I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 18 September 2018

5.00pm

Manukau Chambers
Level 1, Manukau Civic Building
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lotu Fuli

 

Deputy Chairperson

Ross Robertson, QSO, JP

 

Members

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

 

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

 

Mary Gush

 

 

Donna Lee

 

 

Dawn Trenberth

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

 

10 September 2018

 

Contact Telephone:  +64 27 591 5024

Email: carol.mcgarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - TOPS                                                                                               5

8.2     Deputation - Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum                                       6

8.3     Deputation - Rongomai Sports Centre Trust                                                   6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum -  Te Hononga - Puhinui Reserve Connection                         6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Governing Member Update                                                                                          9

12        Board Members' Report                                                                                             11

13        Chairperson's Announcements                                                                                 17

14        Auckland Transport September 2018 update: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board   19

15        Auckland Transport’s Road Safety and Speed Management programme for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board 2018-21                                                                               27

16        Updating the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on ATEED’s activities between 1 January and 30 June 2018                                                                                                         45

17        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Multi-Board and Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019 grant applications                                                                                                                                       57

18        CCTV Maintenance (Covering report)                                                                      69

19        Amendments to 2018/2019 Arts, Community and Events work programme       71

20        Approval of funding toward an Enviroschools project in Ōtara-Papatoetoe      75

21        New community lease – The Scout Association of New Zealand (Papatoetoe East), Kimpton Park, 108 Kimpton Road, Papatoetoe                                                       85

22        Community lease – Mataliki Tokelau Pre-School South Auckland Trust, 53R Raglan Street, Mangere East                                                                                                   93

23        New Road Name Approval for residential subdivision by Finesse Residential Ltd at 44 & 46 Hillcrest Road, Papatoetoe                                                                                    99

24        Approval of the Sunnyside Domain Concept Plan                                                103

25        Adoption of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Open Space Network Plan                            111

26        Representation Review engagement analysis - proposal to split the Manukau Ward                                                                                                                                     115

27        Local board feedback on the government's proposed mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags                                                                                               119

28        Local board resolution responses and information reports                                127

29        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     137

30        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                                  143  

31        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 August 2018, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - TOPS

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Victoria Taupau and representatives from TOPS (The Ōtara-Papatoetoe

 Squad - Youth Council) will be in attendance to make a presentation to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Victoria Taupau and the representatives from TOPS for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Julie Chambers and Carmel Claridge, Orakei Local Board member, are co-chair of the Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum and will be in attendance to make a presentation to the local board

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Julie Chambers and Carmel Claridge for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Rongomai Sports Centre Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Shiu Singh and Don Manase from the Rongomai Sports Centre Trust will be in attendance to make a presentation to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Shiu Singh and Don Manase from the Rongomai Sports Centre Trust for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum -  Te Hononga - Puhinui Reserve Connection

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Mason Ngawhika from Healthy Families will be in attendance to speak to the board.

2.       A mere stone’s throw away from Clendon is potentially one of the premier spaces in Auckland, yet our insights suggest that very few of these residents have ever accessed the Puhinui Reserve.

3.       Consisting of whenua, maunga, awa and moana, from a whare tapa whā health model perspective, these are key ingredients to promote well-being. It is our desire to connect this community to this amazing space while also contributing to the overall connectivity of South Auckland.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thank Mason Ngawhika from Healthy Families for his attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Governing Member Update

 

File No.: CP2018/14227

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

a)      That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Board Members' Report

 

File No.: CP2018/14216

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

2.       Deputy Chair Ross Robertson and Member Ashraf Choudhary attended the Local Government New Zealand Conference from 15 – 17 July in Christchurch on behalf of the board.  A copy of their combined report on the conference is attached.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the board members’ written and oral reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local Government New Zealand Annual Conference - 15 to 17 July 2018 -report

13

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

 

File No.: CP2018/14218

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the chairperson’s verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport September 2018 update: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

File No.: CP2018/17162

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on transport related matters in their area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This month’s report includes the Supporting Future Growth project, an update on the Rough Sleepers Initiative, the completion of Putney Way and responses to previous resolutions by the local board to Auckland Transport (AT).

3.       This report also provides an update on delivery of various LBTCF projects for the local board, which has approximately $658,000 remaining in the fund, which can be spent by the end of current electoral term.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport September 2018 update report.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

4.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area and includes information on the status of the LBTCF.

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

6.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

7.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund recently increased through the Long Term Plan process and has effectively doubled, with the total funding available to all 21 local boards now to $20.8m per year.

8.       The allocation for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board, increased to $1,071,075 per annum. The updated figures for the remainder of his electoral term are reflected in table 1 below.

 Table 1: Ōtara-Papatoetoe LBTCF financial summary table

Otara Papatoetoe Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,815,162

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,157,127

Remaining Budget left

$658,035

 

9.       The table below reflects the status of projects to which LBTCF has already been committed.

Table 2: Status update on current Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

 

Project

Description

Current status

Has the status changed since last month’s update?

Funds allocated

Upgrade of Hunters Corner Streetscape

Improving the amenity of Great South Road at Hunters Corner through street furniture upgrades

Board approved option and allocated funds. Project set up completed, awaiting resource availability

No

$925,000

Completion of Rongomai Walkway

Complete footpath link from East Tamaki Road to Te Irirangi Road

Delivery by Community Facilities. In detailed design stage.

No

$180,000

Canopy for Ōtara Town Centre

Canopy to provide all-weather access from eastern car park to the library

Project being delivered by Community Facilities.

Under review at present.

No

$262,000

Welcome to Ōtara signage

Place-making signage

Signage to progress with no historical text.

No

$55,000

Footpath upgrade at Ōtara Town Centre

Upgrade of the footpath at the Ōtara Town Centre to match recently upgraded sections of footpath (along southern side).

Currently progressing with cost

Yes

$133,000

A path through Milton Park to Papatoetoe North School

Provide an alternate all-weather access for students from Papatoetoe North School

Board approved an option in July and allocated funds. Project being set up and Funding Agreement being prepared to allow delivery by Community Facilities.

No

$87,000

All-weather footpath upgrade from East Tamaki Road to Lovegrove Crescent

Upgrade of the two paths connecting to the renewed Ōtara Creek Bridge - Greenway

This is an AC project being delivered by Community Facilities. Funding agreement signed by AC.

No

$480,000

Projects from Previous term 

N/A

N/A

No

$35,128

Responses to resolutions

Redoubt Road Congestion

10.     Changes to the Mill Road project has resulted in local board advocacy to Auckland Transport to address the traffic congestion on Redoubt Road. This request has been noted and referred to the Redoubt Road/Mill Road project team.

 

Mill Road Project

11.     The project is now within the wider Supporting Growth Alliance - a group comprising all of the agencies delivering the Auckland Transport Alignment Plan including AT and New Zealand Transport Agency. A workshop is being organised to brief the local board on the current status and timeline for the Redoubt Road - Mill Road Corridor Project.

 

Papatoetoe North School

12.     In relation to the requests from the representatives of Papatoetoe North School, AT and Auckland Council Stormwater are working to resolve the flooding issues at the main Graeme Avenue entrance of Papatoetoe North School. Details of the storm water upgrades are being considered alongside the pedestrian safety investigation.

13.     As noted above, there is currently an AT investigation into safety at the Graeme Avenue entrance to the school. The investigation will include looking at the requests from the school which include widening of the footpath, raising the crossing and installing a fence or guard rail to stop children from running onto the road. A decision will be reached by November 2018 and Auckland Transport will provide further advice.

 

Local Board Advocacy

14.     This section provides a regular report about how Auckland Transport is supporting the OPLB advocacy initiatives in the Local Board Plan, as outlined in the table below.

 

15.     Table 3 – Advocacy Initiative Status

Advocacy Initiative

Key Initiative

Status

Transform Manukau’s Metropolitan area through good planning and sustainable development.

Improve connectivity through providing public Wi-Fi and improving walking routes between Manukau Square and transport centre, Hayman Park, and public carparks.

Auckland Transport completed the $50m Manukau Bus Station in early April 2018. The bus station has been successfully operating for the 5 months with all the internal commercial operation in full swing including the relocation of the intercity bus services.

 

We are currently near the final stages for completion of the Putney Way upgrade which links Manukau Square to the Bus Station, Train Station/MIT building and Hayman Park.

 

Promote economic development and public safety in the town centres and strengthen their roles as community hubs.

Investigate opportunities for funding public facility improvements in town centres, e.g. toilets, footpaths, parking and public.

 

Auckland Transport is currently delivering, through the LBTCF, footpath upgrades in Ōtara Town Centre and streetscape upgrades in Hunters Corner, Papatoetoe.

 

Auckland Transport is also undertaking a project to reduce speed along Bairds Road, including the Otara Town Centre, which will increase pedestrian safety.

 

Redesigning the entrances to Ōtara library and Ōtara

Music and Arts Centre, including the courtyard between the council buildings in Ōtara Mall.

A new canopy linking the western car park to the courtyard between the council buildings in Ōtara Mall is currently being programmed for delivery, funded through the LBTCF.

Advocate to AT to realign Station Road / Portage Road / Gray Avenue intersection.

Auckland Transport is in the process of upgrading the Portage Road and Station Road Intersection by installing a roundabout to improve vehicle and pedestrian safety.

 

Work with AT to allocate funding and develop priority routes through parks and other public spaces for cyclists and walkers, as identified in the Ōtara‑Papatoetoe Greenways Plan.

The local board is currently funding an upgraded section of the OPLB Greenways Plan from East Tamaki Road to Lovegrove Crescent in Ōtara via their LBTCF.

Footpath links in Rongomai Park are also under development, which link Te Irirangi Drive to Preston Road.

Other Auckland Transport news

Supporting Growth Programme

16.     Future Urban Land Supply Strategy confirmed the need to accommodate up to 400,000 residents in future urban areas.

17.     Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP) identified approximately $10 billion of transport infrastructure to support growth.

18.     The New Zealand Transport Agency, Auckland Council and Auckland Transport approved the Supporting Growth Programme Business Case in 2016 and future work programme to protect corridors and nodes.

19.     The main growth areas being looked at by this programme are to the South of Otara-Papatoetoe, though will impact significantly as Manukau is a junction for various modes of transport including Redoubt Road–Mill Road, State Highway 1 upgrades and related to A2B link to the airport and 20Connect projects.

20.     Consultation on the Supporting Growth Programme will be open from the 10 September to the 10 October.

Rough sleeping Initiative

21.     On the 31 July 2018, AT in partnership with the Salvation Army, started an initiative to utilise the Manukau Bus Station for rough sleepers (homeless people) during night-time hours.

22.     The initiative was intended to provide shelter for rough sleepers during the coldest period in winter.

23.     In the August report to the local board, the initiative was expected to be operation until early September. Since that report, due in part to resourcing issues, the initiative was ended in late August.

24.     A briefing for the local board is being organised on the outcomes of the project.


 

 

Electronic Gating Project – Papatoetoe & Middlemore train stations

Table 4: Schedule of Electronic Gating Project operational dates

Station

Enabling works commence

Install ticket gates

The ticket gating to be in use:

Middlemore

November

November

December

Parnell

November

November

November

Papakura

December

December

January

 

25.     Auckland Transport is currently nearing the completion of a region-wide programme to install electronic ticket gates at selected stations on the rail network that include Papatoetoe and Middlemore stations.

26.     This work was delayed at Papatoetoe Station but this was resolved and work was completed in July 2018.

27.     Additional stairs will be installed on the Shirley Road side later this year, with a request from the local board being investigated by AT, to relocate short-term pick-up and drop-off parking along Shirley Road closer to the ramp. The Middlemore Station has also been delayed with it now due to be operational in October 2018.

 

Putney Way reopened

28.     The Putney Way upgrade is a streetscape enhancement project supported by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board, Panuku Development and Auckland Transport.

29.     The major works were completed earlier this year with the rain gardens, upgrades to the roading and footpath surfaces and light poles installed with Putney Way reopened.

30.     The public art streetlights are the last features to be installed, with an event are likely to be coordinated with other events in the civic square area. Further details on this event will be provided as they become available for the local board to attend.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /

Local impacts and local board views

31.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Auckland Transport consultations

32.     Auckland Transport provides local boards with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in this Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

33.     In the reporting period for August 2018, no projects were put forward for comment by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. 

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

34.     Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board area are reported on a monthly basis. There were no decisions for the local area in August.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

35.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

36.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

37.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

38.     In terms of its LBTCF, the local board currently has $658,000 of unallocated LBTCF funding for this electoral term. The local board has a number of projects seeking rough order of costs to be presented back to the local board in the upcoming months.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

39.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

40.     Discussions with the local board for the allocation of their LBTCF will continue to be held over the upcoming months.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Ben Stallworthy – Acting Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport’s Road Safety and Speed Management programme for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board 2018-21

 

File No.: CP2018/16769

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on Auckland Transport’s (AT) Road Safety and Speed Management Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland has a serious problem with people needlessly dying and being seriously injured on our roads and streets. In 2017, 64 people died on our roads and an additional 749 were seriously injured.

3.      Road Safety performance in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area has also worsened over the last five years due to various factors. These include economic and population growth, new demands on the unforgiving high speed road network, and growth in people walking, cycling and on motorcycles, classified as vulnerable road users (people not in cars).

4.       The Tāmaki Makaurau Road Safety Governance Group (TMRSG) has been established to provide leadership for improving safety and reducing the high number of deaths and serious injuries (DSi) on the Auckland road network. This group has a strong national and regional mandate to drive safety outcomes and the partners include AT, NZ Police, NZ Transport Agency (NZTA), Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), Auckland Council (AC), Auckland Regional Public Health (ARPH) and Ministry of Transport (MoT).

5.       As AT moves to the Vision Zero approach, it is also proposing an ambitious safety infrastructure acceleration programme estimated to reduce DSi by up to 18% over an initial three year period. It will work closely with its partners to deliver on the Vision Zero goal for Auckland. This follows the New Zealand’s Government’s commitment to deliver a new road safety strategy as outlined in the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport.

6.       There is a strong focus on safety at AT. The Board and Executive Leadership Team have recently endorsed an increased three-year investment in road safety engineering, a Speed Management Plan and behaviour change activities to reduce road trauma, including in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

7.       The Auckland Road Safety Capital Programme 2018-28 is a systemic response to improve road safety outcomes and create a more forgiving road network. Investment will be lifted by an additional $550 million over ten years.

8.       The Regional Fuel Tax will allow AT to improve a larger number of high-risk intersections and routes by installing roundabouts, red-light cameras, and segregated facilities. The combined impact of these accelerated programmes is estimated to reduce DSi by 60% over ten years from the 2017 baseline, as well as contribute towards additional congestion reduction benefits and increased health and environment benefits. Our aspiration is to move towards zero deaths or serious injuries on Auckland’s roads.

9.       One of the fastest and most cost effective ways to reduce road trauma is to implement speed reduction measures. AT is currently working to identify areas and roads around the Auckland region to set lower speed limits.  These roads will be added to the Schedule of Speed Limits and drafted into the bylaw. The bylaw will be consulted Auckland-wide (consultation on the entire programme of works for the Auckland region at a strategic level). Post-consultation, the bylaw will need to be approved by AT’s Board, after which the new lower speed limits will become legally enforceable.

10.     The primary road safety focus areas in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area for the next three years include safe intersections and roads, safe speeds, vulnerable road user safety, sober driving, distraction, young drivers and Māori. These areas are will be addressed through a combined annual programme of investment in safety engineering, speed management, education and training of road users and enforcement of safe road user behaviour with NZ Police

11.     A senior AT representative will present a PowerPoint presentation to the local board at a workshop on 18 September 2018.  A copy of this presentation is Attachment A to this report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receives the report entitled Auckland Transport’s Safety and Speed Management programme 2018-21.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

12.     Auckland’s rapid growth has resulted in a number challenges including housing, transport and public health. The recent increase in road trauma is both a transport and public health issue for the region with significant economic costs. More important, the after-effects of road trauma on the victims’ whānau, friends and community are devastating.  

13.     AT’s long-term goal of Vision Zero is about being more people-centered and emphasises that no loss of life on our road network is acceptable. It is a proven approach from jurisdictions where road designers and operators take greater responsibility in creating forgiving infrastructure that prevents road trauma.

14.     The Vision Zero approach also accepts that road users are people who make mistakes and therefore all parts of the transport system need to be strengthened through a safe road environment, safe speeds, safe vehicles and safe road use, so that when mistakes occur, it does not lead to people dying or being seriously injured. These are the four pillars of the Vision Zero / Safe System approach.

15.     Speed management is a central part of the Vision Zero approach for reducing speeds to survivable levels for road users, particularly on unforgiving rural roads and in urban streets where there are large numbers of vulnerable road users. For individuals, the risks of a severe crash might seem small, but from a societal point of view there are substantial safety gains from reducing average speeds on streets.

16.     Speed management is a low-cost area-wide treatment that will deliver substantial savings including reduced deaths and serious injuries, increased walking, cycling and public transport use, and increased public health benefits. Speed is currently responsible for 30% of all road deaths and serious injuries, and small reductions in average speeds of 1% or a few kilometres per hour can reduce the risk and severity of crashes by up to 4% (Speed & Crash Risk, ITF, 2018).

17.     Speed determines both the likelihood of a crash occurring and the severity of the outcome. Regardless of what causes a crash, whether someone walks away or is carried away will depend on the speed vehicles are travelling. For example if hit by a vehicle travelling at 30km/hr, a person walking has a 90% chance of surviving when compared with only a 20% chance of surviving when hit at 50km/hr. Speed also determines the braking or stopping distance and the time it takes for the driver to react to take evasive measures. A small increase in travel speed corresponds to a relatively large change in stopping distance. The higher the speed the longer the braking or stopping time.

18.     AT and its partners  have a Road Safety Action Plan (RSAP)  in place that identifies key actions from partners for addressing Road Safety Focus Areas in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area (see table in paragraph 23), including speed management. The RSAP is developed collaboratively by AT, NZ Police, Accident Compensation Corporation and NZTA. It covers the NZ Police districts of Auckland City, Waitematā and Counties Manukau. The document is updated quarterly and a new one for the current financial year is being developed.

19.     AT is investing in an ambitious road safety programme including safety engineering, speed management and behaviour change over the next ten years that will contribute towards a 60% reduction in road trauma across Auckland.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

20.     Auckland’s DSi rates have increased by 67% from 486 in 2013 to 813 in 2017 as outlined in the table below.

 

Auckland Region

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Deaths

48

36

52

46

64

Serious injuries

438

447

568

618

749

 

 

21.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board road deaths and serious injuries (DSi) have increased 86% from 2013 to 2017 and made up 7% of Auckland’s total DSi in 2017. Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board had the 5th highest level of DSi among all local boards in 2017 and the 8th highest rate of serious road injuries per capita, out of all local boards in 2016.

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

22.     In the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area 34% of all DSi involved vulnerable road users.



23.     AT’s Road Safety Action Plan for 2018-19 covers the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. Below is an excerpt from the action plan showing five-year DSi trends from 2013 to 2017 for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. The primary safety intervention measures include aspects from the Safe Systems approach: improving the safety of the roads and intersections, speed management, alcohol/drugged driving prevention, distraction and improving safety for people walking, young drivers and Māori (shaded in red in the table below). Please note that DSi Focus Areas overlap i.e. one DSi can appear in multiple focus areas.

 

Road Safety Focus Areas for Ōtara-Papatoetoe 2018/19

         Focus areas             Five year Road Death & Serious Injury (DSi) trend                                                         Interventions

Increase Focus

Safe System Management

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Total

Counties-Manukau Police Road Safety Action Plan

Safe Intersections

14

14

18

17

21

84

Safety engineering, enforcement and campaigns.

 

 

 

Rural Roads

24

27

32

38

52

173

Safety engineering, enforcement and campaigns.

Pedestrian Safety

10

6

7

9

10

42

Travelwise schools, walking school bus routes, safe crossings and Safer communities.

Motorcycle Safety

2

1

7

4

3

17

Safety engineering, checkpoints, enforcement and campaigns.

Safe Speed

2

11

8

14

25

60

Speed management, education and enforcement campaigns.

Maintain Focus

Alcohol/Drugged Driving

6

11

7

10

20

54

Education and enforcement campaigns.

Young Drivers

2

9

2

5

6

24

Young driver training, education and enforcement campaigns.

Cycle Safety

4

1

2

1

0

8

School cycle training.

Emerging Focus

 

Restraints

2

2

1

2

9

16

Restraint education and enforcement, including child restraints.

Older Road Users

0

3

1

0

1

5

Development of a 2018-21 programme.

Distraction & Fatigue

2

7

8

4

11

32

Safe travel stop education and enforcement campaigns.

Māori

7

6

8

9

17

47

Marae-based learner license workshops, speed management Hui.

 

24.     The table also highlights how AT and its partners combine their resources and programmes to address high-risk areas and road user groups through a combination of safety engineering, speed management, education, training and enforcement activities. While a majority of these activities are planned, the action plan is revised quarterly to be more responsive to emerging trends.

25.     Road crashes are investigated by NZ Police and then mapped by NZTA across the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. The map highlights locations of Ōtara-Papatoetoe fatal and serious crashes from 2013 to 2017 where a slightly higher number were midblock (not at intersections) crashes on straight roads.

 

26.     Road death and serious injury locations are also analysed to identify high-risk intersections and routes that have a high collective crash–risk (number of DSi per km or intersection) and personal crash-risk (rate of DSi per vehicle kilometres travelled). This methodology identifies a small percentage of the network carrying a large percentage of the road trauma.

27.     Within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board boundaries there are four high-risk intersections and ten high-risk routes (based on 2012 to 2016 data), of which six are also high-risk for motorcycles. Seven of the high-risk locations have 60km/h speed limits. A number of the high-risk routes are also high or medium-high risk for Motorcycles and Active Road Users.

High risk routes in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area

Ranked in the top 100 high risk routes in the Auckland Region  (2012-2016 data)

Regional Ranking

Route Name

Speed Zone

Collective Crash Risk

Active Road User Collective Crash Risk

Motorcycle Collective Crash Risk

22

Cavendish Drive (Noel Burnside Rd to 82m north of Jerry Green St)

60

High

Low

High

52

Cavendish Drive (Noel Burnside Rd to Great South Rd)

60

Medium High

Medium

Medium High

53

Station Road

50

Medium High

Medium

Medium

54

East Tamaki Drive (Great South Rd to 168m east of Huia Rd)

50

Medium High

Medium

High

58

East Tamaki Drive (40m west of Preston Rd to Springs Rd)

60

Medium High

Medium

High

62

Great South Road (East Tamak Rd to St George St/Tui Rd

50*

Medium High

Medium High

Medium High

74

Great South Road (Allenby Rd to 145m south of Ryan Pl)

Part 50 Part 60

Medium High

Medium High

Medium High

77

East Tamaki Drive (168m east of Huia Rd to 40m west of Preston Rd)

60

Medium High

Medium High

Low

82

Bairds Road

50**

Medium High

Medium High

Low Medium

86

Great South Road (St George St/Tui Rd to Allenby Rd)

50

Medium High

Medium

Low

 

*includes shopping area at Hunters Corner (future town centre speed zone)

**includes Ōtara Town Centre (future town centre speed zone)

 

 

High risk Iintersections in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area

Ranked in the top 100 high risk intersections in the Auckland Region (2012-2016 data)

Regional Ranking

Location

Speed zone

[1]Collective Crash Risk

[2]Active Road User Collective Crash Risk

Motorcycle Collective Crash Risk

12

Manukau Station Road / Lambie Drive

60

High

Low

Low

14

Cavendish Drive / Great South Road

60

High

Low Medium

Low Medium

50

East Tamaki Road / Holroyd Place

50

High

Low

Medium

77

Puhinui Road / Great South Road

50

Medium High

Low Medium

Low Medium

 

28.     AT has embarked on a bold programme to reduce the incidence of death and serious injury by 60% in a 10-year period. The initial three-year target is to reduce the incidence of death and serious injury by up to 18% from the 2018-19 financial year.

29.     The tables below highlight some of the engineering improvements, speed management changes, and behaviour change activities that will be delivered in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area in 2018/19 as part of the 2018-21 AT programme.

 

Safety engineering improvement projects 2018-19

East Tamaki Road to Ōtara Road

Bairds Road - Ōtara Town Centre

East Tamaki Road Route

Pedestrian Safety Crosswalk Installation

88 to 108 Station Road

Crash reduction study into safety improvements

Roundabout 168 St George Street

Crash reduction study into safety improvements

263 St George Street 

Crash reduction study into safety improvements

Bairds Road

Safety investigation between Great South Road and Ōtara Road

Bairds Road

Safety investigation between East Tamaki Road and Preston Road

Station Road / Shirley Road

Crash reduction study into Left turn slip lane

212 St George Street 

Crash reduction study into safety improvements

34 Buckland Road, Mangere East

Pedestrian Safety Zebra Crossing

155 Puhinui Road, Papatoetoe

Pedestrian Safety Zebra Crossing

102 Dawson Road, Ōtara

Pedestrian Safety Zebra Crossing

81 Gary Ave, Mangere East

Pedestrian Safety Zebra Crossing

25 Graeme Ave, Mangere East

Pedestrian Safety Zebra Crossing

107 St George St

Crash reduction study into safety improvements

 


 

 

Other safety improvement projects 2018-19

Swaffield Road  pedestrian refuge

Install a pedestrian refuge island outside Middlemore Park

Allenby Road - Speed Calming

Speed humps to improve safety at bend

 

 

Pedestrian safety and shared path network expansion 2018-19

Selfs Road footpath

New footpath from 10 to 85 Selfs Rd

 

Speed management nvestigations 2018-19

Hunters Corner Town Centre – 30km/hr speed limit with engineering measures to reduce traffic speeds and make it safer for vulnerable road users.

Ōtara Town Centre – 30km/hr speed limit to reduce traffic speeds and make it safer for vulnerable road users. Engineering measures already consulted with Local Board and community.

 

Road safety and school travel behaviour activities 2018-19

16 active Travelwise School Programmes & 1 active WSB, along with re-engaging inactive Travelwise schools and WSB buses.

Driver Distraction Campaign

Motorcycle and Scooter Safety Campaign

Safe speed awareness campaign

Red light running campaign and Educational events with police

Deliver a child restraint checkpoints in partnership with NZ Police

Deliver compulsory breath testing operations with NZ police

 

30.     Speed has an impact on both the likelihood of a crash occurring and the severity of injury, should a crash occur.

31.     Therefore, one of the fastest and most cost effective ways to reduce road trauma is to implement speed reduction measures. Research shows that there is a very strong relationship between speed and road safety. It is difficult to think of any other risk factor that has a more powerful impact on crashes or injuries than speed.

32.     A Vision Zero or Safe System speed is defined as the maximum survivable speed upon impact where the chance of death is less than 10%. 

33.     Speeds of 30 km/h are the maximum any vulnerable or unprotected road user (pedestrians and people on bikes) can withstand without sustaining death of serious injuries. Although this speed is common on local roads in Europe, it is uncommon in New Zealand.

34.     Speeds over 50km/h dramatically increases the chances of death and serious injury in the event of a crash between two vehicles at an intersection.

35.     Contrary to popular belief, the majority of Auckland road deaths and serious injuries occur on 50km/h urban roads, involving vulnerable road users.

36.     While a smaller percentage of speed related crashes occur on rural roads, the ones that do happen are more likely to result in death.

37.     Many people fear that reducing the speed limit in urban areas will dramatically increase journey times. However, research shows that lower speed limits only marginally increased journey times. An NZTA study tracked travel times along six different routes in New Zealand. It found that when driving at the maximum posted speed limit wherever possible, drivers arrived at their destination as little as 1.08 minutes faster than when they drove 10km/h slower.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

38.     AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

39.     Māori residents in Auckland experience a much higher risk of road traffic injury than other ethnicities, at all age groups.

40.     Māori are also over-represented in road deaths and serious injuries related to speed, making up 22% of all speed-related DSi.

41.     The Te Ara Haepapa Road Safety programme is AT’s response to reduce death and serious injuries involving Māori and Rangatahi Māori. The programme is intended to focus delivery through whānau, hapū, iwi, and marae, kohanga reo, kura kaupapa Māori and Māori communities.

42.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area has seen an upward trend in Māori-related DSi and some Māori communities will be engaged with the Te Ara Haepapa Road Safety programme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

43.     There are no financial implications for the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

44.     Risks for the Local Board include reputation and continuing road trauma in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. If the accelerated road safety programme and speed management programme are not championed or supported by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board it may be challenging to implement unpopular safety and speed management projects that could otherwise reduce community road trauma.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

45.     AT welcomes input from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to help address the road safety challenge that is generating such a significant burden on road users and their families.

46.     Getting aligned with our partners and stakeholders (Local Boards, Councillors, Ministers, MoT, NZ Transport Agency, NZ Police, AA, Walk Auckland, Bike Auckland, Road Freight Association to name a few) is imperative for the success of the AT road safety and speed management programme in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

47.     Aucklanders and Local Boards have indicated their support for an increased road safety and speed management programme in the recent Regional Land Transport Programme (RLTP) consultation, to help address Aucklands concerning increase in road trauma.

48.     The RLTP has committed to investing in an accelerated speed management programme, of which the first year will include treatment on 800km of the network. This will require expedient delivery by AT and a more efficient process for changing speed limits.

49.     Reducing speed limits is a sensitive topic, with expectations from some stakeholders that AT should deliver rapid changes to speed limits across Auckland, while others in the community may not like the speed limit reductions and speed calming measures. For individuals, the risks of a severe crash might seem small, but from a societal point of view there are substantial safety gains from reducing average speeds on streets.

50.     AT will do this by talking about the unacceptable loss of human life and focus on road safety with our communities, stakeholders and the media.

51.     This will include running a publicity awareness campaign followed by a consultation process on the Speed Limit Bylaw. The campaign will aim to change the road safety conversation by educating Aucklanders that lower speeds provide survivable crash outcomes as well as enabling our kids to walk and cycle to school, a more liveable streets environment, and many health and environmental benefits.

52.     Before and during the awareness  campaign, AT will engage with our key stakeholders (NZTA, NZ Police, AA) to identify roads that will be affected by the speed limit changes.

53.     The bylaw will be consulted on Auckland-wide (consultation on the entire programme of works for the Auckland region at a strategic level). Due to the urgent imperative to reduce, the number of deaths and serious injuries AT will in many cases not consult on each individual element of the safety improvement plan.

54.     Once the bylaw has been approved by AT’s Board, then the speed limits become legally enforceable. AT will continue to discuss in partnership with local boards on all safety and speed limit changes in their area.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

PowerPoint presentation

37

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Andrew Bell, Strategy & Performance Team Leader, Auckland Transport

Michael Brown, Road Safety Engineering Team Leader, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Randhir Karma, Group Manager Network Management and Safety, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Updating the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on ATEED’s activities between 1 January and 30 June 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/17024

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the local board of Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited (ATEED) activities at a regional, and where possible, a local level.

2.       For the local board to receive the attached six-monthly report from ATEED on their activities in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

3.       ATEED reports to local boards every six months to provide them with an update of their activities.

4.       Work undertaken by ATEED in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe area includes:

·        LDI activities (migrant business support, Little India and the Young Enterprise Scheme)

·        Business capability building and support for new businesses

·        Working with the local board in relation to The Southern Initiative.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited’s six-monthly report to Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for 1 January to 30 June 2018, as shown in attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       ATEED helps lay a strong foundation for Auckland’s economic growth through a broad programme of initiatives focused on:

· Business growth and innovation

· Business attraction and investment

· Conferences and business events

· Major events

· Film

· International education

· Tourism.

6.       ATEED’s work can impact and provide opportunities locally as well as regionally. For this reason they have committed to reporting to local boards every six months.

7.       The report attached reflects this commitment and covers the period from 1 January to 30 June 2018.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

8.       The ATEED activities carried out in the local board area are outlined in the below table.

Table 1. Local ATEED activities

Activity

ATEED team responsible

LDI activities (migrant business support, Little India and the Young Enterprise Scheme)

Economic Development

Business capability building and support for new businesses

Economic Development

Working with the Local Board in relation to The Southern Initiative

Tourism

9.       As part of business-as-usual, destinations in the local board area continue to feature in the official Auckland visitor information website administered by ATEED.

10.     Should a local board choose to allocate some of their Local Development Initiative (LDI) fund to economic development activities, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development team can manage the delivery of a work programme for them. https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/LocalImpactsAndLocalBoardViews.aspx

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /

Local impacts and local board views

11.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no local impact, however some of the activities described in the report do. Details of this are outlined in the six-monthly report attached.

12.     Local board views were not sought for the purposes of this report. Local board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

13.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact their initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

14.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

15.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with their initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

The next ATEED six-monthly report will be presented to the local board in early 2019 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2018.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ATEED six-monthly report to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

49

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Paul Robinson, Local Economic Growth Manager (ATEED)

Samantha-Jane Miranda, Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

James Robinson, Head of Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Multi-Board and Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019 grant applications

 

File No.: CP2018/16667

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants and Multi-Board Grants, Round One 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 17 April 2018 (see Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

3.       This report presents applications received for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants and Multi-Board Grants, Round One 2018/2019 (see Attachment’s B and C)

4.       The Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $218,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

5.       Thirty-six applications were received for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019, requesting a total of $373,049.  In addition, sixteen applications were received for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Multi-Board Grants, Round One 2018/2019 requesting a total of $64,819.

6.       In total, fifty-two applications were received for consideration by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants and Multi-Board Grants, Round One 2018/2019 with a total funding request of $437,868.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 applications as outlined in Table One:

 

Table One: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 applications

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

LG1913-103

The Rising Foundation Trust

Towards wages for the full-time Programme Coordinator.

$5,000.00

LG1913-104

Otara Rugby League

Towards team uniforms for 3 teams junior Otara Ruby League.

$5,500.00

LG1913-106

Manukau Beijing Opera Society Incorporated

Towards venue hire costs for the Papatoetoe Town Hall.

$6,608.00

LG1913-109

Kids Safe with Dogs Charitable Trust

Towards printing costs and payment for instructors and administration personnel.

$9,438.00

LG1913-111

Papatoetoe Avengers Rugby Team

Towards team fees for the New Zealand Junior Rugby Festival held in September 2018.

$990.00

LG1913-113

Auckland Indian Retailers Association Incorporated

Towards stage, marquee, sound and lighting, artist fees, tables, chairs, security, DJ, fencing, insurance, labour and event management fees for 2018 Diwali Mela in Charles Street, Papatoetoe on 6 October 2018.

$30,000.00

LG1913-116

Hillary House Leadership Centre Trust

Towards six months operating costs for the Hillary House Visiting Programme.

$7,252.00

LG1913-118

The Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust

Towards therapist, transport and venue rent costs for 4 clients for music therapy for the period 15 October 2018 to 13 April 2019.

$6,717.00

LG1913-120

Papatoetoe Garden & Floral Art Society Incorporated

Towards venue, printing, judging, advertising, prize and engraving costs for the 87th annual Papatoetoe Garden & Floral Art Society Rose and Open Floral Show.

$2,000.00

LG1913-122

South Auckland Chinese Senior Friendship Club Incorporated

Towards administration, refreshment, koha for speakers, volunteer expenses, bus trip and Christmas, Chinese New Year, Steamboat and Mid-Autumn festival costs for the period October 2018 to September 2019.

$4,050.00

LG1913-124

Te Ama Charity Aotearoa Trust

Towards recorder, laptop, microphones, headphones and phone for recording and editing for Te Ama radio segment for the period 1 January 2019 - 31 December 2019.

$2,000.00

LG1913-125

Otara Business Association Incorporated

Towards lighting, stage, audio, printing, promotion, entertainment, prizes, giveaways, project manager, health and safety coordinator and volunteer costs for the 2018 Otara Christmas Parade.

$20,000.00

LG1913-126

Hindu Heritage Research Foundation (NZ)

Towards venue, printing, food, decoration, performers, videography, DJ and sound equipment costs for the Papatoetoe Deepavali Festival of Lights at Papatoetoe Town Hall on 19 October 2018.

$6,791.00

LG1913-127

Otara Business Association Incorporated

Towards dinner, transport, soft-drinks, gift-packs for 150 people in Auckland for the Otara Seniors Christmas Party on 27 November 2018.

$7,500.00

LG1913-128

Willies Boxing/Fitness Otara

Towards boxing fitness equipment.

$1,000.00

LG1913-129

Papatoetoe Senior Citizens' Club Incorporated

Towards hall hire costs for weekly meetings of the Papatoetoe Senior Citizens Club Incorporated through to 30 September 2019.

$3,800.00

LG1913-130

Hindu Heritage Research Foundation (NZ)

Towards stage, sound, entertainment, food, sanitation, video, printing and volunteer expense costs for the Papatoetoe Family Fund Day 2018 at Alan Brewster Recreation Centre on 24 November 2018.

$7,560.00

LG1913-131

Papatoetoe Central Main Street Society Incorporated

Towards entertainment, promotion, prizes, traffic management and coordinator management fees for the 2018 Papatoetoe Santa Parade and associated Christmas in the park event.

$30,000.00

LG1913-132

Papatoetoe Central Main Street Society Incorporated

Towards transport, meal, soft drink and gift-pack costs for the 2018 Papatoetoe Seniors Christmas Party to be held in Auckland Central.

$7,500.00

LG1913-134

David Riley

Towards printing costs for two Mike Whidett books for teenagers and primary-age children.

$4,500.00

LG1913-135

Papatoetoe Rugby Under 10 Saints Team

Towards team tracksuits, side-line jackets, team gear bags and team accommodation for the Papatoetoe Under 10 rugby team tournament in Queenstown on 29 - 30th September 2018.

$6,038.00

LG1913-139

The United Buddhist Youth Association of Auckland Incorporated

Towards teaching resource, stationery, whiteboards, tables, chairs, computer, printer, teacher fees, venue and student gift costs for the Baoan Buddhist Temple for the period 14 October 2018 to 13 October 2019.

$8,400.00

LG1913-140

The Friendship House Trust

Towards administration, reporting, event services and production, security, koha, RT hire, sound equipment, MC, food and ingredients, signage and fatigue mats for the Friendship House World Homeless Day acknowledgement on 19 October 2018.

$5,000.00

LG1913-141

Papatoetoe Gymnastic Club Incorporated

Towards coaching salary for twenty weeks and leadership course costs for the period 8 October 2018 to 25 February 2019.

$4,000.00

LG1913-142

Roopa Aur Aap Charitable Trust

Towards counsellor's salary for the period 15 August 2018 to 14 August 2019.

$10,000.00

LG1913-143

Bhartiya Samaj Charitable Trust

Towards venue hire, transport costs and seniors outing costs for the period 9 October 2018 to 30 September 2019.

$10,000.00

LG1913-145

Counties Manukau Sports Foundation

Towards activity and event costs programmed for Otara-Papatoetoe for the period 1 October 2018 to 30 September 2019.

$30,000.00

LG1913-146

Accelerating Aotearoa Incorporated

Towards programme administration, design, activation, deliver, travel and meeting costs for the period 1 October 2018 to 31 January 2019.

$40,000.00

LG1913-147

Tu Tangata Roopu Incorporated

Towards stage, sound equipment, performer's fees, giveaways, entertainment rides and amusements, face-painting, security, St John, cleaners and marketing costs for Otara Family Christmas in the Park on 24 November 2018.

$20,000.00

LG1913-149

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Towards Life Education delivery costs for 532 children at Papatoetoe East schools for the period 12 November 2018 to 30 November 2018.

$6,873.00

LG1913-150

Otara Business Association

Towards catering, awards, venue, community meeting, judging, media production and promotion and administration support costs for the Otara Sports Awards on 1 December 2018.

$30,000.00

LG1913-151

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Towards the purchase and delivery of native trees and recycling bins to Ōtara-Papatoetoe schools and preschools participating in the Paper4trees programme.

$4,962.00

LG1913-152

Faith City Trust Board

Towards venue hire, workshops, mentor training and support costs for Project Wy for the period 4 February 2019 to 30 August 2019.

$7,500.00

LG1913-153

Cook Island Tag Football Incorporated

Towards 200 tag shorts for the Cook Islands Tag Football based at the Papatoetoe Rugby Football Club.

$7,000.00

LG1913-154

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards salary for Youthline Coordinator for the period 1 November 2018 to 31 October 2019.

$3,582.00

LG1913-155

Dawson Events Committee

"under the umbrella of Know Your Status Community Trust"

Towards entertainment, prizes, giveaways, free food, sound gear, marquee, stalls activities, administration cost and sound gear for Dawson Lights Christmas 2018.

$11,488.00

 

 

Total Requested

$373,049.00

 

b)      Agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the Multi-Board Grants Round One 2018/2019 applications as outlined in Table Two:

 

Table Two: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Multi-Board Grants Round One 2018/2019 applications

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

MB1819-104

Cook Islands Rugby New Zealand Incorporated

Towards rugby equipment for junior teams.

$3,500.00

MB1819-106

Let’s get Legal Trust

Contribution towards cost of Driver’s license programme workshops.

$7,500.00

MB1819-109

Pasifika Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Towards venue costs for four community workshops and operational administrative costs.

$2,400.00

MB1819-115

Auckland Softball Association Incorporated.

Towards umpire uniforms, protective clothing and equipment bags

$3,000.00

MB1819-118

Manukau Orchestral Society Incorporated

Towards the venue hire and technical costs for a musical performance at the Vodafone Events Centre.

$1,219.00

MB1819-126

Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind

Contribution towards new Digital Talking Books for the Blind Foundation Library.

$3,000.00

MB1819-133

Renu Sikka

Towards venue, photographer, exhibition and facilitator costs for 'Woman of Kaur" ancestry story telling project for the period 4 November 2018 to 25 November 2018.

$300.00

MB1819-141

Tumeke Enterprise Limited

Towards catering cost for a two-day youth programme - Maori and Pasifika in Business Forum

$2,000.00

MB1819-145

Trust MYRIVR

Towards the project manager fees to advertise a free social and health services phone application.

$10,000.00

MB1819-162

New Zealand Council of Victim Support Groups Incorporated

Towards the costs to recruit, train and supervise their volunteer support workers.

$6,000.00

MB1819-172

The Parkinson's New Zealand Charitable Trust

Towards the salaries of six Parkinson's community educators.

$3,500.00

MB1819-174

LifeKidz Trust

Towards the purchase of outdoor play panels and the cost of youth worker wages to run their youth programmes.

$2,000.00

MB1819-182

Counties Manukau Sports Foundation

Towards the 2018 Counties Manukau Sporting Excellence Awards including venue hire, event co-ordinator catering.

$3,000.00

MB1819-186

Pacific Island Law Student’s Association (PILSA)

under the umbrella of "Auckland University Law Students Society Incorporated".

Towards venue, DJ, cultural group, gifts, guest speaker, koha, band, decorations and dinner buffet costs for annual Pacific Law Students end of year dinner 2018.

$2,000.00

MB1819-187

Dream Big Trust

Towards rent costs for six months at the Papatoetoe Seventh Day Adventist Church for the Dream Big Trust.

$10,400.00

MB1819-190

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust

Towards wages for 14 Kiwi Can Leaders who deliver the Kiwi Can programme across seven schools in seven local board areas.

$5,000.00

Total

 

 

$64,819.00

 

 

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

9.       The local board grants programme sets out:

· local board priorities

· lower priorities for funding

· exclusions

· grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

· any additional accountability requirements.

10.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2018/2019 on 17 April 2018 and will operate three quick response and two local grant rounds for this financial year.

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio and community networks.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

13.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

14.     The local board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applications about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

15.     A summary of each application received through Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants and Multi-Board Grants, Round One 2018/2019 (see Attachment’s B and C) is provided.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

17.     Ten applicants applying to Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local and Multiboard Grants Round One indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

18.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

19.     The Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $218,000.

20.     Thirty-six applications were received for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019, requesting a total of $373,049.

21.     Sixteen applications were received for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Multi-Board Grants, Round One 2018/2019, requesting a total of $64,819.

 

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

22.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local boards programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

23.     Following the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board allocation of funding for Local Grants and Multi-Board Grants Round One, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision and facilitate payment of the grant.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants Programme 2018/2019

65

b

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Multi-Board  Round One 2018/2019 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Lincoln Papali'i - Senior Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Fran Hayton - Principal Grants Advsr & Incentives TL

Shane King - Operations Support Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

CCTV Maintenance (Covering report)

 

File No.: CP2018/17241

 

  

 

This is a late covering report for the above item.

 

The report will circulated separately prior to the meeting as an addendum agenda.

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Amendments to 2018/2019 Arts, Community and Events work programme

 

File No.: CP2018/17021

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve amendments to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe 2018/2019 Arts, Community and Events (ACE) work programme. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In June 2018 Colin Dale park became a regional facility and the Governing Body took responsibility from the local board for the annual repayment of the debt for costs incurred for the development of that park.

3.       As a result, the local board has $169,000 of unallocated funds in their Community Response Fund for redistribution to work programmes.

4.       The local board requested that staff across the organisation make recommendations for how the additional funds can be allocated to new and existing projects. 

5.       We recommend that for the 2018/2019 ACE work programme, the following three lines are suitable for additional funding from the Community Response Fund:

·    $15,000 of unallocated LDI budget to work programme line 997 for the Let’s Get Legal Trust to deliver the Community Builders programme.

·    $4,000 of unallocated LDI budget to work programme line 293 so that Sistema Aotearoa can increase their number of participants.

·    $4,000 of unallocated LDI budget to work programme line 999 for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Squad (TOPS) youth council to organise and host the annual Civic Leadership Awards Dinner.  

6.       In addition, we also recommend amending the activity description of work programme line 997 to transfer $4,000 of allocated LDI from the Capacity-Building funding to the Papatoetoe Sunday Markets.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      allocate an additional $15,000 from the Community Response Fund to the 2018/2019 ACE work programme line 997 for the Community Builders programme.

b)      allocate an additional $4,000 from the Community Response Fund to the 2018/2019 ACE work programme line 293 for Sistema Aotearoa.

c)      allocate an additional $4,000 from the Community Response Fund to the 2018/2019 ACE work programme line 999 for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Squad (TOPS).

d)      approve the amendment of 2018/2019 ACE work programme line 997 to reflect the transfer of $4,000 from the the Amazing Markets project funding to the Papatoetoe Sunday markets.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       In June 2018, Colin Dale park became a regional facility and the Governing Body took responsibility from the local board for the annual repayment of the debt for costs incurred for the development of that park.

8.       As a result, the local board has $169,000 of unallocated funds in their Community Response Fund, for redistribution to work programmes.

9.       The local board requested that staff across the organisation make recommendations for how the additional fund can be allocated to new and existing projects. 

10.     ACE staff have reviewed the current work programme to identify areas for additional funding and make recommendations to the local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Community Builders project

11.     The Community Builders programme is based on the neighbourhood development and engagement model used by a group of residents on Cooper Crescent in Ōtara to organise activities and events together on their street to create more positive interactions amongst all the neighbours.

12.     The Cooper Crescent activities are organised by the Let’s Get Legal Trust and include regular street clean-ups and barbecues, free ‘pataka’ food stalls, and their annual Cooper Crescent Christmas Lights.

13.     Additional funding will enable Let’s Get Legal Trust to respond to expressions of interest from residents of other streets to provide them with training, mentoring, leadership and support, and purchase some resources, such as sports and sound equipment.

14.     The total budget for work programme line 997 Capacity Building Project is currently $38,000 and we recommend allocating an additional $15,000 for a new Community Builders initiative, bringing the total budget to $53,000.

Sistema Aotearoa

15.     The Sistema Aotearoa programme currently delivers pre-school music sessions, concert performances, in-school musicianship lessons and instrumental tuition. Last year 1,034 individual students participated in a range of musical activities, and 435 students took part in after-school tuition delivered five nights a week during the school terms.

16.     Additional funding will enable Sistema Aotearoa to meet the demand for more students wanting to participate and ensure the quality of their services is maintained.

17.     The current local board funding for Sistema Aotearoa is $11,000 and we recommend allocating a further $4,000, bringing the total budget to $15,000.

The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Squad (TOPS)

18.     The total budget for work programme line 999 Capacity-Building for Youth Development is currently $34,000 and a portion of this has been allocated to The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Squad (TOPS) to organise and host the annual Civic Leadership Awards Dinner.

19.     Last year the actual cost of hosting this event exceeded the amount that had been allocated by the group.

20.     We recommend allocating an additional $4,000 to enable TOPS to host the event the way they intend, with a budget that reflects the actual cost for running the event, bringing the total budget to $38,000.

Papatoetoe Sunday Markets

21.     The Amazing Grace group has been running the Amazing Sunday Market at 30 Wallace Road from 5 August 2018 and will cease operating on 9 September 2018.

22.     The budget for this initiative is $10,000 which is part of the $38,000 allocated to the Capacity Building work programme line 997.

23.     The Papatoetoe Sunday Markets project is a response to the temporary closure of the local New World Supermarket where residents and community groups contacted staff to explore the possibility of reinstating the Sunday markets that had previously ran over many years in the car park.

24.     The market is operating on a koha basis where stallholders are not charged any fees to encourage wider participation. A grant could help the operators to do more promotion and develop the capacity of the markets.

25.     We recommend allocating $4,000 to the Papatoetoe Sunday Markets to enable the market to run until the beginning of 2019. This allows the markets to operate until New World is reopened, which is expected to be after December 2018.

26.     The Ōtara Business Association will be the fundholder for this budget and different community groups will be allocated a six-week period to operate the market, receiving $1,000 of the budget each to do so.

27.     The table below shows the periods the markets will operate for under each organizer. 

6-week period for each market

Allocation

5 August 2018 to 9 September 2018

$1,000

16 September 2018 to 21 October 2018

$1,000

28 October 2018 to 2 December 2018

$1,000

9 December 2018 to 12 January 2019

$1,000

Total

$4,000

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

28.     The Community Builders and Papatoetoe Sunday Markets amendments will deliver to the board’s Whakaotinga 5/Outcome 5: Hapori whaimana, whakarauhii me te toonui tonu/Empowered, inclusive and prosperous community’s priority.

29.     The Sistema Aotearoa and TOPS amendments will deliver to the local board’s Whakaotinga 6/Outcome 6: Whakamaanawa ana i te Taiohi me te hunga kaumaatua/Honouring youth and seniors.

30.     Staff workshopped proposals for new programmes with the local board on 31 July 2018. The local board requested additional information and recommendations be brought for formal approval at a business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

31.     Approximately 30 per cent of the residents participating in the Community Builders programme are Maori. Approximately 60 per cent of residents are rangatahi and youth under 24 years.

32.     In 2017, 90 per cent of the participants of the Sistema Aotearoa programme were from Maori and/or Pasifika backgrounds.

33.     90 per cent of the recipients of the Civic Leadership Awards identify as Maori and/or Pasifika.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

34.     In June 2018 the Governing Body resolved to make Colin Dale park a regional facility, which absolved the local board from paying the costs incurred for the development of that park.

35.     Therefore, a total of $169,000 of unallocated funds became available as a Community Response Fund for redistribution to new and existing work programmes lines.

36.     Of the $169,000 available fund we recommend allocating the following amounts to ACE work programme lines:

·    $15,000 to line 997 for the Community Builders programme

·    $4,000 to line 293 for Sistema Aotearoa

·    $4,000 to line 999 for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Squad (TOPS) youth council

37.     In addition, we recommend transferring $4,000 from the the Amazing Markets project funding to the Papatoetoe Sunday Markets within line 997.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

38.     The Let’s Get Legal Trust has received interest in participating in the Community Builders programme from other Ōtara street leaders. Additional funding is required to provide adequate mentoring and coaching support to them.

39.     If Sistema Aotearoa does not receive additional funding they may not be able to cater to the growth in demand for their music programmes, or the quality of their current activities might be compromised if they attempt to include the extra participants or performances without extra resources.

40.     If the Papatoetoe Sunday markets do not receive funding, then they may miss the opportunity to continue the momentum of the current market event.

41.     If TOPS do not receive additional funding, then they will not have the resources to host a Civic Leadership Awards that will fully meet the aims of the event: to be significant and inclusive.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

42.     Staff will develop funding agreements to the relevant community organisations upon formal approval of the amendments to the 2018/2019 ACE work programme.

43.     The activities will be updated on SharePoint and reported to the local board in the Quarter One financial report.

44.     All groups receiving local board grants will submit their accountability reports as required and will be encouraged to present the outcomes of their funding to the local board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tess Liew – Strategic Broker

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Approval of funding toward an Enviroschools project in Ōtara-Papatoetoe

 

File No.: CP2018/15372

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To allocate $43,000 toward the Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project for delivery as part of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s 2018/2019 local environment work programme.

2.       To approve in principle the allocation of $51,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year and $61,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year toward the Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project, subject to budget availability.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

3.       At a 12 June 2018 workshop, the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board indicated interest in supporting an Enviroschools project to support children and young people to plan, design and implement sustainability actions.

4.       Environmental Services staff have developed two Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project options for the board’s consideration:

·    Option A – Full Building Sustainable Communities project – this will provide full funding for the establishment of 10-12 new Enviroschools, all teacher releases will be covered for all 6 workshops and a sustainable coordinator will be employed for 28 weeks of the current financial year. Under this option, $2,000 will be allocated towards an e-bike for the sustainability coordinator, and community hui with mana whenua and key stakeholders to consult on the design and implementation of school actions.

·    Option B – Scaled-back Building Sustainable Communities project – this will provide funding for only 8-10 new schools to be engaged, half of the teacher release days will be covered, the sustainability coordinator will find their own mode of transport and only key mana whenua representatives will be engaged in hui to consult on the design and implementation of school actions. 

5.       This report recommends that the board approve Option A for the Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project as it will achieve maximum impact for a sustainable Ōtara-Papatoetoe future. This will be a three-year project which will begin delivery within the 2018/2019 financial year (see full project proposal Attachment A).

6.       Considering the three-year design, this report also recommends that $51,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget is allocated in principle for the 2019/2020 financial year, and $61,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year for Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools, subject to budget availability.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      allocate $43,000 of locally driven initiatives operational expenditure for the Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project, to be delivered as part of the board’s 2018/2019 local environment work programme .

b)      approve in principle the allocation of $51,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year and $61,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year toward the Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project, subject to budget availability in those financial years.

 

Horopaki / Context

Funding availability

7.         On 28 June 2018 the Governing Body approved the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board ‘one local initiative’ through the 10-year budget (resolution number GB/2018/108). This relieved the board of the need to repay $280,000 per annum over ten years for the Colin Dale Park upgrade.

8.       This resulted in $280,000 of locally driven initiative funds being available for allocation towards projects in the 2018/2019 financial year. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board invited all council departments to propose new or expanded work programme projects to utilise the board’s unallocated funds.

9.       At its June 2018 business meeting, the local board approved five projects to be delivered as part of the board’s 2018/2019 local environment work programme (resolution number OP/2018/104). These projects include:

·        $20,000 for Puhinui Reserve Restoration

·        $25,000 for Neat Streets Events (Papatoetoe)

·        $5,000 for the Tāmaki Estuary and Environmental Forum

·        $10,000 for the Manukau Harbour Forum

·        $122,000 for Ōtara Lakes and Waterways Vision Projects.

10.     The Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project would be added to the current 2018/2019 local environment work programme. 

Enviroschools project development

11.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has identified achieving a ‘healthy natural environment’ as an outcome in its 2017 local board plan.

12.     Enviroschools gives effect to this outcome by supporting children and young people to plan, design and implement sustainability actions that are important to them and their communities. Actions can include predator control education, water workshops, community planting and any other sustainability initiatives young people identify a need for in their communities.  

13.     Following the 12 June 2018 workshop the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board indicated an interest in supporting an Enviroschools project to utilise part of the board’s unallocated locally driven initiatives funding.

14.     At the 31 July 2018 workshop, an Enviroschools project proposal was presented to the board for consideration. This proposal is referred to as Option A and is detailed later in this report (see Attachment A for the full project proposal).

15.     Following the presentation, the board requested staff to investigate a scaled-back version of the project. Staff have provided a second option, referred to as Option B, that provides the essentials for running a project with fewer schools (see Attachment A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

16.     A brief summary of financial and operational differences of Option A and B are summarised in Table 1 below

 

 

Table 1. Summary of Building sustainable communities – Enviroschools Option A and B

 

Option A

Option B

Cost (2018/2019)

$43,000

$29,000

Cost (2019/2020)

$51,000

$38,000

Cost (2020/2021)

$61,000

$46,000

Total cost for three-year project

$155,000

$113,000

Number of schools engaged (three years)

10-12

8-10

Workshops

6 full/half days

3 full days, 3x two hour cluster meetings

Community action days

2

1

Sustainable coordinator availability for 2018/2019

28 weeks

20 weeks

Electric bike for sustainability coordinator to travel within the community

Budgeted $2,000

Not budgeted

Approximate percentage increase of Enviroschools in local board area if option is supported

50 per cent

35 per cent

 

17.     Option A and B give effect to the Local Board Plan outcome a “Healthy natural environment” through the board objectives of waste minimisation and healthy waterways. Sustainability benefits will reach beyond these two objectives.

18.     Both Option A and B aim to deliver the same benefits including:

·    growing community capability and capacity 

·    empowering local schools and students to develop sustainability skills

·    supporting a sustainable, prosperous, resilient community. Through knowledge sharing and collaboration, the relationships between schools, mana whenua, other partners and community are developed and strengthened.

19.     The difference between Option A and Option B concerns the scale of the project and overall effectiveness. As detailed in Table 1 above, Option A will require increased funding  to allow for more schools to be engaged, all teacher releases to be covered for workshops and increased involvement of a coordinator for the current financial year.

20.     Staff recommend that Option A be approved as it will maximise the project benefits. Option A will relieve stress of teachers to partake in extra-curricular initiatives, allow the sustainable community coordinator to dedicate more time to the job, provide wide mana whenua and community engagement and more schools will participate.

21.     Learnings from previous Enviroschools projects indicate that three years is needed for a new Enviroschool to establish relationships, embed curriculum and practice to enable lasting sustainable change. The current climate in schools, stresses and time commitments also create the need for a three-year investment. 

22.     A three-year period of dedicated sustainability focus would generate significant momentum for sustainable change across the community. Staff anticipate the number of active Enviroschools would increase in Ōtara-Papatoetoe from five active schools schools, or 16 per cent currently, to 50 per cent under Option A. 

23.     Staff recommend that the board should only consider supporting this project if they are willing to allocate funding in principle for the entire three-year project.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

24.     The Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project gives effect to the board’s aspirational outcomes ‘healthy natural environment’ through sustainability actions designed and implemented by students.

25.     The project will also give effect to further local board outcomes, ‘empowered, inclusive and prosperous communities’ and ‘honouring youth and seniors’ by designing projects that include communities and are owned by young people in Ōtara-Papatoetoe.

26.     Previously the board has sponsored signs for six local Enviroschools (worth $150 each).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

27.     The Enviroschools kaupapa and programme supports young people to foster a closer connection with Taiao - the world around us. Kaitiakitanga and Māori perspectives are integrated elements of Enviroschools kaupapa staff seek to activate and elevate.

28.     Staff encourage Enviroschools to acknowledge and grow authentic relationships with mana whenua and those with traditional knowledge of land and sea.

29.     Mana whenua involvement will be sought and established from the outset of the project.

30.     Provision is made in the Option A budget for community-wide hui with mana whenua, stakeholders working in community empowerment and other interested community members for their project participation.

31.     Provision is made in the Option B budget for less extensive hui, only key mana whenua representative input will be sought.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

32.     The current local environment work programme uses $182,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget. The additional allocation of $43,000 for the Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project raises the overall budget to $225,000.

33.     The budget to support the recommended option (Option A) can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2018/2019. As such, the board’s approval will not have significant financial implications unless existing projects experience a significant overspend or underspend.

34.     Regular quarterly updates on projects will be provided to the board tracking expenditure and identifying any projects at risk of nondelivery, over or underspend.

35.     Further financial implications for the board involve the provisional allocation of $51,000 of the locally driven initiatives operational budget for the 2019/2020 financial year, and $61,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year, subject to budget availability.

36.     Regional Enviroschool programmes receive funding, however the model staff are currently funded to provide is not tailored for local areas.

37.     A locally tailored approach supported by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will build the capacity of local community in a way that regional resources cannot. This will achieve better, more effective and enduring outcomes for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board community.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

38.     If the proposed Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project is not approved at the board’s September 2018 business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed delivery of the project within the 2018/2019 financial year will be implicated.  

39.     If funding is not allocated in principle for year two and three of the Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project, there is a risk that the delivery and success of the project will be hindered.

40.     A table of identified risks and proposed mitigation measures are outlined in Attachment B.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

41.     Subject to the board’s approval, the delivery of the Building Sustainable Communities – Enviroschools project will commence in late 2018. Regular reporting on project delivery will be provided to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board through the quarterly performance report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Enviroschools full project proposal Option A and B

81

b

Attachment B - Risk assessment table

83

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Madison Little – Relationship Advisor Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Authorisers

Gael Ogilvie – General Manager Environmental Services

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

New community lease – The Scout Association of New Zealand (Papatoetoe East), Kimpton Park, 108 Kimpton Road, Papatoetoe

 

File No.: CP2018/15707

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to publicly notify Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new ground lease for the land at Kimpton Park, 108R Kimpton Road, Papatoetoe, to The Scout Association of New Zealand for the Papatoetoe East Scout Group and grant the lease subject to this notification.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council owns the land at Kimpton Park, 108R Kimpton Road, Papatoetoe. 

3.       The Scout Association of New Zealand held a lease for the land and has exercised the right of renewal for the period 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2017.  The lease has now expired and has been holding over on a month-by-month basis. 

4.       The building is owned by The Scout Association of New Zealand.  As specified in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy.  The Scout Association has made a formal application for a new ground lease for the building and part of the surrounding land at Kimpton Park, 108R Kimpton Road, Papatoetoe (Attachment A – Site Map). 

5.       Staff recommend that, subject to public notification of the intention to lease which is a requirement of the Reserves Act 1977 and the resolution of any objections, the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board grant a new lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand to occupy an area of 254.4m2 (more or less) at 108R Kimpton Road, Papatoetoe, for 10 years commencing on 1 October 2017 with one 10 year right-of-renewal.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community ground lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand for the land at Kimpton Park, 108R Kimpton Road, Papatoetoe (identified in Attachment A). 

b)      appoint a hearings panel to consider any submissions or objections received following the public notification and make a decision. 

c)      grant under section 73(3) of the Reserves Act 1977, subject to any objections to the lease being resolved, a new community ground lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand to occupy an area of 254.4 square meters (more or less) being part of Lot 55 Deposited Plan 46107 (1.0770 square meters) Part NA1126/232 (Cancelled) at Kimpton Park, 108R Kimpton Road, Papatoetoe, subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i.   term – 10 years commencing 1 October 2017 with one 10-year right of renewal effecting final expiry on 30 September 2037 

ii.  rent – One dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if requested 

iii.  rent review date – on renewal 

iv. permitted use – scouting activities and associated use 

v.  the approved Scout Association of New Zealand (Papatoetoe East) Community Outcomes Plan be attached to the lease document (Attachment B) 

d)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       Auckland Council owns the land at Kimpton Park, 108R Kimpton Road, Papatoetoe. The scout-owned building is located at the edge of the reserve as indicated in Attachment A.  The area is part of Lot 55 Deposited Plan 46107 (1.0770 square meters) Part NA1126/232 (Cancelled) and is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve.  Under the Reserves Act 1977, the granting of a new lease requires iwi engagement and one month’s public notification of the intention to lease the property.  The proposed new lease will be issued under section 73(3) of the Reserves Act 1977.

The lease terms 

7.       The standard term for community leases for group owned buildings, as outlined in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, are: 

8.       A lease term of 10 years, plus one 10-year right of renewal 

9.       An annual rent of one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum, if demanded. 

10.     A community outcomes plan that identifies the benefits that the group will provide to the community and the measures used to review the group’s performance against the plan over time.  The group reports annually against the agreed performance measures.

The tenant 

11.     The former Manukau City Council entered into a ground lease with The Scout Association of New Zealand.  The lease was renewed in 2003 for a term of 14 years with no further right of renewal.  The lease reached its final expiry on 30 September 2017 and has been holding over on a month-by-month basis. 

12.     The Boy Scout movement in New Zealand began in 1908 under the auspices of The Boy Scouts Association of the United Kingdom.  In 1953, the New Zealand branch became a direct member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement and in 1956 changed its name to The Boy Scouts Association of New Zealand and then to The Scout Association of New Zealand in 1967. The Scout Association of New Zealand operates under the name SCOUTS New Zealand. 

13.     SCOUTS New Zealand has 15,476 members, with 4,740 volunteers. 

14.     Every year SCOUTS New Zealand help 16,000 young people in New Zealand enjoy new adventures; to experience the outdoors; interact with others, gain confidence and can reach their full potential.  Working alongside the youth members are thousands of adult volunteers, with a huge variety of roles and opportunities available. 

15.     There are four key cornerstones in the Scout movement which are all realised through experiences including; outdoors, community, personal development and new skills and experience. 

16.     The programmes that SCOUTS offer cater to the development of boys and girls in the physical, emotional, spiritual and mental aspects of their lives in an appropriately safe environment where they are encouraged to be themselves, work together and thrive. 

17.     The statement of financial position provided as at 30 September 2017 indicates that the funds are sufficient to meet the groups liabilities and are being managed appropriately. 

18.     The Scout Association of New Zealand and Papatoetoe East Scouts group have all the necessary insurance cover (including public liability and building insurance) in place

Options

Option 1: Grant the lease 

19.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, Auckland Council (as owner of the land) must grant a lease for any building on the land that is not used directly by council.  Granting of this lease will enable The Scout Association of New Zealand to continue to provide its services to the local community.  This option is recommended. 

Option 2: Decline the lease 

20.     If the local board does not grant the lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand, then as owners of the building, the association would need to sell the building to another community group approved by the board or remove it from the land.  The Scout Association of New Zealand would then have to find alternative accommodation in the Papatoetoe area to enable them to continue to provide their services to the community.  This option is not recommended.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

21.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the criteria for community occupancy agreements.  

22.     The Scout Association of New Zealand satisfies the required criteria specified in the Community Occupancy Guidelines in the following ways: 

·                it is a registered body incorporated under the Scout Association of New Zealand Act 1956 

·                it has complied with the terms of the current lease 

·                it has a history of delivering its services to the local community. 

23.     Under the respective guidelines, it is recommended that for leases for land with group-owned buildings the standard term is a 10-year lease with one 10-year right of renewal, providing a total term of 20 years. The local board has the discretion to vary the term if it wishes.  However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms within the Community Occupancy Guidelines.  

24.     Any proposed lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand will require public notification and iwi consultation under the Reserves Act 1977.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

25.     At its business meeting of 20 June 2017, the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board resolved to approve the 2017/2018 Community Leases Work Programme (Resolution Number OP/2017/97).  The proposed new lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand is listed as item 2589 on the work programme. 

26.     The services provided by The Scout Association of New Zealand align with the board’s 2017 Local Board Plan: 

·               “Outcome 4: Healthy natural environment” 

·               “Outcome 6: Honouring youth and seniors” 

27.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

28.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under the Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tamaki Makaurau context.  These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan, the Auckland Unitary Plan and local board plans. 

29.     Support for Maori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.  An aim of community leasing is to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.  Additionally, it seeks to improve access to facilities and participation for Māori living in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. 

30.     The Papatoetoe East Scouts will host up to two community events per annum to celebrate Māori culture.  They also make the hall available for use by the community (including Māori) for social and cultural activities.  Nationally 4.4% of scouts identify as being Māori. 

31.     The proposed new lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand was discussed at the South/Central Mana Whenua Forum of 27 June 2018, no objections were raised by those present.  Mana whenua have the opportunity to formally object to the proposed lease when public notification is carried out.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

32.     There are no direct cost implications associated with the grant of a new community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

33.     Should the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board resolve not to grant The Scout Association of New Zealand a new community lease for the Papatoetoe East Scout group, this decision may materially affect the group’s ability to provide its services to the local community.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

34.     Subject to the local board grant of a new community lease and the public notification, council staff will work with The Scout Association of New Zealand to formalise the lease document.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The Scout Association of New Zealand (Papatoetoe East) - site map

89

b

The Scout Association of New Zealand (Papatoetoe East) - community outcomes plan

91

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Jenny Young - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Community lease – Mataliki Tokelau Pre-School South Auckland Trust, 53R Raglan Street, Mangere East

 

File No.: CP2018/16732

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To amend the 21 March 2016 resolution of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board that granted a new community lease to Mataliki Tokelau Pre-School South Auckland Trust for land at Aorere Park, 53R Raglan Street, Mangere East, to reflect the correct area of the lease.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       At the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board business meeting of 21 March 2016 the board resolved under OP/2016/25 inter alia (in part):

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a.       Grant a new community ground lease to the following groups under the terms and conditions as specified in Attachment A – Grant of new community leases, group owned buildings:

ii)       Mataliki Tokelau Pre-school South Auckland Trust, 53R Raglan Street, Mangere (as outlined in the site plan in Attachment C).”

3.       The group has not yet signed the deed of lease and has advised council staff that the site map does not include the additional land for expansion of the centre approved by the board under an Agreement to Lease on 17 March 2014.

4.       Staff recommend that resolution OP/2016/25 a) ii) be amended to reflect the correct area of land occupied by the Mataliki Tokelau Pre-School South Auckland Trust (marked in red on Attachment A).  The terms and conditions will remain unchanged.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      amend resolution OP/2016/25 a) ii) (21 March 2016) to correct the site plan for the lease awarded to Mataliki Tokelau Pre-school South Auckland Trust to include the area of Aorere Park approved by the board under an Agreement to Lease on 17 March 2014, that allowed for expansion of the centre (marked in red on Attachment A), with the terms and conditions as previously approved.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       In March 2016 the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board approved a new community ground lease to the Mataliki Tokelau Pre-school South Auckland Trust for land on Aorere Park at 53R Raglan Street, Māngere East.

6.       Unfortunately, the site plan for the property that allowed for the expansion of the early childhood education centre (approved by the board under an Agreement to Lease on 17 March 2014) did not explicitly outline the expanded area of the centre and when the site map was prepared for the new lease report of March 2016, the aerial map of the property did not reflect the correct outline of the leased area.

7.       The Mataliki Tokelau Pre-school South Auckland Trust was registered with the New Zealand Companies Office under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 and aims to foster the Tokelauan language, culture, tradition, values and education and enhance the development of children and others interested in learning the language of Tokelau.  They have been providing these services from the centre on Aorere Park since 1997.

8.       In 2014 the group received approval to expand the centre to enable an additional 50 pre-school children from the local community to attend.  The centre is open Monday to Friday, from 7.00am to 6.00pm.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

9.       To rectify the error, it is recommended resolution OP/2016/25 a) ii) be amended to reflect the correct area occupied by the Mataliki Tokelau Pre-school South Auckland Trust and as indicated on Attachment A.  This recommendation is procedural.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

10.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to the local recreation, sports and community facilities. 

11.     The services provided by the Mataliki Tokelau Pre-school South Auckland Trust supports the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board 2017 plan honouring youth and seniors. 

12.     The recommendation has been discussed with the local board during the board workshop of 28 August 2018 and no concerns or questions were raised by the board.  The board supports the expansion of the service to the residents of Mangere East and surrounding areas.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

13.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups and are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. 

14.     A total of 15.6% of Ōtara-Papatoetoe residents identified as Māori at the 2013 census, the fourth largest ethnic grouping in the ward.  The early childhood education services provided by the Mataliki Tokelau Pre-school South Auckland Trust is available to all members of the community, including Māori. 

15.     As this report is procedural, mana whenua input has not been sought.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

16.     All costs involved in the preparation of lease documents are borne by Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

17.     The risk of not correcting the error in the site map identifying the leased area is that the group will be responsible for an area of the land that they do not have exclusive use of.  This correction is an administrative function.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

18.     Subject to local board approval, the deed of lease will be amended and sent to the group for signing.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aorere Park, 53R Raglan Stree, Mangere East - Mataliki Tokelau Pre-School South Auckland Trust-site map

97

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Jenny Young - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

New Road Name Approval for residential subdivision by Finesse Residential Ltd at 44 & 46 Hillcrest Road, Papatoetoe

 

File No.: CP2018/16036

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board for a new road name for a road created by way of subdivision at 44 & 46 Hillcrest Road, Papatoetoe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Kiwiana Lane’ (applicant’s preferred road name), and ‘Kohuora Lane’ (alternate name proposed by applicant) were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria.

4.       The name ‘Toitoi Lane’ was also proposed by the applicant; however a similar road name exists and therefore was rejected by LINZ and does not meet the road naming guideline criteria.

5.       All local iwi groups were contacted to provide road naming suggestions, and responses were received from Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki and Ngati Te Ata. Both iwi groups confirmed they were happy with the three names suggested and have no issues.

6.       The name ‘Toitoi Lane’ is similar to ‘Toi Toi Place’ in Auckland, so it does not meet the road naming guideline criteria (as the names have same pronounciation and spelling).

7.       LINZ was happy for any of the other two names proposed to be used.

8.       The applicant has not proposed a road type and have expressed that they do not have any particular preference. In this case, appropriate suffixes include ‘Lane’ or ‘Way’.

9.       The names ‘Kiwiana Lane’, and ‘Kohuora Lane’ are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the road name ‘Kiwiana Lane’, and alternative name being ‘Kohuora Lane’, for the new Private Way created by subdivision at 44 & 46 Hillcrest Road, Papatoetoe. 

 

Horopaki / Context

10.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allowed that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

11.     The subdivision consent BUN60305044 was granted on 25th September 2017, as part of that consent a Private Way was created to service the proposed 10 Lots and will be the access to this development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

12.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·     A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·     A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·     An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

13.     The applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the private way created as part of the development at 44 & 46 Hillcrest Road, Papatoetoe.

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Kiwiana Lane

A name with some Kiwi touch

First Alternative

Kohuora Lane

Maori name relating to the area, park close by with similar name – Kohuora Park

Second Alternative

(rejected by LINZ)

Toitoi Lane

The meaning of Papatoetoe (Maori Name) loosely translated as: undulating area where the toitoi is the predominant feature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Location and layout of new road off Hillcrest Road, Papatoetoe

 

14.     The applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

15.     The applicant’s preferred names meet the road naming criteria as there is no duplication of the names within the Auckland Region and consultation was carried out with local iwi and they have no objection to the proposed names. 

16.     As the applicants preferred name (‘Kiwiana Lane) meets the criteria, it is recommended for consideration for approval while noting that the other proposed name ‘Kohuora Lane’ (alternative name 1) is also appropriate as it complies with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

17.     ‘Toitoi Lane’ is not acceptable because it could be confused with ‘Toi Toi Place’ which is a street located North of Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

19.     The decision sought from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

20.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

21.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

22.     The decision sought from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Anshita Jerath – Intermediate Planner

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Approval of the Sunnyside Domain Concept Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/16884

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board of the Sunnyside Domain concept plan (February 2018).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The concept plan was developed in February 2018 through community engagement with local residents inclusive of consultation with the local early childhood centre.
The community feedback information received defined the activity and equipment selection as part of the overall design for the Sunnyside Domain concept plan.

3.       The concept plan was presented to the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board at a workshop on the 28 August 2018. The local board indicated informal support for the Sunnyside Domain concept plan at the workshop.

4.       The Sunnyside Domain play space has been identified within the Otara Papatoetoe 2018/2019 Work Programme as a renewal (Resolution OP/2018/127).

5.       Once the Sunnyside Domain concept plan has been approved by the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board, the renewal of the play space will commence from September 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the Sunnyside Domain concept plan (August 2018) as in Attachment A.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Sunnyside Domain Concept Plan

105

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Marcus Tali - Community Led & LDI Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Adoption of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Open Space Network Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/00569

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Open Space Network Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Adoption of the open space network plan will assist local board decision-making and provide a framework for the development of open space over the next 10 years.

3.       The purpose of the plan is to set out actions to deliver a sustainable, quality open space network that can respond to, and accommodate, anticipated population growth.

4.       The network will provide the community with access to a range of recreational, social, cultural and environmental experiences.

5.       The open space network plan includes:

·     current state of the network and the challenges it is facing

·     four key moves that provide the framework to deliver a sustainable quality open space network

·     prioritised actions that will deliver the key outcomes.

6.       The plan will need to be implemented within existing budgets, however future budget allocation could be considered through the long-term plan and annual plan processes.

7.       There is a reputational risk if actions within the network plan are not implemented due to lack of funding.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      adopt the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Open Space Network Plan (Attachment A).

b)      delegate approval of any minor amendments to the document to the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       An open space network plan (network plan) has been prepared for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board area.

9.       This network plan outlines the local board’s aspirations and priorities for the future development of local parks and open spaces. The network plan responds to the cultural diversity and growth anticipated in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe area including changes in demographics and patterns of usage.

10.     The network plan sets out the key moves and prioritised actions for the development of open space in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe area over the next 10 years.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Open Space Network Plan

11.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Open Space Network Plan was prepared in consultation with the local board, partners and key stakeholders and is informed by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Neighbourhood Parks Research.

12.     The network plan analyses the current state of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe open space network and sets out four key moves that provide the framework for actions that inform future development and management over the next 10 years.

Current state

13.     The main strengths of the existing open space network include:

·     balance of sport parks, ecological areas and passive open space

·     adequate provision of sports fields

·     a community that treasures the environment and is engaged in working to protect and enhance the waterways

·     a rich cultural heritage.

14.     The main challenges relating to existing open space include:

·     gaps in provision when analysed against the Open Space Provision Policy 2016 (provision targets)

·     limited opportunities for diverse play (to cater to all ages and abilities)

·     improving the environmental quality of the waterways and coastline (Puhinui Stream)

·     issues with the function and configuration of parks

·     lack of connection within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe open space network to surrounding parks and open spaces in adjoining areas.

Key moves

15.     Four key moves have been identified to structure actions to develop Ōtara-Papatoetoe's open space network. They respond to the issues and opportunities identified through the current state analysis.

·     Growth - to respond to urban intensification and the changing environment

·     Community parks - to provide a variety of play experiences for all the community

·     Connections - to develop walking, cycling routes and green networks that the community values

·     Healthy environment - to ensure that the local environment and biodiversity are protected for the future.

16.     The long-term goal is for a sustainable, quality open space network.

Prioritised actions

17.     The primary purpose of the plan is to prioritise actions to improve the open space network.

18.     The following list of principles have been considered when prioritising actions:

·     existing capital works programmes and contractual commitments

·     areas zoned for high growth (metropolitan centres, town centres, local centres, mixed use, terrace housing and apartments) and where there is a gap in provision identified

·     areas of deficiency and/or poor quality open space prioritised over areas of good provision and/or good quality open space

·     cost-benefit of individual actions

·     planning and funding cycles and other influences such as land acquisitions, infrastructure projects, integrated planning with neighbouring local boards and other stakeholders such as environmental services.

19.     Each focus area of action has been prioritised according to the prioritisation principles.

20.     The following actions relate to projects that are across Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area:

Table 1: Overview of key moves and focus areas for prioritised actions

Key move

Focus areas

Growth

·           Open space provision

·           Quality parks

Community parks

·           Passive and active recreation

·           Diversify play

Connections

·           Wayfinding signage

·           Greenways

Healthy environment

·           Waterways

·           Riparian planting

·           Reduce plant and animal pests in parks

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

21.     Staff engaged the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board in the preparation of the network plan through a series of workshops:

·     9 August 2017 – introduction to the open space network plan

·     5 December 2017 – discussion relating to the current state and key moves

·     27 February 2018 – discussion relating to the key moves and prioritised actions

·     3 April 2018 – discussion relating to the feedback on the draft network plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

22.     The provision of quality parks and open spaces help to facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

23.     Staff engaged with mana whenua in September 2017 and February 2018 to seek their views and values in relation to the open space network in Ōtara-Papatoetoe.

24.     The key issues raised by iwi on 28 February 2018 are outlined below:

·     Te Ākitai Waiohua recommends signage for storytelling and to capture the cultural significance of the local board area. Issues were raised around the process of dedicated signage and the Māori naming (dual naming) of parks and facilities.

·     Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki emphasised the need for aspirational prioritised actions that go beyond the provision of picnic tables, seating and bins. 

·     Ngāti Maru recommends priority walking and cycling routes that connect schools and surrounding parks. It was suggested that using a standard template for all the open space network plans will ensure consistency in decision-making. A request was made for the names of pocket parks that have been recommended for divestment or are potential candidates for optimisation.

·     Ngāti Tamaoho expressed the need for updates on community projects related to riparian planting (Ōtara Waterways and Lake Trust). Tall trees beside water courses were advocated to provide shade and improve water quality and biodiversity. In this way, trees provide a natural filter that reduces siltation and nutrient runoff in water courses. Further concerns were raised about which iwi are being consulted in story-telling signage. Mana whenua should be in control of the proposed names and the stories behind them. Comments were made on the process of deciding which iwi’s perspective is represented on dedicated signage. The history behind culturally significant areas can have multiple meanings depending on each tribal affiliation.

25.     These views have been incorporated into the key moves and prioritised actions of the network plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

26.     Actions identified within the network plan will have to be accommodated within existing budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

27.     There is a reputational risk if actions in the network plan are not implemented due to lack of funding.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

28.     The implementation of the plan will occur over a 10-year timeframe and will be coordinated by the council’s parks operations staff.

29.     It is anticipated that the delivery of specific projects identified in the plan will draw on a wide range of potential partners who can contribute assistance, funding and support.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Otara-Papatoetoe Open Space Network Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Emma Golightly - Team Leader - Parks and Recreation Policy

Authorisers

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Representation Review engagement analysis - proposal to split the Manukau Ward

 

File No.: CP2018/16545

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the local board’s position and feedback on the representation review after public views and engagement analysis on the proposal to split the Manukau Ward.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       On 16 May 2018, the local board received a report about the representation arrangements for the 2019 elections.  The report outlined the Joint Governance Working Party proposals for changes to representation arrangements.  The board gave feedback on those proposals.  Since then, an additional proposal has been put forward, that the Manukau Ward be split into two wards. 

3.       At the local board’s 17 July 2018 business meeting it was resolved as follows:

Resolution number OP/2018/128

4.       That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body that the issue of representation of the Manukau ward requires further consideration and public consultation.

b)      advise the Governing Body and working party members of the board’s concern and extreme displeasure at the lack of process followed.  The local board is unhappy that the working party adopted the proposal to split Manukau Ward after the close of formal consultation with local boards on the representation review. 

c)      delegate to the Chair to present the board’s views on the review of representation arrangements, to the Governing Body on 26 July 2018.

CARRIED

5.       Public submissions close on 11 September 2018 and the engagement analysis report is expected on 14 September 2018. A workshop will be held prior to the business meeting on 18 September, with the engagement analysis report tabled at the business meeting.

6.       The board has an opportunity to make their comments to the Joint Governance Working Party who will “hear” public submissions and local board views on 21 September 2018.

7.       On 18 October 2018 the Governing Body makes a decision on representation arrangements for the 2019 elections. Local board representatives can also attend this meeting and give the local board’s input.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      consider the Representation Review engagement analysis on the proposal to split the Manukau ward and formulate its feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party  and Governing Body.

b)      authorise the local board Chair to present the local board’s views to the Joint Governance Working Party and Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Information sheet: Proposal to split the Manukau Ward

117

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Local board feedback on the government's proposed mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags

 

File No.: CP2018/16540

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to formally provide feedback to council’s submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation on the mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The New Zealand government are consulting on a mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags. The consultation document can be viewed at the following link:

http://www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Waste/plastic-bags-consultation-doc.pdf

3.       The consultation document outlines the available options for managing these issues, which include a mandatory phase out, a charge on bags, a formal agreement between government and industry, and mandatory product stewardship.

4.       Council staff are preparing a draft regional submission on this proposal. The draft submission will be provided to Environment and Community Committee for their approval on 11 September 2018.

5.       The draft council submission makes the following key points:

· That Auckland Council supports option one in the consultation document – a total and mandatory ban. Reducing plastic use, litter, and marine pollution are priorities in the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018. The inappropriate consumption, use and discarding of plastic bags has significant impacts on Auckland’s natural environment and our waste collection systems.

· The ban should apply to all retailers who distribute single-use plastic bags, rather than just the larger retailers. An incomplete ban will dilute the effectiveness of this behaviour change intervention on consumers.

· Support for the proposed six-month phase-out timeframe.

6.       The draft submission also identifies areas where Auckland Council considers that further work and discussion is needed post-consultation. These include the thickness of bags captured by the ban and how the ban will be effectively enforced.

7.       This report provides an opportunity for local boards to formally provide feedback on the government’s consultation on the proposed mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags (Attachment A).

8.       Submissions close on 14 September 2018.  Any formal feedback received from local boards before 13 September 2018 will be attached to the council’s final submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      endorse the formal feedback to the council’s submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation on the proposed mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

9.       The New Zealand Government is seeking feedback on a proposed mandatory phase out of the sale or distribution of single-use plastic shopping bags. The phase out would be enacted through regulation under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008 and introduced over a six-month timeframe. 

10.     The recognition by the Ministry for the Environment that over the longer term, plastic waste needs to be designed out of the system is aligned with council’s aspiration for zero waste. This recognition reinforces that Aotearoa New Zealand can be prosperous while creating an economy that is not reliant on externalising environmental harms, such as plastic waste, in our streams and oceans.

11.     Auckland Council’s Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 includes three priorities relating to plastic.

i.        The plan recognises plastic waste as a high priority for avoidance and has identified it as one of three priority waste streams to be addressed.

ii.       Reducing litter is also a priority included in the plan. Managing plastic bags as littered items has a high resource and financial cost to council as well as the natural environment.

iii.      The plan includes a priority relating to reducing marine litter and pollution from plastic waste. This priority was added to the draft plan as a result of significant public concern and feedback on this topic during the consultation period.

12.     A mandatory phase-out of plastic bags will be beneficial for achieving all three priorities.

13.     The contamination caused by the incorrect disposal of plastic bags by consumers in comingled recycling collection systems also has significant consequences. Plastic bags incorrectly disposed of in kerbside comingled recycling can slow or damage recycling processor’s equipment, affecting the quality of recyclate and increasing the processing cost.

14.     Auckland Council prioritises education and enforcement around recycling contamination to avoid the knock-on effect of incorrect plastic bag disposal in kerbside recycling bins. A mandatory phase-out will reduce these impacts.

15.     As such, Auckland Council’s draft submission strongly supports a mandatory phase out or ban on the sale or distribution of single use plastic bags.

16.     This report provides an opportunity for local boards to give formal feedback on the consultation document. Some of the key points made in Auckland Council’s draft submission are outlined below for local boards to consider.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

17.     The Ministry for the Environment’s consultation document outlines a number of options for reducing the use of plastic bags, including a:

·     mandatory phase out

·     levy, tax or charge

·     deposit refund system. This puts a new cost onto a product, which is refunded to the consumer when they bring the material back for recycling.

·     formal agreement with government and industry, in which retailers are required to charge for bags.

·     mandatory product stewardship scheme in which producers that put certain goods on the market are required to be responsible for environmentally sound end-of-life management of the product.

18.     The Ministry’s consultation document considers the pros and cons of each option in detail (see link paragraph 2). It concludes that the most effective option is a mandatory phase out of sale or distribution of single-use plastic bags through regulations under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008.

19.     Auckland Council’s draft submission does not include a detailed options analysis. However, it notes that, as there are alternative, reusable options easily available for use by the general public, the best way to prevent harm from plastic bags is to prevent them from being issued in the first place.

20.     Since a charge on plastic bags, a deposit refund system and a product stewardship scheme would all support the continued distribution of plastic bags, these options are not supported.

21.     The draft submission also does not support a voluntary programme or an agreement between industry and government. This approach would create an inequitable approach to the problem as some businesses or organisations will choose not to participate in a voluntary scheme.

Preferred option

22.     Of the potential options presented by the Ministry for the Environment, Option 1 - mandatory phase out of the sale or distribution of single-use plastic shopping bags is identified in council’s draft submission, as the most effective and wide-reaching mechanism for addressing plastic bag issues.

23.     The submission also provides feedback on some other aspects of the proposal, as outlined below.

Other aspects of proposal

24.     Scope of ban: To be most effective, the ban should apply to all retailers who distribute plastic bags, rather than just the larger retailers. Small retailers should not be exempt as they contribute significant numbers of bags to the waste stream. A ban should also apply to those importing single use bags. An incomplete ban will dilute the effectiveness of this behaviour change intervention for consumers.

25.     Definition of plastic bags: The draft submission supports the current proposed definition that a single use plastic bag is one that includes handles, and is sold or distributed to the public for the purposes of carrying sold goods. It also agrees with the proposal to include degradable, bio-degradable, oxo-degradable and compostable bags in the proposed definition.

26.     However, the submission notes concern that the discussion document currently specifies a particular thickness of plastic bag. This may result in bag producers designing products to be just above this threshold. The submission therefore supports broadening the definition to apply to single-use plastic bags of all thickness.

27.     Timeframe: The draft submission supports the proposal for a six-month phase-out timeframe as this is considered sufficient time to allow retailers and consumers to prepare and adapt, provided the program of behaviour change interventions is comprehensive.

28.     Education and enforcement: Council’s draft submission supports the description of offences, and the strength of the penalties for those outlined in the consultation document. The submission also supports the proposed approach that the Environmental Protection Authority manage enforcement of this ban. It notes that the approach may have some implications for council resources and welcomes the opportunity to participate in further discussions with the Ministry around the best approaches to education and enforcement.

29.     Equity and opportunity: The council’s draft submission recognises that concerns have been raised regarding the need for a just transition for workers relying on plastic bag manufacture. However, it notes that the majority of single-use bags are manufactured off-shore and so local job loss is likely to be minimal.

30.     In fact, the broader move towards a circular economy has the potential to increase job creation (Ellen MacArthur Foundation, 2015).  For example, there are a number of community groups across Auckland who create and distribute alternative bags to their local communities. The submission advocates that these community groups be taken into consideration by the Ministry as potential providers when engaging with retailers on practical options for alternatives to plastic bags.

31.     The submission also notes that the ban has the potential to reduce council litter clean-up costs and volunteer hours spent on litter clean ups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

32.     The draft submission has been informed by the feedback that local boards gave on the draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 in April and May 2018.

33.     This report provides an opportunity for all local boards to give formal feedback. A memo has previously been sent to all local board members outlining the consultation proposal and the process for local boards to give feedback.

34.     Submissions on the consultation document close on 14 September. The council’s regional draft submission will be provided to Environment and Community Committee for their approval on 11 September. To be considered by the committee, local boards need to provide their feedback by 10 September.

35.     Local board feedback received after this date will not be considered by the committee but can also be attached to the final submission, if provided to staff by 13 September 2018.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

36.     The mandatory phase out of single-use plastic bags is consistent with the priorities and values that Maori have identified to Auckland Council through engagement on the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018. These include priorities such as protection of waterways and ecology which receive waste and the protection of Papatūānuku.

37.     The ban also aligns with Te Ao Māori as it recognises the traditional system in which nothing was wasted – everything was able to be returned back to Papatūānuku without detriment to the whenua, awa or moana.  By reducing the prevalence of single-use plastic bags, this ban will support a move towards para kore (zero waste).

38.     The draft submission notes that mātauranga and tikanga Māori should be incorporated into solutions and decision-making by working with mana whenua, enabling Māori participation in decision-making as per Te Tiriti o Waitangi obligations. This will ensure that the implementation of a phase-out works well for Māori. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

39.     The financial costs of a plastic bag ban to Auckland Council are likely to be minimal.

40.     Possible financial benefits include:

· a reduction in damage caused by plastic bags on plant and equipment at the Visy Materials Recycling Facility

· reduction in penalties paid by the council for contamination of kerbside commingled recycling

· reduction in streetscape litter clean up by street maintenance contractors.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

41.     The risks of local boards providing input on the draft consultation document are minimal.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board proposed mandatory phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags feedback

125

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sophien Brockbank, Team Leader Strategic Planning, Waste Solutions

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information reports

 

File No.: CP2018/15214

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

Information reports for the local board

2.       At its 7 August 2018 meeting, the Planning Committee  considered the Impacts of the Unitary Plan on residential development report (Attachment A) and resolved as follows:

 

Impacts of the Unitary Plan on residential development

Resolution number PLA/2018/77

MOVED by Chairperson C Darby, seconded by Cr P Hulse: 

That the Planning Committee:

a)      receive the report and forward it to local boards for information.

CARRIED

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Planning Committee  report and resolutions on the Impacts of the Unitary Plan on residential development.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Impacts of the Unitary Plan on residential development

129

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/14225

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Work Calendar

139

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2018/14223

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the notes for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshops held on Tuesday,
7, 14, 21 and 28 August 2018.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on Tuesday 7, 14, 21 and 28 August 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Notes - 7 August 2018

145

b

Workshop Notes - 14 August 2018

147

c

Workshop Notes - 21 August 2018

149

d

Workshop Notes -  28 August 2018

151

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 September 2018

 

 


 

    

    

 



[1] Collective Crash Risk = total number of fatal and serious crashes or estimated deaths and serious injuries within 50metres of an intersection or within 1kilometre of a corridor in a 5-year crash period

[2] Active Road Users (ARU) = Pedestrians and Cyclists