I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 19 September 2018

5.00pm

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office
Shop 17B
93 Bader Drive
Māngere

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Deputy Chairperson

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Members

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

 

 

Carrol Elliott, JP

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese, QSM, JP

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Janette McKain

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

11 September 2018

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: janette.mckain@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Partnering for Success - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Te Wananga o Aotearoa.                                                                                          5

8.2     Deputation - Light The World Campaign                                                          6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - TOA Pacific Incorporated                                                         6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Member Update                                                                                          9

12        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                        11

13        Chairpersons Report and Announcements                                                             15

14        Auckland Transport September 2018 update to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board 19

15        New community lease to Discovery Foundation Incorporated for part of the first floor of former Ōtāhuhu Library, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu                                             31

16        To grant a new community lease to To’utupu Tongan Trust for 31R Jordan Road, Māngere                                                                                                                        39

17        Māngere Town Centre Library Comprehensive Renewal                                      47

18        Approval of the Boggust Park Development Plan                                                   87

19        New road name in the subdivision at 89A Naylors Drive, Mangere by Imperial Homes Ltd                                                                                                                                       95

20        New private way name in the subdivision at 265 and 267 Portage Road, Mangere by Harinder Singh Saini and Mohammed Zarik Tanveer                                           103

21        Funding for the Crime Prevention Officer programme                                         111

22        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Round One 2018/2019 grant allocations                                                                                                                  115

23        Updating the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on ATEED’s activities between 1 January and 30 June 2018                                                                                                       129

24        Representation Review engagement analysis - proposal to split the Manukau Ward                                                                                                                                     141

25        Local board feedback on the government's proposed mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags                                                                                               145

26        Local board resolution responses and information report                                  153

27        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     163

28        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                                 169  

29        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

Member Carrol Elliott tabled her apology for absence.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 15 August 2018, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Partnering for Success - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Te Wananga o Aotearoa.

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To introduce Deborah Misiuepa, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Relationships and Engagement Manager.

2.       Te Wānanga o Aotearoa aims to be the education provider of choice in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area and to raise educational achievement and identify opportunities to leverage and engage with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and community.

3.       Te Wānanga o Aotearoa seeks to explore mutual interest opportunities in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area that enable a collaborative approach to whanau transformation through education.

3.       Presentation/supporting material of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa annual plan at this link:

https://issuu.com/tewanangaoaotearoa/docs/twoa_te_pu_rongo_2017_full_document

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thanks Deborah Misiuepa for her attendance. 

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Light The World Campaign

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Ira Dennison would like to present to the local board the Light the World campaign that organisers seek to host on 1 December 2018 at Centre Park, Robertson Road, Māngere.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on Light the World campaign and thanks Ira Dennison and members of the organising committee for their attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Light the World Campgain.................................................................... 179

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - TOA Pacific Incorporated

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Malia Hamani, CEO of TOA Pacific Incorporated would like to introduce TOA Pacific Incorporated, a non-profit organisation, and its services to the community of Māngere and Otāhuhu for 15 years.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:                       

a)      thanks Malia Hamani for her attendance and update.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Governing Member Update

 

File No.: CP2018/15593

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 Minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Alf Filipaina and Cr Efeso Collins.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

 

File No.: CP2018/15594

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This item allows the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead roles, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

 

Organisation

Lead

Alternate

Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Bridge BID

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Town Centre BID

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Makalita Kolo

Mangere East Village BID

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Otahuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

Makalita Kolo

South Harbour Business Association BID

Carrol Elliott         

Makalita Kolo

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Carrol Elliott

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Youth Connections South Local Governance Group (3 members)

Christine O’Brien, Makalita Kolo,

Lemauga Lydia Sosene 

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich (appointed 15 March 2017)

Maori input into local board decision-making political steering group (1 lead, 1 alternate)

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Ambury Park Centre

Christine O’Brien

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Mountain Education Trust               

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Local Government New Zealand Zone One Committee

Carrol Elliott (appointed 21 March 2018)

 

Local Board Leads

Infrastructure and Environmental Services lead

 

Carrol Elliott

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Arts, Community and Events lead

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Christine O’Brien

Parks, Sport and Recreation lead and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Libraries and Information Services lead

Christine O’Brien

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Makalita Kolo

 

Local planning and heritage lead – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (Planning)

Carrol Elliott

(Heritage)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Transport lead

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Carrol Elliott/

Makalita Kolo

Economic development lead

Christine O’Brien

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

The Southern Initiative Joint Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (appointed 17 May 2017)

Liquor Licence Hearings – Delegation to represent

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

(appointed 17 May 2017)

 

Manukau Harbour Forum

Carrol Elliott (appointed 19 April 2017)

Togiatolu Water Togiamua (appointed 19 April 2017)

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written updates from the local board members.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member Bakulich report

13

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Member BAKULICH Monthly Report August 2018

Meetings/Events Attended 4/7– 31/7

Date

Meeting

Issues

1 August

MOLB Workshop

As per agenda

8 August

MOLB workshop

As per agenda

11 August

Manukau Rovers Senior Prize Giving

 

 

Auckland Samoa Rugby Football Union tournament launch

 

15 August

MOLB Business Meeting

As per agenda

16 August

Hui with Liz Gordon

Alcohol licences

20 August

Sub regional cluster workshop

As per agenda

21 August

Growing Participation in Sport and Active Sport

 

22 August

MOLB Workshop

As per agenda

29 August

In office 11-1.30pm

 

30 August

Mangere Safety Network Meeting

As per agenda

31 August

In office 11-2.30pm

 

25 July

MOLB Workshop

As per agenda

Acknowledgements

2018 Auckland Rugby League Awards

Club of the Year – Mangere East Hawks

Premier Manager of the Year – Dennis Singh (Otahuhu Rugby League Club)

 

 

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Chairpersons Report and Announcements

 

File No.: CP2018/15595

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and for the local board to receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update and written report of the local board Chair.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairpersons Report

17

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport September 2018 update to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

File No.: CP2018/17159

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board (MOLB) on transport related matters in their area including a decision affecting the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report contains information about the following:

·    This month there is a decision required. Auckland Transport requests MOLB to release funds from its Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) to progress the widening of Bader Drive in front of the Mangere Cosmopolitan Club.

·    The wider transport context, involving a summary of the strategic projects or issues affecting the MOLB’s area.

·    An update on the LBTCF. 

·    An update on Auckland Transport activities in Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board area.

·    Progress made on MOLB advocacy initiatives.

·    A summary of consultation about proposed future Auckland Transport activities is included as Attachment A.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport September 2018 update report

b)      notes the firm estimate of cost of $ 86,000 provided for widening Bader Drive in front of the Mangere Cosmopolitan Club and authorises the release of $86,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund for the widening of Bader Drive in front of the Mangere Cosmopolitan Club.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

3.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area and includes information on the status of the LBTCF.

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in its Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

5.       Auckland Transport continues to deliver a number of strategic projects in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area and they are discussed below.

 

Airport to Botany Rapid Transport Network

 

6.       A key part of Auckland Transport’s public transport strategy is the plan to provide an east west ‘Rapid Transit Network’ that links Auckland Airport with Botany via Manukau.   This project involves New Zealand Transport Agency, Auckland Airport and Auckland Transport working together over a number of years to plan and build a bus or light rail link between these points.  

7.       Auckland Transport planned to brief the Southern Local Board Cluster meeting on 20 August 2018. This briefing had to be re-scheduled to September 2018.

8.       Currently, a very wide range of options (the long list) is being considered. Later this year Auckland Transport will discuss these options with local boards then prepare a short list of more detailed options. Again, Auckland Transport will present these routes and options to local boards and will ask for feedback. The aim being that by the end of 2018 an option that local boards are familiar with and have had input into is developed that will become the basis of the business case for future work.

9.       So far, the project team’s discussions with local boards have been positive and local boards including MOLB, which stated its support in a resolution last month, have actively supported the project.

 

Road Safety and Speed Management

10.    Road safety across Auckland and in the MOLB area has worsened over the last five years for a variety reasons including population growth, new demands on the road network, and more people walking, cycling and motorcycling.

11.     The New Zealand’s Government recently committed to deliver a new road safety strategy as outlined in the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport.

12.     Auckland Transport’s Board and Executive Leadership Team have recently endorsed an increased three-year investment in road safety engineering, a Speed Management Plan and behaviour change activities to reduce road trauma, including in the MOLB area.

13.     This investment includes an ambitious safety infrastructure acceleration programme estimated to reduce death and serious injury by up to 18% over an initial three-year period. Further information, especially related to this area, was provided in a brief to the MOLB on 5 September 2018.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Responding to MOLB Resolutions

14.     Auckland Transport’s aims to respond as quickly as possible to local board resolutions. Responses are listed below with the resolution below in bold and Auckland Transport’s response is below the resolution in normal font.

Resolution number MO/2018/131

b)   That the MOLB allocate up to $7500 towards alcohol ban signage at the Mangere Bridge causeway from the board’s Community Response Fund AND THAT the Community Facilities department be requested to work with Auckland Transport to implement this additional signage enabling Police to enforce the alcohol ban.

15.     This request is currently being actioned. At the time this report was written this task had not been completed. The Auckland Transport and Auckland Council officers responsible for delivery and for payment have made contact and work is being organised. This will take sometime because the weather is wet recently.  At the meeting, there will be a verbal update.

 

c)   That the MOLB request Auckland Transport investigate whether the local board capital fund can be utilised for funding and provide rough order costs for the two bay car parking in Boggust Park Concept Plan.

d)   That the MOLB request Auckland Transport investigate whether Auckland Transport might fund the circuit path in the Boggust Park concept plan as a key Greenways/Auckland Paths connection.

16.     With regards to resolutions c) and d) Auckland Council and Auckland Transport staff are currently working together to assess this project and develop recommendations about whether it can be funded using the LBTCF.  When this is confirmed, the next step is to decide the best way to deliver the project. At the meeting, there will be a verbal update and more detailed reporting will follow.

Resolution number MO/2018/113

f) That the MOLB request a detailed update on the Ōtāhuhu Streetscapes project.

17.     This briefing will take place on 12 September 2018, and be led by the project manager. 

g)   That the MOLB request that the local board be advised when the extra lighting will be installed at the Māngere Bridge causeway.

18.     Auckland Transport is still liaising with the power company and New Zealand Transport Agency (the bridge’s owner).  There are some technical issues related to getting more power lines into the area.  Auckland Transport will provide a report as soon as possible.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

19.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    Be safe

·    Not impede network efficiency

·    Be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

20.     The following table provides an overall summary of the current LBTCF position. Including the increased LBTCF approved by council and applying from 1 July 2018.

 

Table 1: Local Board Transport Capital Fund Summary

21.     During this electoral term MOLB has identified a range of projects and re-assessed their programme in June 2018.  This reassessment led to series of resolutions reactivating projects held until council made a decision regarding its plan for Mangere East. The following update reflects these changes:

 

 

Table 2: Local Board Transport Capital Fund Projects

General Overview

Projects

Current Status 

Status

Upgrading the footpaths in and around the Mangere East Town Centre

 

 Rough Order of Cost approx. $700,000 - 1,000,000.

The MOLB has authorised detailed design

Building a two lane roundabout at the intersection of Bader Drive and Idlewild Road

 

Project in design

 

Rough Order of Costs: (21 June 2017) $700,000 - $1 million

Widening Bader Drive in front of the Cosmopolitan Club

 

Project in design

Rough Order of Costs: (21 June 2017) $200,000 

Ashgrove Reserve Cycle Route

 

Rough Order of Costs: (16 August 2017) $400,000 

The MOLB has authorised detailed design and Auckland Transport is working on this

Bus shelter improvement project

 

Putting together the list of stops

Boggust Park

 

Improved walking and cycling paths in or around Boggust Park

Detailed Project Progress Report

Upgrading the footpaths in and around the Mangere East Town Centre

In July 2018, the MOLB passed a resolution requesting Auckland Transport reactivate detailed design work. The project’s costs are being re-assessed so that roughly costed options can be provided for the MOLB to consider as soon as possible.

Bader Drive Roundabout

In July 2018, Auckland Transport advised the MOLB to change the plan to a single lane roundabout allowing for better pedestrian safety.  The MOLB supported this recommendation.

A re-design is currently underway and it is scheduled for completion by the end of the year so that construction, if authorised by the MOLB, can begin in January 2019.

Widening Bader Drive in front of the Cosmopolitan Club

Design is complete and a firm cost estimate of approx. $ 86,000 is reported for the MOLB’s consideration. If the MOLB supports the project it needs to authorise construction and a draft recommendation is provided above.

Ashgrove Reserve Cycle Route

In July 2018, the MOLB advanced this project to detailed design to produce a firm cost estimate.

Bus shelter improvement project

The MOLB has authorised Auckland Transport to provide a quote to deliver a project to improve bus facilities in the local area. 

Boggust Park walking and cycling pathways project

The MOLB asked Auckland Transport to investigate options for using the LBTCF to deliver some transport-related aspects of the Boggust Park concept plan.

Bader Drive Road Widening Project Decision

22.     The MOLB workshopped a range of options for LBTCF projects in December 2016 and January 2017.  The workshops discussed a range of potential projects and the MOLB received advice from Auckland Transport and council officers before deciding which projects the local board would support and in what priority.  One of the projects selected as a LBTCF project was widening Bader Drive in front of the Mangere Cosmopolitan Club. 

23.     In February 2017, the MOLB requested that Auckland Transport provide quality advice about the cost and feasibility of the project. See resolution number MO/2017/6.

24.     A rough order of cost was provided in June 2017, and at the same time the MOLB authorised Auckland Transport to use LBTCF to complete design and provide a firm cost estimate. See resolution number MO/2017/106.

25.     Design is complete and a firm cost estimate of $ 86,000 is reported for the MOLB’s consideration. If the MOLB supports the project it now needs to authorise construction and included above is a draft recommendation to authorise this.

Local board advocacy

26.     This section provides a regular report about how Auckland Transport is supporting the MOLB advocacy from the Local Board Plan. These have been recorded in the table below.


 

 

Table 3: Advocacy Initiative Status

Advocacy Initiative

Key Initiative

Status

A well-connected area,

part of a great, affordable public transport network that makes it easy for all to move around

Deliver projects with the governing body and Auckland Transport including:

·  Improving street connections between the Ōtāhuhu bus/train station and town centre

·  Upgrading the street environment around Māngere East shopping area and community facilities

·  Completing the Māngere town centre bus station upgrade

·  Support walking and cycling connections around popular parks like Walter Massey and Māngere Town Centre

Auckland Transport has a range of projects underway  supporting this initiative including:

·    Scheduling an update about the Otahuhu Streetscape project

·    Investigation of footpath and lighting improvements in Mangere-East using the LBTCF is underway

·    The MOLB is working with Auckland Transport to support the ‘Rapid Transit’ link from the Airport to Botany, including scheduling  a presentation to the southern local boards’ cluster meeting in September

 

Attractive, accessible and safe cycle ways and walkways

Champion and support the Ōtāhuhu Portage route project to open the area for recreation, walking and cycling

An advocacy issue that Auckland Transport can help support but can’t lead

Implement Norana path walkway and fund priority Local Paths projects

An advocacy issue that Auckland Transport can help support but can’t lead

Continue supporting Te Ara Mua-Future Streets and identify options to increase use of cycle ways and walkways

Auckland Transport’s Walking and Cycling Team continue to work with community to support this project, providing activities that help encourage use of the area

Partner with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa to use digital technology to popularise and increase use of new paths

A MOLB project

Safe, attractive and well-maintained streets for all

Develop and deliver improvements to Bader Drive, e.g. a roundabout at the Idlewild Road intersection and road widening near Māngere town centre

Auckland Transport is currently supporting the MOLB to deliver two LBTCF projects on Bader Drive. Both projects are progressing well

 

 

Progress made on investigations.

 

‘Future Streets’ activation activities

27.     Auckland Transport continues to support encouraging the local community to use the ‘Future Streets’ area and  development  of  a new South Auckland cycle map is the next project.  Auckland Transport is working with Mr ‘T’ and Moana-Nui-a-Kiwa to go further and produce local maps with walking and cycle routes in Mangere.

28.     Auckland Transport is also trying to get some temporary billboards put up in Centre Park, to direct people to Mr ‘T’s new club location.

29.     On Thursday 30 September 2018 a health and safety focused event was organised by Mangere Connect. It involved lots of community groups including Oranga Tamariki, Otara Health, Turuki AWHI and Bader Drive Doctors. Auckland Transport was there to support Mr ‘T’ who was looking after a cycling promotion. He had his team there and gave out ten free bikes that evening. Auckland Transport also provided a DJ, sound system and food.  About 250 people participated in the event. 

30.     The next event is World Car Free Day on Saturday 22 September 2018. This event is at the Blake Rd Reserve BMX track. Auckland Transport will provide food and music. 

 

Mangere Bridge ‘Safer Community’

31.     Auckland Transport is delivering a new road safety initiative that concentrates road safety funding in certain areas. Mangere Bridge is an area in which money has been committed to this initiative.

32.     Recently, there have been discussions about why this project needs to be delivered. It is useful to provide some background information. The history of this project can be summarised as follows:

·    In 2017, Auckland Transport started to highlight safety concerns in the wider Mangere area to the MOLB

·    In early 2017 Auckland Transport ran the Love Being a Local campaign that focussed particularly on Mangere East and Mangere Bridge

·    Later in 2017, Auckland Transport conducted investigations into community reports of speeding and dangerous driving in Mangere Bridge area

·    Late in 2017 Auckland Transport decided to introduce the Safer Communities model for road safety programmes and surveyed areas that needed attention. Mangere Bridge identified as an area that would benefit from a sensible, structured approach and was chosen for the programme

·    In October 2017, it was reported to the MOLB that Mangere Bridge was selected and that consultation would be undertaken with the local community

·    On 29 November 2017, Auckland Transport met with the MOLB and discussed the results of the consultation and asked for feedback from the MOLB. Feedback was positive,so work continued

·    Through 2018, Auckland Transport has kept the MOLB updated on progress

·    In June/July 2018 Auckland Transport conducted a second round of local consultation and reported bask to the MOLB on 11 July 2018.

 

33.     The Safer Communities project originates from a wider Auckland-wide increase in the number of a people injured or killed on the road. Part of Auckland Transport’s plan to address this trend is to prioritise high risk areas and deliver larger, more effective safety projects.

34.     The results of the second round of consultation are being considered to develop more detailed and firmer options. When this is complete, they will be reported back to the MOLB.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

35.    Over the last reporting period, Auckland Transport has invited the local board to provide their feedback on one proposal. It is recorded with feedback received in Attachment A.

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

36.     Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions from August 2018 is included in the table below.

 

Table 4. Traffic Control Committee Decisions March 2018

Road

Area

Activity

Decision

Rimu Road, Coronation Road, Church Road

 

Mangere Bridge

No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Islands, Roundabout Controlled Give-Way, Flush Median, Edge Line

 

Carried

Bader Drive, Orly Avenue

 

Mangere

Lane Arrow Markings, No Stopping At All Times, Cycle Lane, Bus Stop, Shared Cycle Path, Traffic Island, Roundabout Controlled Give-Way, Flush Median, Shoulder Marking, No Passing, Road Hump

Carried

Church Road, Rimu Road, Coronation Road

Mangere Bridge

No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Bus Shelter, Edge Line, Traffic Islands, Road Humps, Roundabout Controlled Give-Way

Carried

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

37.     In this reporting period, iwi liaison has occurred on the Future Streets activation.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

38.     The most significant financial implication for the MOLB is the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF). Auckland Transport has reported that the MOLB has approximately $1.4 million available. 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

39.     The “Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications” section of this report summarised the MOLB’s LBTCF financial situation.

40.     A risk exists with $1.4 million of funding currently unallocated.

41.     The MOLB and Auckland Transport have taken steps to mitigate this risk by authorising investigation of a large body of new work.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

42.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of consultation information sent to the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board August/Septemer 2018

29

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

New community lease to Discovery Foundation Incorporated for part of the first floor of former Ōtāhuhu Library, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu

 

File No.: CP2018/16986

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease to Discovery Foundation Incorporated for part of the first floor of the former Ōtāhuhu Library, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The council-owned building known as the former Ōtāhuhu Library has a vacant community space on the first floor. The space was previously occupied by Whare Mauri Ora Trust.

3.       Subject to the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, a public notice seeking expressions of interest to occupy the premises was advertised and four groups submitted applications.

4.       Applicants were measured against a range of criteria to assess suitability including the community needs that would be met as an outcome of the applicant’s activities.

5.       The highest scoring applicant is Discovery Foundation Incorporated, whose mission is to positively impact upon the lives and future of all youth, their families and communities. Furthermore, the trust aims to give young individuals the skills, tools and strategies that enables them to get the best out of life and to deal effectively with life’s challenges.

6.       This report recommends Discovery Foundation Incorporated as the preferred applicant as it would fit well within the leased area and supports an identified need within the Ōtāhuhu community. The new community lease would be granted in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Local Government Act 2002.

7.       Iwi consultation has concluded and there were no concerns raised. Public notification will follow subject to Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s approval of the recommendation below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Discovery Foundation Incorporated for part of the first floor of former Ōtāhuhu Library, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu (Attachment A).

b)      delegate to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Chair to appoint a hearings panel to consider submissions or objections received, following the public notification, and for the panel to reach a decision.

c)      grant, subject to any objections to the lease being resolved, a new community lease to Discovery Foundation Incorporated for part of the first floor of former Ōtāhuhu Library, 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term - two years from 1 November 2018 with one two-year right of renewal,

ii)       rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum (if demanded),

iii)      maintenance - $500.00 plus GST per annum,

iv)      a community outcomes plan (to be approved by a nominated member of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board) attached as a schedule to the lease document,

v)      all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012,

d)      seek inclusion of an early termination clause in the lease, to provide for any future development of the site.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

The Land and Building

8.       The parcel of land at 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu is legally described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 83294 and Part Allotment 9 Section 3 Ōtāhuhu Village. The land is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

9.       The building known as the former Ōtāhuhu Library is owned by Auckland Council. The building is currently used as a community hub with several other community groups occupying various spaces within the building.

10.     The preferred applicant will be responsible for the interior maintenance of the leased area, however, the exterior, common areas and structural maintenance will be undertaken by council.

Application Process

11.     In accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, an advertisement seeking expressions of interest was placed in the Manukau Courier and council website on 17 October 2017. Applicants seeking community space and listed on the Auckland Council community lease interest register were also informed of the vacancy. The leased area was open for viewing to interested groups on 1 November 2017 and 8 November 2017.

12.     A detailed description of the groups is outlined below.

Discovery Foundation Incorporated

13.     Discovery Foundation Incorporated registered as an incorporated society on 3 October 1990 (under the name Global Youth Foundation Incorporated). The society was renamed Discovery Foundation Incorporated on 7 December 2007. The society’s vision is to positively impact upon the lives and futures of every teenager, their families and communities.

14.     The trust provides teaching and assistance for individuals, especially young people, to enhance their ability to learn and to foster and develop individuals to become leaders in the community and encouraging positive attitudes towards life. The trust enables families to work as a co-operative and supportive group or unit and produces programmes and systems, seminars and courses open to all members of the community.

15.     The society is currently based in Grey Lynn alongside Youthline. The trust has expressed an interest in the premises as they have outgrown their current location and require an area which includes delivery and office space

Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated

16.     Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated registered as an incorporated society on 3 December 1993 (under the name Otahuhu Town Hall Society Incorporated). The society was renamed Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated on 7 March 2014.

17.     The society’s purpose is to equip, engage and empower the community to make a change by delivering a range of social, recreational, sporting and cultural programmes for children, youth and adults of the Ōtāhuhu community.

18.     The society currently holds a licence to occupy and manage agreement with Auckland Council and is operating from a council facility known as the Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre located at 12-16 High Street, Ōtāhuhu.

Niu Ola Trust

19.     Niu Ola Trust registered as a charitable trust on 7 May 2009. The purpose of the trust is to enhance the health of future Pacific populations through advocacy, delivery and empowerment.

20.     The trust provides programmes such as disability dance classes and Māori and Pasifika health courses which are free to the community. The trust collaborates and invites government agencies such as Ministry of Social Development to carry out workshops to provide advice on their client’s entitlements.

21.     The trust is currently using four locations at different times to carry out their services, being Te Roopu Taurima o Manukau building, Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre, Toia – Otahuhu Recreation Centre and the property of a committee member. The trust has identified a need for a stable location.

Tufuga: Creative Hands, Mind and Spirit Charitable Trust Deed

22.     Tufuga: Creative Hands, Mind and Spirit Charitable Trust was registered as an incorporated society on 2 July 2004. The trust is a community-based initiative that was set up to enable social inclusion for individuals living with a mental illness to be able to express themselves using art. Its philosophy is one of positive engagement; strengthening communities through building skills and fostering a sense of belonging and meaning through art.

23.     The trust has a core membership of 40 members with the potential to develop art in the community. Furthermore, the trust had five successful art exhibitions at the Mangere Arts Centre (Nga Tohu o Uenuku) and Nathan Homestead in Manurewa.

24.     The trust is currently occupying the Mangere East Community Centre to carry out their services.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

25.     All applications received were assessed against the criteria contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and priorities set by the Local Board Plan 2017.

Discovery Foundation Incorporated

26.     During the assessment of the applications, Discovery Foundation Incorporated scored well against the following criteria:

·    Group sustainability - The society is fully self-sufficient.

·    Extent of usage - The premises is to be used approximately 48 hours per week.

·    Alignment with Local Board plan - outcome six: A place where everyone thrives and belongs: the society has ensured they are actively involved in the community with a strong focus on young individuals.

27.     The society indicated the premises will be occupied Monday to Friday from 8:30am to 2:30pm, Saturday from 8:00am to 4:30pm and Sunday from 8:00am to 6:00pm. Additionally, the society is willing to share the premises with other groups such as Niu Ola Trust and Otahuhu Central Legacy Group.

Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated

28.     The Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated scored well against the following criteria:

·    Sharing and collaboration - The society described a number of programmes to be delivered from the premises.

·    Group sustainability - The society is fully self-sufficient.

29.     However, the society did not perform well under the extent of usage criteria as the information was not contained in its application. In addition, the society occupies and operates out of the Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre.

30.     The society will use the premises to coordinate programmes for local groups to operate and carry out their activities, such as Justice of Peace, Maori & Pacific Wardens, Niu Ola Trust, Otahuhu Youth Panel and Otahuhu Interact Club. Art, music, performing arts and poetry classes will also be carried out from the premises.

31.     The society indicated the building will be occupied 56 hours a week, Monday to Sunday from 9:00am to 5:00pm. Moreover, the society is willing to share the premises.

Niu Ola Trust

32.     Niu Ola Trust scored well against the following criteria:

·    Group sustainability - The society is fully self-sufficient.

·    Aligns with Local Board Plan - The trust outlined that their programmes align with four of the outcomes set out in the local board plan.

33.     However, the trust did not perform well under eligibility criteria as the membership is not open to all.

34.     The trust is to use the premises for office purposes such as coordinating and collaborating with funders, service providers and clients who would be accessing their services.

35.     The trust indicated the building will be occupied 29 hours a week, Monday to Friday from 9:30am to 3:00pm and Monday evenings from 6:00pm to 8:00pm. Additionally, the trust is willing to share the premises with other groups such as Otahuhu Central Legacy Group, Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre and Discovery Foundation.

Tufuga: Creative Hands, Mind and Spirit Charitable Trust Deed

36.     Tufuga: Creative Hands, Mind and Spirit Charitable Trust scored well against the following criteria:

·    Building size, configuration, location - The premises meets the needs of the trust.

·    Group sustainability - The society is fully self-sufficient.

37.     However, the trust did not perform well under the eligibility criteria as their focus is to support individuals living with mental health issues only.

38.     The premises will be used as their home base while being open to supporting other art groups in the area. The trust indicated the premises will be occupied three days a week and the trust is willing to share the space with other groups.

Community Lease

39.     This report recommends that a lease be granted to Discovery Foundation Incorporated as the preferred applicant following assessment against the criteria stated in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

40.     The term recommended for the lease is for a period of two years with one two-year right of renewal. This is in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and allows the new lessee time to implement initiatives and strategies to increase delivery of services while maintaining a regular review.

41.     A community outcomes plan will be negotiated with the lessee, to be approved by a nominated member of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and attached to the lease document.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

42.     The assessment of the applications was workshopped with the local board on 7 February 2018. The local board supported a shorter term for the proposed new community lease.

43.     The recommendations within this report fall within local board’s allocated authority to grant leases within local community facilities in line with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

44.     The recommendations support the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2017 outcome five: Our community spaces are part of a first-class network. They are popular gathering places used for a variety of activities led by diverse local communities with many interests. They offer choices for people from different cultures and life-stages to take part in local life. Additionally, it also aligns with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2017 outcome six: Our actions ensure positive prospects for the future of children and young people.

45.     The proposed lease will benefit the local community in driving initiatives promoting teaching and assistance for individuals, especially young individuals, to enhance their ability to learn, foster and develop individuals to become leaders in the community by encouraging growth of self-esteem and positive attitudes towards life.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

46.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

47.     The services that are offered by Discovery Foundation Incorporated will provide benefit to the local community, including Māori living in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

48.     Staff presented the proposed lease at the regional Mana Whenua forum on Wednesday 30 May 2018, there were no concerns raised by iwi at the forum. To fulfil the statutory requirements, staff emailed iwi representatives on Tuesday 19 June 2018 allowing 20 working days to respond, there was one response received from Ngāti Whātua Orākei with no concerns raised. Iwi representatives will also have an opportunity to provide feedback during the public notification process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

49.     All costs involved in the preparation of lease documents are borne by Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

50.     Should the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board not grant a lease, the premises will remain vacant and will not be utilised for community purposes. There is also a risk that the vacant premises may be vandalised which is less likely to occur if the building is occupied.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

51.     Subject to the local board’s approval, public notification will follow allowing one month for the public to make submissions. Provided that no submissions or objections are received, staff will work with Discovery Foundation Incorporated to finalise the lease documentations.

52.     Should any submissions or objections be received, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Chair is to appoint a hearings panel and for the panel to reach a decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site plan

37

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Tai Stirling - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

To grant a new community lease to To’utupu Tongan Trust for 31R Jordan Road, Māngere

 

File No.: CP2018/16320

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease to To’utupu Tongan Trust for the former Plunket building at 31R Jordan Road, Māngere.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The building located at 31R Jordan Road, Māngere is vacant and has been identified as a community facility which can be used for community purposes. The building was previously owned by Royal New Zealand Plunket Society Incorporated then surrendered to Auckland Council when the service was closed.

3.       An expression of interest process, as outlined in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, has been carried out to find a new group to operate out of the building. Two interested groups submitted applications.

4.       The applications were measured against the criteria contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines to assess suitability; including the community needs that would be met as an outcome of the applicant’s activities.

5.       The highest scoring applicant is To’utupu Tongan Trust, a community education organisation. The aim of the trust is to raise the aspirations of all youth, particularly those of Tongan origin, to give them a sense of self-worth, lead to higher education and proper employment opportunities and to actively contribute to society.

6.       This report recommends To’utupu Tongan Trust as the preferred applicant as they will fit well within the leased area with their programmes supporting an identified need for community education within the Māngere community.

7.       The term recommended for the lease is a period of two years with one two-year right of renewal. The recommended term provides a reasonable period for the group to transition into the space and initiate its activities while providing an appropriate period for council to review the lease.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      grant, a new community lease to To’utupu Tongan Trust for the building at 31R Jordan Road, Māngere (Attachment A) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term - two years from 1 October 2018 with one two-year right of renewal effecting final expiry on 30 September 2022

ii)       rent - one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      rent review - on the renewal date of 1 October 2020

iv)      permitted use - community education provider and ancillary uses

v)      maintenance fee - two hundred and fifty dollars ($250.00) plus GST per annum

vi)      a community outcomes plan (to be approved by a nominated member of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board) attached as a schedule to the lease document

 

vii)     all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

The Land and Building

8.       The parcel of land at 31R Jordan Road, Māngere is legally described as Lot 31 Deposited Plan 48961. The land is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977 and is vested in trust, in Auckland Council for that purpose.

9.       The building known as the former Plunket building was previously owned by Royal New Zealand Plunket Society Incorporated. The society surrendered the building to Auckland Council on 8 February 2016 when the service closed.

Application Process

10.     In accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, an advertisement seeking expressions of interest was placed in the Manukau Courier and council website in December 2017. Applicants seeking community space and listed on the Auckland Council community lease interest register were also informed of the vacancy. The leased area was open for viewings to interested groups on 17 January and 24 January 2018. The closing date for applications was 26 January 2018.

11.     A detailed description of the applicant groups and their activities is outlined below.

To’utupu Tongan Trust

12.     To’utupu Tongan Trust registered as a Charitable Trust under the name Tongan Youth of New Zealand Centre on 16 March 1997 and changed its name to To’utupu Tongan Trust on 3 July 1998.

13.     The trust is currently operating from a council-owned facility (Onehunga Community Centre) and would like to extend their services to other areas such as Māngere. The trust offers programmes that include the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) Homework Study Skill Centre, this is an afterschool programme to assist students sitting NCEA papers to achieve and gain the required credits in their year level. The trust uses mentors from tertiary institutions to strengthen the programme. The mentors assist the students with homework, studying and organisation skills throughout the year.

14.     Additionally, the trust also runs the active dancing project, a 10-week programme that provides a safe and creative learning space for youth to activate their creativity and learning through dance which is then applied to other areas of their life. There are different themes to teach alongside dance moves for the students, they develop skills in different styles of dance such as vogue basics, raggaeton dance and freestyle. As a result, some of the students are encouraged to showcase the skills learnt at community events held throughout the year.

Papatuanuku Kokiri Marae

15.     Papatuanuku Kokiri Marae first registered as a Charitable Trust on 20 December 1984.

16.     The purpose of the marae is to service the needs of the community; in particular the youth, focusing on strong leadership and being positive role models for their peers.

17.     The marae currently holds a community lease with Auckland Council for land at Centre Park, 141R Robertson Road, Māngere East where the marae owns the buildings. The marae has expressed an interest in the Jordan Road site as a venue (easily accessible to those that reside closer to Auckland Airport) where they can expand their services and use as an overflow site for programmes that are unable to be delivered from the Centre Park site.

18.     Services the marae intends to deliver include:

·    Te Reo Māori me o tatou Tikanga workshops (Māori language, customs and values)

·    Weekly focus groups for Kaumatua (male elders) and Kuia (female elders) to ensure their voices are heard in the community, it also provides a time where they can share and enjoy each other’s company

·    The teaching principles of good kai (food), good planting and harvesting practices

·    Workshops teaching recycling, upcycling and living sustainable lifestyles

·    Driver licence training

·    Study groups and other programmes as required.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Assessment of applications

19.     The applications received were assessed against the criteria contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the priorities set by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2017.

20.     During the assessment of the applications the To’utupu Tongan Trust scored well against the following criteria:

·    Group sustainability - the trust is fully self-sufficient.

·    Building size, configuration, location - the premises fully meets the needs of the trust.

·    Extent of usage - the premises is to be occupied approximately 51 hours per week.

21.     The trust indicated the premises will be occupied on Monday to Friday from 9:00am to 5:00pm, Tuesday and Thursday evenings 5:00pm to 7:00pm, Saturday 9:00am to 1:00pm and Sunday 2:00pm to 5:00pm. Additionally the trust is willing to share the premises with other organisations.

22.     Papatuanuku Kokiri Marae scored well against the following criteria:

·    Aligns with Local Board Plan - Outcome two: We are the heart of Māori and Pasifika culture and Outcome five: A place where everyone thrives and belongs.

·    Group sustainability - the marae is fully self-sufficient.

23.     However, the marae did not perform as well under the sharing and collaboration criteria and did not provide references in support of their application.

24.     The marae indicated the premises will be occupied approximately 37 hours a week, Monday to Friday from 9:00am to 11:30am and 12:30pm to 3:30pm. Furthermore, it will be utilised on Mondays to Thursdays between 6:00pm and 8:00pm and Saturdays between 10:00am to 12:00pm. The marae is not willing to share the premises as they envisage that it will be utilised for activities each day except Sundays.

25.     A late application was submitted by the marae and received by staff on 6 July 2018, the close-off date being 26 January 2018.

Community Lease

26.     This report recommends that a lease be granted to To’utupu Tongan Trust as the preferred applicant following assessment against the criteria contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

27.     The term recommended for the lease is for a period of two years with one two-year right of renewal. The recommended term allows the new lessee time to implement initiatives and strategies to increase delivery of services while maintaining a regular review.

28.     A community outcomes plan will be negotiated with the recommended group, to be approved by a nominated member of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and will be attached as a schedule to the lease document.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

29.     The assessment of the applications was workshopped with the local board on 12 July 2018. The local board has given informal support for a shorter term for the proposed new community lease.

30.     The recommendations within this report fall within local board’s allocated authority to grant leases within local community facilities in line with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

31.     The recommendations support the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2017 outcome five: Our community spaces are part of a first-class network. They are popular gathering places used for a variety of activities led by diverse local communities with many interests. They offer choices for people from different cultures and life-stages to take part in local life. Additionally, it also aligns with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2017 outcome two: We celebrate, showcase and share our many cultures, which attracts visitors to our area. Our cultural diversity and distinct Māori and Pasifika identities are reflected in, and enhance, the everyday life of our community.

32.     The recommended group will benefit the local community in driving initiatives to raise the aspirations of all youth, particularly those of Tongan origin, to give them a sense of self-worth, lead to higher education opportunities, proper employment opportunities and contributing actively to society.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

33.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Te Toa Takitini, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

34.     The services that are offered by To’utupu Tongan Trust are targeted to the Tongan community. However, some of the services provide additional benefits to all local pacific communities, including Māori living within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

35.     To’utupu Tongan Trust indicated that it would utilise the building more often and is prepared to share the building with other organisations thereby maximising the utilisation of the building. Additionally, Papatuanuku Kokiri Marae already had a presence in the community.

36.     Staff presented the proposed lease at the regional Mana Whenua forum on Wednesday 25 July 2018. There were no concerns raised by iwi at the forum. To fulfil the statutory requirements, staff emailed iwi representatives and four responses were received from iwi representative groups: Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua and Ngāti Whātua Orākei with no concerns raised. Ngāti Tamaoho relayed the following “A hard decision Tai, both beneficial kaupapa for the communities that they are supporting, Ngāti Tamaoho cannot give support to one specific group, but wonder without knowing the specific layout of the interior of the building if it can support a dance programme, other than that good luck to the successful group”.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

37.     All costs involved in the preparation of lease documents are borne by Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

38.     Should the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board not grant a lease, the building will remain vacant and will not be utilised for community purposes. There is also a risk that the vacant building may be vandalised, which is less likely to occur if the building is occupied.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

39.     Staff will work with the recommended group to finalise the lease documentation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

45

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Tai Stirling - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Site Plan for 121R Bader Drive, Mangere

Mangere Town Centre Grounds outlined in blue

 

Leased area outlined in red


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Māngere Town Centre Library Comprehensive Renewal

 

File No.: CP2018/16194

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the planned comprehensive renewal of the Māngere Town Centre Library from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Māngere Town Centre Library was last refurbished in 2008 which included a carpet replacement, painting and furniture items. 

3.       It has since had a minor refurbishment but due to the high use of the space it now requires a full interior upgrade to ensure that the needs of the community are met.

4.       The full interior upgrade will include new carpeting, full interior paint, replacement soft furnishings and desking as necessary, service counter upgrade, minor layout changes and full interior lighting upgrade.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the comprehensive renewal of the Māngere Town Centre Library as detailed in attachment A and B.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       Māngere Town Centre Library is a busy community library with a diverse customer base.  The library was last refurbished in 2008 which included a carpet replacement, interior painting and furniture items.  It has since had a minor refurbishment but due to the high use of the space the furnishing and carpet are worn out and require replacement.  During the consultation with the library patrons, we received feedback such as the “library looks tired” and “needs modernising for our tamariki”. The quality of the lighting in the library is not sufficient for the use. To brighten and lighten the space we propose to install new LED light fittings which will both illuminate the spaces better and reduce the library’s power usage.  

6.       The carpeting in the library was last replaced in 2008 and is now worn, especially in high use areas.  The proposed design includes new carpet tiles suitable for library environments in a practical dark grey.  The area by the front window will have a wood look floor installed and will have comfortable soft seating and a built in study bench with additional power points.  All painted surfaces will be renewed with the addition of feature colour walls and a decorative surface applied to the wall of the children’s area and the columns throughout the library. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

7.       At a workshop on 11 April 2018 the local board was supportive of the design, with minor improvements suggested which including koru shapes in the decorative motifs for the pillars in the library.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

8.       This proposal supports the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu’s Local Board Plan 2017, outcome 5: Facilities to meet diverse needs by offering an attractive space for the community to come together.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

9.       Iwi have not been involved in the development of the design due to the nature of the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

10.     The cost of the work is currently estimated to be $451,100 including a $20,000 contingency sum.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

11.     Should the renewal not be approved there would be a delay in the refurbishment and providing the community with an attractive space to come together.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

12.     Following approval from the local board, the project will proceed. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mangere Town Centre Library Look and Feel

49

b

Mangere Town Centre Library Final Design

59

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Marion Weatherley – Project Manager

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 



Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Approval of the Boggust Park Development Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/16914

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for the priority design elements of the Boggust Park development plan to be delivered within the currently approved budget.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       On 8 August 2018, council staff presented the local board with proposed priority design elements for delivery in Boggust Park. Staff requested support to improve the current play space, install fitness equipment and create a new circuit pathway for the community.

3.       This initiative aligns with outcomes from consultation with local residents, the Boggust Park activation group, local iwi and schools, for a safe gathering place offering a variety of activities for a diverse community with many interests.

4.       The proposed design elements can be delivered within the approved localy driven initative (LDI) budget of $450,000.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the design elements presented to the local board at the Mangere-Otahuhu local board workshop, 8 August 2018 to progress the Boggust Park development in accordance with the 2018 Boggust Park Concept Plan, Attachment A.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       In 2018, the concept plan for the development of Boggust Park was prepared. The concept plan was informed by local community and iwi aspirations for the park, which were reflected in the following development projects:

·    Circular pathway

·    Playground extension

·    Toilet

·    Seating

·    Signage

·    Car park

·    Sportsfields.

 

6.       In August 2018, council staff presented the local board with proposed priority design elements for delivery in Boggust Park.

 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

7.       Council staff have worked with the design team, project delivery and local board services staff to agree and finalise a design and production specification in consultation with the local board.

8.       Four discrete design elements are proposed as follows:

·    The existing playground was updated in recent years. It is recommended that the play provision is increased to provide for a wider age group and provide for a wider range of abilities. Increased playground facilities will encourage park visitors to stay at the park for longer periods of time.

·    Installation of a circular pathway at the park will increase active recreation for a wider range of users.

·    Installation of fitness stations will increase recreational use along the circular pathway.

·    Planting of a selection of trees and shrubs to enhance park landscape, particularly around the toilet and playground.

9.       Cost estimates for the work proposed for these four elements is as follows:

Work element

Estimated cost $

Playground improvements

143,000

Circuit footpath

243,000

Fitness equipment

54,000

Planting

10,000

Total includes fees & contingencies

450,000

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

10.     This initiative aligns with the Mangere-Otahuhu local board plan outcomes:

·    Outcome 3 – protecting our natural environment and heritage

·    Outcome 4 – a well-connected area

·    Outcome 5 – facilities that meet diverse needs

·    Outcome 6 – a place where everyone thrives and belongs

11.     In 2017 the local board visited the site. The outcome was to support prioritising which parks in their local area would receive LDI funding (refer to attachment B, Boggust Park Engagement History 2012-2018).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     All community assets contribute significantly to Maori well-being, values, culture and traditions. Where we anticipate any aspects of the proposed project having a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua, we will undertake appropriate engagement.

13.     Local iwi had been involved in the development of the concept plan and are aware of proposed upcoming projects.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

14.     On 17 February 2018 the local board approved up to $450,000 of their LDI capex financial year 2017/2018 budget for the implementation of the Boggust Park Concept Plan (MO/2018/11). This is subject to staff returning to confirm the details and prioritisation of what will be delivered.

15.     On 18 July 2018 the board approved an additional $130,000 from their renewals budget as the first year of a two-year programme to design and construct a new toilet block at Boggust Park (MO/2018/115).

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

16.     Project progression and delivery is dependent on a confirmation from the board of which the design elements to progress.

17.     Boggust Park sits on a 300 metre diameter crater surrounded by a semi-circular rim of a volcanic tuff ring. There could be unanticipated resource consent compliance conditions.

18.     Subject to unanticipated delays through the consent process, it is anticipated that the design, consent and tender stage is estimated to take a minimum of 20 weeks from approval, and that [physical works can commence February 2019.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

19.     Following approval from the local board, staff will return within four weeks to workshop and present the refined design play items for approval.

20.     The board will receive monthly updates on the progress of this project through regular community facilities reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Boggust Park Concept Plan

91

b

Boggust Park Engagement History

93

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jasmine Samuel – Community Led & LDI Specialist

Dave Little – Manager Landscape Architecture

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 



Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 



Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

New road name in the subdivision at 89A Naylors Drive, Mangere by Imperial Homes Ltd

 

File No.: CP2018/16779

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board for a new road name for a new public road in the subdivision at 89A Naylors Drive by Imperial Homes Ltd.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The Applicant has submitted the following names for consideration for the new public road at 89A Naylors Drive, Mangere:

·       Warrencorp Place (preferred name)

·       Saint Kimberley Place (alternative)

·       Kellyleen Close (alternative)

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the new road name ‘Warrencorp Place’ for the new public road in the subdivision at 89A Naylors Drive, Mangere, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

4.       A 12-lot residential subdivision of 89A Naylors Drive was granted in July 2017 (referenced SUB60300598 (legacy number 53041). The subdivision will be accessed by a new public road off Naylors Drive.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

5.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

-    A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

-    A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-    An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

6.       The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new public road at 89A Naylors Drive, Mangere:

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Preferred Name

Warrencorp Place

First Alternative

Saint Kimberley Place

Second Alternative

Kellyleen Close

 

7.       The proposed names incorporate the names of people who were involved in the development of the subdivision.

8.       Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

9.       The proposed suffixes of ‘Place’ or ‘Close’ are deemed acceptable as they accurately describe the characteristics of the road, being a short cul-de-sac.

10.     The names proposed by the Applicant are deemed to meet the road naming guidelines, although it is noted that ‘Saint Kimberley Place’ may be too long for such a short road from a mapping perspective (i.e. it is a lot of text to fit into a small area on maps).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The Applicant requested input from all relevant iwi groups, but no responses were received. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     The Applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locality Plan

99

b

Scheme Plan

101

      Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Danielle Ter Huurne – Intermediate Planner

Roger Low – Senior Subdivision Adviser

 

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

New private way name in the subdivision at 265 and 267 Portage Road, Mangere by Harinder Singh Saini and Mohammed Zarik Tanveer

 

File No.: CP2018/16782

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board for a new road name for a new private way in the subdivision at 265 and 267 Portage Road, Mangere.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The Applicant has submitted the following names for consideration for the new private way at 265 and 267 Portage Road, Mangere:

·       Panjab Way (preferred name)

·       Saini Way (alternative)

·       Ba Way (alternative)

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the new road name ‘Panjab Way’ for the new private way in the subdivision at 265 and 267 Portage Road, Mangere, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

4.       A six-lot residential subdivision of 265 and 267 Portage Road was granted in August 2016 (referenced BUN60081985, legacy number: 48919). The subdivision will be accessed by a new private way off Portage Road.

5.       In accordance with the national addressing standards the road requires a name given that it serves more than 5 lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

6.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

-    A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

-    A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-    An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

7.       The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new private way at 265 and 267 Portage Road, Mangere:

 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Panjab Way

Panjab is a state in India.

First Alternative

Saini Way

Saini is the developer’s surname.

Second Alternative

Ba Way

Ba is a city in Fiji.

 

8.       Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the names ‘Panjab Way’ and ‘Ba Way’ are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region but noted that there is a ‘Sai Street’ approximately 7km from the site therefore ‘Saini Way’ is not acceptable to use.

9.       The proposed suffix of ‘Way’ is deemed acceptable as it accurately describes the characteristics of the private way, being a short enclosed roadway.

10.     The names ‘Panjab Way’ and ‘Ba Way’ are deemed to meet the road naming guidelines. LINZ has confirmed that ‘Saini Way’ is not acceptable to use, and it is also noted that the guidelines do not encourage the use of the names of living persons.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The applicant contacted all local iwi groups requesting input from iwi in the road naming process and requested any suggestions, however no responses were received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locality Plan

107

b

Scheme Plan

109

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Danielle Ter Huume – Intermediate Planner

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Funding for the Crime Prevention Officer programme

 

File No.: CP2018/17120

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve funding for the Māngere Crime Prevention Officer (CPO) programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In 2017/2018 the local board allocated $40,000 from community safety budgets to pilot a CPO programme in Māngere and Māngere East town centres. The trial ran from August 2017 to July 2018.

3.       At the local board workshop on 8 August 2018 staff shared a review of the CPO pilot, with very positive results to date.

4.       Staff are currently preparing an analysis of the range of community safety activities funded by the local board in Māngere and Māngere East, with analysis and recommendations due to the local board in October 2018.

5.       Staff recommend allocating funding for a six-month continuation of the CPO programme, recognising that the longer-term future of the programme will be considered as part of the wider community safety review.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve $31,000 from the existing allocation of work programme line 1065 – Capacity Building: Business Improvement Districts for the Crime Prevention Officer programme in the Māngere and Māngere East town centres for six months from August 2018.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       In 2017/2018 the local board allocated $40,000 from community safety budgets to pilot a CPO programme in Māngere and Māngere East town centres. The trial ran from August 2017 to July 2018.

7.       The CPO operates 30 hours per week engaging with individuals and coordinating services to support these individuals. The CPO also coordinates regular safety meetings with key partners and liaises with police regarding specific individuals.

8.       Staff are currently preparing an analysis of the effectiveness of the various wider community safety activities funded by the local board for the Māngere and Māngere East town centres. Analysis and associated recommendations are due to be submitted to the local board in October 2018. The ongoing contribution of the CPO role will be considered as part of this wider community safety review.

9.       At the local board workshop on 8 August 2018 staff shared a review of the CPO pilot, with very positive results to date. The CPO’s reported activity, along with feedback from the town centre and safety partners, indicates that the work is having a positive effect on perceptions of safety and reducing anti-social behaviour around the town centres.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     The Māngere Town Centre Business Association continues to report a significant reduction in minor crime, petty theft, youth violence, graffiti and anti-social behaviour. In particular, Māngere Town Centre reports a reduction of 50 per cent in minor crime and anti-social behaviour by youth gangs addressed by the CPO.

11.     Local safety partners are reporting re-establishment of positive relations with the local neighbourhood policing team and local businesses through the development of the Māngere community safety partners group run by the CPO. Coordination of intelligence and resources through this group is having a noticeable impact around town centre areas and is providing a holistic, human and community-led approach to assisting individuals identified as impacting on community safety through their behaviours.

12.     Better understanding of individuals involved in anti-social behaviour has resulted in a decrease in minor theft, shoplifting and begging. Some homeless individuals have been supported into housing, and social workers continue to provide support to transition from the street to more secure environments. While these individuals are still visible, they are now known, understood and supported.

13.     Given the positive contribution of the CPO role to date, it is recommended that the programme be continued for six months, from August 2018. This will enable the continuation of positive outcomes pending a decision on the ongoing contribution of this role in a wider community safety approach.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

14.     The CPO contributes to the local board’s objective that local town centres are attractive, lively and safe.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

15.     The CPO initiative takes a holistic approach to community safety.  This includes engaging with local marae and working closely with Māori young people and their whānau. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

16.     The continuation of the CPO programme for six months from August 2018 will cost $31,000, funding from the existing allocation of work programme line 1065 – Capacity Building: Business Improvement Districts.

 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks guidance

17.     The programmes, events and established relationships would be at risk of failing without the support and coordination of the CPO.

18.     Without a considered transition, discontinuing the CPO programme would be disruptive to the community who have built trust in the CPO role and programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

19.     Staff will present analysis and recommendations for the Māngere and Māngere East town centre community safety initiatives to the local board in October 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Muliaga – Strategic Broker

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Round One 2018/2019 grant allocations

 

File No.: CP2018/17318

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Local Grants Round One 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 18 April 2018 (see Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

3.       This report presents applications received in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Round One 2018/2019 (see Attachment B).

4.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $202,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

5.       Twenty-five applications were received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One 2018/2019, including eighteen multi-board applications, requesting a total of $340,691.94.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One 2018/2019  listed in Table One.   

 

Table One: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grant Round One 2018/2019 grant applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1909-102

Cook Islands Outriggers Association

Sport and recreation

Towards outrigger equipment, life jackets, buoyancy floats and first aid kits.

$5,540.00

Eligible

LG1909-103

GirlBoss New Zealand

Community

Towards STEM Workshop costs including facilitator cost, administration, communication, photocopying, transport and merchandise.

$9,900.00

Eligible

LG1909-109

Mangere College

Community

Towards transport, accommodation and food cost for the Nature and Nurture school programme.

$4,578.00

Eligible

LG1909-119

The Otahuhu Club Incorporated

Community

Towards catering cost for the Otahuhu Sportsperson of the Year award dinner.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1909-120

Kids Safe with Dogs Charitable Trust

Community

Towards printing cost, instructor fees and administration cost for the Kids safe with Dogs programme.

$9,438.00

Eligible

LG1909-121

Mangere Town Centre Business Improvement District Incorporated

Community

Towards Zumba Pila Tomu instructor cost.

$3,600.00

Eligible

LG1909-122

Leroy Lakamu

Community

Towards a bouncy castle, gazebo and basketball kit.

$941.00

Eligible

LG1909-123

Mangere Town Centre Business Improvement District Incorporated

Community

Towards the Mangere Otahuhu Social Enterprise Market Day.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1909-126

Let’s get Legal NZ Trust

Community

Towards operations cost of Driver’s license workshops.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG1909-127

Mangere East Rugby League Football Club and Sports Incorporated

Community

Towards heating, new tables and tree removal at the Mangere East Rugby League Club Function Centre.

$40,262.00

Eligible

LG1909-128

Royal New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

Community

Towards cat fostering packs.

$6,636.00

Eligible

LG1909-131

Action Education Incorporated

Community

Towards facilitation and Youth Worker cost for Spoken Word poetry workshops at schools in the local board area.

$4,500.00

Eligible

LG1909-132

Mangere Centre Park Sports Association Incorporated

Community

Towards chairs, folding tables and stall shutters at the Mangere Centre Park sports venue.

$25,000.00

Eligible

LG1909-134

thebreaksnz Limited

Arts and culture

Towards event cost for the BOTY breakdancing Pacific Region final.

$2,478.00

Eligible

LG1909-135

Mangere Bridge Playcentre

Community

Towards an outdoor all-weather enclosure.

$9,478.00

Eligible

LG1909-136

Otahuhu Softball Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the Wayne Roper Memorial Tournament including
‍trophies,
diamond fencing,
‍marquee walls,
‍equipment hire and security

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1909-137

Auckland Niue Rugby League Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards event cost for three Rugby League tournaments during the Pasifika League competitions.

$10,325.00

Eligible

LG1909-138

Te Kura Māori o Waatea

Sport and recreation

Towards sports uniforms.

$4,520.00

Eligible

LG1909-139

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards delivery of Life Education health and nutrition messages to 989 students.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1909-140

Elvis in the Gardens Incorporated

Events

Towards operations cost of the Elvis in the Gardens event in Botanical Gardens Manurewa.

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG1909-142

innonative

Community

Towards cost of a planning workshop for the development of a Community Garden.

$10,646.00

Eligible

LG1909-143

Accelerating Aotearoa Incorporated

Community

Towards programme administration and programme designer cost.

$40,000.00

Eligible

LG1909-145

MUMA Administration

Community

Towards the cost of the wharekai upgrade including replacing an oven, commercial toaster, pots and pans.

$12,466.00

Eligible

LG1909-146

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards the purchase and delivery of 380 native trees and 75 recycling bins to Māngere-Otāhuhu schools and preschools participating in the Paper4trees programme.

$2,471.00

Eligible

LG1909-149

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards salary cost of the helpline coordinator.

$3,380.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$244,659.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Multi-board Round One, listed in Table two.

Table Two: Multi-board Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 grant applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB1819-104

Cook Islands Rugby New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards rugby equipment for junior teams.

$3,500.00

Eligible



MB1819-106

Let’s get Legal Trust

Community

Towards cost of Driver’s license programme workshops.

$7,500.00

Eligible








MB1819-109

Pasifika Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire for four community workshops and operational administrative costs.

$1,050.00

Eligible


MB1819-114

Bike Auckland

Community

Towards the overall costs to run the Bike Burb programme, including venue hire, development fees, workshop costs and communications.

$3,000.00

Eligible








MB1819-115

Auckland Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards umpire shirts, protective clothing equipment bags.

$3,000.00

Eligible








MB1819-118

Manukau Orchestral Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the venue hire and technical costs for a musical performance at the Vodafone Events Centre.

$677.00

Eligible






MB1819-126

Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind

Community

Towards new digital talking books for the Blind Foundation Library.

$2,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-133

Renu Sikka

Community

Towards venue, photographer, exhibition and facilitator costs for 'Woman of Kaur" ancestry story telling project.

$1,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-141

Tumeke Enterprise Limited

Events

Towards catering cost for a two-day youth programme - Maori and Pasifika in Business Forum

$6,000.00

Eligible





MB1819-145

Trust MYRIVR

Community

Towards the project manager fees to advertise a free social and health services smartphone application.

$10,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-151

New Zealand Dance Advancement Trust

Arts and culture

Towards operations costs for the "2019 Youth & Community Engagement Programme".

$6,100.00

Eligible





MB1819-174

LifeKidz Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of outdoor play panels and the cost of youth worker wages to run their youth programmes.

$2,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-182

Counties Manukau Sports Foundation

Events

Towards venue hire, event co-ordinator and catering costs for the 2018 Counties Manukau Sporting Excellence Awards

$3,000.00

Eligible







MB1819-183

Umma Trust

Community

Towards a series of workshops on healthy eating and nutrition and driving.

$10,500.00

Eligible




MB1819-187

Dream Big Trust

Community

Towards rent costs for six months at the Papatoetoe Seventh Day Adventist Church.

$1,300.00

Eligible




MB1819-190

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust

Community

Towards wages for 14 Kiwi Can Leaders who deliver the Kiwi Can programme across seven schools in seven local board areas.

$5,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-191

PHAB Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs to PHAB service workers' salary, coordinators and administrators' wages.

$2,000.00

Eligible








Total

 

 

 

$67,627.00

 

 

 

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2018/2019 on 18 April 2018 and will operate three quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $202,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

13.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

14.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

15.     A summary of each application received through Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Local Grants Round One is provided (see Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

17.     Twenty-three organisations applying to Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Local Grants Round One have indicated their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

18.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

19.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $202,000.00 in 2018/2019.

20.     In Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Round One, 2018/2019, 25 applications were received, including eighteen Multi-board applications, requesting a total of $340,691.94.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

21.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

22.     Following the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board allocating funding for local grants round one, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019

125

b

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-board 2018/2019 application summary   (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Helen Taimarangai - Senior Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Fran Hayton - Principal Grants Advsr & Incentives TL

Shane King - Operations Support Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Updating the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on ATEED’s activities between 1 January and 30 June 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/16991

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the local board of Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited (ATEED) activities at a regional, and where possible, a local level.

2.       For the local board to receive the attached six-monthly report from ATEED on their activities in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

3.       ATEED reports to local boards every six months to provide them with an update of their activities.

4.       Work undertaken by ATEED in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area includes:

·        LDI activities (the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme, 24-hour South visitor promotion, collective business improvement district project and a refresh of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local economic development plan)

·        Business capability building and support for new businesses

·        Film permitting in the Local Board area.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited’s six-monthly report to Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for 1 January to 30 June 2018, as shown in attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       ATEED helps lay a strong foundation for Auckland’s economic growth through a broad programme of initiatives focused on:

· Business growth and innovation

· Business attraction and investment

· Conferences and business events

· Major events

· Film

· International education

· Tourism.

6.       ATEED’s work can impact and provide opportunities locally as well as regionally. For this reason they have committed to reporting to local boards every six months.

7.       The report attached reflects this commitment and covers the period from 1 January to 30 June 2018.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

The ATEED activities carried out in the local board area are outlined in the below table.

Table 1. Local ATEED activities

Activity

ATEED team responsible

LDI activities (the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme, 24-hour South visitor promotion, collective business improvement district project and a refresh of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local economic development plan)

Economic Development

Business capability building and support for new businesses

Economic Development

Film permitting in the Local Board area.

Economic Development

8.       As part of business-as-usual, destinations in the local board area continue to feature in the official Auckland visitor information website administered by ATEED.

9.       Should a local board choose to allocate some of their Local Development Initiative (LDI) fund to economic development activities, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development team can manage the delivery of a work programme for them.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /

Local impacts and local board views

10.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no local impact, however some of the activities described in the report do. Details of this are outlined in the six-monthly report attached.

11.     Local board views were not sought for the purposes of this report. Local board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact their initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with their initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     The next ATEED six-monthly report will be presented to the local board in early 2019 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ATEED six-monthly report

133

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Paul Robinson, Local Economic Growth Manager (ATEED)

Samantha-Jane Miranda, Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

James Robinson, Head of Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Representation Review engagement analysis - proposal to split the Manukau Ward

 

File No.: CP2018/16236

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the local board’s position and feedback on the Representation Review after receiving the public engagement views and analysis for the proposal to split the Manukau Ward.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       On 16 May 2018, the local board received a report about representation arrangements for the 2019 elections.  The report outlined the Joint Governance Working Party proposals for changes to representation arrangements.  The board gave feedback on those proposals.  Since then, an additional proposal has been put forward, that the Manukau Ward be split into two wards. 

3.       At the local board’s 18 July 2018 business meeting it was resolved as follows:

Resolution number MO/2018/117

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)     endorse the board’s feedback on the additional representation review proposal for Manukau Ward to be split into two wards.

i.           does not support the proposal to split the Manukau ward into two separate wards 

 

ii.          has a concern about the way this new proposal has come about, after this local board had already considered and given feedback on an earlier report which didn’t mention this proposal

 

iii.         is of the view that the current Manukau ward serves communities of interest and ensures fair representation.

 

b)     requests that this local board be consulted earlier on such proposals, as the board had already given input on the representation review.

CARRIED

4.       Public submissions close on 11 September 2018 and the engagement analysis report is expected on 14 September 2018 and will be distributed to local board members and tabled at the business meeting.

5.       The board has an opportunity to make their comments to the Joint Governance Working Party who will “hear” public submissions and local board views on 21 September 2018.

6.       On 18 October 2018 the Governing Body makes a decision on representation arrangements for the 2019 elections. Local board representatives can also attend this meeting and give their input.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      consider the Representation Review public engagement analysis on the proposal to split the Manukau ward and formulate its feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party and Governing Body.

b)      authorise the local board Chair to present the local board’s views to the Joint Governance Working Party and Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Information sheet: Proposal to split the Manukau Ward

143

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Local board feedback on the government's proposed mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags

 

File No.: CP2018/16963

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to formally provide feedback on the council’s submission to the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation on the mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The New Zealand government are consulting on a mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags. The consultation document can be viewed at the following link:

http://www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Waste/plastic-bags-consultation-doc.pdf

3.       The consultation document outlines the available options for managing these issues, which include a mandatory phase out, a charge on bags, a formal agreement between government and industry, and mandatory product stewardship.

4.       Council staff are preparing a draft regional submission on this proposal. The draft submission will be provided to Environment and Community Committee for their approval on 11 September 2018.

5.       The draft council submission makes the following key points:

·     That Auckland Council supports option one in the consultation document – a total and mandatory ban. Reducing plastic use, litter, and marine pollution are priorities in the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018. The inappropriate consumption, use and discarding of plastic bags has significant impacts on Auckland’s natural environment and our waste collection systems.

·     The ban should apply to all retailers who distribute single-use plastic bags, rather than just the larger retailers. An incomplete ban will dilute the effectiveness of this behaviour change intervention on consumers.

·     Support for the proposed six-month phase-out timeframe.

6.       The draft submission also identifies areas where Auckland Council considers that further work and discussion is needed post-consultation. These include the thickness of bags captured by the ban and how the ban will be effectively enforced.

7.       This report provides an opportunity for local boards to formally provide feedback on the government’s consultation on the proposed mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags (Attachment A).

8.       Submissions close on 14 September 2018.  Any formal feedback received from local boards before 13 September 2018 will be attached to the council’s final submission.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      endorse the formal feedback to the council’s submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation on the proposed mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags (Attachment A).

 

 

Horopaki / Context

9.       The New Zealand Government is seeking feedback on a proposed mandatory phase out of the sale or distribution of single-use plastic shopping bags. The phase out would be enacted through regulation under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008 and introduced over a six-month timeframe. 

10.     The recognition by the Ministry for the Environment that over the longer term, plastic waste needs to be designed out of the system is aligned with council’s aspiration for zero waste. This recognition reinforces that Aotearoa New Zealand can be prosperous while creating an economy that is not reliant on externalising environmental harms, such as plastic waste, in our streams and oceans.

11.     Auckland Council’s Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 includes three priorities relating to plastic.

I.   The plan recognises plastic waste as a high priority for avoidance and has identified it as one of three priority waste streams to be addressed.

II.  Reducing litter is also a priority included in the plan. Managing plastic bags as littered items has a high resource and financial cost to council as well as the natural environment.

III. The plan includes a priority relating to reducing marine litter and pollution from plastic waste. This priority was added to the draft plan as a result of significant public concern and feedback on this topic during the consultation period.

12.     A mandatory phase-out of plastic bags will be beneficial for achieving all three priorities.

13.     The contamination caused by the incorrect disposal of plastic bags by consumers in comingled recycling collection systems also has significant consequences. Plastic bags incorrectly disposed of in kerbside comingled recycling can slow or damage recycling processor’s equipment, affecting the quality of recyclate and increasing the processing cost.

14.     Auckland Council prioritises education and enforcement around recycling contamination to avoid the knock-on effect of incorrect plastic bag disposal in kerbside recycling bins. A mandatory phase-out will reduce these impacts.

15.     As such, Auckland Council’s draft submission strongly supports a mandatory phase out or ban on the sale or distribution of single use plastic bags.

16.     This report provides an opportunity for local boards to give formal feedback on the consultation document. Some of the key points made in Auckland Council’s draft submission are outlined below for local boards to consider.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

17.     The Ministry for the Environment’s consultation document outlines a number of options for reducing the use of plastic bags, including a:

·     mandatory phase out,

·     levy, tax or charge,

·     deposit refund system. This puts a new cost onto a product, which is refunded to the consumer when they bring the material back for recycling.

·     formal agreement with government and industry, in which retailers are required to charge for bags.

·     mandatory product stewardship scheme in which producers that put certain goods on the market are required to be responsible for environmentally sound end-of-life management of the product.

18.     The Ministry’s consultation document considers the pros and cons of each option in detail (see Attachment A). It concludes that the most effective option is a mandatory phase out of sale or distribution of single-use plastic bags through regulations under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008.

19.     Auckland Council’s draft submission does not include a detailed options analysis. However, it notes that, as there are alternative, reusable options easily available for use by the general public, the best way to prevent harm from plastic bags is to prevent them from being issued in the first place.

20.     Since a charge on plastic bags, a deposit refund system and a product stewardship scheme would all support the continued distribution of plastic bags, these options are not supported.

21.     The draft submission also does not support a voluntary programme or an agreement between industry and government. This approach would create an inequitable approach to the problem as some businesses or organisations will choose not to participate in a voluntary scheme.

Preferred option

22.     Of the potential options presented by the Ministry for the Environment, Option 1 - mandatory phase out of the sale or distribution of single-use plastic shopping bags is identified in council’s draft submission, as the most effective and wide-reaching mechanism for addressing plastic bag issues.

23.     The submission also provides feedback on some other aspects of the proposal, as outlined below.

Other aspects of proposal

24.     Scope of ban: To be most effective, the ban should apply to all retailers who distribute plastic bags, rather than just the larger retailers. Small retailers should not be exempt as they contribute significant numbers of bags to the waste stream. A ban should also apply to those importing single use bags. An incomplete ban will dilute the effectiveness of this behaviour change intervention for consumers.

25.     Definition of plastic bags: The draft submission supports the current proposed definition that a single use plastic bag is one that includes handles, and is sold or distributed to the public for the purposes of carrying sold goods. It also agrees with the proposal to include degradable, bio-degradable, oxo-degradable and compostable bags in the proposed definition.

26.     However, the submission notes concern that the discussion document currently specifies a particular thickness of plastic bag. This may result in bag producers designing products to be just above this threshold. The submission therefore supports broadening the definition to apply to single-use plastic bags of all thickness.

27.     Timeframe: The draft submission supports the proposal for a six-month phase-out timeframe as this is considered sufficient time to allow retailers and consumers to prepare and adapt, provided the program of behaviour change interventions is comprehensive.

 

28.     Education and enforcement: Council’s draft submission supports the description of offences, and the strength of the penalties for those outlined in the consultation document. The submission also supports the proposed approach that the Environmental Protection Authority manage enforcement of this ban. It notes that the approach may have some implications for council resources and welcomes the opportunity to participate in further discussions with the Ministry around the best approaches to education and enforcement.

29.     Equity and opportunity: The council’s draft submissions recognises that concerns have been raised regarding the need for a just transition for workers relying on plastic bag manufacture. However, it notes that the majority of single-use bags are manufactured off-shore and so local job loss is likely to be minimal.

30.     In fact, the broader move towards a circular economy has the potential to increase job creation (Ellen MacArthur Foundation, 2015).  For example, there are a number of community groups across Auckland who create and distribute alternative bags to their local communities. The submission advocates that these community groups be taken into consideration by the Ministry as potential providers when engaging with retailers on practical options for alternatives to plastic bags.

31.     The submission also notes that the ban has the potential to reduce council litter clean-up costs and volunteer hours spent on litter clean ups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

32.     The draft submission has been informed by the feedback that local boards gave on the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 in April and May 2018.

33.     This report provides an opportunity for all local boards to give formal feedback. A memo has previously been sent to all local board members outlining the consultation proposal and the process for local boards to give feedback.

34.     Submissions on the consultation document close on 14 September. The council’s regional draft submission will be provided to Environment and Community Committee for their approval on 11 September. To be considered by the committee, local boards need to provide their feedback by 10 September.

35.     Local board feedback received after this date will not be considered by the committee but can also be attached to the final submission, if provided to staff by 13 September 2018.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

36.     The mandatory phase out of single-use plastic bags is consistent with the priorities and values that Maori have identified to Auckland Council through engagement on the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018. These include priorities such as protection of waterways and ecology which receive waste and the protection of Papatūānuku.

37.     The ban also aligns with Te Ao Māori as it recognises the traditional system in which nothing was wasted – everything was able to be returned back to Papatūānuku without detriment to the whenua, awa or moana.  By reducing the prevalence of single-use plastic bags, this ban will support a move towards para kore (zero waste).

38.     The draft submission notes that mātauranga and tikanga Māori should be incorporated into solutions and decision-making by working with mana whenua, enabling Māori participation in decision-making as per Te Tiriti o Waitangi obligations. This will ensure that the implementation of a phase-out works well for Māori. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

39.     The financial costs of a plastic bag ban to Auckland Council are likely to be minimal.

 

40.     Possible financial benefits include:

·     a reduction in damage caused by plastic bags on plant and equipment at the Visy Materials Recycling Facility

·     reduction in penalties paid by the council for contamination of kerbside commingled recycling

·     reduction in streetscape litter clean up by street maintenance contractors.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

41.     The risks of local boards providing input on the draft consultation document are minimal.  

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board feedback

151

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Bonnie-May Shantz - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

 

File No.: CP2018/15598

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

 

Information reports for the local board:

 

2.       At its 7 August 2018 meeting, the Planning Committee  considered the Impacts of the Unitary Plan on residential development report (Attachment A) and resolved as follows:

 

Impacts of the Unitary Plan on residential development

Resolution number PLA/2018/77

MOVED by Chairperson C Darby, seconded by Cr P Hulse: 

That the Planning Committee:

a)      receive the report and forward it to local boards for information.

CARRIED

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

b)      note the Planning Committee  report and resolutions on the Impacts of the Unitary Plan on residential development.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Impacts of the Unitary Plan on residential development report

155

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/15596

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      notes the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Calendar

165

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2018/15597

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the notes for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 1, 8 and 22 August 2018.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 1, 8 and 22 August 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

1 August workshop notes

171

b

8 August workshop notes

173

c

22 August workshop notes

175

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 


 

    

  


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Light the World Campgain                             Page 179


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

19 September 2018