I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 19 September 2018

4:30pm

Local Board Office,
2 Glen Road,
Browns Bay

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

Members

Chris Bettany

 

 

David Cooper

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Caitlin Watson

 

 

Vicki Watson

 

 

Mike Williamson

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Vivienne Sullivan

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

12 September 2018

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 427 3317

Email: vivienne.sullivan@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

 

DELEGATIONS HIBISCUS AND BAYS LOCAL BOARD 2016-2019

 

Portfolio

Description

Local Board Members

Minor landowner approvals and landlord approvals including events

Confirm if the matter is minor for staff to exercise their delegation

Julia Parfitt -Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald - Deputy Chairperson  

Transport Information Group

Discuss transport issues/projects

Janet Fitzgerald

Julia Parfitt

Resource consent applications 

Input into notification decisions for resource consent applications 

Gary Holmes 

Janet Fitzgerald

Urgent Decision Making

To make decisions on matters that cannot wait until the next ordinary meeting of the local board

Julia Parfitt – Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald-Deputy Chairperson

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

Chris Bettany

Julia Parfitt

Arts, Community and Events

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

Chris Bettany

Caitlin Watson

Parks, Sport and Recreation

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

David Cooper

Mike Williamson

Service, Strategy and Information

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

Gary Holmes

Julia Parfitt

Economic Development

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

Janet Fitzgerald

Gary Holmes

Silverdale Led Heritage Character Design Guidelines

To approve any minor changes

Janet Fitzgerald

Caitlin Watson

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report 2017/2018

To approve any minor changes

Janet Fitzgerald

 

Appointments to outside organisations

 

Organisation

Local Board Member

Vaughan Homestead (Torbay Historical Society)

Julia Parfitt

Chris Bettany - Alternate

Victor Eaves Management Committee

Mike Williamson

Local Government New Zealand Zone One (Auckland and Northland)

Janet Fitzgerald

 

Business Improvement Districts (BIDS)

 

Destination Orewa Beach

Vicki Watson

David Cooper - Alternate

Torbay

Chris Bettany

Julia Parfitt - Alternate

Browns Bay

Chris Bettany

Gary Holmes - Alternate

Mairangi Bay

David Cooper

Julia Parfitt - Alternate

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Hibiscus and Bays Pest Free Plan                                                                     5

8.2     Papaya Stories - Disco Walk                                                                               6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Options to dispose of accessway reserve at R3 Newhaven Terrace, Mairangi Bay.   7

12        Deep Creek Reserve Redevelopment Design                                                          15

13        Proposed location of new swimming pontoons                                                      27

14        Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Development Plan                                                   33

15        Future land status for Hibiscus and Bays local parks held under the Local Government Act 2002                                                                                                  37

16        Reserve classification programme for Hibiscus and Bays local parks                49

17        New road name in the Senna Properties Limited subdivision at 15 Central Boulevard, Silverdale                                                                                                  77

18        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development's Six Monthly Report to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board                                                                                 85

19        Endorsement of the Hibiscus and Bays Biodiversity and Pest Free Plan            97

20        Ward Councillors Update                                                                                          119

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      121

22        Record of Workshop Meetings                                                                                127  

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

An apology from Chairperson J Parfitt has been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 15 August 2018, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Hibiscus and Bays Pest Free Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Sally Cargill has requested a deputation to discuss the Hibiscus and Bays Pest Free Plan.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Ms Cargill for her presentation.

 

8.2       Papaya Stories - Disco Walk

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Yana Papaya, from Papaya Stories has requested a deputation to discuss the community work her organisation does.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Ms Papaya for her presentation on the work of Papaya Stories.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Options to dispose of accessway reserve at R3 Newhaven Terrace, Mairangi Bay.

 

File No.: CP2018/16157

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the support of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on a disposal option for the reserve at R3 Newhaven Terrace, Mairangi Bay.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The accessway reserve at R3 Newhaven Terrace, is part of the Mairangi Bay Accessways. The accessways allow pedestrian access through the neighbourhood without using longer roadway routes.

3.       This particular accessway reserve is currently being used for both pedestrian and unauthorised vehicular access.

4.       The reserve has been used by the Mairangi and Castor Bays Presbyterian Church at 9 Hastings Road and three properties at 8, 10, and 10A Penzance Road for unauthorised vehicular access to their properties for many years.

5.       The vehicle access has never been formally approved by council and is a current private encroachment across a council reserve.

6.       The reserve serves no recreation or other community purpose. Its size is larger than its function requires and it could be more productively used by either being declared road or by disposing of the land to the adjoining owners.

7.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved in February 2018 to investigate service need and disposal options that will finally put the land use issues to rest and meet all parties’ needs (HB/2018/16).

8.       Options are presented and analysed in this report and the recommended approach is to revoke the reserve and sell it to willing adjoining owners. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      support the option to progress the revocation of the reserve at R3 Newhaven Terrace, Mairangi Bay and progress the sale and purchase of it to willing adjoining owners

b)      require that in any sale and disposal, guaranteed public pedestrian access is provided by way of an easement to council over a defined portion of the land currently known as R3 Newhaven Terrace, Mairangi Bay, to ensure safe public access from Penzance Road to Hastings Road

c)      request officers to progress the process of revocation of the reserve status at R3 Newhaven Terrace, Mairangi Bay

d)      formally rescind the 2015 resolution (HIB/2015/3) to require residents of 8, 10 and 10A Penzance road, Mairangi Bay, to enter into encumbrances with Auckland Council.

 

Horopaki / Context

Background

9.       Since the 1950’s, properties at 9 Hastings Road and 8, 10, and 10A Penzance Road, Mairangi Bay, have used the reserve for unauthorised access to their properties by establishing access and driveways to their respective properties adjoining the reserve.

10.     An accessway reserve is specifically for ‘road to road’ pedestrian access. Its function is to provide foot access only.

11.     The reserve is ten meters wide and sealed from Penzance Road to the point where it adjoins the church property and is thereafter a sealed pedestrian path within a vegetated area and steps to Hastings Road.

12.     It has always physically appeared as a ‘driveway’. While this is incorrect, the perception is strong within the community.

13.     The accessway is wider than it needs to be to perform its function. It performs no recreational function and has no other amenity benefits for the public other than access.

14.     The reserve has a formed and sealed pedestrian footpath along most of its length except where four angle car parks bisect the footpath, impeding pedestrians.

Existing resolution to encumber adjoining properties titles

15.     The existing resolution to encumber the adjoining owner’s titles is the local board’s current direction to staff.  The resolution would need to be rescinded if the local board supported revocation of the reserve status. It could be rescinded after a decision to support disposal or after disposal is authorised.

16.     If no decision to support disposal is made, the original 2015 resolution stands.

17.     The private properties, however, would have a 10 year opportunity to establish legal access from their own properties to the road.

18.     Establishing access from their own properties to the road frontage would result in the loss of four on street angle parking spaces along Penzance Road, and may be nearly impossible for one of the owners.

Land disposal options

19.     In February 2015 the Hibiscus and Bays Facilities and Reserves Committee initially resolved that the private properties enter into an encumbrance with a 10 year sunset (HIB/2015/3) in order to allow the adjoining owners time to establish legal access to the road front from their properties.

20.     More recently, on 21 February 2018 the local board indicated support for revocation of the reserve status and resolved to ask staff to present options to dispose of the land (HB/2018/16).

21.     At that meeting the local board was advised that one option for disposal is to the adjoining owners as the reserve does not hold any real service qualities, reserve or recreation value to the public, apart from the provision of a pedestrian footpath.

22.     In any disposal the prime requirement of council would be retention of a safe pedestrian access from Penzance Road to Hastings Road.

Options

23.     There are four potential options to deal with the land:

i)        Dispose of the land by revoking its reserve status and sell the land to the adjoining
owners.

ii)       Undertake a Public Works Act 1981process to declare the land to be road.

iii)      Require the owners to establish independent access to Penzance road by 
encumbering their titles.

iv)         Do nothing.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Option 1:  Revoke the reserve status and sell the land to willing adjoining owners.

24.     This option relies on the adjoining owners of 9 Hastings Road and 8, 10 and 10A Penzance Road, Mairangi Bay, being willing and able to acquire agreed portions of the accessway.

25.     For clarity, any valuation of the land for sale would be based on current market value at a ‘before and after’ rate. This means that the per square metre cost of the land would be calculated on whether the addition of the land to an owner’s property significantly improves their options for development, and therefore their land value.

26.     If the adjoining owners acquired portions of the accessway in a right of way arrangement, then the land does nothing to improve their potential property development so does not significantly improve their overall value.  It is likely that the per square metre rate will be somewhat lower than that of nearby residential land.

27.     The process requires council to agree to revoke the reserve status, publicly advertise its intention to do so and formally revoke the status, returning the land status to ‘general land’. A consequential amendment to the zoning would be made to change it from open space to residential.

28.     The land would then need to be surveyed to apportion agreed sections of the accessway according to the adjoining owner’s individual needs and a conditional agreement reached to jointly own and maintain the land.

29.     Valuations would be required to help determine the appropriate market price of the portions. Sale and purchase agreements would be signed to effect the sale. Titles will be updated to reflect the changed ownership of the land.

30.     At the same time an agreement to grant easement would be sought for the purposes of a pedestrian right of way over the land between Hastings Road and Penzance Road. 

31.     The agreement would determine a safe width and land area and also be surveyed. The agreement would include maintenance clauses and a pedestrian safety barrier to be installed and maintained by council.

32.     The benefits of this arrangement are:

·        the council receives a guaranteed pedestrian access, continuing the original function of the accessway.

·        the owners acquire land that gives them their own private access to Penzance Road.

·        the church will be able to re-organise its own parking within its ‘new’ land, removing the current angle parks so that the pedestrian access is connected and improved.

·        the land will be privately owned so current illegal parking on the accessway by others will cease.

·        pedestrian safety will be improved, the current land use issues are extinguished, and the matter is brought to a mutually beneficial end.

33.     The negatives are:

·        the process can take up to a year depending on how quickly the council is able to agree to revoke and undertake the formal process.

·        the owners will be required to mee allt their legal, survey and purchase costs and council will meet all its own costs including that of the revocation process

 

Option 2:  Declare the land to be road.

34.     This option relies on Auckland Transport being willing to accept the land as road.  At present the accessway does not provide a road function except that it provides access in and out for the church and adjoining owners.

35.     The declaration can be commenced by council under section 114 of the Public Works Act 1981. The declaration only has effect if Auckland Transport agrees to accept the transferred land and it is gazetted as legal road. Department of Conservation and Land Information New Zealand would be notified.

36.     The General Manager, Community Facilities has the delegation to request the Minister of Lands to declare the land to be road by way of Gazette Notice. The General Manager Community Facilities must first consider the views of the local board.

37.     Although this process is simpler and less time consuming that option 1, it is not likely to achieve the same finality and certainty for the residents. It would allow any vehicle to use the roadcreating security and safety risks.

38.     Because the land would be managed by Auckland Transport under this option, the residents would have direct access to road but no control or management of the ex-accessway.

39.     Auckland Transport is reluctant to own and maintain an asset that does not realistically offer a public benefit (i.e. the benefits are principally to the adjoining residents).  The residents and church would not benefit as much under this method than if the land was owned by them.

40.     The accessway does not conform to Auckland Transport's code for acceptance in that it is too narrow, not up to current specifications and unlikely to be able to meet the code.

Option 3:  Require the owners to establish independent access to Penzance Road by encumbering their titles.

41.     This option should only be considered where there is no appetite to dispose of the land and the landowner wants the residents to establish vehicular access to an existing legal road.

42.     The resolution is already in place, but this option is punitive and may not be realistically achievable by all the owners.  The main issue with this option is that at the end of a 10-year period the residents may not have gained legal access, forcing the council into further legal action which may be disproportionate to the actual issue.  It is not a recommended option if a full and final solution is required.

Option 4: Do nothing

43.     This is an option but not palatable and carries a great deal of legal and reputational risk.  The report to the local board in February 2018 outlined all the potential risks and the local board has signalled that it wishes to take appropriate action to solve the issue.

Summary of options

44.     For disposal options 1 and 2, there would be a minimal effect to the public as the land would either be maintained by new owners, or by council as before.

45.     Vehicular access would remain, publicly via a road declaration, or privately if the land was sold.

46.     The adjoining owners would cover their respective legal, survey and transfer costs of the land disposal, or Auckland Transport would manage the land under a road declaration.

47.     Future maintenance would either be solely by the owners or by Auckland Transport.

48.     In either disposal method, the pedestrian foot-path would be reinstated, improved and separated with a barrier from the vehicle accessway.

 

 

49.     For both disposal options the need for encumbrances would end.

50.     Options 3 and 4 are not recommended.

Recommended option

51.     The Manager, Land Advisory Services recommends option 1 and supports the disposal of the land to the interested parties, at a rate that reflects the current value of the land occupied by the accessway.   

52.     The reasons are that it gives a greater flexibility for the owners to manage their land, their access and maintenance.  It allows an essentially non-service obsolete portion of accessway reserve to be better utilised while maintaining its core function – pedestrian access by way of easement to council.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

53.     Impact on the local community would be minor, as no physical changes would happen to the reserve except an improvement to the alignment and safety of the pedestrian access.

54.     The remaining pedestrian access would be maintained by council through R 3 Newhaven Terrace by way of easement back to council.

55.     The property owners would own the entire accessway between them and would be jointly liable for maintenance. Signage could be provided at the Penzance Road end indicating a private driveway and a public pedestrian accessway.

56.     The church will still maintain their vehicular access for church patrons and other community groups that use the building.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

57.     There will be no effect on Māori from the disposal of the reserve.

58.     The public, including Māori will still enjoy the benefit of pedestrian access between Penzance and Hastings Roads. In any disposal iwi consultation is required under Part IV of the Conservation Act 1987.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

59.     There will be no major financial implications to council from any disposal of the land. There is a process to undergo and there will be some footpath improvement costs to ensure pedestrian safety.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

60.     A risk in not addressing the current encroachments is that the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board would knowingly allow a non-permitted vehicular access over a reserve contrary to the Reserves Act 1977.

61.     The solution to dispose of the land and retain a pedestrian access easement separated from vehicles reduces liability for council and residents.

62.     There are no known negative impacts on the surrounding neighbourhood of disposal with an easement.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

63.     If the local board supports disposal by revocation and sale of the land, staff will begin the revocation process of the reserve status and then undertake disposal of the land in agreed shares to the church and to the owners of 8, 10, and 10A Penzance Road, Mairangi Bay, by sale and purchase agreements: 

·        enter into a conditional agreement with the purchaser’s subject to council approval(s)

·        satisfactory conclusion of statutory processes

·        agreement on final terms and conditions and requiring all agreements to settle contemporaneously. 

·        request approval to revoke from the Environment and Community Committee (ECC) of the Governing Body and to begin the revocation process

·        report back to ECC if there are any objections

·        present the item to Finance and Performance Committee to obtain approval to sell.

·        Sale of the land would be subject to:

·        council retaining a suitable easement in gross

·        relocation of the current angle car parking spaces to re-connect the pedestrian access

·        installation of a barrier along the length of the sealed access

·        signs installed at both ends of the accessway.

 

64.     If disposal by way of a road declaration is supported, staff will commence the declaration process.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Plan R3 Newhaven Terrace (Penzance walkway)

13

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Allan Christensen – Managesr, Land Advisory Services

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Deep Creek Reserve Redevelopment Design

 

File No.: CP2018/15172

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the design for the redevelopment of the upper Deep Creek Reserve, Torbay as outlined in the attached drawings and specifications and as discussed at the local board workshop on the 9 August 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Deep Creek Reserve (located on Deep Creek Road) will be upgraded from a soil sports field to a sand-carpet soccer football training pitch. This will improve the usability of the upper reserve area, particularly during the winter months, and help alleviate sports field capacity issues in the area.

3.       The upgrade will also see the addition of a sealed car park with 20 spaces, accessible public toilets and a number of landscape improvements such as seating, planting and road frontage bollards renewal.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the design for the redevelopment of the upper Deep Creek Reserve in Deep Creek Road, Torbay as per Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      approve proceeding with developed design and resource consent for works in accordance with the concept design (including the external wrap design, as per Attachment B of the agenda report).

 

Horopaki / Context

4.   The Sports Field Capacity Development Programme (SFCD) 2014 analysed three areas in and around Torbay, which showed that there is a shortfall of 85 hours of sports time in the Hibiscus and Bays area.

5.   Auckland Council is upgrading Deep Creek Reserve from a soil to a sand-carpet turf sports field. The upgrade of the sports field at Deep Creek Reserve will assist to address the above-mentioned shortfall, add approximately 10-12 more hours of playing capability and help to alleviate capacity issues at Freyberg Park.

6.   The redevelopment will generally improve the usability of the upper reserve area, especially during the winter months. Further improvements to support the usability of the reserve for active recreation are developed.

7.   The overall design for the redevelopment consists of the following improvements:

·        Three quarter size sand carpet football training pitch including drainage and irrigation

·        training light emitting diode (LED) floodlights

·        20 sealed car park spaces

·        all accessible public toilet

·        landscape improvements such as seating, planting and road frontage bollards.

8.       The detailed design plans have been attached to this report in Appendix A.

9.       Public consultation on the design has been undertaken in April 2017 with general support of the development from the community. The project team worked with several neighbouring property owners to address issues with the lighting design which led to an updated design.

10.     The toilet block included in the design for Deep Creek Reserve is a Permaloo precast concrete toilet that has been custom-designed to our specification.

11.     At the local board workshop 9 August 2018; design options for the wrap to go onto the exterior of the toilet was presented.

12.     The concept design with the sporting theme, attached as Attachment B, was confirmed as the preferred design for the site given it underlines the active recreation character of the reserves development and by using a mainly green backdrop in the photo help to minimise the visual impact from the streetscape and when entering the car park.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

13. A number of themes have been developed as design options for the toilet’s exterior:

Options

Analysis

Advice

Option one: Do nothing

 

Given the constant increase in demand for active recreation this option does not align with the Auckland long-term plan

This option is not recommended.

Option two: Renewal of sport field only

While the renewal of the sport field will provide additional usage time for the reserve and the Torbay area, the lack of parking and facilities would again limit the usability.
Upgrading the field to increase usage without a car park would also add to an already identified traffic congestion in this area buy encouraging long-term parking along the street.

This option is not recommended, given its limited improvement of the reserve.

Option three: redevelopment of the reserve as a whole to meet future active recreation needs including parking, amenities and seating

By developing the reserve into a destination for active recreation and providing a fully sealed car park and amenities, the reserve increases usability to the expected 10-12 hours and recognises the requirement of providing amenities as users will usually remain at the reserve for longer.

This option is recommended as it best meets the needs of the community in the future.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

14.    The local board are supportive of the redevelopment of the Deep Creek Reserve and have allocated $1.2 million to complete the works.

15.     The Redevelopment at Deep Creek Reserve will help to meet the objective in the Local Board Plan to ensuring the community enjoys access to quality parks, reserves and facilities for leisure, sport and recreation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan, the Unitary Plan and Local Board Plans.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

17.     Maintenance costs for the reserve would overall increase due to the number of new assets being created. The design however has considered maintenance aspects for the future and will deliver a well-balanced cost-benefit result.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

18.     There are no perceived risks associated with the recommendation of this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

19.     Following approval of the design, the project can move into the delivery stage and construction can commence on site.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Design plans

19

b

Concept design for the exterior toilet wrap

25

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Barbara Heise – Project Manager

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Proposed location of new swimming pontoons

 

File No.: CP2018/17098

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the preferred locations for the installation of two new swimming pontoons in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has allocated $40,000 locally driven initiatives capital expenditure for installation of one new swimming pontoon in the East Coast Bays subdivision and one new swimming pontoon in the Hibiscus Coast subdivision in the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Staff have undertaken a service assessment to identify the most suitable locations that will add the most value to the network of active experiences in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

4.       The proposed locations are:

·        East Coast Bays subdivision - Browns Bay

·        Hibiscus Coast subdivision - Little Manly

5.       Subject to the local board’s approval of the locations, staff will proceed with the necessary consents and installation of pontoons in the proposed locations to best practice requirements and guidelines for pontoon installation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the installation of two new swimming pontoons at Browns Bay and Little Manly as per Attachment A of the agenda report, to be funded from its 2018/2019 locally driven initiatives capital budget in accordance with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolution HB/2018/122.

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       Community Facilities and Community Services have developed a collaborative work programme to respond to the key outcomes identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2017.

7.       Improving the quality of experiences provided by parks reserves and facilities is identified as a key outcome.

8.       Providing more swimming pontoons at locations that will provide the best experience for local communities and visitors will contribute to improved recreation opportunities and help provide a high-quality experience for reserve users.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

9.       Subject matter experts have collectively provided advice and feedback as to best practice requirements and guidelines for pontoon installation. This advice was used to develop a set of criteria to identify the most suitable locations for new swimming pontoons.

 

 

10.     Summary of site criteria:

a)      ensure the pontoons are resilient and to reduce the ongoing cost of maintenance, the chosen sites must be sheltered from north-easterly winds, and storm swells.

b)      ensure that the pontoons are safe and provide the best experience for the widest range of abilities they must be accessible through all tides. They must not be too far offshore at high tide, while at low tide still be located in sufficient water depths.

c)      to provide the most value to local communities, the pontoons must be easily accessible from known high-value recreation spaces, without impacting on existing uses such as ski lanes, boat ramps, boating, sailing and surf club activities.

11.     Site analysis:

a)      Hibiscus Coast

·        The current locations of pontoons are; Stanmore Bay, Manly Beach, Tindall’s Bay and Arkles Bay.

·        Based on the site criteria, the next most suitable location is Little Manly as per attachment A.

·        Other sites were considered (for example the Orewa Estuary and Matakatia), however, based on health and safety concerns or not meeting the above criteria they were found to be impractical.

b)      East Coast Bays

·        There is currently one pontoon located at Waiake Beach.

·        Based on the site requirements the recommended location for a new pontoon is Browns Bay, south of the ski lane as per Attachment A.

·        Other locations (Rothesay, Murrays, Mairangi and Campbells Bays) are considered too exposed and raise the potential for conflict of water space usage due to existing activities.

12.     The Community Services Parks team support the outlined approach to pontoon service provision in the Hibiscus and Bays area, subject to the normal pipeline process, business case requirements, and approval throughout investigation, design and delivery.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

13.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2017 identifies new pontoons as a key initiative.

Outcome: Our community enjoys access to quality parks, reserves and facilities for leisure, sport and recreation: Investigate options to provide pontoons at more beaches.

14.     The proposed initiative linked to specific pontoon projects in the 2018/2019 Work Programme for both Community Services (service assessment, refer HB/2018/99) and Community Facilities (investigation, design, delivery and future maintenance, refer HB/2018/122).

15.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has allocated $40,000 from their 2018/2019 locally driven initiatives capital budget for delivery/installation: SharePoint Line Item # 1920.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     All community assets contribute significantly to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions. Where any aspects of the proposed projects are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken during the initial phases of the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

17.     The local board has allocated $40,000 from their 2018/2019 locally driven initiatives capital budget for the delivery/installation: SharePoint Line Item # 1920.

18.    The intent is to deliver within the allocated budget. Following detailed design and consenting more accurate cost estimates will be determined.

19.     Should the estimated cost of delivery of the two pontoons exceed the $40,000 allocated then a further report will be provided to the board seeking either additional budget or a reduced project scope to enable delivery within budget.

20.    Any savings achieved upon completion of the two pontoon installations will be returned to the local board’s locally driven initiatives capital budget for reallocation.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

21.    The intention is to install the two pontoons prior to the 2018/2019 summer season. Timeframe risks relating to the consenting process mean that accurate timeframes for delivery cannot be determined at this time.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

22.     Following approval from the local board, next steps are to:

·        complete design documentation

·        prepare and submit resource consent application

·        manage the physical works delivery through the engagement of approved contractors.

23.     The local board will receive monthly updates on the progress of this project through regular Community Facilities reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Approximate Pontoon Location Map

31

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Angie Bennett – Work Porgramme Lead, Investigation and Design

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Development Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/17072

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.         To adopt the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Development Plan (attachment A) as an internal reference and enabling document, and for staff to implement the  next phase of investigation and design through the Community Facilities Work Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan was adopted on 18 March 2015 by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. The Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan provides a guide for the future management of the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves.

3.       A series of strategic land acquisitions by Auckland Council and former North Shore City Council have been completed in order to increase the size of Mairangi Bay Beach Reserve, increasing the provision of open space and opportunities to enhance recreation and amenity outcomes.

4.       The Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan includes a concept plan, which identifies a number of projects that will develop and define the future of Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves. This includes projects that will be delivered by or with assistance of Council Controlled Organisations  including Watercare and Auckland Transport, as well as the future surf club clubroom development of the Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club. The Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan concept plan projects are:

·        Montrose Terrace carpark and Link Lane;

·        Montrose Terrace and Sidmouth Street cul-de-sac;

·        Montrose Terrace (Beachfront road removal);

·        Reserve amenity enhancements;

·        Pedestrian bridge enhancements;

·        Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club clubrooms and storage facility;

·        Watercare pump station upgrade;

·        Seawall renewal.

5.       With a number of complex, interdependent projects to be delivered there is a need to prepare a Mairangi Bay Development Plan to ensure these projects can be delivered in a coordinated way.

6.       The Mairangi Bay Development Plan is a strategic assessment that provides initial scope, requirements and extent of the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan projects, scheduling, prioritisation and indicative costs at an outcome level.  This information has been established through review and referencing relevant plans and documentation, undertaking a planning assessment and engagement with stakeholders, who have a direct involvement or lead in the noted projects.


 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Development Plan (Attachment A of the agenda report) to guide the delivery of projects identified in the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan (March 2015).

b)      approve the inclusion, within the Community Facilities Work Programme of  the investigation and design tasks, detailed in the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Development Plan (Attachment A of the agenda report, page 30) , as funding is identified.

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       The Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan (MBRMP) concept plan projects, on the whole, are interdependent and bring differing timings and potential budget provision and responsibilities. The Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Development Plan (development plan) is intended to guide the next phase of investigation and design by providing an overview of each project, including relevance with other projects, order of delivery of projects, planning overview and potential funding. 

8.       The development plan identifies, at a broad level, planning, engagement and financial requirements for the various projects and related components stemming from the MBRMP. To enable a fuller picture, stakeholders directly associated with the MBRMP identified projects, were consulted and background reports and documentation have been referenced to enable the drafting of the development plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

9.       In terms of informing the decision making and public engagement process, the Mairangi Bay Reserves Development Plan provides information and guidance across the following areas:

·        Provide an engagement process for all project stakeholders to collectively identify all of the projects details including opportunities, constraints and areas of overlap between stakeholders/projects;

·        Prioritise all projects and develop a coordinated development programme;

·        Develop broad cost estimates for all projects to assist the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and Auckland Council in allocating project funding in future financial years;

·        Identify a broad consenting strategy for all projects to assist Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and Auckland Council in project delivery;

·        Ensure all aspects of the development plan are aligned with the objectives and policies of the MBRMP.

10.     Staff are recommending that the local board resolves to adopt the development plan, to inform future delivery of the defined MBRMP concept plan projects and help guide future decision-making processes.

11.     As projects are progressed, through investigation and design, further opportunities will arise to undertake community consultation and shape community aspirations within detailed design, including engagement with Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

12.     The project specifically aligns to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2017 outcome:

·        Our community enjoys access to quality parks, reserves and facilities for leisure, sport and recreation. 

13.     The project also aligns to the following outcomes in the Local Board Plan 2017:

·        A protected and enhanced environment.

·        Our people are involved and have a strong sense of pride in the look and feel of their local areas.

14.     The Parks Sport and Recreation (PSR) 2017/2018 Work Programme was approved by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on 6 June  2017 (HB/2017/84).  The development plan was included within this programme.

15.     Subject to formal local board approval of the development plan, the outcomes and project staging schedule will be included within the future Community Facilities Work Programme. This will initiate the next phase of investigation and design.

16.     Workshops were held with the local board on 23 April 2018 and 23 August 2018 where Parks and Places representatives presented the development plan as a draft. Based on feedback received at this workshop, staff have prepared an amended draft for adoption.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

17.     The PSR 2017/2018 Work Programme was presented to the Parks Sport and Recreation North-Western area Mana Whenua Hui on 2 September 2017.

18.     The work undertaken in the Parks and Places team work programme has been designed to enable meaningful engagement with Iwi by outlining the potential project and how it will deliver on the outcomes identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan. The intention is to provide enough information for Iwi to efficiently provide input into the direction of the project before the design process begins.

19.     A draft of the development plan was presented to the Mana Whenua Hui on 2 May 2018.  A commitment was made that the projects initiated through the investigation and design phase will be presented to the North-Western area Mana Whenua Hui and Iwi will have the opportunity to express interest and provide further input into the projects in the develo;ment plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

20.     To initiate projects based on activities in Community Parks and Places work programme further Locally Driven Initiatives investment may be required. If recommended outcomes are agreed, staff will work with the local board to identify possible opportunities for funding as part of the proposed Community Facilities work programme.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

21.     There is an inherent risk in investing in investigation and design to initiate a project when there is no capital funding identified to deliver the physical work components.

22.     The investigation and design phase of project delivery may identify issues that require the feasibility of the project to be reassessed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

23.     The development plan provides desired outcomes for projects stemming from the MBRMP concept plan. Detail on the activities that will deliver on the agreed outcomes will require further investigation, community engagement and design.

24.     Following adoption of the development plan, Parks and Places will engage with the Community Facilities team to include investigation and design tasks, as per the development plan project staging schedule, within future work programmes. Investigation and design staff will work with the local board to progress the projects as funding is identified.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Development Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Don Lawson - Parks Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Future land status for Hibiscus and Bays local parks held under the Local Government Act 2002

 

File No.: CP2018/16165

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to declare and classify local park land to be reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and start any notification process required by the Reserves Act 1977; and to confirm local park land that will continue to be held under the Local Government Act 2002.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       A comprehensive land status investigation of all Hibiscus and Bays local parks has been completed. This is a crucial preliminary task in the development of the local parks management plan.

3.       The investigation identified 61 land parcels currently held under the Local Government Act 2002 out of approximately 900 land parcels that make up the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board  parks network. The remainder are held under the Reserves Act 1977.

4.       The local board has the option to continue to hold a local park (or part of a local park) under the Local Government Act 2002 or declare and classify the land reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.

5.       The reasons why the council holds the land, the current and likely future use, continuity with adjoining land parcels as well as benefits and constraints of legislation, are all key considerations associated with the decision to retain land under the Local Government Act 2002 or declare and classify reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.

6.       Staff have individually assessed the merits of each option and propose that:

·        20 parcels of land are retained under the Local Government Act 2002 (refer Attachment A);

·        36 parcels of land are declared and classified under the Reserves Act 1977 (refer Attachment B); and

·        the intention to declare and classify five parcels of land not currently zoned as open space in the Auckland Unitary Plan is publicly notified (refer Attachment C).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      confirm 20 parcels of land described in Attachment A of the agenda report (dated 19 September 2018) will continue to be held under the Local Government Act 2002.

b)      approve 36 parcels of land described in Attachment B of the agenda report (dated 19 September 2018), to be declared reserve and classified in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

c)      approve public notification of the intention to declare and classify the five parcels of land described in Attachment C of the agenda report (dated 19 September 2018).

 


 

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       Local parks in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area include a mix of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and Reserves Act 1977 (Reserves Act).

8.       Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has allocated decision making responsibility for all local parks in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board  area.

9.       In December 2017, the local board approved the intention to prepare a management plan (the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan) for all local parks excluding the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan.

10.     As part of preparing the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan, it is necessary to review whether local parks to be included in the plan are held under the LGA or the Reserves Act, and if they are held under the Reserves Act whether they have been appropriately classified.

11.     The local board have the option to hold park land under the LGA or the Reserves Act. Any land held under the LGA which the local board wishes to manage under the Reserves Act must be declared reserve and classified appropriately in accordance with the Reserves Act.

12.     A land investigation was completed. The primary focus was to determine if the land was held under the LGA or Reserves Act. The investigation revealed 61 land parcels are currently held under the LGA with the remainder held under the Reserves Act.

13.     Staff reviewed all parcels of land and considered the following future land status options for those parcels of land held under the LGA:

·   continue to hold the land under the LGA; or

·   declare and classifying land currently held under the LGA to be reserve under the Reserves Act.

14.     The outcomes of this review were presented to the local board at the 23 August 2018 workshop.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

15.     When reviewing the future land status options staff considered the following:

i.        Why does the council own the land and how was it acquired?

ii.       What is the primary purpose of the land?

iii.      What is the status of adjacent parcels of land within the same park?

iv.      What is the current and likely future main use of the land?

v.       What potential does the land have for protection, enhancement and development?

vi.      Is there likely to be a need to retain flexibility for future use?

16.     Applying the criteria above, 20 parcels of land have been identified as best suited to remain under the LGA (Attachment A). This is primarily because either the current use does not align with any of the classification options in the Reserves Act and/or there is a likely need to retain flexibility for future use. Plunket and early childhood education centres are examples of activities where this occurs.

17.     No further action is required by the local board for land that is to remain under the LGA.

18.     Forty-one parcels of land held under the LGA have been identified and recommended for declaring and classifying reserve under the Reserves Act (Attachment B and C). 

19.     The predominant reason for declaring and classifying these parcels is to either align with the status of adjacent parcels of land within the park or to reflect the primary purpose of the land. Most of these parcels align with either recreation or local purpose (esplanade, accessway or community use) classifications.

20.     Section 14(2) of the Reserves Act requires public notification when declaring and classifying land as reserve where the Auckland Unitary Plan does not make provision for the land as reserve (i.e. zoned open space in the Auckland Unitary Plan).

21.     Five parcels of land proposed to be declared and classified require public notification calling for any objections to the proposal (refer to Attachment C).

22.     Staff recommend that the local board declare and classify the land identified in Attachment B; and publicly notify their intention to declare and classify the land in Attachment C as reserve under the Reserves Act.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

23.     At the workshop on 23 August 2018, the local board reviewed the parcels of land proposed to be retained under the LGA. Members assessed the proposal and rationale for retaining some parcels of park land under the LGA as identified in Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

24.     Mana whenua have been consulted on the land status and classification programme as part of the wider local parks management plan. 

25.     Proposed land status and classification information was sent to interested mana whenua to review in June 2018.  Feedback received from Ngāti Manuhiri was considered and amendments made to proposals.

26.     A hui was held to clarify the rationale and obtain further feedback for the proposed land status actions.

27.     Mana whenua representatives from Ngāti Manuhiri, Ngāti Whātua O Kaipara, Te Kawerau ā Maki and Ngāti Whanaunga who attended the hui supported the proposal to declare and classify land currently held under the LGA as reserve. They also supported staff’s assessment and rationale for retaining the parcels of land proposed to remain under the LGA.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

28.     Financial implications include costs for advertising the intention to declare and classify land and any hearing that is required to hear any objections to the proposal. These costs will be absorbed by the Local Parks Management Plan project budget.

29.     There are no financial implications associated with retaining land under the LGA.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

30.     The following table outlines the risks and mitigation associated with keeping local parks under the LGA or declaring and classifying land to be reserve.

Risk

Mitigation

Perception that the LGA offers parkland less protection from sale or disposal than if it was held under Reserves Act

 

Both Acts require a public consultation process where land is proposed to be disposed of.

Retaining land under the LGA has only been recommended where flexibility for future use is likely to be beneficial (e.g. commercial use).

Reserves Act classifications constrain the range of uses that land can be used for

Current and likely future use of each individual parcel proposed to be declared and classified under the Reserves Act has been assessed based on the considerations in paragraph 15. above and the Reserves Act Guide.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

31.     The local board’s resolution to declare and classify land to be reserve (for those that do not require public notification) will be forwarded to council’s General Manager Community Facilities (under delegation from the Minister of Conservation) for a decision to gazette the resolution.

32.     The process to publicly notify the intention to declare parcels of park land as reserve and proposed classification (for those parcels that require notification) will be initiated.

33.     The period for objections to be received will be one month from the date of the notice (proposed to be late September 2018).

34.     The local board is required to consider any objections to the proposal and decide whether to proceed with declaring parcels of park land as reserve. A report will be presented to the local board for consideration in November 2018.

35.     If the local board proceed, a copy of the local board’s resolution together with any objections received will need to be forwarded to council’s General Manager Community Facilities (under delegation from the Minister of Conservation) for a decision to gazette the resolution.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Parcels to be retained under LGA

41

b

Parcels to declare and classify (notification not required)

43

c

Parcels to delcare and classify (notification required)

47

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Dafydd  Pettigrew - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Matthew Ward - Service & Asset Planning Team Leader

Nicki Malone - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Reserve classification programme for Hibiscus and Bays local parks

 

File No.: CP2018/16166

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a programme to classify or reclassify reserves to align with the primary purpose of the local park (or part of the local park) and approve public notification where required by the Reserves Act 1977.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       All local parks in the Hibiscus and Bays local board area held under the Reserves Act 1977 must be classified to be included in the local parks management plan.

3.       A comprehensive land status investigation of all Hibiscus and Bays local parks has been completed and identified a large number of unclassified reserves held under the Reserves Act 1977.

4.       Staff have also identified a small number of reserves that require reclassification to better reflect current or future use of the reserve or to correct classification errors.

5.       Each individual parcel of Hibiscus and Bays reserve land has been assessed and classification actions for unclassified reserve land and reclassification actions for some incorrectly classified reserves are being proposed.

6.       Staff have considered the benefits and disadvantages of the Reserves Act 1977 and Local Government Act 2002 in managing and enabling the use, protection and development of the local park, and developed a set of criteria to guide assessment of each land parcel.

7.       These criteria incorporate guidance from the Reserves Act1977  Guide[1], consideration of the local park’s values, current and likely future use of the local park, workshop feedback from the local board and consultation with mana whenua.

8.       The Reserves Act 1977 requires public notification when reclassifying reserve land and in certain circumstances when classifying reserve land. Hearings may be required to hear objections on any of the classification actions that are notified.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board approve classifying the land parcels that do not require public notification; and notifying the classification or reclassification of other land parcels as outlined in this report.

10.     Completing the reserve classification and reclassification processes will enable staff to proceed with finalising the draft local parks management plan for the local board to consider publicly notification.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve pursuant to sections 16(1) and 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 classification of 400parcels of reserve land described in Attachment A of the agenda report (dated 19 September 2018)

b)      approve pursuant to section 16(4) of the Reserves Act 1977 public notification of proposals to classify the parcels of reserve land described in Attachment B of the agenda report (dated 19 September 2018)

c)      approve pursuant to section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977 public notification of the proposals to change the classification of the parcels of reserve land described in Attachment C of the agenda report (dated 19 September 2018)

d)      approve a hearing panel consisting of a minimum of three local board members in preparation for any requests to speak to objections or submissions on the proposed classifications that have been publicly notified under clause b) above.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

11.     Hibiscus and Bays Local Board have allocated decision making responsibility for all local parks in the Hibiscus and Bays local board area (the local board area).

12.     In December 2017, the local board approved the intention to prepare a management plan (the local parks management plan) covering all local parks excluding reserve land included in the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan.

13.     The local parks management plan will be a statutory reserve management plan prepared in accordance with section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act).

14.     Section 16 of the Act requires all land held as reserve under the Act to be classified appropriately, and that to be included in the local parks management plan, the land must be classified prior to the notification of the draft plan.

15.     Classification involves assigning a reserve (or part of a reserve) a primary purpose, as defined in section 17 to 23 of the Act, that aligns with its present values. Consideration is also given to future values and possible future activities and uses.

16.     A review of all local parks in the local board area has been completed with approximately 300 parks comprising approximately 900 land parcels investigated to confirm:

·        which local parks (or parts of a local park) are held as a reserve under the Act

·        whether the council is the administering body or the owner of the reserve, and whether the Crown has underlying ownership of the land,

·        whether any reserves (or parts of reserves) to be included in the management plan are unclassified or require reclassification to better align with their primary purpose,

·        whether or not the council has the power to classify the unclassified reserves or decision making is held by the Minister of Conservation (under delegation to council’s General Manager Community Facilities),

·        recommendations for classification and reclassification for each land parcel forming part of a local park where this was required.

17.     Following this review and consultation with Mana Whenua, the classification recommendations were presented to the local board at a workshop on 23 August 2018.

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

18.     The local board has three options for dealing with unclassified reserve land and land requiring reclassification:

·        Option 1: Classify or reclassify the land according to its primary purpose in accordance with the Act.

·        Option 2: Revoke the reserve status and hold the land under the Local Government Act 2002.

·        Option 3: Continue to hold the land as unclassified reserve under the Act (status quo).

19.     Option 3 has been discounted as it would mean that the local parks management plan would not comply with the Act, the council would not be meeting its statutory obligations under the Act and staff would not be able to recommend public notification of the draft plan.

20.     In considering whether to proceed with option 1 or 2 for each land parcel, staff have considered:

·        the intended purpose of the land when it was acquired, for example, was it vested as a recreation or esplanade reserve on subdivision;

·        the long-term protection that the Act provides from inappropriate use and development;

·        the benefits of unified and integrated management of individual parks and the local parks network as a whole;

·        whether underlying Crown ownership of the local park prevents the reserve status being revoked;

·        whether statutory processes and future decision-making will be streamlined;

·        the need for greater flexibility and choice in how local parks are used by the public; and

·        whether revoking the reserve status of a particular land parcel would materially lead to a greater range of park activities being able to occur.

21.     These criteria have been developed and workshopped with the local board and Mana Whenua representatives to guide the assessment of each land parcel. In the context of this investigation, staff have not identified any parcels of local park that warrant the reserve status being revoked and being managed under the Local Government Act 2002.

Classification

22.     The investigation found 407 land parcels are currently held as unclassified reserve under the Act and require classification.

23.     Staff have considered the Reserves Act Guide and the following questions when determining the primary purpose and appropriate classification for the reserve.

i.        Why does council own the land? Why was it acquired?

ii.       What are the main values of the land or potential future values, uses and activities?

iii.      What potential does the land have for protection, preservation, enhancement or development?

iv.      What is the status of adjacent parcels of land within the park?

24.     Attachment A identifies 400 land parcels of reserves that require classification under section 16(1) or 16(2A) of the Act. These proposals do not require public notification under the Act.

 

Classifications requiring public notification

25.     The Act requires public notification of the proposed classification of a reserve except where:

·        the proposed classification aligns with the open space zoning in the Auckland Unitary Plan,

·        the reserve has been held under previous legislation for a similar purpose, or

·        the proposed classification was a condition under which the land was acquired. 

26.     Most unclassified reserves in the local board area have been acquired through land subdivision. The local board is only required to pass a resolution to classify the reserve. Public notification of the proposed classification is not required.

27.     However, Attachment B identifies seven unclassified reserves that require the proposed classification to be publicly notified under section 16(4) of the Act.

28.     Objectors and submitters may request a hearing in which case it is proposed that a hearings panel consisting of three local board members is formed to hear any objections or submissions and to make recommendations to the Minister’s delegate.

Reclassification

29.     During the land classification investigation, ten parcels of classified reserves were identified as requiring reclassification for the following reasons:

·        to better align with the current or anticipated future use of the reserve; or

·        to correct previous classification errors.

30.     Section 24(2)(b) of the Act requires all proposals to reclassify reserves to be publicly notified together with the reasons for the proposed change in classification.

Mana whenua alternative proposals for classification

31.     Staff have engaged with Mana Whenua over proposed classifications and reclassifications of local parks.  Changes have been made in response to this feedback.

32.     At the conclusion of a hui held on 16 August 2018, only two reserves remained where Mana Whenua representatives proposed different classifications to those recommended by staff.

33.     The reserves are East Avenue-Tiri Road Esplanade Reserve (Lot 3 DP 356951) and Karaka Cove Esplanade Reserve (Lot 8 DP 429799) (refer to location maps in Attachment D)

34.     Both reserves are proposed to be classified local purpose (esplanade) reserve which is consistent with the purpose for which these parcels of land were acquired.

35.     Mana Whenua representatives have suggested historic reserve classification due to cultural heritage features being recorded on these sites. Refer to Attachment E for further assessment and analysis of the classification proposed for these land parcels.

36.     Staff recommend that the proposal (as contained in Attachment A) to classify these reserves local purpose (esplanade) stands as:

·        the pa site on East Avenue-Tiri Road Esplanade Reserve will be adequately protected under legislation; and

·        the pa site on Karaka Cove Esplanade Reserve was destroyed in 1964 and no significant archaeological features remain. Cultural features of this site will be adequately protected under legislation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

37.     Staff have discussed reserve classification programme with the local board at previous workshops relating to the local parks management plan in late 2017 and throughout 2018.

38.     At a workshop with the local board on 23 August 2018, staff reviewed each of the parcels proposed to be reclassified with the local board.

39.     Staff also highlighted specific classification proposals of interest to local board members and provided an overview of the methodology and rationale used to determine the recommendations for unclassified reserves.

40.     Feedback from the local board members was supportive of the rationale and proposals for classification and reclassification of reserves that were discussed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

41.     Staff have been working closely with interested mana whenua on land classification as part of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Park Management Plan.

42.     Proposed reserve classification information was sent to interested Mana Whenua to review in June 2018.  Feedback received in writing from Ngāti Manuhiri was considered and amendments made.

43.     Staff followed up at a hui in August 2018 to clarify the rationale and obtain further feedback on the proposed classification actions.

44.     Mana Whenua representatives from Ngāti Manuhiri, Ngāti Whātua O Kaipara, Te Kawerau ā Maki and Ngāti Whanaunga who attended the hui generally supported staff’s assessment, rationale and proposals for land classification.

45.     At the conclusion of the hui, Mana Whenua only proposed two classification actions different to our recommendations which have been addressed in paragraphs 31 to 36.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

46.     Financial implications include costs for advertising the proposals to classify or reclassify reserve land and any hearing that may be required. These costs will be absorbed by the Local Parks Management Plan project budget.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

47.     The following table outlines the risks and mitigation associated with classifying or reclassifying land reserve under the Reserves Act.

Risk

Mitigation

Public objections delaying management plan process

Minimal parcels proposed for reclassification.

Reclassification only proposed to better align current use/activity with primary purpose of classification under the Act

Reserves Act classifications constrain the range of uses that land can be used for.

Assessment of each individual parcels current and likely future uses and alignment with the Act.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

48.     The risk of not classifying any unclassified reserves is that the local board is not meeting its statutory obligations under the Act and would not be able to include those reserves in the draft local parks management plan.

49.     In the case of reclassifying reserve land, the risk of not changing the classification is that current or future uses do not align with the present classification which could either prevent granting leases for certain types of activities or require additional public notification processes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

50.     The majority of parcels classified under section 16(1) and 16(2A) of the Act will not require any further action by the local board.

51.     Staff will arrange for reserves classified under section 16(1) of the Act to be gazetted by the council’s General Manager Community Facilities (under delegation from the Minister of Conservation).

52.     A public notice of the proposed classification for those parcels that require notification, and those that require reclassification will be prepared and advertised in local papers covering the local board area and via online channels in late September 2018.

53.     Following the close of the public notice period at the end of October 2018, hearings may be required on submissions and objections made to any classification proposal. Ideally any hearings will be held before the end of November 2018. The local board will be advised if this is required as soon as possible. 

54.     A hearing on objections to reclassification proposals is not required under the Act.

55.     Following the close of the public notification period and any hearings, a report will be prepared for the local board to consider any objections and submissions and make a decision whether to proceed with classification or reclassification as the case may be.

56.     The local board’s final decision if it decides to proceed with classifying and reclassifying will be forwarded to council’s General Manager Community Facilities (under delegation from the Minister of Conservation) for decision to gazette. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Parcels to be classified (public notificiation not required)

55

b

Parcels to be classified (public notification required)

69

c

Reserve parcels to be reclassified (mandatory public notification)

69

d

Location Plan - reserves with alternative propsals for classification by Mana Whenua

71

e

Assessment of alternative proposals by Mana Whenua for classification

73

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Dafydd  Pettigrew - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Matthew Ward - Service & Asset Planning Team Leader

Nicki Malone - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

New road name in the Senna Properties Limited subdivision at 15 Central Boulevard, Silverdale

 

File No.: CP2018/16168

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for a name for a new private road in the Senna Properties Limited subdivision at 15 Central Boulevard, Silverdale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       As a result of an oversight, the Senna Properties Limited subdivision was able to be completed without a road name being required for the subject road. The current owner has no interest in naming the road which nevertheless requires a name in accordance with the national addressing standard, given that it serves more than five lots. As a result, the council has decided to take on the responsibility of naming this new private road.

4.       Council has researched possible names and submitted the following preferred name for the road serving the new subdivision at 15 Central Boulevard, Silverdale.

Preferred Name

Relevance

Weir Lane

World War I Local Serviceman

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the new road name of Weir Lane for the Senna Properties Limited subdivision at 15 Central Boulevard, Silverdale, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 and as referenced in Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       The subdivision containing 45 sites has been approved and the council reference is CCT90002371-3.

6.       A condition of the subdivision consent was to suggest to council a name for the new private road. This did not happen, and the current developer has no interest in the road naming process. The naming of the new road has now fallen to Auckland Council to complete.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

7.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·        A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·        A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·        An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

8.       The council’s preferred name for the new road off 15 Central Boulevard is Weir Lane, being the surname of a WW I New Zealand Serviceman from the Orewa area.

9.       Stanley Francis Weir was working on his father’s farm and enlisted on 28 May 1915 when aged 23. After training he was sent to Egypt and promoted to Corporal at the New Zealand Base Camp near Cairo and further promoted to Sergeant.

10.     Weir was later killed in action at Matruh in Egypt on 25 December 1915. He is buried in Chatby Military and Memorial Cemetery in Alexandria, Egypt.

11.     Ngāti Manuhiri have been contacted on the proposed name and have advised that they would have preferred an iwi road name in this area. However, they understood the reasoning behind the suggested name and as a result no alternative name was offered.

12.     The officer acknowledges that where possible the use of Māori names is encouraged in the Auckland Plan. In this instance, where there is only one road that requires naming, the officer supports the name of Weir Lane.

13.     Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that the proposed road name is unique and acceptable.

14.     The proposed name is deemed to meet the council’s road naming guidelines and the officer’s recommendation is to approve the preferred name.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

15.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger the significance policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     The council has consulted with local iwi, Ngāti Manuhiri, who has supported the suggested name.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

17.     The council has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

18.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

19.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Weir Lane Locality Map

81

b

Weir Lane Scheme Plan

83

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove - Subdivision Advisor, Orewa

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development's Six Monthly Report to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

File No.: CP2018/16993

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the six-monthly report from Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development on their activities in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development reports to local boards every six months to provide them with an update of their activities.

3.       Work undertaken by Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development in the Hibiscus and Bays area includes:

·        Hibiscus and Bays eco-tourism plan development

·        Business capability building and support for new businesses.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         receive the Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited’s six-monthly report for 1 January to 30 June 2018, (Attachment A) to the agenda report.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

4.       Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) helps lay a strong foundation for Auckland’s economic growth through a broad programme of initiatives focused on:

·        Business growth and innovation

·        Business attraction and investment

·        Conferences and business events

·        Major events

·        Film

·        International education

·        Tourism.

5.       ATEED’s work can impact and provide opportunities locally as well as regionally. For this reason they have committed to reporting to local boards every six months.

6.       The report attached (Attachment A) reflects this commitment and covers the period from 1 January to 30 June 2018.


 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

7.       The ATEED activities carried out in the local board area are outlined in the below table.

Table 1. Local ATEED activities

Activity

ATEED team responsible

Hibiscus and Bays eco-tourism plan development

Economic Development / Destination

Business capability building and support for new businesses

Economic Development

8.       As part of business-as-usual, destinations in the local board area continue to feature in the official Auckland visitor information website administered by ATEED.

9.       Should a local board choose to allocate some of their Local Development Initiative fund to economic development activities, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development team can manage the delivery of a work programme for them.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

10.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no local impact, however some of the activities described in the report do. Details of this are outlined in the six-monthly report attached.

11.     Local board views were not sought for the purposes of this report. Local board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact their initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with their initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     The next ATEED six-monthly report will be presented to the local board in early 2019 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2018.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Six Monthly Report

89

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Chris Lock – Senior Strategic Advisor – Local Boards (ATEED)

Samantha-Jane Miranda – Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authoriser

 James Robinson – Head of Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Endorsement of the Hibiscus and Bays Biodiversity and Pest Free Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/14486

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for the Hibiscus and Bays Biodiversity and Pest Free Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Hibiscus and Bays Restoration Network was established in 2015 with support from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and the East Coast Bays Community Project. It is a network of local community restoration volunteers and groups who share successes, challenges and information.

3.       With increasing national and regional support for the eradication of pests, the network began discussing the development of a plan to guide and focus ecological restoration activities and provide a leverage to source funding. With technical assistance from Council’s biodiversity team more local groups and interested parties were identified and invited to join the network.

4.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board subsequently allocated locally driven initiatives operational funding in the 2017/2018 financial year to facilitate the development of a community led pest free plan through the Hibiscus and Bays Restoration Network for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

5.       A steering group of representatives from different groups and organisations was formed. Supported by an independent facilitator, the steering group met regularly to engage the wider Hibiscus and Bays community in discussions about restoration and pest management.

6.       Workshops were held in November and December 2017 with representatives from restoration groups across the local board area to agree the scope of the pest plan.

7.       The steering group created a general vision, with developed goals and outcomes and a pest free strategy was written with input from community. A hui was held at Te Herenga Waka Marae in June 2018 to share the Hibiscus and Bays Biodiversity and Pest Free Plan with the community and stakeholders.

8.       A coordinator will be engaged in the 2018/2019 financial year, with funds from the local boards locally driven initiatives operational budget, to begin delivery of the Hibiscus and Bays Biodiversity and Pest Free Plan.

9.       Attachment A to this report is the finalised Hibiscus and Bays Biodiversity and Pest Free Plan for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s consideration and endorsement.

10.     A deputation from the Hibiscus and Bays Restoration Network will present the plan to the local board at its 19 September 2018 business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the attached Hibiscus and Bays Biodiversity and Pest Free Plan.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Biodiversity and Pest Free Plan

99

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Theresa Pearce - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2018/15112

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillors, Councillor Wayne Walker and Councillor John Watson, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Councillors Walker and Watson for their update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/15113

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the local board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar: a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings.  It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

123

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Record of Workshop Meetings

 

File No.: CP2018/15114

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board held workshop meetings on 9 and 23 August 2018.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the records of the workshop meetings held on 9 and 23 August 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Record of Workshop Meeting, 9 August 2018

129

b

Record of Workshop Meeting, 23 August 2018

131

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 

    

    

 



[1] Local Government New Zealand and Department of Conservation (n.d), Reserves Act Guide, retrieved from https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/about-doc/role/legislation/reserves-act-guide.pdf