September 2018’.

 

Horopaki / Context

10.     Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways.  Auckland Transport reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan.  This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

11.     This report addresses transport-related matters in the local board area and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and updates on current LBTCF projects.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

12.     The Franklin Local Board’s LBTCF funding availability is summarised below.

Franklin Local Board transport capital fund financial summary

Funds available in current political term (includes 2019/20 FY)

$2,856,450

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$1,660,346

Remaining budget left

$1,196,104

 

13.     Increased LBTCF funding was approved by Auckland Council, which became available on 1 July and is included in the table above.  With the extra funding now available, the board has programmed a workshop in October to consider further projects.

14.     The board’s current or recently completed LBTCF projects are included in the table below (NB: ROC = rough order of costs, and FEC = firm estimate of cost):

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

443

Upgrade of Beachlands town centre gardens

·      FEC estimate of $279,396 (for hardwood)

·      Spend to date = $259,899

·      On 6-Jun-17, the board approved construction, based on hardwood FEC.

 

Latest update:

·      Construction completed in last week of August.

·      Final costs to be reported.

518

First View Avenue, Beachlands – installation of new kerb and channel between Sunkist Bay and Wakelin Roads (both sides)

·      FEC estimate of $347,097

·      Spend to date = $330,291

·      On 28-Nov-17, the board approved the project for construction based on the estimate of $347,097.

 

Latest update:

·      Construction completed.

·      Final costs to be reported.

519

Second View Avenue, Beachlands – installation of new kerb and channel between Puriri and Cherrie Roads (north side)

·      FEC estimate of $340,000

·      Spend to date = $337,124

·      On 28-Nov-17, the board approved the project for construction based on the estimate of $340,000.

 

Latest update:

·      Construction completed.

·      Final costs to be reported.

520

Pukekohe Flagtrax – proposed installation on existing streetlights in Pukekohe

·      ROC estimate of $147,000 (based on an estimated 150 units)

·      Spend to date = $6,770

·      On 6-Jun-17, the board approved the project for detailed design and costings, based on the estimate of $147,000 for 150 FlagTrax units.

·      An inventory of poles has been compiled.  This this is for the loop road around the Pukekohe CBD that has 154 poles.

·      AT does not support the installation of Flagtrax on its streetlight assets.

 

Latest update:

·      A meeting was held in early May between AT and a board representative to discuss other options.

·      A follow-up meeting will be scheduled, but awaits AT getting a structural assessment of all existing light poles within the ring road currently without banner arms, to determine whether they could be fitted with them.

·      AT is having significant issues finding an existing contractor with a structural engineer available to undertake this work.

##

Station Road parking and pedestrian improvements

A project to formalise and improve parking on Station and Birch Roads, and improve pedestrian safety by providing new footpath on Station Road, Pukekohe.

·      ROC estimate of $181,000

·      Refer separate decision report on this agenda.

 

Responses to resolutions

15.     At its 17 November 2017 business meeting, the board passed the resolution below:

Resolution number FR/2017/200

That the Franklin Local Board:

d)      request that Auckland Transport expedite completion of the Comprehensive Parking Management Plan and parking survey for Pukekohe, in order that current and projected car parking requirements can be ascertained in light of the town’s growth and to inform decisions on proposed disposals of car parking land.

16.     The parking survey and final report have been completed.  At the 14 August workshop the board requested that the report findings be presented at a workshop.  A workshop session has been booked in October.

17.     At its 5 June business meeting, the board passed the resolution below:

Resolution number FR/2018/71

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      request that Auckland Transport plan a new public transport promotional campaign for the Pukekohe area once the new overbridge is opened, to ensure that potential users are aware of the improved facilities.

18.     Auckland Transport initially considered that the Pukekohe promotion would be most effective as part of a network-wide campaign promoting increased train frequency after the implementation of a new rail timetable on 26 August.

19.     However, the campaign was delayed so AT Metro is now adapting an existing GO Metro campaign promoting bus-train combos, and producing a second message highlighting the improved bus-train connections at Pukekohe station, for use on bus backs in the Pukekohe area.

20.     The artwork is being prepared while access arrangements to bus depots is finalised so posters can be adhered to buses.  This is yet to be confirmed at the time of writing.

21.     At its 26 June business meeting, the board passed the resolution below:

Resolution number FR/2018/96

That the Franklin Local Board:

b)      requests Auckland Transport to urgently audit the installation, placement and size of the chevron and other safety signs installed in the Franklin Local Board area, as part of the Rural Road Signage and Delineation project.

22.     Auckland Transport engaged Traffic Engineer Solutions (TES) to carry out an independent peer review and safety audit of recently installed signage along 12 routes in the Franklin Local Board area.

23.     Remedial action plans were developed and the contractors expected to complete remedial works by 14 September.

24.     At its 28 August business meeting, the board passed the resolution below:

Resolution number FR/2018/116

That the Franklin Local Board:

b)      note with concern the sub-standard quality of chip sealing repairs and request that Auckland Transport:

i)    take steps to identify areas where recent chip sealing is failing and put in place and communicate with the Local Board a plan to rectify these failings;

ii)   put in place more robust monitoring of contractors’ work;

iii)   research alternative surface methods and materials that will address these quality concerns.

 

25.     A response is being prepared and may be available to distribute prior to the meeting.

 

Local projects and activities

 

Pukekohe Station project update

26.     Stage 2 of the Pukekohe station upgrade project is nearing completion, and the new station is open and operational.

27.     On 7 September, a dawn unveiling ceremony was held for a mana whenua timber carving newly installed near the Station Road entrance to the station.  An interpretive sign will be erected to document the significance and meaning of the artwork once the information has been finalised by mana whenua.  It is hoped to complete the design by the end of September so the sign can be installed in October.

28.     The Exeloo toilets are not yet commissioned due to water flow rate issues.  The main water connection has now been tested and Beca are finalising a recommendation to resolve.

29.     The design for the roading works in front of 99 Manukau Road has been commissioned.

30.     Outstanding project works include:

·    resolve minor snags/defects within the bus and rail station with the contractor

·    install permanent rubbish bins in the bus shelter – due this month

·    install pram crossing on eastern side of Station Road

·    install handrail around platform stairs to prevent people striking their heads

·    extend downpipe by platform stairs to drain to a man hole

·    resolve water ponding issues near mobility parking spaces in park and ride area

·    reconnect Exeloo toilets

·    complete road works in front of 99 Manukau Road.

 

31.     At a workshop on 11 September, the board asked Auckland Transport to consider visibility issues between old and new pavement markings within the pick-up/drop-off bay at the Station Road entrance, especially in the wet.  This request has been referred to the project manager for review.

32.     For more information on the project, visit at.govt.nz/pukekohestation.

 

Redoubt Road-Mill Road corridor project update

33.     Auckland Transport completed the designation for the Redoubt Road–Mill Road Corridor Project in early 2016.  It was originally assumed that the detailed design and construction of the northern section of the corridor would have been the first stage of that, with further work on the planning approvals for the central and southern sections progressed in parallel.

34.     However, the new government signalled a shift in transport investment priorities for Auckland through the new Government Policy Statement (GPS) on Transport released in April 2018.  This shift is now reflected in the update of the Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP) report and recommendations, also released in April.

35.     For the Redoubt Road–Mill Road corridor, the revised ATAP recommended scaling back from completing the entire corridor at a cost of $1 billion in the first decade and instead targeting intersection and safety improvements along the corridor, noting:

“While further work needs to be done to identify where these improvements should be targeted, key priority areas for investment include:

·    Improve intersections to address the most severe congestion

·    Improve parts of the northern end to address the most severe safety issues

·    Construct sections that pass directly through former Special Housing Areas at the time these areas grow

·    Construct the new Drury South interchange

·    Undertake route protection and land purchase of the southern section.”

 

36.     In addition, the current Auckland Council Structure Plans for Drury and Pukekohe have increased the assumed level of growth in the south by more than 30 per cent.  The role, form and function of Mill Road, as one of the key pieces of transport infrastructure, is being influenced by this increased growth.  The increase is significant enough that the transport network from the Transport for Future Urban Growth Business Case is being reconfirmed.

37.     As a result of the ATAP revision and increased growth from the Structure Plans, Auckland Transport has withdrawn a tender for detailed design and construction of the northern section of the corridor.  The northern section of the corridor has been passed to the Supporting Growth Alliance so that the entire corridor can be assessed as a whole, and the most appropriate staging and priority across the entire corridor, can be determined.

38.     Under the guidance of the GPS and ATAP, the implementation and business plan for the Redoubt Road-Mill Road corridor is being progressed through the Supporting Growth Alliance and being considered within the context of the wider strategic transport network for the south.

39.     The Supporting Growth Programme is the government and Auckland Council’s strategic transport planning programme, set up to investigate and deliver the transport networks Auckland needs over the next 30 years to accommodate this future urban growth.

40.     Consideration of the Redoubt Road–Mill Road Corridor within the Business Case for the Strategic Transport Network for the South will confirm the sequencing for which parts of the entire Mill Road corridor progress through implementation and protection, and in what time periods.

41.     In terms of progressing upgrading the corridor, Auckland Transport is planning to undertake capacity upgrades along Redoubt Road in the latter half of 2019.  This will entail the provision of dynamic lanes, similar to the scheme recently incorporated on the Whangaparaoa peninsula and installed on Panmure Bridge, which provides an additional traffic lane for the peak direction.

42.     Information on dynamic lanes can be found at:

https://at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/whangaparaoa-road-dynamic-lanes-trial/

 

Supporting Growth southern consultation open

43.     Consultation is now open for land use and transport plans being investigated in Auckland's southern future urban growth areas.

44.     Auckland Council is developing structure plans for land use to guide future urban development in Drury-Opaheke and Pukekohe-Paerata.

45.     The Supporting Growth Programme is planning the transport networks needed to support this growth in Auckland over the next 30 years, including those areas mentioned and also Takanini.

46.     Joint public information days are being held from mid-September to early October as follows:

Date

Time

Venue

Wednesday 12 September

2.30pm-8.00pm

Redhill Community Centre (cnr 163 Dominion Rd and Croskery Rd, Papakura)

Thursday 13 September

2.30pm-8.00pm

Pukekohe Town Hall (Massey Ave, Pukekohe)

Wednesday 19 September

2.30pm-8.00pm

Drury Hall (10 Tui St, Drury)

Saturday 22 September

10.00am-2.00pm

Auckland Council’s Manukau Civic Building (33 Manukau Station Rd, Manukau)

Tuesday 2 October

2.00pm-7.00pm

Pukekohe Library (12 Massey Ave, Pukekohe)

Wednesday 3 October

2.00pm-7.00pm

Sir Edmund Hillary Library (209 Great South Rd, Papakura)

 

47.     Interested parties are welcome to attend the open days to view transport options, talk to the Supporting Growth team and give feedback.  Representatives of Auckland Council will also be at these open days to present information on the structure plans.

48.     Feedback closes at 5.00pm on Wednesday 10 October.  Consultation information and feedback forms are available at:

http://www.supportinggrowth.govt.nz/have-your-say/south/

 

Other transport news

 

Skypath funding commitment

49.     On 23 August, Auckland Mayor Phil Goff welcomed the government’s pledge of $67 million to build Skypath, the walk and cycleway across the Auckland Harbour Bridge.

50.     Skypath will be transformational for Auckland, allowing pedestrians and cyclists to have permanent access across the harbour for the first time.

51.     As well as encouraging active modes of transport between the North Shore and the city for daily commuter use, the project will also provide locals and visitors alike with a unique experience to enjoy fantastic views of the city and harbour from the bridge.

 

More CCTV enforcement of city bus lanes

52.     Auckland Transport has installed CCTV cameras in bus lanes on Queen Street, Hobson Street and Khyber Pass Road in the central city, in addition to existing CCTV monitoring enforcement on Fanshawe Street.

53.     The cameras generate an alert, so an enforcement officer is not needed on the street.  The CCTV footage is reviewed by an experienced officer who makes the decision about whether an infringement should be issued.

54.     When CCTV was introduced on Fanshawe Street in July 2017 there was an initial jump in the number of infringements issued, but infringements are now back to similar levels as before CCTV.

55.     The key benefits of using CCTV to remotely monitor bus lanes are:

·   Lanes can be monitored 24/7

·   One officer can monitor multiple lanes

·   Eliminates health and safety risks for staff who would normally need to stand on the road side for hours.

 

56.     Bus lanes are for buses, motorcycles, scooters and cyclists.  Other vehicles can enter the bus lane to turn left up to 50 metres before turning.

57.     The infringement fee for driving illegally in a bus lane is $150, which is set by central government legislation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

58.     Auckland Transport provides the Franklin Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

59.     The local board’s views on any proposed schemes are taken into account during consultation on those proposals.

Auckland Transport consultations

60.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Franklin Local Board for its feedback. The proposals are summarised below, as is any feedback received, and any responses to that feedback, if available at the time of writing.

61.     Following public and stakeholder consultation, Auckland Transport considers the feedback received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on, or proceed with an amended proposal if changes are considered necessary.

62.     Proposed ‘No Stopping At All Times’ (NSAAT) parking restrictions, Bell Road and Fern Place, Beachlands – Auckland Transport is proposing to install new NSAATs on sections of Bell Road and Fern Place near Beachlands School, and refresh and relocate existing road markings and “School” signs.  The changes are designed to improve inter-visibility in the area between motorists and pedestrians, and provide a safer crossing environment for school children. Car parking activity on narrow Fern Place, particularly at school pick-up and drop-off times, has also been restricting inter-visibility and through access for other vehicles, including emergency vehicles.

63.     The board supported the proposals on Bell Road but was concerned at the extent of NSAATs on Fern Place.  The board requested that the NSAATs be limited to only what is strictly necessary.

64.     Proposed right turn bay and associated widening, Waiuku Road and Stuart Road intersection, Pukekohe – Auckland Transport is proposing to install a new right turn bay on Waiuku Road, at the intersection with Stuart Road in Pukekohe.  The proposal includes widening of the road and shoulder along the intersection to accommodate the right turn bay.  The proposed changes are expected to improve safety and visibility for traffic turning into and out of Stuart Road, by providing a dedicated facility for right turning traffic, especially heavy commercial vehicles.

65.     The board appreciated the safety issues at the intersection but suggested further enhancements to improve safety, including a speed limit reduction, changes to the entrance of Foy Road opposite Stuart Road, and advance warning signage.

66.     Auckland Transport has considered the board’s and public feedback on the proposal and advises that Waiuku Road including past Stuart Road is currently under investigation for a reduction in speed limit, and a proposal will be released for consultation later this year.

67.     In addition to the proposed right turn bay on Waiuku Road into Stuart Road, Auckland Transport is also investigating the following measures to further improve safety at the intersection:

·   Corner benching (cutting back roadside banks) on Waiuku Road to improve visibility exiting Stuart and Foy Roads

·   Restricting right turn and straight through movements out of the western leg of Foy Road’s intersection with Waiuku Road and realigning the eastern leg to become a T-junction

·   Improving warning signage and road surface on Waiuku Road approaching the intersection.

 

68.     The additional improvement works will be investigated and, if appropriate, incorporated into the project to be constructed in the 2018/2019 financial year.

69.     The option of installing a roundabout at the intersection was also raised by the public during consultation. However, a roundabout would not be a safe or viable option geometrically due to the horizontal and vertical alignment of Waiuku Road. A major realignment of Waiuku Road through this section would be required to accommodate a roundabout that meets minimum design and safety requirements in the rural road environment (either in the current 100 km/h speed limit or a potential reduced speed limit in the future), meaning land purchase would also be needed.

70.     Auckland Transport also has an upcoming project to install a roundabout at the intersection of Waiuku, Patumahoe and Attewell Roads, which is due to begin construction prior to the end of the year. The project is expected to provide an alternative and safe route choice within the local roading network.

Traffic Control Committee (TCC) resolutions

71.     Resolutions passed by the TCC during the month of August 2018 affecting the Franklin Local Board area are shown below.

Street/s (Suburb)

Type of Report

Nature Of Restriction

Decision

Artists Avenue, Ninth View Avenue, Marine Garden Crescent, Angiangi Crescent, Marangai Place, Cadwill Drive (Beachlands)

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Angle Parking, Give-Way Control, Traffic Island

Approved in principle

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

72.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

73.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

74.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

75.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Jenni Wild – Elected Member Relationship Manager South (Franklin/Manurewa)  Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport- Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund: Station Road parking improvements

 

File No.: CP2018/17618

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present options for parking improvements on Station Road, Pukekohe, as requested by the Franklin Local Board and for the board to formally initiate a new Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) project to implement its preferred option.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Against a background of heavy demand for commuter parking on the eastern side of Pukekohe station, in February 2018, the Franklin Local Board’s deputy chair requested Auckland Transport to look into the provision of angle parking on Station Road in Pukekohe and discuss its findings with the board.

3.       In April 2018, Auckland Transport attended a board workshop to discuss various considerations and concerns with installing angle parking as suggested.  The board requested Auckland Transport to return to a further workshop in July to present a “green-fields” plan identifying options to maximise parking on Station Road and reduce parking on Birch Road, if possible incorporating a footpath to enhance pedestrian safety on Station Road.

4.       At a July 2018 workshop, Auckland Transport presented a number of options for angle and parallel parking and new footpath on Station Road, and additional improvements on Birch Road.  Cost estimates were provided for the various options, ranging from $108K to $1.3M.

5.       The board indicated its preference for Option 1 formalising parallel parking but requested amendments including additional footpath along the A&P showgrounds frontage, and ‘hockey stick’ markings to delineate all parallel parking spaces.

6.       At a September 2018 workshop, the completed feasibility report for Station Road and Birch Road parking layout improvements (refer Attachment A) was discussed with the board. That report discusses Option 1A that incorporates the improvements requested by the board, for which the rough estimate is $181,104.

7.       At the workshop, the board indicated it wished to formally initiate an LBTCF proposal to implement its preference for Option 1A.  This report includes a recommendation to give formal effect to that decision.

8.       The Franklin Local Board currently has $1,196,104 available in the current political term for new LBTCF projects in the Franklin area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      request Auckland Transport to proceed to detailed design and costing on a proposal to formalise and improve parking on Station and Birch Roads, and improve pedestrian safety by providing a new footpath on Station Road in Pukekohe, being the preferred Option 1A detailed in the report at Attachment A

b)      authorise that the project be funded from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, based on the rough estimate of $181,104.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

9.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport.  Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.

10.     Any LBTCF projects selected must be safe; must not impede network efficiency; and must be located in the road corridor or on land controlled by Auckland Transport, though projects running through parks or reserves can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

11.     The Franklin Local Board has a remaining budget of $1,196,104 available in the current political term for new LBTCF projects in the local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Station Road parking – project background

 

12.     Auckland Transport and the NZ Transport Agency are in the final stages of building a fully-integrated bus and train station at Pukekohe.

13.     Stage 1 focused on the construction of a temporary bus facility on Custom Street, and the signalisation of the Custom Street-Manukau Road intersection.  This stage was effectively completed in 2016.

14.     Stage 2 of the project includes a new six-bay bus station and shelters, a new 87-space park-and-ride, a new over-bridge with lifts linking the rail and bus stations (and also Custom Street to Station Road), customer toilets, bicycle parking and a drop-off zone. The new bus station and park-and-ride were officially opened on 6 June 2018, and the new over-bridge was fully opened on 31 July.

15.     Since the beginning of the project, informal areas previously used by commuters for car parking on the western side of the station have been closed for construction, which has created a higher demand for on-street parking on the eastern side of the station, notably on Station Road. That heavy demand has occasioned some debate in the community as to the best way of increasing available parking in the area.

16.     It has also been recognised from the outset that the new 87-space park-and-ride being built at Pukekohe station (now completed) would not provide sufficient parking for all existing commuters accessing the station by private motor vehicle once opened. Also, many rail commuters living rurally do not have the option of accessing the station by other means (bus, cycling or walking).

17.     Note: The new park-and-ride provides additional parking capacity to the available on-street parking in the area, and is not intended as substitution for it. Further, by constructing a fully-integrated bus and train station, alternative methods of accessing the station (other than by private motor vehicle) have been significantly improved for commuters, particularly by bus and walking, and also cycling.

18.     Patronage at Pukekohe station is also showing strong annual growth. In the year to June 2018, patronage increased by 7.9 per cent over the previous year. Parking demand for commuters is also increasing.

19.     The A&P Showgrounds is also located on Station Road, Pukekohe. During regular events, on-site parking is often full, creating a regular demand for on-street parking and walking to the venue, despite there being no footpaths available.  During major events such as the annual A&P Show in February, a number of show patrons choose to angle park along the western side of Station Road against the railway line to maximise parking spaces, leading to some observation that formalising angle parking against the railway line could permanently increase parking availability.

20.     Against this background, on 20 February 2018 the Franklin Local Board’s deputy chairperson requested Auckland Transport consider the possibility of formalising angle parking on Station Road, and bring information to the board for discussion.

 

Investigations of parking options

 

21.     Auckland Transport completed initial investigations and attended a board workshop in April 2018 to discuss its findings with the board.  At that workshop, Auckland Transport raised a number of cost considerations impacting on the proposal to formalise angle parking on Station Road, including the unsealed road shoulder against the railway line, the railway embankment, the open stormwater culvert and power poles.

22.     Auckland Transport also raised a number of safety concerns with the proposal, including motorists reversing into live traffic lanes, insufficient lane width for safe manoeuvring exiting 90 degree angle parking spaces (meaning any angle parking installed would need to be at a 60 degree angle or less), and angle parking less than 90 degrees encouraging unsafe U-turn traffic movements from the north in a semi-rural environment.

23.     Following consideration and discussion, the board requested Auckland Transport to present a “green-fields” plan identifying options to maximise parking on Station Road and reduce parking on Birch Road, if possible incorporating a footpath to enhance pedestrian safety, at a further workshop in July.

24.     In July 2018, Auckland Transport attended a board workshop and presented a number of options as follows, listing the pros and cons and estimated costs of each:

Option

Description

Cost

1

Do-minimum case – Parallel parking on existing road corridor

$108K

2A

Angle parking on railway side with “No Stopping At All Times” (NSAAT) parking restrictions on eastern side

$147K

2B

Angle parking on eastern side with NSAATs on western side

$210K

2C

Mixture of angle and parallel parking

$222K

3A

Angle parking on railway side and parallel parking on eastern side

$965K

3B

Option 3A with 8m manoeuvring space for angle parks and footpath

$1.3M

 

25.     Traffic and parking issues, data and options were also discussed in relation to Birch Road.

26.     Following discussion and consideration of the material presented, the Franklin Local Board indicated that Option 1, the formalisation of parallel parking on Station Road, was its preferred option.

27.     However, the board requested modifications to Option 1, including new footpath on the eastern side of Station Road, centerline markings on Birch Road, and ‘hockey stick’ markings to delineate all car parks on Station and Birch Roads (to minimise parking loss due to haphazard parking).

28.     On 11 September 2018, Auckland Transport presented the final reported included at Attachment A: “Station Road Pukekohe Parking Layout Improvements: Option Feasibility Report”.

29.     The report details the background, site constraints, crash data, speed limit, layout and existing operation, data on parking demand and Auckland Transport Code of Practice guidelines on parking standards. The report covers the options presented for consideration on 31 July, and the benefits and dis-benefits and costs of each.

30.     The report concludes with Option 1A, being initial Option 1 as modified at the board’s request. The benefits of Option 1A are listed below:

·   Low cost ($181,104)

·   No land take

·   Formalises current operation

·   Minimises dead space (83 carparks provided)

·   Allows access to parking spaces from both directions

·   Road alignment not affected

·   Footpath on both sides of road

·   Improves lighting

·   Improves delineation with centreline marking and passing area on Birch Road.

 

31.     The only dis-benefit of Option 1A are vehicles using the live traffic lane to manoeuvre in and out of the carparks; however this is no different to the current conditions.

32.     The preferred Option 1A also includes safety and operational improvements on Birch Road, including ‘No stopping At All Times’ parking restrictions east of Castelle Lane, centreline markings and ‘hockey stick’ markings to minimise wasted space.

33.     A plan of the preferred Option 1A is included at Appendix C of the report at Attachment A.

34.     At the 11 September workshop, Auckland Transport sought advice on whether the board wished to proceed further with the project as a formal LBTCF proposal.  The board has $1,196,104 available in the current political term for new LBTCF projects.

35.     The board indicated it wishes to proceed with the project as soon as possible.  This report has been prepared so the board can formalise its decision by formal resolution.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

36.     Auckland Transport’s investigations into angle parking on Station Road in Pukekohe, and the development of options to maximise parking and pedestrian safety on that road and Birch Road were undertaken at the request of the Franklin Local Board.

37.     Auckland Transport has attended three workshops with the board, and the board has provided input and guided the refinements of its preferred option.

38.     The board’s preferred Option 1A will improve the availability of on-street commuter parking by minimising wasted space, and will provide safe walking access to Pukekohe station.  The proposed improvements will also benefit patrons of the A&P showgrounds, particularly when on-site parking is beyond capacity.  The proposed improvements on Birch Road will improve parking behaviour and road safety for general motorists on that road.

39.     Prior to the implementation of any proposed improvements on Station Road and Birch Road, consultation would be undertaken and any feedback received would be shared with the board prior to final project approval.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

40.     The proposed decision of approving detailed design and costing on the project will have no specific impact on Māori. The proposal will generally benefit and improve safety for all users of the train station and the A&P showgrounds, and motorists using Birch Road.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

41.     The Franklin Local Board’s LBTCF funding availability is summarised below.

Franklin Local Board transport capital fund financial summary

Funds available in current political term (includes 2019/20 FY)

$2,856,450

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$1,660,346

Remaining budget left

$1,196,104

 

42.     The remaining budget includes increased LBTCF funding approved by Auckland Council that became available on 1 July 2018. The LBTCF is tied to political office terms rather than financial years. The board is requested to allocate the remaining budget to projects by 30 June 2019.

43.     If the board approves a project to improve parking layout on Station Road and improve pedestrian access to Pukekohe station based on the estimate of $181,104 there will remain over $1 million for it to allocate to other local transport projects.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

44.     Resourcing issues may impact on the timely progression of the project.  Auckland Transport may out-source work as required to ensure the project is not overly delayed.

45.     Project estimates may increase during the detailed design and costing phase.  The project will be reported back to the board with an updated firm estimate, and the decision will lie with the board whether to proceed to construction or not in light of any increased estimate.  If significant cost increases are apparent before the completion of detailed design and costing phase, that information will be reported back to the board earlier to obtain continued authorisation to proceed despite the increasing cost estimates.

46.     The community may prefer a more costly project that provides angle parking on Station Road than the more modest Option 1A preferred by the board.  The option feasibility report is attached for full disclosure to the public of all considerations presented to the board, which is elected to make decisions on behalf of the community.

47.     During large events at the A&P showgrounds, informal angle parking on Station Road is observed to occur, that provides greater on-street parking capacity for event goers than when parallel parking occurs. There may be criticism during large events that the formalisation of parallel parking on Station Road has reduced available event parking. Any criticism will likely reduce as the formalised parallel parking becomes accepted as the new norm.  The new footpaths proposed as part of the project will also provide safer pedestrian access to the main gates at the A&P showgrounds.

48.     There may be opposition to the proposed 50 metres of parking restrictions on Birch Road.  Due to the narrow width on the northern side of the road from Castelle Lane, the proposed parking restrictions will improve road safety for residents and motorists on the road.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

49.     If the Franklin Local Board initiates a new LBTCF project to improve parking layout on Station Road and improve pedestrian access to Pukekohe station, the project will proceed to detailed design and costing. This stage will begin to expend funding from the LBTCF.

50.     Auckland Transport will report back to the board following completion of the detailed design and costing phase to seek approval to proceed to construction. If the board decides to proceed to construction, public consultation would need to be undertaken and Traffic Control Committee approval for the on-road changes would be needed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Option Feasibility Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Jenni Wild – Elected Member Relationship Manager South (Franklin/Manurewa)  Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

New road and private way names in the subdivision at 40, 54 & 58 Whitford Park Road and 18, 24 & 30 Saleyard Road, Whitford by Coumat Limited

 

File No.: CP2018/15437

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board for new road names for a new public road and six new private ways in the subdivision at 40, 54 & 58 Whitford Park Road and 18, 24 & 30 Saleyard Road, Whitford by Coumat Limited.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The applicant has submitted the following names for consideration for the new private ways at 40, 54 & 58 Whitford Park Road and 18, 24 & 30 Saleyard Road, Whitford:

·      Le Coz Road (Road 1)

·      Woodlanding Lane (Private way 1)

·      Strachan Lane (Private way 2)

·      Hirere Crescent (Private way 3)

·      Lark Lane (Private way 4)

·      Crosties Crescent (Private way 5)

·      Heda Loop (Private way 6)

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      Approves the names ‘Le Coz Drive,’ ‘Woodlanding Road,’ ‘Strachan Road,’ ‘Hirere Road,’ ‘Lark Lane,’ ‘Crosties Crescent’ and ‘Heda Loop’ for the new public road and private ways in the subdivision at 40, 54 & 58 Whitford Park Road and 18, 24 & 30 Saleyard Road, Whitford, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki / Context

4.       An 88-lot residential subdivision of 40, 54 & 58 Whitford Park Road and 18, 24 & 30 Saleyard Road, Whitford was granted in August 2015 (referenced BUN60082470, legacy number 46455). The subdivision will be accessed by a new public road off Whitford Park Road, and six new private ways off that road.

5.       In accordance with the national addressing standard the private ways require a name as they serve 6 or more lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

6.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·         A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·         A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·         An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

7.       The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new public road and private ways at 40, 54 & 58 Whitford Park Road and 18, 24 & 30 Saleyard Road, Whitford:

Road #

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Road 1

Le Coz Road

The maiden name of the developer’s wife.

Private way 1

Woodlanding Lane

Original name of Turanga Road (north of the subdivision)

Private way 2

Strachan Lane

Distributor of the Turanga New Reel in 1944 (the paper is still run to this day).

Private way 3

Hirere Crescent

The name of a 60ft boat that used to bring supplies up the estuary to the Whitford general store.

Private way 4

Lark Lane

The name of a boat in the 1860’s that used to deliver goods to the general store in Whitford.

Private way 5

Crosties Crescent

The mill that supplied the timber to build the village hall in Whitford.

Private way 6

Heda Loop

A freight ship that delivered goods to the general store until 1937.

 

The Applicant has also proposed the following alternative road names, should any of the above names be considered unacceptable.

Alternative road name

Meaning

Kūkupa Crescent

Maori name for wood pigeon

Hakeke Lane

Type of bush mushroom that grows throughout Whitford

Kōkopu Crescent

Fish found in the Turanga Creek

Koura Crescent

Native crayfish found in the Turanga Creek

Purdy Crescent

Developer that wished to start hot water pools in Brown Hill Lane but was denied at the time.

Canavera Crescent

A grape grower on Trig Road in 1894.

Dowden Crescent

The builder of the village hall in 1911/1912.

Horne Road/Crescent

General store operator in 1913.

Trices Crescent

The first European settlers in Whitford. 

 

8.       Land Information New Zealand’s addressing team has reviewed the proposed names and confirmed that the names ‘Le Coz Road,’ ‘Woodlanding Lane,’ ‘Strachan Lane,’ ‘Hirere Crescent,’ ‘Lark Lane,’ ‘Crosties Crescent,’ ‘Heda Loop,’ ‘Kūkupa Crescent,’ ‘Hakeke Lane,’ ‘Kōkopu Crescent,’ ‘Koura Crescent,’ ‘Purdy Crescent’ and ‘Canavera Crescent’ are acceptable as there are no existing roads with the same names.

9.       LINZ also advised that ‘Dowden Crescent,’ ‘Horne Road/Crescent’ and ‘Trices Crescent’ are acceptable but noted that there is an existing road called “Dowdens Lane” in Hobsonville, and a road called “Hornes Lane” in Onehunga.

10.     The proposed suffixes of ‘Road,’ ‘Crescent,’ ‘Lane’ and ‘Loop’ are deemed acceptable as they accurately describe the characteristics of the public road and private ways. ‘Road’ is an appropriate suffix for Road 1, being an open roadway primarily for vehicles, and ‘Crescent,’ ‘Lane’ and ‘Loop’ are acceptable suffixes for the private ways, as they are narrow country roadways and both ends of the roads join the same thoroughfare.

11.     The names proposed by the applicant are deemed to meet the road naming guidelines.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

12.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

13.     The applicant has consulted with local iwi, and a response was received from Ngai Tai ki Tamaki in support of the Māori names and raising no objections to the other names. No other responses were received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

14.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

15.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

16.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locality Plan

41

b

Scheme Plan

43

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Danielle Ter Huurne- Intermediate Planner

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Latham Construction Limited at 90 Karaka Road, Beachlands

 

File No.: CP2018/16237

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Franklin Local Board, for the naming of one new public road and the naming of the extension of two existing roads, created by way of subdivision at 90 Karaka Road, Beachlands.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       The applicant has submitted the following names for consideration for the new road at 90 Karaka Road, Beachlands.

Road 1

·    Winterman Road (preferred name)

·    Turiwhatu Road (first alternative)

·    Waiwaia Road (second alternative)

·    Aukaha Road (second alternative)

4.       The applicant also seeks to name the extension of two existing roads, Jack Lachlan Drive (Road 2) and Seventh View Avenue (Road 3).

5.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the new road name options, ‘Winterman Road’ ‘Turiwhatu Road’, ‘Waiwaia Road’ and ‘Aukaha Road’ were determined to meet the road naming guidelines criteria.

6.       Local iwi groups were consulted and initially Ngai Tai ki Tamaki Tribal Trust had no issues with the road naming of Winterman Road, though later correspondence indicated that they preferred the inclusion of the new Maori road names suggested. Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua preferred the inclusion of the Maori road names proposed, over ‘Winterman Road’, and Ngati Te Ata objected to ‘Winterman Road’ and preferred the inclusion of the Maori road names instead.  No response was received from Ngati Tamaoho.

7.       The names ‘Winterman Road’, ‘Jack Lachlan Drive’, and ‘Seventh View Avenue’ are recommended for approval to the Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      Approves the road name ‘Winterman Road’ for the new public road (Road 1) and ‘Jack Lachlan Drive’, and ‘Seventh View Avenue’ for the extension of those roads of the same name, created by way of subdivision at 90 Karaka Road, Beachlands in accordance with 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974

 

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       The 5-lot residential subdivision was approved on 5 March 2018 and the Council reference is BUN60313613 (LUC60313615/SUB60313613). It is located to the south of Karaka Road and will be serviced by a new public road and the extension of two existing roads.

9.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the Local Board’s approval.

 

10.     The applicant has proposed the following names for consideration.

Preference

Proposed New Road Name (Road 1)

Meaning

Preferred Name

Winterman Road

The Winterman family is a prominent family who have lived in Beachlands for over 30 years, on the surrounding farms. The family is active in the community and runs the local Post Shop as a family business.

First Alternative

Turiwhatu Road

Te Reo name for the New Zealand dotterel.

Second Alternative

Waiwaia Road

Te Reo word for ‘beautiful’.

Third Alternative

Aukaha Road

Te Reo word for ‘to strengthen’.

 

 

Preference

Proposed name for extension of existing road (Road 2)

Meaning

Preferred Name

Jack Lachlan Drive

An extension of an existing road, and will be completed as part of works.  No new name required.

 

Preference

Proposed name for extension of existing road (Road 3)

Meaning

Preferred Name

Seventh View Avenue 

An extension of an existing road, and will be completed as part of works.  No new name required.

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

11.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·      A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·      A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·      An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

·      The use of Maori names is also encouraged.

12.     The applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines, and all names are considered to meet the assessment criteria.  Specifically, the use of ‘Winterman Road’ would reflect the heritage of the site and local area due to the Winterman family’s association with the site and wider Beachlands community.  Whilst the use of Maori road names is actively encouraged, the alternative names suggested for consideration are not of specific relevance to the site or local area.

13.     As the applicant’s preferred name (‘Winterman Road’) meets the criteria, it is recommended for approval, while noting that the alternative names (‘Turiwhatu Road’, ‘Waiwaia Road’, and ‘Aukaha Road’) are also appropriate as they comply with the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

14.     The proposed suffixes, ‘Road,’ ‘Drive’ and ‘Avenue’ are deemed acceptable as they accurately describe the characteristics of the roads.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

15.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     Ngai Tai ki Tamaki Tribal Trust have advised that the new Maori road names proposed ‘Turiwhatu Road’, ‘Waiwaia Road’, and ‘Aukaha Road’ are all preferred over ‘Winterman Road’.

Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua prefer the inclusion of the proposed Maori road names over ‘Winterman Road’.

Ngati Te Ata objected to ‘Winterman Road’ and would prefer the use of one of the Maori road names over Winterman Road. 

Ngati Tamaoho was also consulted, however no response was received.

17.     The proposed names were also sent to Land Information New Zealand who have confirmed that all of the proposed road names are acceptable and are not in use elsewhere in the Auckland region.

18.     For completeness, it is noted that the applicant received comments from various representatives from Ngai Tai ki Tamaki at different points of time during consultation.  Other road names raised during consultation (other than those discussed elsewhere in this report) are as given below with brief comments for completeness:

·     Tumu Road (or Terrace) – recently approved or likely to be approved for use elsewhere in the Auckland region, so not acceptable to LINZ.

·     Tuarongo Terrace (or Road) – recently approved road name for use elsewhere in the Auckland region, so not acceptable to LINZ.

·     Hunguengue Road (or other suffix) – received by developer’s agent much later with insufficient time to consult with LINZ on appropriateness prior to finalization of this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

19.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

20.     The decision sought from the Franklin Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

21.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Eamon Guthrie - Planner

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

New road name in the subdivision at 185 Jutland Road, Pukekohe by Roy Developments Limited

 

File No.: CP2018/16919

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board for a name for a new road to be created in a subdivision located within the Belmont Special Housing Area at 185 Jutland Road, Pukekohe by Roy Developments Limited.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The Applicant, Roy Developments Limited, has submitted the following names for consideration for a portion of the new road (Lot 100) at 185 Jutland Road, Pukekohe:

·    Raoriki Road         (preferred name)

·    Wheki Road          (first alternative)

·    Waiwaka Road     (second alternative)

4.       Approval is also sought to use a previously approved name, Whakapono Road, for the extension of that same road.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the new road name ‘Raoriki Road’ for the new road, and the existing name of Whakapono Road for the extension of that road, in the subdivision at 185 Jutland Road, Pukekohe, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       The road (Lot 100) is in a 17 Lot residential subdivision which has been approved in the Belmont Special Housing Area at 185 Jutland Road, Pukekohe and the council reference is BUN60306576.

6.       The road is required to be named in accordance with the national addressing standard as it serves more than 5 lots. 

7.       However only a portion of Lot 100 requires a new road name as it is a T-junction and the portion of future road that it intersects with and forms a ‘T’, is a through road. Another portion of this through road has already been named Whakapono Road as part of an early subdivision at 175 Victoria Street.  This can be better understood by referring to both Attachments A and B and the associated explanations.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

8.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·         A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·         A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·         An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

9.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

 

10.     The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new road created as part of the development at 185 Jutland Road, Pukekohe.

 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Raoriki Road

“Swamp Buttercup”, an endangered Buttercup -  name in keeping with the area-wide theme of native plant species.

First Alternative

Wheki Road

The most common “Tree Fern” - name in keeping with the area-wide theme of native plant species.

Second Alternative

Waiwaka Road

A now scarce tree over parts of its former range due to clearance of swamp forest - name in keeping with the area-wide theme of native plant species.

 

11.     Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that the above names are acceptable to use.

12.     The proposed suffix of ‘Road’ is deemed acceptable as it accurately describes the characteristics of the road.

13.     The name proposed by the Applicant is deemed to meet the road naming guidelines.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

14.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

15.     The applicant has consulted with local iwi and no objections to these names were received, and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki acknowledged their support of the names.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

16.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

17.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

18.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locality Plan

55

b

Scheme Plan & Road Linkage Plan

57

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Lesley Wood - Intermediate Planner

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

New road name in the subdivision at 34 McEldownie Road, Drury by Drury South Limited

 

File No.: CP2018/17132

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board for a new road name for a new public road in the subdivision at 34 McEldownie Road, Drury by Drury South Limited. The subdivision involved a number of sites on Ararimu Road, Quarry Road, Maketu Road, Ramarama Road and McEldownie Road and is part of the wider development known as the Drury South Crossing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       Maketu Road, one of the roads with properties forming part of the new subdivision, has been formally ‘stopped’ under the Local Government Act and is therefore no longer a legal road reserve.

4.       Given the proximity of the new spine road to the old Maketu Road, it is the developers preference to continue to use this name for the new road.

5.       The Applicant has therefore submitted the following names for consideration for the new road at 34 McEldownie Road, Drury:

·   Maketu Road (preferred name)

·   Noia Road (alternative name)

·   Tamaoho Road (alternative name)

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      Approve the road name ‘Maketu Road’ for the new road in the subdivision at 34 McEldownie Road, Drury, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       Resource consents (referenced LUC60319074 and SUB60311999) were granted in May 2018 to subdivide various subject sites on Ararimu Road, Quarry Road, Maketu Road, Ramarama Road and McEldownie Road and also construct a new spine road.

7.       The new road will be accessed from Ararimu Road, near the Ramarama motorway off-ramp and will replace the old Maketu Road, which has been formally ‘stopped’ under the Local Government and is therefore no longer legal road reserve.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

8.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

 

9.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·         A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·         A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·         An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

·         The use of Māori road names is actively encouraged

 

10.     The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new road at 34 McEldownie Road, Drury:

Preference

Proposed New Road Name (Road 2)

Meaning

Preferred Name

Maketu Road

The name of the old road in a similar location to the new road, which has been ‘stopped’.

First Alternative

Noia Road

Noia was one of the leading Wai O Hua and Te Uri O Pou rangatira of the 18th Century, and the daughter of Waikahina. He is thought to have built and refortified the pa at Te Maketu between 1740 and 1780.

Second Alternative

Tamaoho Road

Eponymous ancestor of Ngati Tamaoho and leading rangatira of the lower Waikato area

 

11.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

12.     The proposed suffix of ‘Road’ is deemed acceptable for the new road, as it appropriately describes the characteristics of the road, being an open road primarily for vehicles.

13.     The names proposed by the Applicant are deemed to meet the road naming guidelines.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

14.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

15.     The applicant has consulted with local iwi, and responses were received from Ngati Tamaoho and Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi Authority. Ngati Tamaoho suggested the above names. Te Akitai Waiohua supported the names ‘Maketu Road’ and ‘Noia Road’ but did not support the name ‘Tamaoho Road.’ No other responses were received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

16.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

17.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

18.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locality Plan

63

b

Scheme Plan

65

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Danielle Ter Huurne- Intermediate Planner

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

New private way and road names in the subdivision at 600 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford by Maraetai Co Limited

 

File No.: CP2018/17139

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board for a new road name for a new private way in the subdivision at 600 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford by Maraetai Co Limited.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The Applicant has submitted the following names for consideration for the new private way at 600 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford:

·   Maea Rise (preferred name)

·   Pae Tawhiti Rise (alternative name)

·   Aumoana Rise (alternative name)

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      Approve the new road name ‘Maea Rise’ for the new private way in the subdivision at 600 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki / Context

4.       A three stage 16-lot rural-residential subdivision of 600 Whitford-Maraetai Road was granted in July 2018 (referenced BUN60081167). The subdivision will be accessed by a new private way off Forestry Road, which branches off Whitford-Maraetai Road.

5.       In accordance with the national addressing standards, the private way requires a name because it serves more than 5 lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

 

7.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·         A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·         A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·         An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

·         The use of Māori road names is actively encouraged

 

8.       The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new private way at 600 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford:

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Maea Rise

Means emerge, arise, appear, become visible, come into view. Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki suggested this name given the private way’s position, being at a higher elevation than the road, and its surrounding views.

First Alternative

Pae Tawhiti Rise

Distant horizon. Again, due to the surrounding views and vantage point looking out to the horizon.

Second Alternative

Aumoana Rise

 

Open sea.

 

       All of the above names were suggested by Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki.

 

9.       Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

10.     The proposed suffix ‘Rise’ is deemed acceptable as it accurately describes the characteristics of the private way, being a road that reaches a higher elevation.

11.     The names proposed by the Applicant are deemed to meet the road naming guidelines.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

12.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

13.     The applicant has consulted with Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki Tribal Trust, who suggested all of the above names.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

14.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

15.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

16.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locality Plan

71

b

Scheme Plan

73

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Danielle Ter Huurne- Intermediate Planner

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/15987

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the monthly update of the Franklin Local Board governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report provides an update of the Franklin Local Board governance forward work calendar. A schedule of key decisions that will come before the board at business meetings over the next year is attached (Attachment A).

3.       The calendar aims to support the local board’s governance role by:

i)          Ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)         Clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)         Clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be regularly updated to ensure that formal reporting milestones for new projects are added to the schedule. Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar is a less formal but more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.

5.       At its business meeting on 6 June 2017, Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar would be reported monthly to enable greater public transparency on forthcoming local board key decision timescales (Resolution number FR/2017/82).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the September 2018 update of the Franklin governance forward work calendar (Attachment A to the report entitled ‘Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar).

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The governance forward work calendar brings together reporting on all of Franklin Local Board’s projects and activities previou7sly approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes governing body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response. Inclusion on a formal business meeting agenda will allow greater transparency for the public.

7.       Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar is a more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.

8.       The forward work calendar is arranged in three columns: ‘Topic’, ‘Purpose’ and ‘Governance Role’:

i.)         Topic describes the items and may indicate how they fit in with broader processes such as the annual plan.

ii.)        Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates.

iii.)        Governance role is a high-level categorisation of the work of local boards.

9.       At its business meeting on 6 June 2017, Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar would be reported monthly to enable greater public transparency on forthcoming local board key decision timescales (Resolution number FR/2017/82).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     This report is an information report providing the governance forward work programme for the next six months.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     All local boards have been receiving governance forward work calendars on their business meeting agendas. This will support more effective management of the local board’s governance work.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The projects and processes referred to in the governance forward work calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     There are no financial implications relating to this report.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     This report is a point in time of the governance forward work calendar. It is a living document and updated month to month.  It minimises the risk of the board being unaware of planned topics for their consideration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     Staff will review the calendar each month and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work calendar - September 2018

77

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

 

File No.: CP2018/00054

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the workshop records for local board workshops held on 21 and 28 August 2018, and 4 and 11 September 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Workshop records are attached for 21 and 28 August 2018, and 4 and 11 September 2018.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         receive the workshop records for 21 and 28 August 2018, and 4 and 11 September             2018.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 21 August 2018

81

b

Workshop record 28 August 2018

83

c

Workshop record 4 September 2018

85

d

Workshop record 11 September 2018

87

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 September 2018