I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 20 September 2018

9.30AM

Upper Harbour Local Board Office
30 Kell Drive
Albany

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Members

Uzra Casuri  Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

John McLean

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Sonya Inger

Democracy Advisor

 

12 September 2018

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142681

Email: sonya.inger@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          6

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

8.1     Preserve Bomb Point Action Committee                                                          6

8.2     Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust / North Harbour Hockey Association: Lease renewals                                                                                                                6

8.3     Harbour Sport: Matariki event update                                                               7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 16 August 2018                                                                                                                                         9

12        New community lease to the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust and a sub-lease with North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated for the sand turf at Rosedale Park, Albany                                                                                                                                       27

13        Proposed licences for grazing of land at 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai 41

14        Development of open space land at Western Park, Hobsonville Point                 57

15        Investigation into north-west community facility provision                                   91

16        Auckland Transport monthly report - September 2018                                        151

17        Future of the Upper Harbour septic tank pump-out programme                        175

18        Panuku Development Auckland local board six-monthly update 1 February - 31 July 2018                                                                                                                                     181

19        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) update to the Upper Harbour Local Board: 1 January to 30 June 2018                                                 191

20        Upper Harbour Open Space Network Plan                                                            203

21        Governance forward work calendar - October 2018 to September 2019            259

22        Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 9 and 23 August, and 6 September 2018                                                                                               263

23        Board Members' reports - September 2018                                                           271  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               275

C1       Provision of a suburb park at Hobsonville Point                                                   275  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

 

i)              A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

 

ii)             A non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 16 August 2018 as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Preserve Bomb Point Action Committee

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To address the Upper Harbour Local Board about the future of the Bomb Point reserve in Hobsonville Point.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Grant Dixon, Chairperson of the Preserve Bomb Point Action Committee, along with residents from Hobsonville Point, will be in attendance to discuss their concerns for the future of the Bomb Point reserve.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      thank Grant Dixon, Chairperson of the Preserve Bomb Point Action Committee, for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.2       Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust / North Harbour Hockey Association: Lease renewals

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To address the Upper Harbour Local Board about lease renewals at Rosedale Park, Albany, which will be considered today at Item 12 of the agenda.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Sharon Williamson, Trustee of the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust, and Riki Burgess, Chief Executive of the North Harbour Hockey Association, will be in attendance to discuss the renewal of the lease for the sand turf located at Rosedale Park, Albany.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      thank Sharon Williamson from the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust, and Riki Burgess from the North Harbour Hockey Association, for their attendance and presentation.

 


 

 

8.3       Harbour Sport: Matariki event update

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To address the Upper Harbour Local Board and provide an update on the Matariki event, facilitated by Harbour Sport.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Jenny Lim, ActivAsian Lead from Harbour Sport, will be in attendance to show members a highlights video of the Matariki event held at Massey University, which was recently funded by the Upper Harbour Local Board.

3.       Jenny will also briefly outline future plans for the programme and discuss feedback received at the event.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Jenny Lim, ActivAsian Lead from Harbour Sport, and thank her for her attendance and presentation.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 16 August 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/15133

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 16 August 2018, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held on Thursday, 16 August 2018, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board open unconfirmed minutes - 16 August 2018

11

b

Upper Harbour Local Board minutes attachments - 16 August 2018

21

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

New community lease to the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust and a sub-lease with North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated for the sand turf at Rosedale Park, Albany

 

File No.: CP2018/17060

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust for part of Rosedale Park, 60 Paul Matthews Drive, Albany.

2.       To approve Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust entering into a sub-lease with North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

3.       North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated has a community lease with the former Takapuna City Council for part of Rosedale Park for a term of two years, commencing 1 April 1989 with three rights of renewal of 10 years each, reaching final expiry on 31 March 2021. The lease is for a sand turf covering a rectangular area of approximately 450m².

4.       North Harbour Hockey Association owned the sand turf at Rosedale Park. In 2000, it transferred ownership to Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust and in turn, the trust leased the facility back to the association. At this point, a sub-lease arrangement should have been entered into; however, this was overlooked.

5.       As asset owner, the trust has applied for a new lease and approval to enter into a sub-lease arrangement with the association. The current lease has three years left to run. As the lease is still in the name of the association, they have agreed to the surrender of the lease. 

6.       North Harbour Hockey Stadium is a new premier hockey centre under construction in the western sector of Rosedale Park. The stadium is the result of a collaboration of the association, the trust and the New Zealand Hockey Federation Incorporated. A lease for the stadium was granted to the trust by the Upper Harbour Local Board on 14 December 2017, for a term of 10 years with two rights of renewal of 10 years each. 

7.       The community objectives (outcomes) plan negotiated with the trust for the stadium lease will apply to the lease for the sand turf.

8.       Any new community lease to the trust, and approval to enter into a sub-lease, should align to the commencement date of the lease for the stadium to the trust. This will provide security of tenure and enable the trust to undertake fundraising and coordinate project implementation and upgrading of the sand turf.

9.       The operative reserve management plan for Rosedale Park adopted in 1996 contemplates the activity of hockey in this location. The park is held by Auckland Council in fee simple and classified as a recreation reserve.

10.     This report recommends that the Upper Harbour Local Board:

·        approve the surrender of North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated lease dated 29 September 1989

·        grant a new community lease to Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust for a term of 10 years commencing from the date of commencement of the stadium lease with one 10‑year right of renewal. This term is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. The board has the discretion to depart from the recommended term and may wish to consider a term of 10 years, with two 10-year rights of renewal, to align the term of the sand turf to the term of the new stadium

·        grant approval to Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust entering into a sub-lease arrangement with North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated for the same term less one day.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the surrender of the North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated lease dated 29 September 1989.

b)      grant a new community lease to Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust for the sand turf facility, being 450m2 (more or less) on part of Rosedale Park, 60 Paul Matthews Drive, Albany, described as Part Lot 133 Parish of Paremoremo (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term: 10 years commencing from the date of the commencement of the deed of lease between Auckland Council and the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust for the North Harbour Hockey Stadium, with one 10-year right of renewal

ii)       rent: $1 plus GST per annum if requested

iii)      the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust Community Objectives (outcomes plan) as approved be attached to the lease document (refer to Attachment B to the agenda report)

iv)      the lease area being 450m2 (more or less) may be subject to change when the new footpaths being constructed have been completed, as part of the Northern Corridor Improvements roading project

v)      that all other terms and conditions are in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

c)      grant approval for the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust to enter into a sub-lease with the North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated to occupy and manage the sand turf facility, being 450m2 (more or less) on part of Rosedale Park, 60 Paul Matthews Drive, Albany, described as Part Lot 133 Parish of Paremoremo (refer to Attachment C to the agenda report) on the following terms and conditions:

i)        the sub-lease shall be for a term not exceeding the term of the head lease, less one day, with or without a right of renewal

ii)       the sub-lease area being 450m2 (more or less) may be subject to change when the new footpaths being constructed have been completed, as part of the Northern Corridor roading project.

 

Horopaki / Context

Rosedale Park

11.     Rosedale Park covers an area of over 50ha and is separated into two parts known as Rosedale Park North and Rosedale Park South. The park has an important role serving the recreational needs for organised sport for a wide population and a number of sporting codes.

12.     The Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust sand turf is managed by the North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated and occupies part of Rosedale Park North, described as Part Lot 133 Parish of Paremoremo. Lot 133 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. This classification supports the activities of the trust.

13.     The operative reserve management plan for Rosedale Park adopted in 1996 contemplates the activity of hockey at this location. This means public notification and/or iwi engagement prior to any new lease being granted is not required in accordance with Section 54 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Lease history

14.     The 32-year lease to the North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated entered into with the former Takapuna City Council for part of Rosedale Park will reach final expiry on 31 March 2021.

15.     In 2000, the association transferred ownership of the sand turf at Rosedale Park to the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust. In turn, the trust leased the facility back to the association.  At this point, a sub-lease arrangement should have been entered into; however, this was overlooked.

North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated

16.     The association manages the sand turf and works closely with the trust. The sand turf is well used by a cross-section of the community.

17.     The association wishes to continue sub-leasing the sand turf and improvements from the trust.

18.     The association was incorporated on 5 May 1992 (registration number 548216). Its objectives are to:

·        control, develop, foster and regulate all aspects of the game of hockey throughout the association’s jurisdiction for all persons and to contribute towards the advancement of the game throughout New Zealand

·        provide and manage playing and other facilities for hockey.

Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust

19.     As asset owner, the trust has applied for a new lease and approval to enter into a sub-lease arrangement with the association. The current lease has three years left to run. With the deeds still being in the name of the association, the association has agreed to the surrender of the lease. 

20.     The Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust was incorporated on 16 July 1999 (registration number 971796).

Its purpose is to:

·        provide community hockey facilities and services for the North Harbour and wider community, including the North Harbour Hockey Association and Hockey New Zealand

·        develop and maintain the facility (and any other facility in the North Harbour region) for the benefit of the general public, and for the promotion and support of participation of the sport of hockey throughout New Zealand

·        provide special structures and facilities (community pavilion and playing facilities) for the benefit of the aged and/or disabled and general public

·        foster and provide social welfare activities for the benefit and in the interest of the public

·        provide facilities for primary, secondary and tertiary students and institutions to enable coaching, educational seminars, conferences, sports facilities, and sponsorships and grants as the trustees see fit.

21.     In June 2018, the trust provided a North Harbour Facility Plan Update, prepared by Global Leisure Group, of hockey facility usage and future needs for the wider Auckland region to support its application. This notes:

·        hockey currently has a shortfall of 5.7 turfs in the North Harbour region, based on existing demand and turf capacity

·        looking ahead 10 years and allowing for the region’s projected growth rates and the planned addition of two new turfs, there is an expected shortfall of 5.6 turfs by 2028.

22.     The trust’s recent needs assessment, also provided by Global Leisure Group, evidenced the continued need for the sand turf and there was general support for a new lease to the trust.

Sand turf facility

23.     The sand turf was built in 1989 by the association and re-carpeted in 2010. Since then, it has been used between 40 and 50 hours per week in the winter season (March to September). However, its condition has deteriorated to such an extent that its use has been restricted for safety reasons. An upgrade of the turf is required as the current surface is reaching the end of its useful life. To ensure player safety, sand turfs need to be re-carpeted approximately every 12 years. 

24.     There are future plans to upgrade the turf from sand to water to allow increased utilisation.

25.     The facility is rectangular and approximately 450m2 in size and the association covers all operating, maintenance and utility costs within that footprint. The association also contributes capital towards the turf’s replacement, estimated at $400,000. The fenced area around the turf will be amended as a result of new footpaths being constructed as part of the Northern Corridor Improvements roading project. The area for the new lease and sub-lease should be to the boundary of the new fencing, but could still be subject to minor changes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

26.     The trust has filed a comprehensive application in support of its application for a new community lease.

27.     Prior to any new lease for the sand turf being granted to the trust, the association will need to agree to surrender its current lease. On 29 August 2018, written confirmation of the surrender from the association was received.

28.     A collaboration of the association, the trust and the New Zealand Hockey Federation Incorporated has enabled the development of a new facility, being the North Harbour Hockey Stadium. This is a premier hockey centre under construction in the western sector of Rosedale Park. A lease for the stadium was granted to the trust by the Upper Harbour Local Board on 14 December 2017 (refer Attachment C) for a term of 10 years with two rights of renewal of 10 years each. The commencement date is on final approval by the Minister of Conservation or her delegate.

29.     A new lease of the sand turf will give the trust security of tenure and enable it to seek funds towards the cost of the proposed upgrade of the sand turf. Any new community lease to the trust, and approval to enter into a sub-lease, should align to the commencement date of the lease for the stadium. The trust has also requested that the new lease term for the sand turf align with the length of term of the new hockey stadium. While council staff recommend the lease is granted for a 10-year term, with a 10-year right of renewal, the local board has the discretion to depart from the recommended term and may wish to consider a term of 10 years with two 10-year rights of renewal, to align the term of the sand turf to the term of the new stadium.

30.     The community outcomes plan negotiated with the trust for the stadium lease will apply to the lease for the sand turf.   

31.     This report supports the need for North Harbour Hockey to retain its existing sand turf to meet hockey participation growth.

32.     Landowner approval will be required prior to the improvement works commencing on the sand turf.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

33.     Staff attended a workshop on 23 August 2018. The board were informed that the proposal is contemplated in the operative reserve management plan, and therefore there is no requirement to undertake an expression of interest process.

34.     During the local board workshop, the board raised concerns regarding whether Albany United Football Association and North Harbour Softball Association, who also occupy Rosedale Park, were happy for the trust to retain the facility.

35.     North Harbour Softball, who use the area intermittently, supports the retention of the facility area. Albany United Football has no objections.

36.     The Upper Harbour Local Board is the allocated authority to approve the granting of the community lease and approval of a sub-lease arrangement

37.     A new community lease to the trust will align with the 2017 Upper Harbour Local Board Plan outcomes of:

·        an attractive built environment

·        a healthy, active community that values its sport and recreation facilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

38.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan 2050, the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

39.     There is no change to the proposed activities being undertaken on the land.

40.     Ensuring community facilities are well maintained and accessible for all members of the community will be of benefit to all, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

41.     There are no known financial implications associated with granting a new lease to the trust. 

42.     Replacement of the sand turf carpet costs of around $400,000 will be met by the trust, with the assistance of funding agencies. Sport New Zealand has agreed to fund the bulk of the turf upgrade as it would benefit the New Zealand High Performance programme by enabling added turf capacity. Access of this funding requires certainty of tenure over the sand turf site. This funding support is only available within a limited window as part of the stadium project.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

43.     Should the local board resolve not to grant a lease to the trust, nor allow it to enter into a sub-lease arrangement with the association, the trust will have limited ability to upgrade the sand turf which is nearing the end of its life and poses a safety risk. This will impact on the trust’s ability to meet hockey participation demands in the Upper Harbour Local Board geographical area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

44.     Subject to the grant of a new community lease, council staff will work with key representatives from the trust to finalise the deed of lease arrangement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan for the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust sand turf facility at Rosedale Park, 60 Paul Matthews Drive, Albany

33

b

Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust Community Objectives (outcomes plan)

35

c

Site plan for sub-lease area from the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust to North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated, sand turf facility at Rosedale Park, 60 Paul Matthews Drive, Albany

37

d

Upper Harbour Local Board resolution number UH/2017/222 dated 14 December 2017

39

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Wendy Zapart - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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20 September 2018

 

 

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20 September 2018

 

 

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20 September 2018

 

 

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20 September 2018

 

 

Proposed licences for grazing of land at 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai

 

File No.: CP2018/16730

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To consider granting grazing licences to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust for land at Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       There have been changes to grazing areas used by pony clubs in the Upper Harbour Local Board area due to the New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA) Northern Corridor Improvements (NCI) project.

3.       Options for alternative locations have been explored resulting in a decision that four clubs are to be located at the equestrian hub at Wainoni Park. To provide additional grazing, the land at Brigham Creek Road can be made available for off-site grazing.

4.       A new trust entity, the Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust, is being formed to manage the grazing and equestrian activities at the various locations. 

5.       In addition to the land owned by Auckland Council at the site, a strip of land being approximately 1ha owned by NZTA will be licensed to Auckland Council to sub-license to the Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust.

6.       Iwi engagement and public notification of the council’s intention to grant grazing licences is required under the Local Government Act 2002 and the Conservation Act 1987.

7.       This report recommends that licences for grazing at 161-167 Brigham Creek Road be approved subject to conditions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant grazing licences to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust of areas totalling approximately 10.9ha, at 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai, for pony club grazing, supplementary to the main grazing area at Wainoni Reserve.

b)      delegate authority to the Upper Harbour Local Board Chairperson to appoint a panel to consider submissions or objections received, and for the panel to make a decision.

c)      grant, subject to there being no objections or any submissions or objections received being resolved on, a grazing licence to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust for the area marked A (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) being 6.6ha (more or less) at 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai, on the following terms and conditions:

i)        term: five years commencing 1 December 2018, with two further rights of renewal of five years each, with the proviso for the council to relocate or redefine the licence area during the terms, should the land be required for council purposes

ii)       rent: $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested.

d)      grant, subject to there being no objections or any submissions or objections received being resolved on, a grazing licence to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust for the areas marked B (refer to Attachment B to the agenda report) being 3.3ha (more or less) at 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai, on the following terms and conditions:

i)        term: commencing 1 December 2018 and terminable on three months’ written notice.

e)      grant a grazing sub-licence to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust for the area marked ‘NZTA licenced area’ being 1ha (more or less) at 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai, (refer to Attachment C to the agenda report) on the following terms and conditions:

i)        term: to align with the license granted by the New Zealand Transport Agency to Auckland Council.

f)       agree that the Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust will not lodge any submission or participate in any objection or appeal which opposes or may affect, prevent, or interfere with the licensor’s future plans in relation to the ‘NZTA Licensed Area’ land, or any adjoining land.

g)      ensure that all other terms and conditions in accord with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Local Government Act 2002.

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       The Rosedale Pony Club previously occupied land at Rosedale Park. The lease to the group for that area was due for renewal on 1 March 2018. Due to changes in land use and configuration associated with NZTA and NCI, the club was notified that the council would not be renewing the lease.

9.       Wainoni Park is already used for equestrian activities and has been identified by council staff as suitable for relocation of the three pony club groups. They, along with Greenhithe Riding for the Disabled and the four clubs, have signed agreements with both the council and NZTA agreeing to relocate to Wainoni Park, in return for various works being carried out at Wainoni Park.

10.     The three pony club groups have formed a new entity, the Wainoni Park Pony Club Incorporated (WPPC) to co-ordinate pony club activities. The WPPC, together with Greenhithe Riding for the Disabled, have formed Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust, which will hold the lease at Wainoni Park and any offsite grazing licences.

11.     During negotiations, there were concerns expressed that there may not be enough area at Wainoni Park to accommodate the grazing activities of the groups. The various grazing areas available, post practical completion of the project, are shown in the table below.

 

Location

Approximate area

Occupation agreement

Rosedale Park North

6ha

Month-by-month licence

Jack Hinton Drive

1ha

Proposed month-by-month licence

Wainoni Park

13ha

Proposed lease

121 Clark Road

8ha

Monthly lease, but available until September 2019

Brigham Creek Road

·   Area A - 6.6ha

·   Area B – 3.3ha

·   NZTA area – 1ha

·   Total – 10.9ha

Proposed licences:

·   Area A – 5x5x5, total 15 years

·   Area B – monthly on three months’ notice

NZTA licensed area sub-licensed by Auckland Council

 

12.     The local board wishes to make available additional grazing areas to assist with the relocation from Rosedale Road and to deal with any shortfall of grazing.

13.     The land at the north end of Rosedale Park is still available for continued grazing, together with land at Jack Hinton Drive. The land at Rosedale Park north requires a new occupation agreement, and the land at Jack Hinton Drive is authorised on a month-by-month licence.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

14.     Auckland Council has recently purchased the land at the intersection of the Upper Harbour Motorway and 161-167 Brigham Creek Road in association with other land transactions related to the NCI project.

15.     The Brigham Creek Road land is legally described as Sections 13,14,15, SO 421598
Lot 161 DP 182711. These parcels are held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 for recreation purposes (refer Attachment D).

16.     The land has been used for grazing prior to the council’s purchase and has some improvements for this activity with a water tank, troughs and fencing.

17.     Eventually the land will be required by the council for roading purposes, open space and recreation facilities with the anticipated growth in population in the surrounding areas. The Whenuapai Structure Plan and ongoing work by Auckland Transport indicates there may be need for a local road connection in the future, through the northern end of the site, to connect to Kauri Road.

18.     Licences can be considered for both short and longer-term occupation for grazing activities. Using a licence rather than a lease allows greater flexibility for management when accommodating changes and future uses for the land, or if the area is required for council purposes. The licenced area can be amended without the need for surrender and regrant.

19.     By way of example, during the potential 15-year term of the licence, there may be the development of a cycleway along or preservation of the water course areas and a licence would provide easier administration in this case.

20.     NZTA have offered a licence of occupation to Auckland Council for a strip of land along the Upper Harbour Highway frontage. The area is fenced from the road and can be used for grazing which benefits the licensee. NZTA has retained this strip for highway purposes and use of the area is terminable on three months’ notice. The intention of the license from NZTA is for Auckland Council to sub-license to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

21.     At the 14 December 2017 business meeting, the local board passed a series of resolutions relating to the use of the land for question purposes (refer Attachment E).

22.     This matter was workshopped with the local board on 15 March 2018 and again on 23 August 2018. The local board supports granting an occupation of the land at Brigham Creek Road for offsite grazing.

23.     At the 23 August 2018 workshop, staff advised the following:

·        That it would be appropriate that Area A could be notified for an offsite grazing license of five years, with two renewals of five years. Area A consists of 6.6ha of grazable land, approximately the land equivalence lost to Rosedale Pony Club and Greenhithe Pony Club due to the NCI project. The remaining 3.3ha of grazable land in Area B could be notified for a license terminable at three months.


 

·        That the formal access to the licensed grazing areas should be via an existing council maintenance entrance on Area A and that the entrance at 161 Brigham Creek road (Area B) should only be used as an informal entrance. This would allow the council greater flexibility to develop any future assets onsite in Area B, should funding become available.

24.     The local board were supportive of this proposal.

25.     The remaining land at Rosedale Park North would be offered on a 3-month terminable license until the Brigham Creek land was available to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust. It should be noted that, because of the notification process, if the land at Brigham Creek was not available for offsite grazing to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust, then staff would provide advice and seek guidance from the local board if offsite grazing at Rosedale Park North was appropriate in the longer term.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

26.     Engagement will be undertaken during October with nine iwi groups identified as having an interest in the land in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

27.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tamāki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

28.     There may be costs to the licensee to establish the Brigham Creek Road land for grazing purposes as the condition and usefulness of the infrastructure on the site is not known. As the land might be required in future for alternate purposes, requiring boundary adjustments or relocation of the Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust within Brigham Creek, any investment in the site by the group should be limited to supporting grazing. Any improvements or equipment installed should therefore, be temporary or relocatable in nature.

29.     There is no cost to the local board for the iwi engagement and public notification which is borne by the Community Facilities department.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

30.     The grazing activity at Brigham Creek Road is on the fringes of an urban area and may not be sustainable in this location. In the medium to longer term, the demand from urban development for supporting service and recreation land is likely to increase.

31.     Staff recommend a clause be inserted into each licence to provide that the licensee agrees that it will not lodge any submission or participate in any objection or appeal which opposes or may affect, prevent, or interfere with the licensor’s future plans in relation to the land, or any adjoining land. This is to enable the timely development of land when required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

32.     Subject to local board approval, council staff will undertake iwi engagement and public notification on the proposal as required under the Local Government Act 2002 and the Conservation Act 1987.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan of licensed area to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust, 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai

47

b

Site plan of licensed grazing area to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust, 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai

49

c

Site plan of sub-licensed area to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust, 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai

51

d

Site plan of overview of licensed areas to Wainoni Park Equestrian Trust, 161-167 Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai

53

e

Resolutions of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting dated 14 December 2017

55

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Wendy Zapart - Community Lease Advisor

Ron Johnson - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


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Development of open space land at Western Park, Hobsonville Point

 

File No.: CP2018/14590

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the proposed development of Western Park at Hobsonville Point, in accordance with the Infrastructure Funding Agreement (IFA) dated 28 October 2010, between the former Waitākere City Council and former Hobsonville Land Company (now Homes, Land and Community – HLC).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Development of the Western Park will be carried out by HLC.

3.       The developer has prepared a concept plan for the Hobsonville Point Western Park in consultation with council staff for the local board’s consideration and approval (refer Attachment A).

4.       The proposed park forms part of the wider Hobsonville Point open space network and play strategy, developed on behalf of HLC by Isthmus. Within that play strategy, Isthmus have designed the park to cater for a broad range of ages, particularly for older children in the 12 to 18-year age bracket.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the Western Park, Hobsonville Point, detailed design dated 27 July 2018 (as presented in Attachments B and C to the agenda report).

b)      approve removal of the barbeque in Western Park, Hobsonville Point, and replacing it with picnic tables.

Horopaki / Context

5.       HLC is a subsidiary of Housing New Zealand and was formed specifically to oversee and facilitate the development of land at the former Hobsonville Point Airbase. HLC have prepared a comprehensive development plan for Hobsonville Point, which includes a mixed use residential development of up to 5000 homes over 167ha. This includes development of:

·        the Hobsonville land (subject to the IFA)

·        the 2ha Landing development (outside the IFA)

·        the 20ha Marine Industry precinct (outside the IFA).

6.       On 28 October 2010, an IFA between Waitākere City Council and HLC was signed. The parties agreed the reserves would be vested by HLC within the Hobsonville land, as shown on the reserves plan attached to that document, to fully satisfy the reserve requirements of the development.

7.       The development of reserves to be vested under the IFA will fully satisfy any requirement for development contribution for parks infrastructure with regard to the Hobsonville land (land area subject to the IFA). This means that any growth programme funding that may have been collected for the Hobsonville land has been fully offset for works to be completed by HLC. In accordance with the agreement, the standard of reserve development to be completed by HLC is to equal, and may exceed, council’s usual standard of reserve development.

8.       Western Park is approximately 3825m² in size and is identified as Reserve 4 on the updated reserves plan that is appended to the IFA. The park will be developed as a reserve in accordance with the IFA.

9.       A concept design (refer Attachment A) and detailed designs (refer Attachments B and C) have been prepared for the park, in consultation with council staff and the local board.

10.     The consultation with the community involved working with the local Hobsonville Point High School where students were asked to come up with designs for the park. In October 2017, designs were chosen, and workshops were scheduled where the concept designs were presented to students. The Real Kids Early Learning Centre were also involved in developing a special meeting area, which developed into a triangular seat design. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

11.     The concept designs were presented to the local board at a workshop on 7 December 2017, and a concept plan was prepared in January 2018 (refer Attachment A). Detailed engineering design has also since been developed (refer Attachments B and C).

12.     The park has distinct areas defined by specific zones which have been designed to be discrete areas, but can also be used together as an obstacle course loop. These zones include the chillout, active play and nature play zones. The overall effect of the park is that it can be used as an obstacle course for all ages, including the concrete forms, trampolines, formal exercise equipment, stepping logs, and natural log elements, within the nature play area.

13.     The chillout and active play areas contain active forms constructed in concrete, along with two trampolines. Options originally included play-fall surfacing, grass, wet-pour and painted concrete. This area has retained five of the active forms and two trampolines, rather than the three originally discussed. Large rocks will also be used alongside the chillout forms. The built forms will either be set into wet-pour or grass.

14.     The picnic table and shade area has been relocated away from the existing transformer to the plaza and seating area. Staff have recommended that the barbeque be removed and replaced with a picnic table and seating. 

15.     The active play zone will have some linear active play elements and upright fitness equipment. The active play area has a wobbly log, scaling wall, stairway jumps, and a ring swing.

16.     The nature play area is to be planted out with a mix of large feature trees, including titoki, cabbage trees, puka, pōhutukawa, lancewood and puriri. The area will be a mix of planting and bark, with natural log seating and low-lying play elements with a timber aesthetic.

17.     Isthmus originally proposed to have a large area of river pebbles as a walking surface within the nature play zone with a mix of pebble sizes from 10-50mm. After concerns were raised that the pebbles could be used as missiles, these have been replaced by bark/cushion fall and additional play elements have been introduced. These additional elements include an uneven balance beam, spinner plates, multi-springer and seesaw. The surrounding large specimen trees are proposed to be planted into cement stabilised aggregate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

18.     On 7 December 2017, a workshop was held with the local board where an early draft of the concept plan was presented. This concept had an active play zone, a nature play zone, a chillout zone with active play, an active lawn, and a park shelter and barbeque plaza area. The local board were supportive of the concrete/grass forms in the chillout and active zones, but preferred real grass rather than synthetic.


 

19.     The local board requested soft-fall for the areas surrounding the concrete forms and climbing walls to be low-scale to ensure play standards are complied with. The local board also had concerns about providing ‘skateable’ edges in some areas as noise could be an issue. These concerns have been addressed in the final design.

20.     Questions were asked about maintenance of the nature play/exploration area. The local board were supportive of the proposed chillout hammock, which has since been removed. The local board supported the park catering for the 12 to 18-year age bracket.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

21.     Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngati Whatu o Kaipara were consulted at a Placemaking Advisory Group and Mana Whenua workshop held on 20 February 2018, with the aim of incorporating an iwi narrative into the design.

22.     Planting, naming, storyboards and the seat designed by the Real Kids Early Learning Centre are aspects of the park that will ensure there is a sense of kaitiakitanga (guardianship of the environment) and connection to the space with the wider area, e.g. Scott Point ecological sports park, the Rawiri Stream and the North-West Wildlink.

23.     The Real Kids Early Learning Centre seat concept was developed as a meeting place for people of all ages within the community, which evolved from a conversation about kaitiakitanga and guardianship.

24.     Planting was recommended to connect with the planting at Scott Point ecological sports park and Rawiri Stream, and both Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngati Whatua o Kaipara have been involved in planting specifications for these projects.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

25.     The local board has delegated decision-making responsibility for the development and management of the Western Park once the assets become vested to council.

26.     Annual maintenance costs are estimated by Community Facilities to be $7646, with a range between $6348 and $18,052. Maintenance of the hard and soft landscaping is expected to begin five years following practical completion, in accordance with the IFA. Practical completion is expected to be in the 2018/2019 financial year. It is anticipated that the play items will transfer to the council for maintenance at practical completion for health and safety reasons.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

27.     The main risk for the delivery of the playground is inadequate handover. This will be managed by outsourcing the council practical completion and handover process to a consultant who will ensure that all documentation is provided. This documentation is to include warranties, as-builts and producer statements, and assurance that the playground has been designed and complies with NZ 5828:2015 playground equipment and surfacing safety standards.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

28.     HLC wishes to develop the park as soon as possible, once approval from the Upper Harbour Local Board is obtained. Engineering details have been received and are attached to the report (refer Attachments B and C).


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Western Park concept plan

61

b

Western Park detailed plans

69

c

Western Park play details

79

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Maylene Barrett - Senior Parks Planner

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

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Investigation into north-west community facility provision

 

File No.: CP2018/13534

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the findings of the north-west community facility provision investigation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In 2017/18, staff investigated community facility provision across the north-west of Auckland. The purpose was to identify any current gaps in services or facilities, or if there are likely to be gaps in the future, and when they might appear.

3.       The key findings of the investigation are:

·        existing provision is sufficient to support current demand, but significant projected growth across the study area will place pressure on existing facilities and create demand for new facilities

·        the profile of the north-west is changing; the baseline population is aging but new developments are bringing in younger people, families and increasing ethnic diversity which will impact future service needs

·        there is disparity across the study area (economic and geographic), which restricts access and creates barriers to participation for some residents, particularly those in rural areas and in lower socio-economic areas such as parts of Westgate and Massey

·        a pool and additional sport and recreation space are priorities for many residents

·        there is some capacity within existing facilities and opportunities to better target services to increase participation in low user groups.

4.       The recommended key moves to address the north-west investigation findings are:

·        action to address condition issues at Kumeu Library to maintain service levels

·        new aquatic provision from 2026 (ideally located near Westgate in Henderson-Massey)

·        additional recreation/leisure space in Rodney by 2026 and further recreation space in the longer term (2036) in the Henderson-Massey or Upper Harbour area to support four additional courts across the study area

·        potential additional multi-purpose community space in Whenuapai from 2026 and Kumeu from 2036, subject to the impact of new provision in Westgate, the rate of growth across the area, and the needs of emerging communities. 

5.       There is a risk that the actual rate of growth is different to projections. There are opportunities through the next phase of work to reassess and mitigate the impacts of this. 

6.       Staff will report the north-west investigation to the Environment and Community Committee in October to formally confirm the findings and provision gaps.

7.       Staff will progress the key moves in line with the indicative business case process.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      endorse the findings of the north-west community facility provision investigation for aquatic provision as follows:

i)        there is a future gap in aquatic provision in the north-west from 2026

ii)       the key move to address the future aquatic gap in provision is a new aquatic facility (ideally located near Westgate in sub-catchment 3 of the study area)

iii)      the next steps to progress the future aquatic gap in provision are to commence the strategic case for change and the development of investment options to implement the indicative business case, approved through the Long-term Plan- 2018-2028.

b)      endorse the findings of the north-west community facility provision investigation for recreation and leisure provision as follows:

i)        there is a future gap in recreation and leisure provision in the north-west of at least four new indoor courts between 2026-2036

ii)       the key moves to address the future gap in recreation and leisure are the provision of one or two courts in the Rodney area by 2026 and at least two additional courts in the Massey/Upper Harbour part of the north-west by 2036

iii)      the next steps to progress the future gap in indoor court provision in the Rodney area and Massey/Upper Harbour areas are to commence the strategic case for change and the development of investment options to implement the indicative business case, approved through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

c)      endorse the findings of the north-west community facility provision investigation for provision of multi-purpose community space as follows:

i)        there is no current gap in multi-purpose community space provision in the north-west, but one will emerge in future based on forecast population growth

ii)       the key moves to address this are additional multi-purpose community space in Whenuapai from 2026 and Kumeu from 2036, subject to the impact of the new multi-purpose facility in Westgate, the rate of growth across the area, and the needs of emerging communities.

d)      note that the next step is to monitor population growth in the area and develop an indicative business case when the population reaches 10,000.

 

Horopaki / Context

Background to the investigation into community provision

8.       The Community Facilities Network Plan, which guides council’s investment in the provision of community facilities, identified a potential gap in aquatic provision in Auckland’s north-west and a priority action to investigate this.

9.       Due to the high level of growth anticipated for the north-west, the action was expanded to incorporate a wider scope of community facilities; including libraries, arts, community spaces and leisure and recreation.

10.     The purpose of the north-west investigation is to determine if there are gaps in current services or facility provision or if there are likely to be gaps in the future and when they might appear.

11.     The north-west study area is approximately 150km2 and represents 3 per cent of Auckland’s geographic area. It includes parts of the Rodney, Upper Harbour and Henderson-Massey Local Board areas. Its estimated population in 2017 is 34,230.

12.     The north-west is growing at a faster rate than the Auckland average. Over the next 30 years (to 2046), the population is projected to expand to over 150,000 people. This growth is likely to place pressure on existing community services and facilities and create demand for new community services.

The investigation is the first phase in a three-phase process for making investment decisions

13.     To support the cost-effective delivery of community facilities, Auckland Council uses a three- stage process for investigating and investing in new or substantially changed community services or facilities. This is based on the New Zealand Treasury Better Business Case model.

 

 

Methodology for investigation

14.     In order to complete the investigation, four streams of research were conducted:

·        Community profile - provides an overview of the current state and likely future state of the study area using census data, growth data and other primary research.

·        Social research summary - summarises the findings from recent social research, surveys community engagement to show how residents perceive and feel about their environment and their concerns and aspirations for the north-west.

·        Community facility stocktake - identifies the network of existing facilities (council and non-council) in the study area and analyses available data on the current state, including what is on offer, how it is being used, who is using it, and its condition.

·        Gap analysis – analyses evidence from the community profile, social research and community facilities stocktake. It assesses whether current provision is sufficient to support demand and how it aligns with provision guidelines and desired national, regional and local outcomes. It determines whether demand for services and facilities is likely to exceed supply and where and when this might occur.

Decision-making

15.     The Rodney Local Board has delegations that will enable it to approve some, but not all, of the options to address condition issues at Kumeu Library. This will be addressed in more detail in the October 2018 report back on options.

16.     Addressing other gaps identified in this paper will require Governing Body approval.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

17.     The high-level findings of the north-west community provision investigation are provided in a summary report as Attachment A.

Growth and community profile

18.     Significant growth over the next 30 years will create demand for new services/ facilities:

·        current population in the study area is 34,230, but this is projected to increase to 150,556 by 2046 (four times the current population)

·        the largest and fastest rate of growth is projected in sub-catchment 2 (the Whenuapai, Hobsonville and Redhills area) which will have 50 per cent of the population by 2046

·        the increased number of people living and working in the area will place pressure on existing services and create demand for the provision of new services and facilities.

19.     The resident profile of the north-west is changing and services/facilities will need to respond:

·        the resident population base is older and aging - this trend will continue; however, younger people with families are anticipated in areas of new development

·        ethnic diversity is increasing - while the majority of residents identify as New Zealand European, pockets of the study area have large Māori, Pacific and Asian population groups. Greater ethnic diversity is likely to accompany growth across the area

·        the changing demographics across the north-west creates opportunity to better target services, particularly to increase participation in low user groups, and to locate new facilities in areas that create the greatest access to the most users.

20.     Some disparity of opportunities due to socio-economic factors and geographical isolation:

·        most of the study area is relatively affluent; however, the part that falls within the Massey and Westgate areas have the lowest individual and family income, and highest percentage of people receiving a benefit

·        barriers to the use of community facilities are more likely to be felt by lower income households. Deprivation has been identified as a factor, which restricts participation and contributes to inactivity

·        in the Rodney Local Board area where it is rural and geographically isolated, there are a significant number of older people living alone. Over time this trend is likely to increase

·        older people may be vulnerable to social and geographic isolation and require support through accessible community facilities.

21.     Urbanisation of rural areas will result in changing needs for community services and facilities:

·        the study area is changing from mostly rural to future urban. Kumeu, Whenuapai and Hobsonville are zoned as town centres and Westgate is identified as a metropolitan centre. This intensification will place pressure on existing facilities and create new demand

·        reduced lot sizes of residences in urban areas will increase demand for community facilities close to where people live

·        strategically locating facilities where population densities are increasing will support access and participation and reduce overcrowding of existing facilities

·        for those in rural areas, distance to a facility can create a barrier to participation. Locating facilities in rural areas where the population is under-served removes barriers to participation associated with travel.

Gap analysis

22.     Provision in the north-west was analysed against the provision guidelines in the Community Facilities Network Plan, a review of existing facilities, population projections, social research and community profiling to assess likely future demand, and gaps over time.

23.     The following table summarises the key take-outs from this analysis:

Service

Demand

Gap

Library, community, and arts

·    The profile of study area aligns with general users of these facilities creating a strong user base

·    Utilisation of libraries is increasing, although Māori and Pacific population groups are under-represented

·    There are significant condition issues with Kumeu Library

·    There is capacity in existing facilities to support growth

·    The new Westgate multi-purpose library/ community facility will provide additional provision.

·  There are currently no gaps in provision

·  Should the Kumeu Library close, there will be a gap in library services

·  As Kumeu and Whenuapai move from rural to urban centres, additional spaces for community and arts services are likely to be required (the threshold for new provision is approximately 10‑20,000 people).

Leisure and recreation

·    Court provision across the study area is relativity low in relation to population

·    Residents are travelling to facilities in other catchments to access services

·    Social research identified community aspiration for additional provision

·    Demand for indoor courts is increasing at Massey Leisure Centre

·    Māori, Pacific and Asian population groups are under-represented at Massey Leisure Centre

·    Changes in the profile of the study area suggest demand for indoor courts will continue to increase over time.

·  There is no current population requirement for additional indoor recreation space

·  By 2026, population projections will exceed the National Strategy ratio for indoor courts (1:9000 people)

·  To support growth in the long-term, six courts may be required in the north-west (four more than currently provided)

·  One or two in the Rodney area by 2026

·  Two additional courts in the Henderson-Massey and/or Upper Harbour areas by 2036.

Aquatic

·    Lack of aquatic provision was referenced in all social research

·    General demand for aquatic provision is likely to increase over time as more families move into the area

·    Residents are travelling to facilities in other catchments to access services

·    Catchments for neighbouring aquatic facilities (e.g Westwave) are reaching capacity

·    Deprivation levels and distance to facilities is linked to lower swimming participation in parts of Henderson-Massey.

·  The majority of residents fall outside a catchment for an aquatic facility and there is limited access to non-council facilities

·  The study area does not quite reach population thresholds for an aquatic facility (minimum threshold is 35‑50,000 people)

·  By 2026, the population base will be approaching this threshold

·  If the area is extended to include those parts of Henderson-Massey that sit outside a 5km catchment of Westwave pool (which includes pockets of higher deprivation), then the population threshold is reached sooner

·  Locating a facility near Westgate in the Henderson-Massey area would serve the majority of the population within a 5km catchment

·  This location would provide better access to residents in Henderson-Massey living in areas of higher deprivation who have lower levels of swimming participation.

Key moves to address the gaps

24.     Based on the gap analysis, the investigation concludes that current provision is sufficient to support immediate demand, but additional facilities will be required to address growth and emerging gaps over the next 10 years, including:

·        action to address condition issues and maintain service levels at Kumeu Library 

·        new aquatic provision will be required in the north-west from 2026 (ideally located near Westgate in sub-catchment 3 of the study area)

·        additional recreation and leisure space to provide at least six courts across the study area (four more than is currently provided):

o   one or two courts in the Rodney area by 2026 

o   at least two additional courts in the Massey or Upper Harbour part of the study area by 2036

·        potential additional multi-purpose community space in Whenuapai from 2026 and Kumeu from 2036, subject to the impact of the new multi-purpose facility in Westgate, the rate of growth across the area, and the needs of emerging communities. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

25.     Two workshop sessions were held with each local board in the study area.

26.     In March 2018, staff presented the key findings of the community profile. In June 2018, staff presented the draft findings of the investigation.

27.     Local board member feedback from the workshops focused on:

·        general support for location and timing of community space

·        concern over proposed timing of gaps for leisure and recreation provision

·        concern over the proposed location of leisure and recreation provision

·        concern over the proposed timing of aquatic provision and that the study area did not reflect the wider population served by aquatic facility in the north-west, particularly residents of Henderson-Massey Local Board who live in areas of high deprivation and have low levels of swimming participation.

28.     Additional research and analysis was undertaken in response to feedback from local board members. As a result, the following changes were made to the findings:

·        adjustment to where the local leisure and recreation space may be located

·        adjustment to when additional courts space may be required

·        consideration of a potential wider population base for aquatic provision, which adjusted the timing for a new facility.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

29.     The social research used to inform this investigation gathered views from a variety of residents in the north-west, including Māori.

30.     Pockets of the study area within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area have a high Māori population. Provision of facilities in these areas would benefit Māori as a significant proportion of the community.    

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

31.     Through the One Local Board Initiative (OLI) process, funding has already been included in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 to develop three indicative business cases that align with the key moves outlined above, as follows:

·        aquatic provision in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area

·        recreation and leisure space in Rodney Local Board area

·        indoor court provision in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

32.     The indicative business cases will clarify options to address provision gaps, analyse costs and benefits and recommend the preferred option(s) that deliver best value for money.

33.     There are no other direct financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

34.     The demographic and growth projections may change. This information may require updating when new growth modelling is produced, and new census information becomes available. Any implications arising from this can be considered and mitigated as part of the next phase of indicative business case work.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

35.     The findings of the north-west community facility provision investigation will be reported to the Environment and Community Committee in October 2018.

36.     Staff will progress the key moves outlined in the following table:

Service area

Recommended key move

Area

Commencement

Library

Option for investment to ensure continued library services in Kumeu for 15 years

Sub-catchment 1

2018/19

Leisure and recreation

Indicative business case for additional recreation and leisure services

Sub-catchment 1

2018/19

Community and arts

Indicative business case for multi-purpose space in Kumeu

Sub-catchment 1

When population reaches at least 10,000

Community and arts

Indicative business case for multi-purpose community and arts spaces in Whenuapai

Sub-catchment 2

When population reaches at least 10,000

Leisure and recreation

Indicative business case to identify land for additional recreation and leisure services

Sub-catchment 2/3

2018/19

Aquatic

Development of indicative business case for aquatic facility

Sub-catchment 3

2018/19

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachment

No.

Title

Page

a

North-west Community Facilities provision investigation summary report

99

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Antonia Butler - Principal Policy Analyst

Elizabeth Fitton-Higgins - Team Leader Community Policy - South

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly report - September 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/16682

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To respond to requests on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), provide a summary of consultation material sent to the local board, and to provide transport-related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Upper Harbour Local Board and its community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month. In particular, this report:

·        notes the forward works programme for this 2018/2019 financial year (refer Attachments A to D)

·        notes consultation information sent to the local board for feedback

·        notes decisions of the Traffic Control Committee as they affect the local board area

·        receives the 2018/2021 Auckland Transport Road Safety and Speed Management programme report (refer Attachment E).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport update for September 2018.

b)      receive the 2018/2021 Auckland Transport Road Safety and Speed Management programme report as presented at Attachment E to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki / Context

3.       This report addresses transport-related matters in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. AT reports monthly to local boards, as set out in the local board engagement plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) update

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget delivered by AT and is provided to all local boards by Auckland Council. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·        be safe

·        not impede network efficiency

·        be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).


 

6.       The Upper Harbour Local Board’s LBTCF allocation is $1,835,080 for the current political term. In addition, there is a sum of $764,795 which has been approved by the council and is available from 1 July 2018. This takes into account the increase of the LBTCF approved by the Governing Body during council’s long-term plan (LTP) budgeting process.

7.       The Upper Harbour Local Board held a workshop in August to consider its list of projects and use of the remaining funds.

Electoral term allocation 2016/17 to 2019/20 as at 30/06/18

$1,835,080

Budget committed to date (projects below)

$1,938,222

 

 

STATUS

 

Gills Road pedestrian bridge

$297,222

Complete

 

School stay-put signs

$45,000

Complete

 

Chester/Wickham cycle route

$56,000

Complete

 

Rame Road upgrade

$1,540,000

Design

 

Current budget remaining to allocate in term

 

 

-$103,142

Additional budget in RLTP for 18/19 and 19/20

 

 

$764,795

New total budget remaining for electoral term

 

 

$661,653

8.       The following table provides an update on the board’s current projects:

Project

Description

Status

Gills Road

footpath and pedestrian bridge

To construct a footpath along Gills Road

This project has been completed and is open to the public.

Rame Road upgrade

A full upgrade of Rame Road

AT is obtaining quotes from Design Consultants. A workshop is scheduled with the local board in September to work through the amended concept design.

Forward works programme - 2018/2019 financial year

9.       The following table represents AT’s plans for costings and lengths of re-surfacing, pavement rehabilitation, footpath renewals and minor capital improvements.

10.     The attached maps (refer Attachments A to D) represent Auckland Transport’s plans for renewals and minor capital improvements over the next 12 months and major capital projects for the duration of the current Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP). This information may be subject to change due to, but not limited to, changes in scope and budget limitation. The information is correct as at 16 July 2018.

Road resurfacing / pavement rehabilitation

Activity type

Status

Sum of programme cost estimate

 

Renewal - chipseal

Dispatched

582,401

 

 

Renewal – pavement rehabilitation

Dispatched

743,680

 

 

Renewal – thin asphaltic concrete

Dispatched

1,031,344

 

 

Renewal – thin asphaltic concrete

Works complete

250,444

 

 

Grand total

 

$2,607,869

 

 

 


 

 

Minor improvement works

Programme

Status

Sum of total project cost

No. of projects

 

C.101127 minor improvements

Investigation

57,500

2

 

C.101320 regional improvements programme

Design

 

1

 

C.102145 network optimisation

Scheme

 

1

 

C.100765 – new footpath programme

Design

 

2

 

Grand total

 

$57,500

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

Current issues under investigation

11.     The local board has requested that the following issues be investigated. These are in the initial investigation stage.

Works proposed on the intersection of Brigham Creek Road / Hobsonville Road / Williams Road

12.     The future function and form of Hobsonville Road is being reviewed by the Supporting Growth Alliance (SGA). A notice of requirement was lodged in 2012 and is on hold until the SGA analysis is finalised.

Bush Road parking removal and afternoon (PM) clearway

13.     AT completed observations to remove parking in Bush Road to allow installation of a clearway in the afternoon. These observations indicated merit in a combination of parking removal and PM clearway installation for vehicles approaching the Albany Highway.

14.     AT has discussed this proposal with the business association who have requested that AT undertake a parking survey. This survey will be undertaken and reported back to both the business association and the local board upon completion.

15.     AT still needs to complete internal/external consultation as per the normal process.

Pedestrian safety: Oteha Valley Road near Harrowglen Drive and the entrance to Mayfair Village

16.     AT is currently investigating a pedestrian crossing at the entrance to Mayfair Village. Feedback from local residents will be taken into consideration as part of the consultation process.

17.     There is also an investigation underway on improving pedestrian safety at the intersection of Oteha Valley Road and East Coast Road. Feedback from local residents will be taken into consideration as part of the consultation process.

18.     With regard to issues of speed at this location, AT will request that the NZ Police assess the potential for increased enforcement.

Parking in cycleways around Pinehurst School

19.     AT is investigating the use of cycleways for parking on Rosedale Road, outside Pinehurst School. The area is well marked, and restrictions are enforceable. AT have this issue recorded on a log list and have had staff located there regularly to inspect and enforce, especially over the weekends.


 

Hobsonville Point and electric vehicles (EVs)

20.     AT is currently developing a public position on EVs, including an on-street charging infrastructure. It is likely that off-street charging will be strongly preferred, but with provision for on-street chargers at the curb in exceptional circumstances. The processes for deciding whether an on-street charger should be permitted are currently quite onerous and lengthy for applicants. However, there is work underway that should streamline this process.

21.     When considering on-street chargers, some of the challenges are:

·        avoiding street clutter, especially charging cables obstructing pedestrians, cyclists and vehicle movements

·        reserving previously available on-street bays for EVs only can be contentious between EV owners and non-EV owners, as this may be regarded as privatising public bays. It is understood that a similar Wellington project is experiencing this challenge with strong competition for bays between EV owning against non-EV owning residents

·        access to suitable land/parking

·        the cost of achieving an on-site electrical connection to the charger itself, which can be significant.

22.     There are many opportunities to make Hobsonville more EV friendly and provide charging facilities to those without garages or off-street parking:

·        Distribution of fast chargers at a commercial site or an off-street destination – commercial providers may be supportive of this approach. On-street fast chargers would be subject to AT approval.

·        A charging hub at an off-street site – this could be scalable and include an EV car‑share scheme later, as in the Christchurch example:

o   https://ccc.govt.nz/news-and-events/newsline/show/2874 - low powered charging distributed over a designated public carpark, which is cheaper to implement and caters for overnight trickle charging, although is potentially less attractive for users.

·        Given the experience in Wellington, it may be preferable to target lower demand parking sites as EV charging sites. 

Teal Way parking

23.     AT have investigated the possibility of removing some of the broken yellow lines from the turning circle at the end of Teal Way. AT’s investigation illustrated that some of the car parks could be moved. This work is planned for completion by December 2018.

24.     Regarding installing broken yellow lines along the kerbside near the intersection of Teal Way and Nugget Avenue, AT’s view is that visibility is significantly impacted by vehicles parking 6m from the intersection.

25.     Traffic speeds along Teal Way are relatively slow with the 85th percentile (the speed at which 85 per cent of all vehicles are observed to travel under free-flowing conditions past a nominated point) being 29km/h. Therefore, it is acceptable for the road to become one-way at times. There are also many driveways along the roadway, allowing gaps for traffic to weave through.

26.     As no significant safety issues can be identified, AT cannot justify the installation of broken yellow lines along the entire kerbside in the vicinity of the intersection.

Impact on West Harbour Marina development plans on the ferry service

27.     AT is aware of the proposed redevelopment at West Harbour marina and will work with the developer. AT understands that the proposed development will not adversely affect ferry operations, and may even have a positive impact on the overall amenity of the area.

28.     AT currently leases the ferry berth from the marina and manages the ferry service contract.  AT supports improvement in service levels provided to passengers. 

29.     The local board have identified the need for improvements to the West Harbour ferry service, in particular to increase frequency and to expand the service to include later evening and weekend trips.

30.     To develop the ferry facility further and improve services, additional investment is required that is not currently available. Funding for ferry projects was considered during the recent Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP), which then guided development of the 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP).

31.     While both documents recognise the important role Auckland’s ferries play as part of the wider transport system, the cost of proposed new transport projects significantly exceeded available funding. This meant only the highest priority projects could proceed.

32.     AT will continue to improve ferry services and infrastructure. Should additional funding become available for ferry projects, the priority is to improve services on routes such as Pine Harbour, Hobsonville and West Harbour, where demand is beginning to exceed capacity.

33.     AT is also preparing a revised Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP), which will include all current and proposed services and infrastructure proposals, including ferries. This will be available for public comment later this year.

Visibility issues exiting Bernleigh Terrace into Luckens Road, West Harbour

34.     An AT engineer completed an initial review of local board feedback and further to this, a detailed investigation will be undertaken to ensure a comprehensive review of the issue. AT will provide an update by early November.

Street lighting on Brigham Creek Road

35.     AT have had additional lights fitted to power poles along Brigham Creek Road. However, Vector only allowed new lights to be fitted to a small number of poles.

36.     Most of the road is still rural but developers are required to upgrade the carriageway and lights as properties are developed on Brigham Creek Road, which has already happened in Whenuapai. AT do not have any plans to upgrade the lighting along Brigham Creek Road at this time.

Other issues still under investigation

37.     AT is still investigating the following requests and will report to the local board once the work is complete:

·        Meadowood Drive traffic counts

·        Bernleigh Terrace dangerous turning

·        Retailers’ signs on cycle path, Oteha Valley Road

·        Westpark Marina ferry terminal, development issues.

Consultation documents on proposed improvements

38.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Upper Harbour Local Board for feedback, and are summarised here for information purposes only.

39.     Following consultation, AT considers the feedback received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on, or amend the proposal if changes are considered necessary:

·        proposed traffic and parking controls for the new roads in Whenuapai. The area for consultation is west of Pamu Road, between Dale Road and Harewood Street, as part of a new residential subdivision. The following changes are proposed:

o   give-way controls at all intersections

o   speed tables on all roads for local speed management

o   no stopping at all times (NSAAT) road markings at intersections and along the narrow section of Boyes Avenue for parking control

·        New Network North bus stop changes – Unsworth Drive

·        proposal to install NSAAT on Rame Road,Greenhithe

·        proposal to install NSAAT on Sunset Road, Unsworth Heights

·        proposed pedestrian improvements at the intersection of Ramp Road and Parkway Drive, Rosedale.

Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee (TCC) report

40.     Decisions of the TCC during the month of August 2018 affecting the Upper Harbour Local Board area are listed in the following table:

Date

Street (suburb)

Type of report

Nature of restriction

Decision

1 August 2018

Apollo Drive, Rosedale

Permanent traffic and parking changes

No stopping at all times (NSAAT)

CARRIED

1 August 2018

Horizon Way, Reflection Drive, West Harbour

Permanent traffic and parking changes combined

NSAAT, angle parking, give-way control, traffic islands

CARRIED

North Shore – the new bus network arrives in September

41.     AT have designed a simpler bus network. There will be fewer routes, but buses will be more frequent (particularly between 7am-7pm) seven days a week, and services will be better connected. 

42.     Fewer areas will have direct services to the city centre. There will be better connections with the Northern Busway and customers will be able to transfer to frequent services to the city centre.

43.     New network highlights include:

·        four new, frequent bus routes at least every 15 minutes, seven days a week

·        three Northern Busway services

·        new services to local destinations.

44.     North Shore households will receive a brochure detailing the changes in early September and there will be a series of public information events. Korean, simplified Chinese and accessible versions of the brochure will be available from the AT website, along with helpful videos in these languages. Sign language will also be available online.

45.     New timetables will be available from early September and the AT Journey Planner will be updated at that time.

46.     A few AT school buses will have route changes from Term 4 of the school year. AT will provide affected schools with detailed information.

47.     A map of the New Network is available on the AT website (www.at.govt.nz).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

48.     Receipt of this monthly report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

49.     There are no financial implications in receiving this monthly update.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

50.     Receipt of this monthly report has no risks. AT has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps51.    AT provides the Upper Harbour Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Map of forward works plan renewals - Upper Harbour

159

b

Map of footpath renewals - Upper Harbour

161

c

Map of minor improvements work - Upper Harbour

163

d

Map of major capital projects - Upper Harbour

165

e

2018/2021 Auckland Transport Road Safety and Speed Management Programme report

167

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster, Elected Member Relationship Manager

Ben Stallworthy, Acting Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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20 September 2018

 

 

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20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Future of the Upper Harbour septic tank pump-out programme

 

File No.: CP2018/16882

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback on whether Auckland Council should consult on ending the septic tank pump-out scheme and associated targeted rate in the Annual Plan 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In June 2018 the Governing Body approved the introduction of a new water quality targeted rate to raise $452 million over 10 years to achieve cleaner harbours, beaches and streams.

3.       One initiative that will be delivered through the targeted rate is a regional proactive compliance monitoring programme for on-site wastewater systems across Auckland. This will require property owners to regularly provide documentation that their systems have been inspected and maintained. This approach is based on a Waiheke model that has led to improvements in water quality in some areas. It is expected to improve the maintenance and operation of on-site wastewater systems across Auckland.

4.       Development of the new compliance programme has prompted a review of the three-yearly septic tank pump-out service, which has been operating in the former Waitākere City Council legacy area, to consider whether it is still fit for purpose.

5.       The service currently provides a triennial pump-out to approximately 581 systems in the board area and has an operational asset-based services budget of $112,610 per annum.

6.       This review has identified a number of issues with the reach and scope of the Waitākere pump-out service. For example, the service only targets properties with septic tanks and long-drops but not modern systems. This means it only services approximately half the on‑site wastewater systems in the board area. It also only pumps the sludge out of the septic tank or long-drop. It does not cover the maintenance of filters, occupancy or disposal fields, which are important for an effective on-site wastewater system.

7.       Despite the pump-out service being in place for 20 years, monitoring shows that the state of popular swimming spots in the legacy Waitākere City Council area is not improving and, in some areas, is getting worse.

8.       Given these issues, staff are proposing that a formal consultation and engagement process for ending the three-yearly septic tank pump-out service and associated targeted rate be carried out as part of the 2019/2020 Annual Plan consultation process.

9.       Feedback is being sought from all three impacted local boards (Henderson-Massey, Upper Harbour and Waitākere Ranges) on this proposal. The local boards’ feedback will be presented to the Governing Body to support their decision-making on the annual plan.

10.     Residents with on-site wastewater systems within the legacy Waitākere City Council area will continue to receive pump-outs according to the current triennial schedule, until formal consultation on the rate is undertaken and a final decision has been made.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to the Governing Body as to whether Auckland Council should consult in the draft Annual Plan 2019/2020 on ending the three-yearly septic tank pump-out service and associated targeted rate.

 

Horopaki / Context

Water quality improvement targeted rate

11.     In June 2018, Auckland Council adopted the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 which includes a new water quality improvement targeted rate.

12.     This targeted rate will generate $452 million over 10 years to fund an accelerated water quality improvement work programme. This includes a septic tank and on-site wastewater programme.

13.     The proposal approved through the targeted rate is to introduce an improved compliance programme to ensure on-site wastewater systems are regularly inspected and maintained. This will reduce the amount of wastewater entering waterways to help improve water quality.

Regional compliance programme for on-site wastewater systems

14.     Currently, the legacy Waitakere City Council area is the only part of Auckland which has a targeted rate for septic tank pump-out service. The council is not involved in overseeing the maintenance of wastewater systems in other areas of the region, apart from on Waiheke Island.

15.     This inconsistency in the management of on-site wastewater treatment devices across the region informed the development of the new regional on-site wastewater compliance monitoring programme.

16.     The new programme under development is modelled on the on-site wastewater compliance scheme in place on Waiheke Island. In this programme, the council requests property owners to regularly provide documentation that their systems have been inspected and maintained. The expected benefits of this new programme are:

·        it will cover and check all types of on-site wastewater systems, not just septic tanks and long drops

·        it will be used to increase awareness of property owners about the importance of regularly checking their systems and that they are responsible for their system performance, not the council

·        it will be rolled out across the region to improve and have consistent oversight of all properties with on-site wastewater systems, not just in areas such as Waiheke and Waitākere

·        the roll-out of the Waiheke scheme since 2008 has shown improvement in water quality in some streams on the island.

17.     The roll-out of the new on-site wastewater compliance monitoring programme will be funded as part of the new water quality targeted rate, with a forecast (uninflated) cost of approximately $8.2 million over the 10 years of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

Septic tank pump-out service

18.     Since 1998, some properties within the legacy Waitākere City Council area have paid a targeted rate for pump-outs, cleaning and inspection of on-site wastewater treatment systems, including septic tanks, long-drops, grease traps and greywater systems.

19.     Households pay a targeted rate for maintenance of on-site wastewater systems and are visited every three years to have their tanks inspected, pumped out and cleaned.

20.     The programme services approximately 3900 properties with 4270 on-site wastewater systems, including 581 systems in the Upper Harbour Local Board area. The others are located in the Waitākere Ranges and Henderson-Massey Local Board areas.

21.     In Upper Harbour, the pump-out service has an operational asset-based services budget of $112,610 per annum.

22.     A review of the pump-out service has identified a number of issues with the reach and scope of the programme. Specifically:

·        the programme excludes modern on-site wastewater systems as it only covers properties with septic tanks and long-drops (about half of the properties with on-site wastewater systems in the former Waitākere City Council area)

·        the remaining properties with other types of on-site wastewater systems, such as those with aerators and chemical treatment, are not regularly checked by council. These systems also need to be maintained at least annually to be effective and not contribute to poor water quality

·        the programme only pumps the sludge out of the septic tank or long-drop. It does not cover the maintenance of filters, occupancy or disposal fields, which are important for an effective on-site wastewater system

·        the programme may lead to a perception among home-owners that they do not need to be concerned about the state of their system as maintenance is carried out by council through the pump-out service

·        system failures and overflows can occur between the three-yearly pump-out.

23.     Despite the pump-out service being in place for 20 years, water quality monitoring has shown that the state of popular swimming spots around the former Waitākere City Council area is not improving and, in some areas, is getting worse.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Options analysis

24.     There are two options available for the future of the septic tank pump-out service and associated targeted rate. These are:

·        Option A: the status quo, continue offering the septic tank pump-out service and charging the targeted rate.

·        Option B: consult on ending the septic tank pump-out service and associated targeted rate in the Annual Plan 2019/2020.

25.     To continue offering the septic tank pump-out service in Option A is not preferred. As outlined above, various issues have been identified with the scope and reach of the septic tank pump-out service. There is also no evidence that it is leading to improvements in water quality.

26.     The regional compliance scheme for on-site wastewater systems will also soon be introduced, whether or not the septic tank pump-out service continues. This means that under the status quo, residents in the former Waitākere City Council area will soon be required to both:

·        pay the septic tank pump-out targeted rate for the triennial pump-out

·        pay the water quality improvement targeted rate and provide regular certification that their wastewater system has been inspected and is functioning property.

27.     Currently, residents and the wider community have differing views on whether the three-yearly septic tank pump-out service is delivering value for money. Some residents have stated that they can get their tank pumped out for a lower cost than the council is charging through the septic tank targeted rate.

28.     Others have said they like the convenience of the service. However, residents will probably find this service less convenient if they also need to arrange for certification of their on-site waste system through the regional compliance programme.

Recommended option: Consult on ending the septic tank pump-out service

29.     Because of the various issues with the septic tank pump-out service described above, staff recommend that the Annual Plan 2019/2020 should include a proposal to end the legacy Waitākere septic tank pump-out service and associated targeted rate.

30.     Before making this proposal to the Governing Body, feedback is being sought from all three of the impacted local boards.

31.     The local boards’ feedback will be provided to the Governing Body for their decision when confirming the contents of the draft Annual Plan 2019/2020.

32.     If a proposal to end the septic tank pump-out service is included in the Annual Plan 2019/2020, this will go through a formal public consultation process in early 2019, alongside the rest of the Annual Plan consultation process.

33.     If the final decision is to discontinue the pump-out service, staff will provide a remission for residents in the targeted rate area who have already paid for a pump-out.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

34.     The purpose of this report is to formally request local board feedback on the future of the septic tank pump-out service and associated targeted rate.

35.     A workshop to discuss these issues was held with the local board on 6 September 2018.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

36.     Waterways and improvements to water quality are of key significance to mana whenua in their role as kaitiaki of Auckland’s natural environments.

37.     On-site wastewater systems are impacting water quality in areas across the former Waitākere City Council area. Despite the pump-out service being in place for 20 years, the state of popular swimming spots is not improving and, in some areas, is getting worse.

38.     The new regional on-site wastewater compliance monitoring programme seeks to improve water quality, restoring the mauri of waterways.

39.     Feedback was sought from mana whenua on introduction of the water quality improvement targeted rate and associated work programmes, including the regional compliance programme for on-site wastewater systems, during the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 process.

40.     Ten iwi groups provided specific feedback on the targeted rate, with nine iwi in support, including Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority and Settlement Trust. One iwi group offered conditional support.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

41.     The three-yearly septic tank pump-out service and the associated targeted rate currently remain in place. The service has an operational asset-based services budget of $112,610 per annum in the board area.

42.     Residents with on-site wastewater systems within the legacy Waitākere City Council area will continue with the current triennial pump-out schedule until formal consultation on the rate is undertaken.

43.     If the final decision is to discontinue the pump-out service, the council will stop collecting the rate and providing the service from 1 July 2019. Staff will work through a remission process for residents in the targeted rate area.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

44.     There are relatively few risks for the local board in providing feedback on the proposal to end the septic tank pump-out service and targeted rate at this stage. Any final decision will be subject to a full consultation process through the Annual Plan 2019/2020. This will enable the local board to hear from their community before giving final feedback on the proposal.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

45.     Local board views provided in response to this report will be presented to the Governing Body to inform their decision-making on annual plan consultation documents.

46.     If the Governing Body supports the staff recommendation, a proposal to end the septic tank pump-out service associated targeted rate will be included in the draft Annual Plan 2019/2020 for public consultation and feedback.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Theresa Pearce - Relationship Advisor

Janet Kidd – Principal Wai Ora Strategic Programmes

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland local board six-monthly update 1 February - 31 July 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/13441

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Upper Harbour Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area for the six months from 1 February to 31 July 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Panuku was established in September 2015 by the merger of two council-controlled organisations (CCOs), Waterfront Auckland and Auckland Council Property Limited (ACPL).

3.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

4.       Panuku manages around $2 billion of council’s property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland local board update for 1 February to 31 July 2018.

 

 

Ngā Mahi ā-Hapori / Local Activities

Portfolio Management

5.       Panuku manages ‘non-service’ properties owned by the council and Auckland Transport (AT). Non-service properties are those that are not currently needed for service or infrastructure purposes. These properties were generally being held for planned future projects that are no longer required, such as road construction, park expansion or development of future town centres.

6.       As at 30 June 2018, the property portfolio comprises 1437 properties, containing 1119 leases. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

7.       The return on the property portfolio for the period ending 30 June 2018 was above budget, with a net surplus to council and AT shareholders of $3.9 million ahead of budget.

8.       The average monthly tenantable occupancy rate for the six-month period is more than 98 per cent, which is above the Statement of Intent (SOI) target of 95 per cent.

Properties managed in the Upper Harbour Local Board Area

9.       Panuku currently manages 27 commercial and four residential interests within the Upper Harbour Local Board area. A list of properties managed is attached to this report at Attachment A.


 

Business interests

10.     Panuku also optimises the commercial return from business interests it manages on the council’s behalf. This includes two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

11.     There are currently no managed business interests in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

12.     The 2018-2028 Long-term Plan (LTP) reflects a desire of council to materially reduce or slow down expenditure and unlock value from assets no longer required, or which are sub-optimal for service purposes. In response to this, ACPL developed a new method of dealing with service property called ‘optimisation’, prior to the establishment of Panuku. 

13.     Asset optimisation deals with ‘service property’. It is self-funding, maximises efficiencies from service assets, and maintains levels of service whilst releasing property for sale or development. A key element of optimisation is that the sale proceeds are locally reinvested to advance approved projects and activities on a cost-neutral basis. Panuku continues to advance this programme of work. This includes the development of a cross-council project to coordinate and execute asset sales and optimisation. 

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

14.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

15.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and AT to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

16.     Target for July 2017 to June 2018:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$60 million disposal recommendations

$88 million as at 30 June 2018

(includes $62 million from the Papatoetoe, Avondale and Panmure priority locations)

17.     Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

To be determined as part of the Statement of Intent (SOI) with council

The target will include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for housing development and urban regeneration projects

 


 

Process

18.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku Board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Under review

19.     Properties currently under review in the Upper Harbour Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the Governing Body.

Property

Details

Proposed Lot 14, 61-117 Clark Road, Hobsonville

A review assessed that retaining the site for open space purposes would result in an overprovision of open space in terms of council’s Open Space Provision Policy.

The internal consultation commenced in October 2017. No alternative service uses were identified.

The board opposed a disposal due to concerns regarding the loss of open space in an area where residential intensification is planned.

At its February 2018 meeting, the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal to Homes, Land, Community (2017) Limited for housing and urban renewal purposes.

131 Clark Road, Hobsonville

Large site with multiple zones under the Unitary Plan. The portions zoned Neighbourhood Centre and Mixed Housing Urban are being rationalised with a view to implementing the planned neighborhood centre and housing. Most of the site will be retained by council for open space and roading purposes.

Panuku is working with council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department regarding Scott Point Sustainable Park master plan open space requirements, and with AT regarding transport infrastructure requirements. Once design requirements are confirmed, Panuku will engage with the board regarding the site.

Hobsonville Marina (Clearwater Cove, West Harbour)

Following an approach from the lessee to acquire the freehold of all the council-owned sites, ACPL/Panuku undertook a consultation process with council departments, CCOs and the local board, about the future of the marina. 

Initial feedback supported a partial disposal of the site in principle, provided community access to the marina is not jeopardised, improved public car parking facilities are provided and boat hard-standing is retained.

In October 2017, the local board resolved that it could not endorse Panuku’s proposal for Westpark Marina given the information available, and that any decision on the proposed disposal by the Finance and Performance Committee be deferred, pending receipt of further information about council’s obligations to preserve public access to the site, including the Waitemata City Council (West Harbour) Empowering Act 1979 (the West Harbour Act).

 

The local board further resolved in December 2017 that it opposes any sale, that the marina should remain in council ownership, that it does not support the proposed development plan, and that the proposed plan is not in the best interests of the community.

A public engagement process was undertaken between 16 June and 23 July 2018 to inform and seek feedback from the community. This process included two information sessions at the marina and an online survey.

Council is now in the process of reviewing the feedback. Once finalised, Panuku will present the outcome of this consultation to the local board at a workshop in early September and following that, will seek local board formal views as appropriate.

The Panuku Board will make a decision whether a recommendation for disposal of any of the land will be made to the Finance and Performance Committee.

Acquisitions and disposals

20.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

21.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

22.     Panuku purchased 12 properties for open space across Auckland in the 2017-18 financial year at a cost of $27 million, and bought seven properties for storm water use at a value of $4.2 million.

23.     No properties were purchased in the Upper Harbour Local Board area during the reporting period.

24.     Panuku undertakes acquisitions for Auckland Council’s Parks Department and Healthy Waters, under delegation from the Chief Executive of Auckland Council. Panuku does not unilaterally decide what properties to buy and when, but rather follows a directive to manage the commercial transactions, following committee approval to purchase a particular property. A prerequisite of the committee resolution is reporting to the Upper Harbour Local Board.

25.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause, due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 

Disposals

26.     For the last six-month period to the end of June 2018, the Panuku disposals team has sold 11 properties, realising $6.35 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. The team’s 2017/18 disposals target was $8.0 million for the year and the team achieved $15.06 million of unconditional net sale proceeds from 17 sales over the whole year. This target was part of Panuku’s overall disposals target of $100 million, which includes the sale of development opportunities. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

27.     No properties were sold in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

Development

28.     Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately 50 region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

29.     Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best practice project delivery, to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

30.     Following is a high-level update on development activities in the Upper Harbour Local Board area:

·        Unlock Hobsonville – In November 2015, the Auckland Development Committee resolved that the 14/6 Masterplan be adopted, and Panuku be allowed to proceed immediately with the development of the Airfields in Hobsonville.

·        Megalot 1 – AV Jennings was confirmed in April 2016 as the development partner for the first stage of the Airfields precinct, which focuses on 1.95ha towards the southern edge of the site. The first of 102 homes have been completed by AV Jennings and designed and built by GJ Gardner. This milestone was celebrated with a tour of the property in December 2017, and was attended by Councillor Wayne Walker, Panuku Chief Executive Roger MacDonald, and representatives from GJ Gardner and AV Jennings.   

·        Megalots 2, 3 and 4 – 9.9ha of residential land was settled with Top Garden Property Development Limited (Avanda) on 13 November 2017. They will be delivering 510 dwellings, which will include a minimum of 10 per cent affordable housing. Civil infrastructure works commenced in late November 2017 to construct Waka Moana Drive, Commanders Avenue and the balance of Wallace Road. In June, Avanda had its first stage of homes awarded ‘6 Homestar’ through Panuku’s bespoke checklist. Their design has received the quality-assurance mark from the New Zealand Green Building Council (NZGBC) which certifies their healthiness and sustainability. The mark ensures good energy efficiency, ventilation, moisture control and insulation. 

·           Megalots 5 and 6 – are envisaged to be developed as a mixed-use area. Following consultation with key stakeholders, this area is intended to encourage employment and a minimum of 278 new homes via a go-to-market exercise later this year.

Housing for Older People (HfOP)

31.     The council owns 1412 units located in 62 villages across Auckland, which provide rental housing to low income older people in Auckland.

32.     The Housing for Older People (HfOP) project involved the council partnering with a third-party organisation, the Selwyn Foundation, to deliver social rental housing services for older people across Auckland.

33.     From 1 July 2017, the joint venture business (Haumaru Housing), took over the tenancy, facilities and asset management of the portfolio under a long-term lease arrangement.

34.     Haumaru Housing was granted community housing provider (CHP) status in April 2017. Having CHP registration enables Haumaru to access the government’s income-related rent subsidy (IRRS) scheme.

35.     Auckland Council has delegated Panuku to lead a new multi-year residential development programme.

36.     The first new development project is a 40-unit apartment building on the former Wilsher Village site on 33 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson. Once completed in mid-2019, this development will increase the council’s portfolio to 1452 units.


 

37.     The following HfOP villages are located within the Upper Harbour Local Board area:

Village

Address

Number of units

Windsor Court

480A East Coast Road, Windsor Park

18

Ngā Mahi ā-Rohe / Regional Activities

38.     Over the year, Panuku achieved key project milestones and performance results in its priority development locations. Panuku categorises three types of priority locations:

·        Transform locations – Panuku ‘transforms’ locations by creating change through urban regeneration. Panuku leads the transformation of select parts of the Auckland region working alongside others and using the custodianship of land and planning expertise. The catalytic work Waterfront Auckland led at Wynyard Quarter is a great example of the transformation of urban locations

·        Unlock locations – Panuku ‘unlocks’ development potential for others. By acting as a facilitator; using relationships to break down barriers and influence others, including the council family, to create development opportunities

·        Support locations – Panuku plays a ‘support’ role to ensure council is making the most of what it already has. Intensification is a key driver in the Auckland Plan. Panuku will support housing demands by enabling development of council-owned land.

Transform locations

39.     The Wynyard Quarter is undergoing rapid change both commercially and residentially, with thousands of Aucklanders using this space every week.

40.     Panuku has partnered with Willis Bond to deliver a total of 500 homes in Wynyard Quarter over several stages, the first of which (Wynyard Central Pavilions) is now complete. This first stage of the new precinct offers a mix of 113 residences, comprising 25 free-stranding pavilions, eight townhouses and 80 apartments, with retail space on the ground floor.

41.     The east-west connection between Halsey and Daldy Streets (Tiramarama Way), was completed in June of this year, with the street opening on Friday 29 June 2018 and receiving much positive feedback.

42.     Transform Manukau covers over 600ha and is the largest of the Panuku priority locations. The Auckland Plan sees Manukau as the commercial centre of southern Auckland, but the significant investment in transport and community amenities has not been matched by intensification of the adjacent land to provide more homes and jobs. The area contains over 6ha of undeveloped council land in the town centre that is suitable for residential and commercial development.

43.     There is also significant crown land, held by both Housing New Zealand Corporation Limited (HNZC) and the Counties Manukau District Health Board, that can provide significant additional housing. Panuku is focusing on taking the development sites to market to test the appetite for private sector investment. There is a 300-home development on Barrowcliffe Place already underway. Panuku are also focusing on public realm projects that will enhance the overall environment and liveability of the area. Panuku is working closely with the Southern Initiative and Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) to develop integrated actions to benefit the local community.

44.     In May 2018, the Framework Plan to guide the Onehunga transformation was approved which is on a similar scale to Wynyard Quarter and Manukau. The plan was completed involving significant consultation with the community. Panuku is leading the redevelopment of strategic council-owned land, and works in partnership with government and others, to deliver positive outcomes for the local community.

45.     The East-West link and proposed light rail, which affects the wharf and southern parts of the area, is currently being reassessed by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA).  Panuku is expecting amended plans later this year. Further refinement of the Framework Plan will occur once this can be reviewed. Working with the local board and key stakeholders, Panuku has advanced plans on the town centre and the Onehunga wharf precinct where possible.

Unlock locations

46.     In Takapuna, Auckland Council owns nearly 4ha of land focused around the Anzac Street car park and the Gasometer site. Consultation on redevelopment of these sites has started.

47.     In Northcote, Panuku are continuing to build on the urban regeneration concepts outlined in the November 2016 Framework Plan, and have progressed engagement and co-design with Homes, Land and Community (HLC) for the Awataha Greenway project and other key projects. The information kiosk continues to provide a ‘shop front’ for the community to walk in and ask any questions. With the LTP 2018-2028 having been signed off by the council in late-June, Panuku is now able to commence implementation of the first-year’s projects, including the Greenslade Reserve stormwater detention project.

48.     The council’s Planning Committee approved the over-arching plans to redevelop Old Papatoetoe in June. Construction on the mall has been completed and the focus is now on leasing the remaining tenancies. The supermarket construction is progressing; however, Panuku have been advised that this is unlikely to be completed by Christmas. Panuku is working closely with Foodstuffs on the new plaza space. The Panuku Board has now approved the programme business case which details how new housing in the town centre will be enabled. The temporary food hub proposal for the old netball clubrooms is progressing well.  

49.     The overall plan for Henderson was approved in May 2017 by the Governing Body. The 2018-2021 Unlock Henderson work programme was endorsed by the local board and approved by the Panuku Board in June 2018. The vision is for Henderson to grow into an urban eco-centre. This vision will guide planning and development with an outcome towards ‘liveable growth’ by creating a safe, attractive and vibrant mixed-use environment with a uniquely west Auckland identity.

50.     The opportunity to revitalise Avondale has been given the green light in November 2017, with approval of the over-arching plan for its regeneration by the Planning Committee. The vision for Avondale will be enabled through a number of key moves. Panuku will work closely with the local board and community to implement a retail strategy that attracts new businesses, increasing diversity of products and services. The train station, upgraded bus network and new cycleways offer great transport options and Panuku will continue to strengthen connections between these activity hubs and the town. A focus for the regeneration of Avondale is to work with developers to build quality residential neighbourhoods that offer a mix of housing types, including terraces and apartments. A number of significant developments are already underway in the area.

51.     Located within the Tāmaki Transformation area, Panmure town centre is well-located with excellent public transport links to the wider Auckland area. Panmure was chosen as a location for regeneration due to large areas of underused, council-owned land in the town centre that represent significant redevelopment opportunities. The project area covers 43ha and encompasses land owned by council, the Tāmaki Regeneration Company (TRC), the Crown and Auckland Transport (AT). Panuku will work in partnership with these entities to facilitate the staged transition of sites for development.


 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

52.     This report is for the Upper Harbour Local Board’s information.

53.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries that the local board may have relating to a property in the Upper Harbour Local Board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

54.     Tāmaki Makaurau has the highest Māori population in the world, with one in four Māori in Aotearoa living here. 

55.     Māori make up 12 per cent of the region’s total population, and mainly live in Manurewa, Henderson-Massey, Papakura, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Māngere-Ōtahuhu and Franklin. Māori have a youthful demographic, with 50 per cent of those living in Tāmaki Makaurau being under the age of 25 years. Five per cent of Māori in the region are currently 65 years and over.      

56.     There are 19 mana whenua in the region, with 14 having indicated an interest in Panuku’s lead activities within the Upper Harbour Local Board area. 

57.     Māori make up 5 per cent of the Upper Harbour Local Board population. There is no marae located within the local board area. 

58.     Panuku works collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects, including potential property disposals, development sites in the area, and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level, with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum, who have a broader mandate.

59.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Properties managed in the Upper Harbour Local Board area

189

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sven Mol - Corporate Affairs Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Carlos Rahman - Senior Engagement Advisor

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) update to the Upper Harbour Local Board: 1 January to 30 June 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/17118

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.          To inform the local board of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development Limited (ATEED) activities at a regional and, where possible, a local level.

2.          For the local board to receive the attached six-monthly report from ATEED on its activities in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development Limited’s six-monthly report to the Upper Harbour Local Board for 1 January to 30 June 2018 (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

 

3.          ATEED reports to local boards every six months to provide them with an update of their activities.

4.          Work undertaken by ATEED in the Upper Harbour area includes:

·        locally driven initiative (LDI) activities (the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme and the support for international education providers)

·        business capability building and support for new businesses

·        film permitting in the local board area

Horopaki / Context

5.          ATEED helps lay a strong foundation for Auckland’s economic growth through a broad programme of initiatives focused on:

·        business growth and innovation

·        business attraction and investment

·        conferences and business events

·        major events

·        film

·        international education

·        tourism.

6.          ATEED’s work can impact and provide opportunities locally as well as regionally. For this reason, ATEED has committed to reporting to local boards every six months.

7.          The report attached reflects this commitment and covers the period from 1 January to 30 June 2018.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

8.          Activities carried out by ATEED in the Upper Harbour Local Board area are outlined in the following table:

Activity

ATEED team responsible

LDI activities (the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme and the support for international education providers)

Economic Development

Business capability building and support for new businesses

Economic Development

Film permitting in the local board area

Economic Development

9.          As part of business-as-usual, destinations in the local board area continue to feature in the official Auckland visitor information website administered by ATEED.

10.          Should a local board choose to allocate some of their locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding to economic development activities, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development team can manage the delivery of a work programme for them.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /

Local impacts and local board views

11.          The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no local impact; however, some of the activities described in the report do. Details of this are outlined in the six-monthly report attached.

12.          Local board views were not sought for the purposes of this report. Local board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

13.          The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds on a case-by-case basis to any potential impacts these initiatives may have on Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

14.          The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

15.          The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with their initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

16.          The next ATEED six-monthly report will be presented to the local board in early 2019 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2018.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development six-monthly report to the Upper Harbour Local Board: 1 January to 30 June 2018

195

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Chris Lock - Senior Strategic Advisor, Local Boards (ATEED)
Samantha-Jane Miranda - Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

James Robinson - Head of Strategy and Planning (ATEED

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Upper Harbour Open Space Network Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/15974

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Upper Harbour Open Space Network Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Adoption of the Open Space Network Plan will assist local board decision-making and provide a framework for the development of open space over the next 10 years.

3.       The purpose of the plan is to set out actions to deliver a sustainable, quality open space network that can accommodate and respond to anticipated population growth.

4.       The network will provide the community with access to a range of recreational, social, cultural and environmental experiences.

5.       The Open Space Network Plan includes:

·        current state of the network and the challenges it is facing

·        four key moves that provide the framework to deliver a sustainable, quality open space network

·        prioritisation principles, decision-making tools, local board advocacy matters and actions that will assist in delivering the key outcomes.

6.       There is no funding to implement projects in the Open Space Network Plan beyond renewal of existing assets and planned capital expenditure.

7.       There is a reputational risk that residents’ expectations of identified actions within the network plan will not be implemented due to lack of funding. The local board can use the plan to advocate for funding as part of the annual and long-term plan processes.

8.       The implementation of the plan will occur over a 10-year timeframe and will be coordinated by the council’s parks operations staff.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      adopt the Upper Harbour Local Board Open Space Network Plan (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      delegate approval of any minor amendments to the document to the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board.

 

Horopaki / Context

9.       An Open Space Network Plan has been prepared for the Upper Harbour Local Board area (refer Attachment A).

10.     This network plan outlines the local board’s aspirations and priorities for the future development of local parks and open spaces. The plan responds to the cultural diversity and growth anticipated in the Upper Harbour area, including changes in demographics and patterns of usage.

11.     The network plan sets out the key moves and actions for the development of open space in the Upper Harbour area over the next 10 years.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

12.     The network plan was prepared in consultation with the local board, partners and key stakeholders and is informed by the Upper Harbour Neighbourhood Parks Research report.

13.     The network plan analyses the current state of the Upper Harbour open space network and sets out four key moves that provide the framework for actions that inform development over the next 10 years.

Current state

14.     The main strengths of the existing open space network include:

·        good distribution of open space in established areas

·        good network of walkways  

·        rich history and cultural heritage

·        a community that treasures the environment and is engaged in working to protect and enhance waterways.

15.     The main challenges relating to existing open space include:

·        significant population growth that will place pressure on the open space network

·        some parks have limited development and could be considered for activation

·        waterways and motorways characterise the Upper Harbour area and create a challenge for the delivery of a connected community

·        walking and cycling is compromised by motorways and steep terrain

·        many parks lack signage (names, information and wayfinding)

·        low environmental quality (water and biodiversity)

·        many streets lack trees

·        changing sport and recreation trends and preferences.

Key moves

16.     Four key moves have been identified to structure actions for developing Upper Harbour’s open space network. They respond to the issues and opportunities identified through the current state analysis:

·        Growth – responding to the growing community.

·        Sport and recreation – providing access to a range of formal and informal play opportunities.

·        Connections – developing connections for the community.

·        Healthy environment – improving water and biodiversity quality.

17.     The long-term goal is for a sustainable quality open space network.

Principles, advocacy, decision-making and actions

18.     The primary purpose of the network plan is to provide actions to improve the open space.

19.     Prioritisation principles provide direction for planning and implementing park development to improve the open space network. The following list of principles will assist in prioritising the actions:

·        existing capital works programmes and contractual commitments

·        areas zoned for high growth (metropolitan centre, town centres, local centres, mixed use, terrace housing and apartments) and where there is a gap in provision identified

·        areas of deficiency and/or poor-quality open space prioritised over areas of good provision and/or good quality open space

·        cost benefit of individual actions

·        planning and funding cycles and other influences such as land acquisitions, infrastructure projects, integrated planning with neighbouring local boards and other stakeholders, such as Environmental Services.

20.     The local board has an advocacy role in the acquisition of land. 

21.     Decision-making tools provide direction on issues that relate to the actions to improve the open space network. They have been discussed in the network plan.

22.     The actions are summarised and the key move for each action is identified. The following actions relate to projects that are across the Upper Harbour Local Board area:

Key move

Focus areas

Lead actions

Growth – responding to the growing community

Open space provision

·    increase open space provision in growth areas and areas of poor provision

Quality park network

·    optimise existing open space and improve visitor experience

·    treasure heritage sites

·    support key principles to the management and development of coastal park land

·    seek sustainable design solutions

·    improve resilience to climate change

Sport and recreation - providing access to a range of formal and informal play opportunities

 

Sport

 

·    provide opportunities for sport that appeal to a range of communities, ages and abilities

·    recognise the health and well-being benefits of active communities

·    work with public and private partners to achieve financial benefits

·    seek opportunities for facility provision beyond the local board when planning for sport and recreation

Recreation

·    provide recreation opportunities that appeal to a diverse range of communities, ages and abilities

·    utilise Upper Harbour’s network of parks that border the upper reaches of the harbour for recreation

·    develop trails in parks for walking, running, cycling and horse-riding

Connections – developing connections for the community

 

 

Community

 

·    engage the community in park design to bolster identity, connectedness and to strengthen sense of belonging as appropriate

·    provide infrastructure in parks to facilitate community events where appropriate

·    provide park names in a timely manner to raise awareness of the park

Connections – developing connections for the community

 

Walking and cycling

·    provide a quality walking and cycling network to connect neighbourhoods

Signage

 

·    provide signage that connects the community with the parks and open space network to build stronger neighbourhoods

Street trees

·    enhance the street environment with appropriate species to provide shade for pedestrians and cyclists

Healthy environment – improving water and biodiversity quality

Ecological restoration

·    support actions that increase tree cover within the local board area

·    support actions that protect, restore and enhance the natural environment (Taiao)

·    support environmental outcomes that benefit the North-West Wildlink

·    support actions that protect, maintain and enhance environmental health (Mauri Tu)

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

23.     Staff engaged the Upper Harbour Local Board in the preparation of the network plan through a series of workshops and with a working group as follows:

·      1 June 2017 – introduction to the open space network plan

·      13 July 2017 – discussion regarding the open space network strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats

·      9 November 2017 – confirmation of the key moves

·      5 April 2018 – discussion relating to the actions, prioritisation principles and iwi input

·      10 May 2018 – discussion regarding the actions

·      31 May 2018 – discussion relating to the draft network plan

·      8 June 2018 – discussion relating to the draft network plan

·      24 July 2018 – discussion relating to the draft network plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

24.     The provision of quality parks and open spaces facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

25.     Staff engaged with mana whenua in July 2017 and November 2017 to seek their views and values in relation to the open space network in Upper Harbour. Written correspondence in December 2017 provided another opportunity for feedback. 

26.     Mana whenua aspirations and priorities for the open space network in Upper Harbour include the following:

·     Rangatiratanga Authority -the status of iwi and hapu as mana whenua is recognised and respected   

·     Whakapapa - Māori​ names are celebrated

·     Taiao (natural environment) - the natural environment is protected, restored and/or     enhanced

·     Mauri Tu (environmental health) - environmental health is protected, maintained and/or enhanced

·     Mahi Toi (creative expression) - iwi/hapu narratives are captured and expressed creatively and appropriately

·     Tohu (wider cultural landscape) - mana whenua significant sites and cultural landmarks are acknowledged

·     Ahi Kā (living presence) - iwi/hapu have a living and enduring presence and are secure and valued within their rohe

·     access to the harbour

·     consideration of traditional/historic pathways and portages

·     waste disposal.

27.     These views have been incorporated into the key moves and actions of the network plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

28.     Actions identified within the network plan will have to be accommodated within existing budgets as no additional funds have been allocated.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

29.     There is a reputational risk that residents’ expectations of identified actions within the network plan will not be implemented due to lack of funding. The local board can use the plan to advocate for funding as part of the annual and long-term plan processes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

30.     The implementation of the plan will occur over a 10-year timeframe and will be coordinated by the council’s parks operations staff.

31.     It is anticipated that the delivery of specific projects identified in the plan will draw on a wide range of potential partners who can contribute advice, assistance, funding and support.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Open Space Network Plan

209

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Wendy Rutherford - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Governance forward work calendar - October 2018 to September 2019

 

File No.: CP2018/15450

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar for the period October 2018 to September 2019, as set out in Attachment A to this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar - October 2018 to September 2019

261

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 9 and 23 August, and 6 September 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/15451

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       The Upper Harbour Local Board workshops were held on Thursday 9 and 23 August, and 6 September 2018. Copies of the workshop records are attached (refer to Attachments A, B, and C).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 9 and 23 August, and 6 September 2018 (refer to Attachments A, B, and C of the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 9 August 2018

265

b

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 23 August 2018

267

c

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 6 September 2018

269

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Board Members' reports - September 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/15452

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Upper Harbour Local Board on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

[Note: This is an information item and if the board wishes any action to be taken under this item, a written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda.]

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal board members’ reports.

b)      receive the attendance record of members as submitted by Deputy Chairperson Lisa Whyte in response to requests from residents via social media for more transparency on attendance.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Board members' attendance for the electoral term 2016-2019

273

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

20 September 2018

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Provision of a suburb park at Hobsonville Point

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

The public conduct of of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.