I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 25 September 2018

4:00pm

Onehunga Community Centre,
83 Church Street,
Onehunga

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Deputy Chairperson

Debbie Burrows

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Bernie Diver

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Maria Meredith

 

 

Alan Verrall

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Tracey Freeman

Democracy Advisor

 

19 September 2018

 

Contact Telephone: 021 537 862

Email: Tracey.Freeman@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum                                                              5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                              7

12        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                    9

13        Board Member's Reports                                                                                            17

14        Election of Deputy Chairperson                                                                                 19

15        Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Round One 2018/2019 grant allocations                                                                                        21

16        Hamlin Park - Field Reallocation                                                                                31

17        Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                     63

18        Auckland Transport September 2018 Update to the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board                                                                                                                             67

19        Road Name Approval: 2 New Roads for Fenchurch 5A and 5B in Glen Innes.    71

20        Road Name Approval: Three New Roads at 33 Panama Road, Mount Wellington 81

21        Representation Review Engagement Analysis                                                        89

22        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 February - 31 July 2018                                                                                                                     103

23        Updating the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board on ATEED's activities between 1 January and 30 June 2018                                                                                        111

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      123

25        Record of Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Workshops                                  127  

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 28 August 2018, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

 

 

Attachments

a          Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum......................................................... 133

 


 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

 

File No.: CP2018/13047

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board an update on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Opportunity for the Governing Body representative to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on projects, meetings, events and issues of interest to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board and its community.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2018/13045

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson's Report September 2018

11

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Board Member's Reports

 

File No.: CP2018/13043

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Providing Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the board members report.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Election of Deputy Chairperson

 

File No.: CP2018/17563

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint a Deputy Chairperson for the period of 29 October 2018 to the end of the 2016-2019 term.

2.       Member B Diver has tendered his resignation as Deputy Chairperson from 29 October 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

3.       The Local Board must elect a member to this position in accordance with Schedule 7, clause 25 of the Act, noting that no member has a casting vote.

4.       The Local Board will need to determine (by resolution) what method they will apply to elect the Deputy Chairperson – System A or System B.

Schedule 7, Part 1, Clause 25 of the Local Government Act 2002 states that:

25           Voting systems for certain appointments

(1)          This clause applies to:

(a)     the election or appointment of the chairperson and deputy chairperson of a regional council; and

(b) the election or appointment of the deputy mayor; and

(c)     the election or appointment of the chairperson and deputy chairperson of a committee; and

(d) the election or appointment of a representative of a local authority.

(2)     If this clause applies, a local authority or a committee (if the local authority has so directed) must determine by resolution that a person be elected or appointed by using one of the following systems of voting:

(a) the voting system in subclause (3) (system A):

(b) the voting system in subclause (4) (system B).

(3)          System A:

(a)     requires that a person is elected or appointed if he or she receives the votes of a majority of the members of the local authority or committee present and voting; and

(b) has the following characteristics:

(i)     there is a first round of voting for all candidates; and

(ii)      if no candidate is successful in that round there is a second round of voting from which the candidate with the fewest votes in the first round is excluded; and

(iii)     if no candidate is successful in the second round there is a third, and if necessary subsequent, round of voting from which, each time, the candidate with the fewest votes in the previous round is excluded; and

(iv)    in any round of voting, if 2 or more candidates tie for the lowest number of votes, the person excluded from the next round is resolved by lot.


 

 

(4)     System B:

(a)     requires that a person is elected or appointed if he or she receives more votes than any other candidate; and

          (b) has the following characteristics:

                 (i)         there is only 1 round of voting; and

                 (ii)        if 2 or more candidates tie for the most votes, the tie is resolved by lot.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      elect a Deputy Chairperson for the period 29 October 2018 to end of the 2016-2019 political term, utilising either System A or System B of Schedule 7, Part 1, Clause 25 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Round One 2018/2019 grant allocations

 

File No.: CP2018/16720

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One and Multi-board Round One 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Local Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 24 April 2018 (see Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

3.       This report presents applications received in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One and Multi-board Round One 2018/2019 (see Attachment B).

4.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

5.       Thirty-two applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round One 2018/2019, including fourteen multi-board applications, requesting a total of $261,042.00.

 


 


Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round One 2018/2019.

Table One: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round One 2018/2019 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1911-102

Onehunga Chinese Association incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire and outdoor activities.

$9,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-103

Panmure Historical Society

Historic Heritage

Towards restoration cost of museum exhibits and display materials

$7,000.00

Ineligible

LG1911-106

Tongan Youth Trust / To'utupu Tonga Trust

Community

Towards an NCEA study programme for Pasifika students in the local board area.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-108

Pukepuke 'o Tonga

Arts and culture

Towards the Pukepuke ‘o Tonga Community workshop.

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-109

Mt Richmond School

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of a Clevertouch LED Screen TV.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-112

Communicare

Community

Towards venue hire cost.

$1,043.00

Eligible

LG1911-113

Kids Safe with Dogs

Community

Towards printing, instructor fees and administration cost.

$9,438.00

Eligible

LG1911-114

Netherlands Society "Oranje" (Auckland) Incorporated.

Community

Towards building entrance canopy and child safety gate.

$4,595.00

Eligible

LG1911-115

Third space Trust

Community

Towards an education coordinator, nutritional classes and barista education class cost.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-116

Mt Wellington Roller Sports Club

Sport and recreation

Towards Community Liaison cost for six months.

$5,000.00

Ineligible

LG1911-118

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards coaching cost and venue hire for junior development in Maungakiekie-Tamaki.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-119

The Synergy Project Trust

Community

Towards the E3 Triple Ex Youth Mentoring and Training Programme.

$9,165.00

Eligible

LG1911-124

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards costs associated with the Positive Ageing workshop programme.

$9,364.00

Ineligible

LG1911-125

Shanti Niwas Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the International Day of Older Person (IDOP) celebrations.

$12,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-126

Harmony Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the Laukau Po'uli cultural group, arts programme.

$7,200.00

Eligible

LG1911-127

Dolphin Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards materials for theatre productions.

$1,839.00

Eligible

LG1911-128

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the salary of the Youthline Helpline Coordinator.

$3,312.00

Ineligible

LG1911-129

Maungarei Community Christian Trust

Community

Towards the activities of the Kidz@One youth leadership programme.

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG1911-130

Harmony Trust

Community

Towards cost for the ‘Harmony in Relationships’ - counselling service.

$6,000.00

Ineligible

LG1911-131

Harmony Trust

Community

Towards costs of the Ready for the Road- Youth Responsible Driver Programme.

$10,000.00

Ineligible

LG1911-133

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of a mobile phone for the volunteer co-ordinator.

$1,346.00

Eligible

LG1911-134

Resource Rescue Limited

Environment

Towards the costs associated with a "Run test and Tag" training course.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-135

Ellerslie School Board of Trustees

 Environment

Towards the cost of new equipment.

$9,332.00

Eligible

LG1911-137

New Zealand Nepal Society

Community

Towards activity cost associated with running a ‍Woman’s fitness programme, Children’s Nepalese language classes and Nepalese sport activities.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-140

Panmure Yacht and Boating Club

Community

Towards CCTV cameras.

$15,000.00

Ineligible

LG1911-141

New Zealand Kung-Fu Wushu Federation Incorporated (Auckland Branch)

Sport and recreation

Towards coaching, training and promotion of the martial art Kung-Fu Wushu in Onehunga.

$8,592.00

Eligible

LG1911-142

The Asian Network Incorporated (TANI)

Community

Towards Bi-lingual Community Health Worker operating cost.

$8,500.00

Ineligible

LG1911-143

Mt Wellington Roller Sports Club

Sport and recreation

Towards rink hire fees for club training activities and community learn to skate classes.

$9,225.00

Eligible

LG1911-144

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards the Life Education health and nutrition programme in the local board schools.

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-145

Deaf Wellbeing Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards salary cost.

$5,824.00

Ineligible

LG1911-146

Onehunga Primary School

Environment

Towards the purchase cost of eight hungry bins for the school

$2,672.00

Eligible

LG1911-148

Mountains to Sea Conservation Trust - Experiencing Marine Reserves

Community

Towards the Tamaki Kaitiaki programme at Tamaki College.

$3,000.00

Eligible

Total

$218,947

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Multi-board Local Grant Round One 2018/2019.

Table Two: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multi-board Grant Round One 2018/2019 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB1819-114

Bike Auckland

Community

Towards the overall costs to run the Bike Burb programme: including venue hire, development fees, workshop costs and communications.

$3,000.00

Eligible





MB1819-115

Auckland Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards Umpire Shirts and protective clothing and Equipment Bags.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB1819-116

Auckland Indian Sports Club Incorporated.

Sport and recreation

Contribution towards annual hockey turf hire fees.

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB1819-118

Manukau Orchestral Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the venue hire and technical costs for a musical performance at the Vodafone Events Centre.

$745.00

Eligible




MB1819-126

Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind

Community

Contribution towards new digital talking books for the Blind Foundation Library.

$2,000.00

Eligible




MB1819-151

New Zealand Dance Advancement Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of venue hire, studio hire and the artistic cost for dance education coordinator. Cost for the Artistic Executive, Production Manager, dancers and senior dance tutors for the "2019 Youth and Community Engagement Programme”.

$3,600.00

Eligible








MB1819-154

StarJam Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the costs to run StarJam music workshops including the programme coordinator salary, tutor fees, venue hire, equipment and administration costs.

$4,250.00

Eligible






MB1819-162

New Zealand Council of Victim Support Groups Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs to recruit, train and supervise their volunteer support workers.

$6,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-174

LifeKidz Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of outdoor play panels and the cost of youth worker wages to run their youth programmes.

$2,000.00

Eligible




MB1819-177

NZ Filipino Sto Nino Devotees Trust

Events

Towards the venue hire and audio-visual costs for a two-day basketball competition and the Annual Sto Nino Fiesta and Sinulog Festival.

$2,000.00

Eligible





MB1819-185

Ken Maunder Park Community Trust

Sport and recreation

Toward architect, building consent, structural engineer and fire consultant fees for the refurbishment of the club house pavilion.

$4,000.00

Eligible





MB1819-191

PHAB Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs to PHAB service workers' salary, and coordinators and administrators' wages.

$1,500.00

Eligible



MB1819-193

OUTLine New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards a portion of general operating expenses including telephone and internet costs, printing, insurance, clinical supervision wages, training fees and volunteer costs.

$1,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-196

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust

Community

Towards the wages of three Stars programme coordinators, each located in a different local board school.

$5,000.00

Ineligible

Total

$42,095

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

 

8.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2018/2019 on 24 April 2018 and will operate three local grants rounds for this financial year. 

9.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

12.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

13.     A summary of each application received through Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 and Multi-Board Local Grants Round One is provided (see Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

14.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

15.     Fourteen applicants applying to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Local grants round one indicated that their application targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

16.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

17.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000.00 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

18.     In Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One 2018/2019, thirty-two applications were received, including fourteen multi-board applications, requesting a total of $261,042.00.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

19.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

20.     Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocating funding for round one local grants and multi-board round one grants, commercial and finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board 2018/2019 Grants Programme

29

b

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Grant Round One and Multi-board One, application summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Helen Taimarangai - Senior Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Fran Hayton - Principal Grants Advsr & Incentives TL

Shane King - Operations Support Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Hamlin Park - Field Reallocation

 

File No.: CP2018/16473

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend the reallocation in the use of the sports fields at Hamlin Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Mount Wellington Softball has increased in player and team numbers and their current use at Thompson Park is unable to accommodate their needs and therefore they require additional space to cater for their senior teams. 

3.       Mount Wellington Softball has requested the use of Hamlin Park as their home ground for the summer season of softball.

4.       Hamlin Park is currently used by Mount Wellington Cricket Club and Mount Wellington Rugby Club. 

5.       Mount Wellington Cricket Club has a small clubroom on Hamlin Park with a lease that expired on 31 July 2003.

6.       Auckland Council Sports Park Services have undertaken a Feasibility Study on the needs of cricket and softball in the Mt Wellington area which has identified that there is a surplus of cricket wickets and a shortfall of softball fields. The surplus of wickets is offsetting the shortfall in neighbouring areas.

7.       The Mount Wellington Softball and Mount Wellington Rugby have had discussions and are interested in amalgamating their clubs together to be based on Hamlin Park. 

8.       To actively optimise the use of existing sports park land and reflect the changing trends of sport in Auckland, the reallocation of existing fields will be required to be undertaken at times, and there will be some short-term disruption for longer term benefits.

9.       Four options where considered as part of the analysis of the allocation of Hamlin Park with the preferred option being option two. The options considered were:

1.   Status Quo - Mt Wellington Cricket remain at Hamlin Park and Mount Wellington Softball are allocated other parks in the wider Mount Wellington area.

2.   Mount Wellington Softball are allocated Hamlin Park for summer use and Mount Wellington Cricket are allocated wickets at Mt Wellington War Memorial Park.

3.   Dual use of Hamlin Park by Mount Wellington Cricket and Mount Wellington Softball where they share space and time on Hamlin Park.

4.   Short term solution with Mt Wellington Cricket remaining at Hamlin Park and Mt Wellington Softball allocated Sir Woolf Fisher as temporary use to consider any other possible options.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of the fields at Hamlin Park to Mount Wellington Softball as their home fields for the summer season commencing in 2018.

b)      approve the allocation of two cricket fields at Mount Wellington War Memorial Park to Mount Wellington Cricket as their home fields for the summer season commencing in 2018.

c)      request that Council’s Parks Sport and Recreation team work with Mount Wellington Softball and Mount Wellington Cricket on their relocations.

Horopaki / Context

10.     There are several sports parks in the greater Mount Wellington catchment that cater for summer and winter sports.  (Refer Map 1 and Table 1).

Map #1: Location of sports parks in and around the Mount Wellington area

Table #1: Summary Table of Sports Parks and Summer use in and around Mount Wellington

Park

Local Board

Allocated Summer Use #1

Allocated Summer use #2

Ellerslie Domain

Orakei

Touch

 

Thompson Park

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Softball

 

Sir Woolf Fisher Park

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

None

 

Mount Wellington War Memorial Reserve

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Cricket

Touch

Hamlin Park

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Cricket

Touch

Fergusson Domain

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Touch

 

Waikaraka Park

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Summer Football

Cricket

Simson Reserve

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Softball

 

Norana Reserve

Mangere - Otahuhu

American Football

Tag

Mc Manus Park

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Touch

 

Otahuhu Mt Richmond Reserve

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Touch

 

Seaside Park

Mangere - Otahuhu

Cricket

 

 

11.     Thompson Park is the current home ground for Mount Wellington Softball. (Refer Map 2)

12.     Mount Wellington Softball does not have any clubrooms on Thompson Park.

13.     Thompson Park can only accommodate two junior softball fields.

14.     Mount Wellington Softball has increased in player and team numbers and their current use at Thompson Park is unable to accommodate their needs and therefore they require additional space to cater for their senior teams.

15.     Hamlin Park is in the Mount Wellington area off the intersection of Penrose Road, Waipuna Road and Mount Wellington Highway.

16.     Hamlin Park is the current home ground for Mount Wellington Cricket and Mount Wellington Rugby. (Refer Map 3)

17.     Mount Wellington Cricket has a small clubroom in the western corner of the Park. (refer photo 2) The building is small approximately 10m x 5m and is almost triangular.  The outside of the building is not in a good state with some dry rot in the window sills which could possibly be cleaned up.

18.     The lease for the Mount Wellington Cricket clubrooms expired on 31 July 2003 so the current lease continues month by month.

19.     Mount Wellington Rugby has large clubrooms on private land adjoining the north western side of Hamlin Park.

20.     Hamlin Park currently provides two rugby fields for winter sport and four touch fields and an overlapping cricket wicket for summer sport.

21.     There is a small old toilet/changing room building alongside the Mount Wellington Cricket clubrooms. (refer photo 1).

Map #2: Location of junior softball field on Thompson Park – home of Mount Wellington Softball

 

Map #3: Hamlin Park showing current summer field layout and location of the two clubrooms

 

Photo #1: Toilet/changing room building in foreground and the Mount Wellington Cricket clubrooms at the rear.

 


 

 

Photo #2: Mount Wellington Cricket clubrooms

 

22.     Mount Wellington Softball has increased in player and team numbers and their current use at Thompson Park is unable to accommodate their needs and therefore they require additional space to cater for their senior teams. 

23.     Mount Wellington Softball has requested the use of Hamlin Park as their home ground for softball for the 2018/19 summer season and beyond, so they can accommodate the growth they are experiencing and able to provide for senior teams.

24.     Mount Wellington Softball and Mount Wellington Rugby have had discussions and are interested in amalgamating the clubs together and to be based on Hamlin Park.

25.     Mount Wellington Softball has received supporting letters from, Auckland Rugby, Ruapotaka Marae, Sport Auckland and Auckland Softball Association for the amalgamation with Mount Wellington Rugby and better utilisation of Hamlin Park.

26.     Mount Wellington Cricket have received 2 letters of support from Auckland Cricket.

27.     The following is the background of the consultation to the proposal:

a.       27 February 18 Presentation to Maungakiekie - Tamaki Local Board by Mt Wellington Softball requesting the use of Hamlin Park to meet their growing needs

b.       15 May 18 Presentation to Maungakiekie - Tamaki Local Board by Principal Sports Advisor on options and needs of softball. Board recommended having consultation with affected parties from softball, cricket and rugby with Alan Verrall and Nerissa Henry as representatives at the sessions.

c.       23 May 18 Meeting with Auckland Softball Kevin Mc Millian, Mt Wellington Softball Sylvia Raraka, Maungakiekie - Tamaki Local Board - Alan Verrall and Nerissa Henry, Auckland Rugby - Brett Young, Mt Wellington Rugby – Jeff McIntyre, and Strategic Broker - Ossie Manukuo.

d.       30 May 18 Meeting with Auckland Cricket – Iain Laxon, Dean Bartlett and Tony Naidu, Maungakiekie - Tamaki Local Board - Alan Verrall and Nerissa Henry, Mt Wellington Rugby – Jeff and Strategic Broker - Ossie Manukuo

 

e.       27 June 18 Meeting with Mt Wellington Cricket, AK Cricket – Dean Bartlett, MTLB - Alan Verrall and Nerissa Henry, Mt Wellington Rugby - Jeff McIntyre and Mt Wellington Cricket - Lewis Hori

f.       11 July 18 Written response from Mt Wellington Cricket to Maungakiekie - Tamaki Local Board

g.       31 July 2018 Workshop with Maungakiekie – Tamaki Local Board members Chris Makoare Chair of the Local Board, Alan Verrall and Nerissa Henry and Council staff from Community Leases, Parks Sports and Recreation teams on the proposal.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

28.     Softball team numbers across the Auckland Softball Association have grown slightly since 2013 from 290 to 307 teams. There are sufficient softball fields in Auckland to serve the needs, but some are remotely located and therefore there is a need for several senior and junior diamonds in specific high needs areas.

29.     There is considerable growth in the Mount Wellington Softball team numbers. They have increased from four teams in 2011 to 12 slow pitch (juniors and adults), five tee ball (children), one men’s, one girls under 15 and two women’s giving a total of 16 softball teams in 2017.

30.     Thompson Park cannot support the provision of senior softball which restricts the growth of Mount Wellington Softball.  Mount Wellington Softball will not be able to grow in team numbers without the provision of extra field time.

31.     Cricket is growing at the rate of the population and are endeavouring to develop their sport by creating a relationship with Kilikiti and are planning on introducing a new mid-week game format to attract more players.  The changing diverse nature in Auckland is a focus of Auckland Cricket to encourage more participants to become active. 

32.     There is a cricket shortfall in neighbouring Albert Eden of 16 wickets for morning play. There is surplus in Maungakiekie – Tamaki of four and a half wickets which help to offset some of the neighbouring shortfall as sports are managed across Auckland as a regional provision and not constrained by local board, codes or club boundaries.

33.     Mount Wellington Cricket have two T20 teams in 2017/2018 and planning to have three teams in 2018/2019.

34.     Mount Wellington Softball is growing considerably faster than the Mount Wellington Cricket which appears to not have any current growth.

35.     If Mount Wellington Cricket are not allocated the use of Hamlin Park for cricket training and play, then the main option would be to relocate their needs to Mount Wellington War Memorial Park (MWWMP).

36.     If Mount Wellington are not allocated Hamlin Park for cricket they could continue to use their clubroom facility as a headquarters while playing at Mt Wellington War Memorial. This will be part of further discussions with Mt Wellington Cricket.

37.     There have been discussions between Mount Wellington Rugby and Mount Wellington Softball regarding amalgamation and the possibility of joint club rooms on Hamlin Park.  If Mount Wellington Softball are allocated Hamlin Park for summer use they could on an informal basis, make use of the Mount Wellington Rugby clubrooms while discussions continue on their possible amalgamation.

38.     Mount Wellington Cricket do not support the reallocation of Hamlin Park to Softball and has raised concerns, as identified in their letter to the Maungakiekie – Tamaki Local Board.


 

 

39.     Mount Wellington Cricket has stated that they do not wish to be relocated as the use of Mount Wellington War Memorial Park is not suitable to meet their needs due to

·    the history of being at Hamlin Park since the 1960’s,

·    loss of their clubrooms building at Hamlin Park,

·    the strong winds at MWWMP,

·    cricket balls going into the estuary,

·    people walking through the field during games and

·    that there are no training nets, storage facilities or clubrooms at MWWMP.

40.     There are several options that have been considered as shown in table below:

Table #2: Options for solution on allocation of Hamlin Park

 

Options

 

Description

Pros

Cons

Recommendations and Costings

1

Status Quo no change.

Cricket remains at Hamlin Park - current home

Softball remains at Thompson Park

Mount Wellington Softball look for an alternative venue for a senior softball field like Sir Woolf Fisher Park or Norana Park

Mount Wellington Cricket and Mount Wellington Rugby may combine as joint entity and look at providing one joint facility on the park to support both clubs.

Mount Wellington Cricket home remains at Hamlin Park in existing clubrooms

Cricket will retain it historical use which they have had since 1961.

Cricket Clubrooms will continue to be used at Hamlin Park by Mount Wellington Cricket

Thompson Park remains for softball to provide two (2) junior softball field

Sir Woolf Fisher could provide one (1) senior softball field and one (1) junior softball field.

Norana Park could provide two (2) senior softball fields and two (2) junior softball fields

Mount Wellington Softball unable to expand to cater for growth in area.

Unlikely Mount Wellington Softball will amalgamate with Mt Wellington Rugby in one facility

Softball not provided with senior diamonds at home and may be loss of players from club

Mount Wellington Softball will not have all fields at one home location

Mount Wellington Softball not have own or joint clubrooms.

 

Not Recommended

Softball not able to grow in providing active sport for local community

Costings

If Softball require a senior pitch, then some costs may be required for the provision of temporary facilities to accommodate softball at other venues. Financial assistance would be required if new portable back stop fences are required at a cost $10k – $15k.

 

2

Mount Wellington Softball are allocated Hamlin Park for summer use.

Mount Wellington Cricket are relocated to Mount Wellington War Memorial Park

(Refer Map 4)

 

Mount Wellington Softball and Mount Wellington Rugby will be able to amalgamate and work on a joint facility to support not both clubs but other users.

Mount Wellington Softball will be able to expand their team numbers with the additional senior softball fields.

Mount Wellington Cricket may disband and discontinue operation as members may leave club if they need to train and play at Mount Wellington War Memorial Park.

 

 

 

 

 

There are no clubrooms at MWWMP for Mount Wellington Cricket to use except the possible option to join with Marist Brothers Old Boys Rugby Club. No discussions have been held with Marist Brothers Old Boys Rugby Club.

Auckland Cricket will need additional capacity at other sites to offset loss of Hamlin Park.

Mount Wellington Cricket building will become vacant and may need to be removed. If Mount Wellington Cricket do not remove their building, then the cost for removal or maintenance will reside with the local board.

Recommended Option

Mount Wellington Softball able to cater for the growth of the sport in Mount Wellington and provide for more senior teams.

 

 

 

Although Cricket allocation will change there is sufficient capacity for cricket at Mount Wellington War Memorial Park.

Costings

A permanent backstop would be required to meet softball standards for senior play.  This will cost approx. $150k. There is no current funding. 

Therefore, in the short-term Softball has mentioned they would move the fences they have at Thompson Park. Some financial assistance may be required for this move. Financial assistance would be required if new portable back stop fences are required at a cost $10k – $15k.

Setting out, marking and repairs to the surface at Hamlin Park will be undertaken by Council contractors as part of general maintenance works.  Financial assistance would be required for the removal of the cricket block and reinstatement of the surface would be required at a cost of $10k.

 

3

Dual use of Hamlin Park by Cricket and Softball

Mount Wellington Softball and Mount Wellington Cricket share the use over summer

Cricket would not be required to move and could use MWWMP on weekend for home games

Mount Wellington Softball could use Sir Woolf Fisher Park or Norana Park when not at Hamlin Park.

Possibility that Mount Wellington Softball and Mount Wellington Cricket and Mount Wellington Rugby could all amalgamate into one facility

Restrictive use on field by Clubs and they would need to share weekend use on alternative weekends

Clubs may not accept split use of fields

Cricket block is in centre of field.

Only one (1) senior softball field and one (1) junior softball field would be available at Hamlin Park

Expansion of code or club on Hamlin Park would be restricted by having 3 summer users on one park.

 

Mount Wellington Softball would be split across two sites

 

Not Recommended

Softball would not be able to grow and provide active sport for the local community.

Cricket would be restricted in use.

 

Costings

A permanent backstop would be required to meet softball standards for senior play.  This will cost approx. $150k. There is no current funding. 

 

Therefore, in the short-term Softball would need some new portable back stop fences as the fences they have will remain at Thompson Park. Financial assistance would be required for the supply of the fences at a cost $10k – $15k.

An artificial grass carpet would be required to be laid over the cricket block during softball usage for the safety of players. This would need to be uplifted each week and laid out by the club. Financial assistance would be required for the supply of the carpet at a cost $8k -$10k.

 

4

Short term solution

Softball use Sir Woolf Fisher for 2018/19 season temporary arrangement

(Refer Map 5)

Provide time to work through options to find the best option

Thompson Park remains for softball to provide two (2) junior softball field

Sir Woolf Fisher could provide one (1) senior softball field and one (1) junior softball field.

Not acceptable to Softball

Delay the decision on the issue.

May restrict some softball growth

 

Not Recommended

Growth of Softball placed on hold as not able to grow in providing active sport for local community

 

Costings

In the short-term Softball would need some new portable back stop fences as the fences they have will remain at Thompson Park. Some financial assistance would be required for the supply of the fences. Cost $10 – $15k

 


 

 

Map #4: Hamlin Park with two (2) full sized softball diamonds

 

 

Map #5: Sir Woolf Fisher Park with two (2) senior softball fields

 

 

41.     Cricket are currently losing several of their fields from across Auckland and some are not being replaced with another field which will stretch the operation of their competition fields. (Refer Table 3).

Table #3: Possible Changes impacting on Provision of Cricket wickets in Auckland

Proposed

Local Board

Action

Sunnynook Park

Campbells Bay

Devonport - Takapuna

Temporary loss of cricket pitches due to earthworks to create stormwater pond. Out of action for 2 summers

Greenslade Reserve Northcote

Kaipatiki

Temporary loss of artificial wicket due to earthworks to create stormwater pond. Replacement of artificial pitch with roll out – no hard stand area in middle of field

Onepoto Domain

Northcote

Kaipatiki

Proposed permanent removal of Cricket Block in middle of two fields. Safety issue with AFL using the two fields in summer and playing over a concrete wicket. Also, there is a greater need for a baseball diamond on the North Shore and the diamond will be off the AFC field, so the wicket will be permanently removed.

Hamlin Park

Mount Wellington

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Possible removal of artificial wicket to permit softball to be established at the park. Yet to be determined by Maungakiekie – Tamaki Local Board.

Sir Woolf Fisher Park

Mount Wellington

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Although installation not originally approved removal of artificial wicket has occurred as required by Maungakiekie – Tamaki Local Board to allow for open play space.

Mt Wellington War Memorial Park

Panmure

Maungakiekie - Tamaki

Planned removal of No 1 artificial wicket as safety issues with wicket being too close to the No 1 Rugby Field. Still to be confirmed if wicket to be replaced on new alignment

Auckland Domain

Newmarket

Waitemata

Reduction from 19 wickets to 8 wickets due to serve overlapping of outfields creating safety issue for players. Also, hoggin wickets remaining in middle of winter fields not safe for winter players

Opaheke Park

Papakura

New grass cricket wicket provided with 4 strips

Huapai Domain

Rodney

New grass cricket wicket provided with 5 strips

 

42.     During the summer period, when the ground conditions are suitable, construction works are undertaken on the sports fields to improve or renew the existing facilities.  This generally takes the field out of use for the whole of the summer period to enable the improvements and major renewals to be undertaken. Also, there are many events undertaken in summer which can restrict the use of the cricket field for a short period.  These works and events have a major impact on cricket by reducing the number of fields available for cricket to use.

43.     An investigation and review are underway on all wickets across Auckland to ensure players safety. The overlapping of outfields is concerning and is creating a potential risk to players and the safety zone from permanent artificial wickets to other field boundaries is not consistent or meets our safety guidelines. Also, hoggin wickets are remaining in middle of winter fields which also creates a risk for winter players.  It is likely that out of the review changes will occur and the number of cricket wickets across Auckland will substantially reduce which will cause a shortfall.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

44.     The recommendations in this report falls under the local boards’ delegated authority relating to local recreation, sports and community facilities.

45.     The recommendation also supports the Maungakiekie – Tamaki Local Board Plan 2017 outcome of Maungakiekie – Tamaki being an active and engaged community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

46.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. Support for Maori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Te Toa Takitini, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. These commitments are also articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan, the Unitary Plan and the local board plans.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

47.     Financial implications are indentified in the Options table. (Refer to Table 2).

48.     If the recommended outcomes are agreed then Maungakiekie – Tamaki Local Board may be approached to support the move of Mount Wellington Cricket to Mount Wellington War Memorial Park.

49.     If Mount Wellington Cricket relocate, Parks will work with Mount Wellington Cricket to identify possible opportunities for the provision of a home at Mount Wellington War Memorial Park or other venues.

50.     If Mount Wellington Cricket relocate then the Maungakiekie – Tamaki Local Board may end up with the ownership of the old cricket building on Hamlin Reserve to remove or maintain if Mount Wellington leave the site and disown the building.  Mount Wellington Cricket may still use the facility as a headquarters while playing at Mount Wellington War Memorial. Discussions will need to be held with Mount Wellington Cricket on the future of the building.

51.     Funding for permanent softball backstops is not currently available if softball relocate to Hamlin Park.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

52.     If the proposed change of field use proceeds, then the risks are identified in the options table. (Refer to Table 2).

53.     Summer season commences on Saturday 20th Oct 2018. If the Board approve the reallocation then the changeover could be undertaken prior to this summer.

54.     The softball club could continue to use Thompson Park for training, as they have previously, until the season commences, and the softball diamonds and fields are setup at Hamlin Park.

55.     Almost all fields are closed for field renovations until 20th Oct, start of summer, which involve sowing, coring, aeration and fertilising to get a grass cover for summer users although clubs do use the fields under the maintenance team’s guidance.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

56.     If approval is given to reallocate Mount Wellington Cricket Club from Hamlin to MWWMP then further discussion will be held with the club and the Auckland Cricket Association on the setup at MWWMP and facilities that are available.

57.     Works will commence on the removal of the cricket block and in the short-term temporary backstops will need to be found to cater for softballs needs. Field markings will be provided.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Cricket Assn Letter of Support for MW Cricket #1

45

b

Auckland Cricket Assn Letter of Support MW Cricket #2

49

c

Auckland Softball Assn Letter of Support for MW Softball

51

d

Auckland Rugby Letter of Support for MW Softball

53

e

Mt Wellington Cricket Submission to MTLB

55

f

Mt Wellington Rugby Letter of Support for MW Softball

57

g

Ruapotaka Marae Letter of Support for MW Softball

59

h

Sport Auckland - Letter of Support for MW Softball

61

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Grant Jennings - Principal Sports Parks Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund

 

File No.: CP2018/17616

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Allocation of Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Local boards can use the LBTCF to deliver transport infrastructure projects that are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. There is $2,259,391 in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s (MTLB) LBTCF, which needs to be allocated by 30 June 2019.

3.       This report makes recommendations to assist allocation of MTLB’s LBTCF.

4.       Recommendations in this report were arrived at by assessing a shortlist of potential projects against criteria agreed by the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      allocate $50,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund to install five driver feedback signs on Apirana Avenue Glen Innes, Grey Street Onehunga, Elstree Avenue Glen Innes and two on Kings Road Panmure.

b)      notes the Rough order of cost of $600,000 provided by Auckland Transport to build two raised crossings on Tripoli Road, the first between Matapan and Stuart Avenue and the second north of Hobson Drive, Panmure and authorize release of the Local Board’s Transport Capital Fund for Auckland Transport to use to complete detailed design and provide a Firm Cost Estimate.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

6.       There is currently $2,259,391 remaining in the Maungakiekie Tāmaki LBTCF. This must be allocated by 30 June 2019.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

7.       Potential projects were considered for the LBTCF at a business meeting in May 2018 and the projects discussed are summarized as follows:

·   Driver feedback signs

·   Raised pedestrian crossings on Tripoli Road, Panmure

·   Roundabout on Barrack Road, Mt Wellington

·   Speed table on Quadrant Road (between Arthur Street and Grey Street, Onehunga)

Driver Feedback Signs

8.       The MTLB raised concerns about speed in a number of streets in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki area. The MTLB identified five sites that are the highest concern. Apirana Avenue, Elstree Street, Glen Innes, Grey Street, Onehunga and two sites on Kings Road, Panmure.

9.       Driver feedback signs are electronic signs that let drivers know their speed, provided it is under 50kms, if the speed is higher than 50km per hour it flashes a ‘slow down’ warning to drivers. These have proven to be a very effective way of lowering speed on local roads.

10.     Auckland Transport provided quality advice confirming that there are speed concerns at these sites but that the sites do not rank high enough to be prioritized in current budgets. Although unable to pay for the signs Auckland Transport’s local Minor Safety team does support the installation of driver feedback signs.

11.       The cost to install each sign is $10,000; the total amount for five sites is $50,000.

Raised Pedestrian Crossings in Tripoli Road, Panmure

12.     The MTLB expressed concern with the safety of students from Tamaki primary school crossing Tripoli Road. A pedestrian crossing facility exist, however the MTLB feel this is not currently slowing traffic enough to allow safe crossing. They have asked for a raised pedestrian crossing between Matapan Road and Stuart Avenue. Auckland Transport’s advice is that a second raised pedestrian crossing on Tripoli Road by Hobson Drive should be installed because this road caters for high volumes of pedestrians including students creating an increased crash risk.

13.     The projects cannot be added to Auckland Transport’s programme within the next 2-3 years which allows them to be funded by the LBTCF.  Auckland Transport supports the MTLB’s request to have these installed this financial year using LBTCF.  Auckland Transport has provided a Rough Order of Cost for these projects are $300,000 each and the next stage is to request a Firm Cost Estimate and detailed design.

Barrack Road Roundabout

14.     The MTLB requested Auckland Transport investigate a roundabout on Barrack Road to slow traffic. Auckland Transport’s advice is that a roundabout on Barrack Road should not be supported. Barrack Road is a straight stretch of road with no other road forming an intersection. Without an intersection a roundabout is impractical and is unlikely to have the desired effect.

 

Quadrant Road Speed Table

15.     Auckland Transport investigated the possibility of a speed table on Quadrant Road, Onehunga because the Board raised an issue with speed near the local school.

16.     Auckland Transport’s advice is that it does not support the installation of a speed table on Quadrant Road between Arthur Street and Grey Street. This is because providing a speed table on Quadrant Road is likely to increase ‘rat running’ and speeding in the neighboring streets.

17.     Also, the crash history of the area is not sufficient to warrant a speed table. Only two crashes have been identified in the last five years. None of the crashes were caused by speed or related to pedestrians. Auckland Transport would support an area wide speed calming treatment if the MTLB is willing to fund the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local board views, informed by local community engagement, were incorporated in the short list of projects and development of the criteria discussed in this report.

19.     The projects were workshopped with the MTLB using the agreed criteria and with quality advice from Auckland Transport officers. This advice and the option discussed but not supported has been summarized above.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

20.     Any engagement with, or impact on, Māori will be assessed on a project by project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

21.     The financial implication of the board approving recommendations a and b of this report is the allocation of $50,000 of the LBTCF. This leaves $2,209,391 remaining.

22.     All other recommendations in this report are subject to further analysis of financial implications. However, the current estimate for the raised pedestrian tables identified is $600,000. This figure is a Rough Order of Cost from which the MTLB can extrapolate a commitment of approx. 10% for design costs (or approx.$60,0000) in order to develop a Firm Cost Estimate.

23.     Inclusion of the $600,000 will leave $1,609,391 to plan for allocating to other projects the board identify.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

24.     Auckland Transport will put risk management strategies in place on a project by project basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

25.     Auckland Transport will progress the decisions made by the local board as a result of this report and provide updates via the monthly reporting process. If it becomes clear that there is a risk of underspend of the LBTCF within this electoral term, Auckland Transport will make further recommendations to the board at a future business meeting using the agreed criteria.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport September 2018 Update to the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board

 

File No.: CP2018/17528

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board on transport related matters in their area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month, but the report contains information about the wider ‘context’ involving a summary on AMETI – Eastern Busway project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport September 2018 update report.

 

Horopaki / Context

3.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. Auckland Transport reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

4.       Auckland Transport continues to deliver a number of strategic projects in the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board area, discussed below.

 

AMETI - Eastern Busway

 

5.       AMETI is a very large project that will build New Zealand’s first urban busway providing congestion free ‘bus only’ lanes for commuters running from Panmure Station all the way to Botany. When it is completed, people will be able to commute easily and quickly from Botany to Panmure and vice versa.

 

6.       Auckland Council has now formally approved the Notice of Requirement (NOR) for the section of the AMETI - Eastern Busway between Panmure and Pakuranga. This announcement comes after more than three years of detailed public consultation and a consenting process that culminated in a hearing late last year. Now the NOR process is complete, this stage of the project can proceed.

 

7.       The Panmure to Pakuranga stage starts construction in late 2018 and involves construction of a dedicated, congestion free busway along Lagoon Drive and Pakuranga Road. It includes new cycling and walking connections, improvements to major intersections, urban design and landscaping enhancements, a new bridge across Tamaki River and the creation of a new park and improved public spaces.

 

8.       This work will create traffic disruptions and Auckland Transport is working hard to encourage people in the community to plan ahead to avoid the disruption caused by these major works. 

 

9.       Auckland Transport expect to complete the next round of consultation, which is about the Pakuranga to Botany section with affected landowners and community stakeholders by December 2018.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     This is an information only report. Analysis and advice is found in the September decision report. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

11.     Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions from July and August 2018 are included in the following table.

Table 4: Traffic Control Committee Decisions July, August 2018 

Street

Area

Work

Decision

Beasley Avenue

 

Penrose

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

Carried

Campbell Road, William Avenue

 

Greenlane

Lane Arrow Markings, No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Stop Control, Flush Median

Carried

Kalmia Street, Stanway Place, Sultan Street

 

Ellerslie

No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, P2 Parking, P60 Parking, P15 Parking, Lane Arrow Markings, Traffic Signal Control, Traffic Islands, Stop Control, Give-Way Control, Keep Clear, Edge Line

Carried

Wilson Way, Penrose Road, Station Road

 

Mt Wellington

No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Lane Arrow Markings, Flush Median, Stop Control, Footpath, Keep Clear, No Passing

Carried

Dunkirk Road

 

Panmure

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

Carried

Mountain Road

Panmure

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

Carried

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.


 

 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     The proposed decision to receive the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all of its projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     Auckland Transport will provide an update report to the local board in October 2018.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Felicity Merrington, Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Ben Stallworthy, Acting Manager, Elected Member Relationships

Victoria Villaraza, Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Road Name Approval: 2 New Roads for Fenchurch 5A and 5B in Glen Innes.

 

File No.: CP2018/17008

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to name 2 new roads created by way of subdivision for Fenchurch 5A (69 & 73-81 Taniwha Street & 17-23 Sunnymead Road) and Fenchurch 5B (57-65 Taniwha Street, 29-33 Sunnymead Road, 5 Mansfield Street) in Glen Innes (Special Housing Area).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has Road Naming Guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       Tāmaki Regeneration Company (TRC) has collected a list of preferred and a pool of alternative names for 2 new roads in the Fenchurch 5A and 5B development sites. Auckland Council’s guidelines and criteria for naming new roads have been adhered to in this situation, along with previously agreed steps between TRC and Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board (MTLB).

4.       On behalf of the developer, New Zealand Housing Foundation, TRC has submitted the following road names for the Fenchurch 5A & 5B developments:

Preferred Names:

·    Wā kāinga Lane

·    Filemu Lane

 

Pool of Alternative Names:

·    Kōmitimiti Lane*

·    Whanaunga Lane

·    Papatotara Lane*

·    Penina Lane

·    Whanau Lane

·    Matawhero Lane

 

5.       Following consultation with iwi, Ngaati Whanaunga suggested the following additional options:

·    Toko

·    Kiitahi

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve 2 new names within the Fenchurch 5A and 5B developments, Glen Innes, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974:

·    Fenchurch 5A JOAL: (insert approved name)

·    Fenchurch 5B JOAL: (insert approved name)

Horopaki / Context

6.       Resource consent (referenced R-JSL-2016-785) was issued 20 July 2017 for a three-block construction of 70 new residential lots, under the Housing Accords and Special Housing Area Act 2013 (HASHAA).

Block 5A involves 30 residential dwellings and 2 JOALs; Block 5B involves 28 residential dwellings and 1 JOAL; and Block 5C involves 12 residential dwellings and 1 JOAL.

Of the 4 new JOALs to be created, only two (Block 5A and Block 5B) will require a road name in accordance with the national addressing standard, as they each serve more than 5 lots.

7.       Site plan of the Fenchurch 5A and 5B developments can be found in Attachment A.

8.       Master plan and location plan of the Fenchurch 5A and 5B developments can be found in Attachment B.

9.       Local iwi have also provided Te Reo road name options, detailed below.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

11.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

  a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

  a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

  an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area;

  the use of Maori in names is actively encouraged.

12.     Theme: The road names were chosen to compliment recently approved road names within the broader Fenchurch neighbourhood redevelopment - all of which represent and acknowledge the former and existing community mix of Māori, Pakeha and Pacific Island residents. Both of the preferred names have been chosen to support the positive meaning of “Taniwha”, i.e. as guardian of the people living within its territory.

13.     TRC have proposed road names which are summarized in the table below:


 

Fenchurch 5A & 5B Development Preferred Names

Proposed Names

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Wā kāinga Lane

Te Reo Māori word meaning true home, home base, home.

Suggested as a word that promotes good community spirit.

Filemu Lane

 

Samoan word meaning ‘Peace’.

[Adjective: quiet, easy. Verb: to be quiet, to be easy].

To acknowledge the existing community’s Polynesian roots. Suggested as a word that promotes good community spirit.

 

Pool of Alternative Names for Fenchurch 5A & 5B

Proposed Names

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Kōmitimiti Lane

Te Reo Māori word meaning ‘to mingle, integrate, blend, combine, mix, come together, fuse, merge, and intermingle’.

Whanaunga Lane

Te Reo Māori: Ancestor name of Ngaati Whanaunga. Associated tupuna to many hapū of Tāmaki. Suggested by Ngaati Whanaunga

Papatotara Lane

Te Reo Māori word for the inner side of the bark of the Totara, a term also used to refer to high-ranking women. Used in our waiata. Suggested by Ngaati Whanaunga

Penina Lane

Samoan word meaning ‘Pearl’. To acknowledge the existing community’s Polynesian roots. Suggested as a word that promotes good community spirit.

Whanau Lane

Te Reo Māori word meaning ‘family, extended family, to be born, give birth’. Suggested as a word that promotes good community spirit.

Matawhero Lane

Māori name for the planet Mars.

 

Iwi have proposed road names in the table below:

Iwi’s Proposed

Names

Background/Significance
(as described by Ngaati Whanaunga)

Toko

Toko Renata Te Taniwha - Past Chairman of Hauraki Maori Trust Board. Has been instrumental in the development of Hauraki, Marutuuahu, and many iwi, both at a local and national level.

Kiitahi

Meaning true to one’s word. Name of an ancestor who signed the te tiriti o Waitangi. Attended many hui maintaining Ngaati Whanaunga Mana Whenua in Tamaki.

 

14.     Land Information New Zealand has confirmed the proposed names are acceptable for use in this location and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

15.     The proposed names and the suggested road type ‘Lane’ are deemed to meet the council’s road naming guidelines.

Iwi Consultation: All suggested road names were provided to relevant mana whenua for their review and feedback. Ngaati Whanaunga responded with 8 suggestions, two of which were acceptable for use and included in the applicants proposed names. Four were excluded as they were too similar to roads already used in the Auckland region, and the remaining two acceptable name suggestions have been included in the table above for consideration by the local board.

No objections or additional comments were raised by Mana Whenua for any of the other proposed names.

16.     Ngaati Whanaunga has advised the family of both Toko and Kiitahi who are in support of their names being used.

17.     Community Consultation: Proposed road names have been produced via consultation with the community and key stakeholder groups, such as TRC’s Community Liaison Committee, Lalaga Pasifiki, the Glen Innes and Panmure Business Associations, and other community organisations. Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board members were also canvassed in 2017 for potential new names.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

19.     The review sought from the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

20.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

21.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

22.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plans

75

b

Attachment B - Master and Location Plans

77

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Road Name Approval: Three New Roads at 33 Panama Road, Mount Wellington

 

File No.: CP2018/17076

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to name three private new roads created by way of a subdivision at 33 Panama Road, Mount Wellington. Each new road is a jointly owned access lot (JOAL).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has Road Naming Guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       This report outlines the background for the naming of three new roads created by way of resource consent BUN60311188, LUC60311213, SUB60320331, approved on 20th March 2018. This is Stage 6 of the 7-stage ‘Richmond’ housing development, intended to provide over 600 new dwellings on the site over the next 3-5 years.

4.       Wilshire Group Limited have submitted the following road name options:

TABLE 1: PROPOSED ROAD NAMES

REF

PREFERRED NAME

ALTERNATIVE NAME 1

ALTERNATIVE NAME 2

TYPE

JOAL A1

Hurupi

Waka Nathan

Kaimanu

Way

JOAL A2

Verdant

Zinnia

Windross

Lane

JOAL A3

Bellis

Puia

Lange

Mews

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve 3 names from the abovementioned list of options, for the following new private roads created by way of subdivision at 33 Panama Road, Mount Wellington, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

·    JOAL A1: (insert chosen name)

·    JOAL A2: (insert chosen name)

·    JOAL A3: (insert chosen name)

Horopaki / Context

5.       The three new roads to be named form Stage 6 of the ‘Richmond’ residential housing development on the large site at 33 Panama Road, Mt Wellington. The resource consent for Stage 6 was approved on the 20th March 2018 (Council reference BUN60311188, LUC60311213, SUB60320331) for 68 residential dwellings over 12 blocks. The Stage 6 site itself will be constructed over 6 stages. One stage is complete, and the remainder of the site is to be developed over the next 3-5 years.

 

6.       The three new roads to be named are as follows (also depicted on Attachment 1 scheme plan):

·    JOAL A1: A private lane that will be owned by the Residents Association. This is a new road off Tahuhu Road, allowing access to two apartment buildings, 10 garages and a shared parking space. One apartment block (6 homes) may use this as their address.

·    JOAL A2: A private lane that will be owned by the Residents Association. This is a new road off Tahuhu Road, 9 homes will use this as their address.

·    JOAL A3: A private lane that will be owned by the Residents Association. This is a road off Mangahoe Road and intersecting JOAL A2. 16 homes will use this as their address.

7.       Due to the large scale of the Richmond project, the applicant has explored various themes relevant to the site for road naming options:

·    Historic significance to the site – including past owners and Maori history

·    People – residents of the wider area (links to local schools, league clubs and other people that have positively contributed to Auckland and/or the local area)

·    Plant varieties – native plants and ferns and nursery plant varieties

·    Volcanic – rock types, terms relating to volcanoes

·    Location – the site is both close to the Tamaki estuary and has the natural spring and soak hole, and had fertile soils that were used for pre-European gardens

 

8.       The above roads are all required to be named in accordance with the national addressing standard because they serve more than 5 lots.

9.       A site plan of the development can be found in Attachment A.

10.     A master plan and location plan of the development can be found in Attachment B.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

11.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

12.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

-   a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

-   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

-   the use of Maori is names is actively encouraged.

13.     The applicants proposed road names are summarised in the table below:

Road Number

Applicant’s Proposed Names & Preferences

Meaning

(as described by applicant)

JOAL 1:

Hurupi Way

(Preferred)

Maori word for fresh growth (of plants).

 

Waka Nathan Way

(Alternative 1)

Rugby Union player and All Black. Ex-student of Otahuhu College. Waka Nathan is still living.

 

Kaimanu Way

(Alternative 2)

New Zealand passionfruit, Passiflora tetrandra - native tendril climber with alternating, pointed, shiny leaves, white flowers smaller than the garden passionfruit and orange-coloured, pear-shaped fruit.

JOAL 2:

Verdant Lane

(Preferred)

Definition – green with grass or other rich vegetation, of bright green colour of lush grass.

 

 

Zinnia Lane

(Alternative 1)

Zinnia is a genus of plants of the sunflower tribe within the daisy family.

 

Windross Lane

(Alternative 2)

Graham Windross was the owner of the nursery site that moved to the property in 1990. Graham Windross is still living.

JOAL 3:

Bellis Mews

(Preferred)

Bellis is a genus of flowering plants in the sunflower family.

 

Puia Mews

(Alternative 1)

Maori word for volcano, geyser, hot spring, eruption. This is in reference to the 4 volcanic cones that once existed on this land.

 

Lange Mews

(Alternative 2)

David Lange was born and raised in Otahuhu, attending schools including Otahuhu College. He went onto be Prime Minister of NZ. He died 13th August 2005.

 

14.     Land Information New Zealand has confirmed the proposed names are acceptable for use in this location and not duplicated elsewhere in the region

15.     All suffixes listed in the tables above are acceptable.

16.     The applicant has proposed three road names where two people being commemorated are still living – these are Waka Nathan and (Graham) Windross. As referenced in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Road Naming Policy and Guidelines, the names of living people are actively discouraged as community attitudes and opinions can change over time.

17.     Graham Windross and the family of Waka Nathan are in support of their name being used; however no response has been received from the family of David Lange since being contacted by the applicant.

18.     Iwi Consultation: All relevant local iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei commented that they would prefer Te Reo names but did not suggest any additional names. No other objections or additional comments were raised by Mana Whenua for any of the proposed names.

19.     Community Consultation: The applicant consulted the Richmond Residents Association where principle members have seen and approved of the road naming strategy and proposed names.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

21.     The review sought from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

22.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

23.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

24.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

85

b

Attachment B - Master and Location plan

87

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Representation Review Engagement Analysis

 

File No.: CP2018/17605

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the local board’s position and feedback on the representation review.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Public submissions closed on 11 September 2018 and the engagement analysis report was received on 18 September 2018.

3.       The board has an opportunity to make their comments to the Joint Governance Working Party who will hear public submissions and local board views on 21 September 2018.

4.       On 18 October 2018 the Governing Body makes a decision on representation arrangements for the 2019 elections.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      consider the Representation Review engagement analysis and formulate its feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party and Governing Body;

b)      notes the feedback provided on 26th July 2018, resolution number MT/2018/73, and is concerned about the confusion that may be caused with constituents in the affected boundary areas as the ward boundary is different to the local board boundary;

c)      supports the status quo on the southern local board boundaries.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Representation Review Engagement Analysis of Submissions from Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Area.

91

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 February - 31 July 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/13788

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area for the six months from 1 February to 31 July 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Panuku was established in September 2015 by the merger of two council controlled organisations, Waterfront Auckland and Auckland Council Property Limited.

3.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

4.       Panuku manages around $2 billion of council’s property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 February to 31 July 2018.

 

 

Ngā Mahi ā-Hapori / Local Activities

Development

5.       Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately 50 region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

6.       Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best practice project delivery, to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

7.       Following is a high-level update on development activities in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area:

8.       Transform OnehungaThe Framework Plan (in part) to regenerate Onehunga, on a similar scale to Wynyard Quarter and Manukau, went live in July 2018. The plan was completed involving significant consultation with the community.  Panuku is leading the redevelopment of strategically placed council-owned land, and works in partnership with the Government and others, to deliver positive outcomes for the local community.  The current Framework Plan has focus to the north of Neilson Street. Once there is more certainty around major infrastructure projects, including the proposed East West Link and Light Rail, Panuku will expand the scope of the Framework Plan south. The East West link which affects the wharf and southern parts of the area is currently being reassessed by New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA).  The final board of inquiry decision approving the East West link was approved in January 2018, we are however expecting an amended plan or options late this year.  Panuku has advanced plans on improving local connections, the town centre and the Onehunga wharf precinct where possible.  

9.       Council has purchased the Port of Onehunga which will settle on 1 October 2018.  The Port is seen as key to transforming the Onehunga waterfront to a place for people and to enable access to the Manukau Harbour.   The first 3 – 5 years of ownership of the Port will involve maintenance and repairs of the existing structures to ensure operations can continue. This involves working through physical issues, legal and planning prior to any substantive works occurring.

10.     The laneways project has commenced with onsite works for the first laneway expected in late 2018.

11.     Tāmaki RegenerationThe Glen Innes Town Centre Plan developed by Tamaki Regeneration Company (TRC) in consultation with stakeholders and partners requires further amendment prior to being brought to a Local Board business meeting for endorsement. Auckland Transport, Community Service Strategy and Integration, and Healthy Waters have requested amendments or clarification on elements of the plan.

12.     Unlock PanmurePanuku has completed the Unlock Panmure High Level Project Plan (HLPP) with community input and in partnership with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, Tāmaki Regeneration Company (TRC), Auckland Transport (AT), and Auckland Council. The HLPP was endorsed by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board at the 27 February business meeting and approved by the Planning Committee on 6 March 2018.

13.     The Unlock Panmure three year work programme outlining key delivery projects in FY19-21 was endorsed by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board at the 22 May business meeting and approved by the Panuku Board on 27 June 2018. Panuku will continue to work with the local board to undertake project specific engagement with the local community on the Community Hub and Streetscape Upgrade projects in the immediate year.

14.     The key delivery projects in FY19-21 were presented to the Fixed Stakeholder Advisory Group (FSAG) on 6 July 2018, and a 6 weekly meeting with the group has been set up to provide project update and invite feedback as projects progress.     

15.     The Unlock Panmure HLPP public document and video is due to be released in August 2018, and will be available at the Panmure Library, Panmure local board office, and online.

Portfolio Management

16.     Panuku manages ‘non-service’ properties owned by the council and Auckland Transport (AT). Non-service properties are those that are not currently needed for service or infrastructure purposes. These properties were generally being held for planned future projects that are no longer required, such as road construction, park expansion or development of future town centres.

17.     As at 30 June 2018, the property portfolio comprises 1437 properties, containing 1119 leases. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

18.     The return on the property portfolio for the period ending 30 June 2018 was above budget, with a net surplus to council and AT shareholders of $3.9 million ahead of budget.

19.     The average monthly tenantable occupancy rate for the six-month period is more than 98 per cent, which is above the statement of intent target of 95 per cent.

Properties managed in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Area

20.      Panuku currently manages 77 commercial and 72 residential interests within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.


 

 

Business interests

21.     Panuku also manages the commercial return from business interests on the council’s behalf. This includes two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

22.     There are currently no managed business interests in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

23.     The 2018-2028 Long-term Plan (LTP) reflects a desire of council to materially reduce or slow down expenditure and unlock value from assets no longer required, or which are sub-optimal for service purposes. In response to this, ACPL developed a new method of dealing with service property called optimisation, prior to the establishment of Panuku. 

24.     Asset optimisation deals with ‘service property’. It is self-funding, maximises efficiencies from service assets, and maintains levels of service whilst releasing property for sale or development. A key element of optimisation is that the sale proceeds are locally reinvested to advance approved projects and activities on a cost-neutral basis. Panuku continues to advance this programme of work. This includes the development of a cross-council project to coordinate and execute asset sales and optimisation. 

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

25.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

26.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and AT to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

27.     Target for July 2017 to June 2018:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$60 million disposal recommendations

$88 million as at 30 June 2018

(includes $62 million from the Papatoetoe, Avondale and Panmure priority locations)

28.     Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

To be determined as part of the statement of intent with council

The target will include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for housing development and urban regeneration projects

 


 

 

Process

29.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Under review

30.     There are no properties currently under review in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

Acquisitions and disposals

31.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

32.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

33.     Panuku purchased 12 properties for open space across Auckland in the 2017-18 financial year at a cost of $27 million, and bought seven properties for storm water use at a value of $4.2 million.

34.     No properties were purchased in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area during the reporting period.

Disposals

35.     For the last six-month period to the end of June 2018, the Panuku disposals team has sold 11 properties, realising $6.35 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. The team’s 2017/18 disposals target was $8.0 million for the year and the team achieved $15.06 million of unconditional net sale proceeds from 17 sales over the whole year. This target was part of Panuku’s overall disposals target of $100 million, which includes the sale of development opportunities. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

36.     Two of the properties sold are in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area: 7 Eastview Road, Glen Innes and 525-529 Ellerslie-Panmure Highway, Mt Wellington.

Ngā Mahi ā-Rohe / Regional Activities

37.     Over the year, Panuku achieved key project milestones and performance results in our priority development locations. Panuku categorises three types of priority locations:

·        Transform locations – Panuku ‘transforms’ locations by creating change through urban regeneration. Panuku leads the transformation of select parts of the Auckland region working alongside others and using the custodianship of land and planning expertise. The catalytic work Waterfront Auckland led at Wynyard Quarter is a great example of the transformation of urban locations

·        Unlock locations – Panuku ‘unlocks’ development potential for others. By acting as a facilitator; using relationships to break down barriers and influence others, including the council family, to create development opportunities

·        Support locations – Panuku plays a ‘support’ role to ensure council is making the most of what it already has. Intensification is a key driver in the Auckland Plan. Panuku will support housing demands by enabling development of council-owned land.

Transform locations

38.     In addition to the Transform Onehunga project, Panuku has two other project locations identified as Transform.

39.     The Wynyard Quarter is undergoing rapid change both commercially and residentially, with thousands of Aucklanders using this space every week.

Panuku has partnered with Willis Bond to deliver a total of 500 homes in Wynyard Quarter over several stages, the first of which – Wynyard Central Pavilions – is now complete. This first stage of the new precinct offers a mix of 113 residencies comprising 25 free-stranding pavilions, 8 townhouses and 80 apartments with retail space on the ground floor. Willis Bond is also leading the delivery of 51 apartments at 132 Halsey, which is expected to be complete in Spring 2018. At the same time it is anticipated that works will begin on the second stage of Willis Bond’s residential development at 30 Madden Street with the construction of 90 apartments and six townhouses as well as ground floor retail. This residential construction is due to be completed by the end of 2020.

Precinct are due to commence construction on their next commercial building at 10 Madden Street in Spring 2018, with an anticipated completion date towards the end of 2020. This seven level building will provide approximately 8,500m2 of commercial space including ground floor retail.

The east-west connection between Halsey and Daldy Streets, Tiramarama Way, was completed in June of this year, with the street opening on Friday 29 June 2018 receiving much positive feedback.

Negotiations are underway with Orams regarding the development of Site 18 (on the corner of Beaumont and Jellicoe Streets) for a marine refit facility and residential development.

40.     Transform Manukau covers over 600 hectares and is the largest of the Panuku priority locations.

          The Auckland Plan sees Manukau as the commercial centre of southern Auckland, but the significant investment in transport and community amenities has not been matched by intensification of the adjacent land to provide more homes and jobs. The area contains over 6 hectares of undeveloped council land in the town centre that is suitable for residential and commercial  development. There is also significant Crown land held by both HNZC and the Counties Manukau DHB that can provide significant additional housing. Panuku is focussing on taking the development sites to market to test the appetite for private sector investment. Currently there is a 300 home development on Barrowcliffe Place already underway. We are also focussing on public realm projects that will enhance the overall environment and liveability of the area. Panuku is working closely with The Southern Initiative and ATEED to develop integrated actions to benefit the local community.

Unlock locations

41.     In addition to the Unlock Panmure project, Panuku has six other project locations identified as Unlock.

42.     In Takapuna, Auckland Council owns nearly four hectares of land focused around the Anzac Street carpark and the Gasometer site, consultation on redevelopment of these sites has started.

43.     At the Airfields, Hobsonville Point, six of the seven super-lots have now settled with AV Jennings with the remaining super-lot due for settlement October 2018. Fortytwo housing units have been completed to the end of June 2018. In stage 2, the development by Avanda will result in 510 dwellings. The tier 1 roads which are Wallace Road, Waka Moana Drive and Commanders Avenue are progressing well and are on target for practical completion December 2018. The first housing development is anticipated to start in December 2018. 


 

 

44.     In Northcote, we are continuing to build on the urban regeneration concepts outlined in the November 2016 Framework Plan, and have progressed our engagement and co-design with HLC for the Awataha Greenway project and other key projects. The information kiosk continues to provide a ‘shop front’ for the community to walk in and ask any questions. With the 2018 LTP signed off by Council in late-June, Panuku is now able to commence implementation of the first-year’s projects including the Greenslade Reserve stormwater detention project.

45.     The council’s Planning Committee approved the over-arching plans to redevelop Old Papatoetoe in June. Construction on the Mall has been completed and we are now focussed on leasing the remaining tenancies. The supermarket construction is progressing; however we have been advised that this is unlikely to be completed by Christmas. We are working closely with Foodstuffs on the new plaza space. The Panuku Board has now approved the Programme Business Case which details how new housing in the town centre will be enabled.  The temporary food hub proposal for the old netball clubrooms is progressing well.  

46.     The overall plan for Henderson was approved in May 2017 by Governing Body. The 2018-2021 Unlock Henderson work programme was endorsed by the local board and approved by the Panuku board in June 2018. The vision is for Henderson is for it to grow into an urban eco-centre. This vision will guide planning and development with an outcome towards ‘liveable growth’ by creating a safe, attractive and vibrant mixed-use environment with a uniquely west Auckland identity.

47.     The opportunity to revitalise Avondale has been given the green light in November 2017 with the approval of the over-arching plan for its regeneration by the Planning Committee. The vision for Avondale will be enabled through a number of key moves. Panuku will work closely with the local board and community to implement a retail strategy that attracts new businesses, increasing diversity of products and services. The train station, upgraded bus network and new cycleways offer great transport options and we will continue to strengthen connections between these activity hubs and the town. A focus for the regeneration of Avondale is working with developers to build quality residential neighbourhoods that offer a mix of housing types, including terraces and apartments. A number of significant developments are already underway in the area.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

48.     This report is for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s information.

49.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries you have relating to a property in your local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

50.     Tāmaki Makaurau has the highest Māori population in the world with one in four Māori in Aotearoa living here. 

51.     Māori make up 12% of the region’s total population who mainly live in Manurewa, Henderson-Massey, Papakura, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Māngere-Ōtahuhu and Franklin. Māori have a youthful demographic with 50% of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau under the age of 25 years. 5% of the Māori population in the region are currently 65 years and over.      

52.     There are 19 Mana Whenua in the region, with 14 having indicated an interest in Panuku lead activities within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area. 

53.     Māori make up 13 percent of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board population, and there are three marae located within the local board area.   

54.     Panuku works collaboratively with Mana Whenua on a range projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

55.     Onehunga and Panmure are key Panuku projects within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area and have attracted interest from a number of mana whenua and Māori developers.

56.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.    

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sven Mol - Corporate Affairs Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Helga  Sonier - Senior Engagement Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Updating the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board on ATEED's activities between 1 January and 30 June 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/17548

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Local Board of Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited (ATEED) activities at a regional, and where possible, a local level.

2.       For the Local Board to receive the attached six-monthly report from ATEED on their activities in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

3.       ATEED reports to local boards every six months to provide them with an update of their activities.

4.       Work undertaken by ATEED in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki area includes:

·        Business capability building and support for new businesses

·        Film permitting in the Local Board area

·        Support for the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited’s six-monthly report to Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for 1 January to 30 June 2018, as shown in attachment A of the agenda report.

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       ATEED helps lay a strong foundation for Auckland’s economic growth through a broad programme of initiatives focused on:

·        Business growth and innovation

·        Business attraction and investment

·        Conferences and business events

·        Major events

·        Film

·        International education

·        Tourism.

6.       ATEED’s work can impact and provide opportunities locally as well as regionally. For this reason, they have committed to reporting to local boards every six months.

7.       The report attached reflects this commitment and covers the period from 1 January to 30 June 2018.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

8.       The ATEED activities carried out in the local board area are outlined in the below table.

Table 1. Local ATEED activities

Activity

ATEED team responsible

Business capability building and support for new businesses

Economic Development

Film permitting in the Local Board area

Economic Development

Support for the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme

Economic Development

9.       As part of business-as-usual, destinations in the local board area continue to feature in the official Auckland visitor information website administered by ATEED.

10.     Should a local board choose to allocate some of their locally-driven initiatives (LDI) fund to economic development activities, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development team can manage the delivery of a work programme for them.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no local impact, however some of the activities described in the report do. Details of this are outlined in the six-monthly report attached.

12.     Local board views were not sought for the purposes of this report. Local board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

13.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact their initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

14.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

15.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with their initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

16.     The next ATEED six-monthly report will be presented to the local board in early 2019 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2018.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ATEED Six-monthly report to the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board

115

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

 

Authors

Chris Lock, Senior Strategic Advisor - Local Boards (ATEED)

Samantha-Jane Miranda, Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

James Robinson, Head of Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

Victoria Villaraza, Relationship Manager


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/13039

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is required and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

125

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Workshops

 

File No.: CP2018/13041

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 11th and 18th September 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The workshops are held to give an information opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects, and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on 11th and 18th September 2018.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Record of Workshops September 2018

129

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 


 

    

  


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum          Page 133


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 September 2018