I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 27 November 2018

4:00pm

Onehunga Community Centre,
83 Church Street,
Onehunga

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Deputy Chairperson

Debbie Burrows

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Bernie Diver

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Maria Meredith

 

 

Alan Verrall

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Tracey Freeman

Democracy Advisor

 

21 November 2018

 

Contact Telephone: 021 537 862

Email: Tracey.Freeman@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Papaya Stories - Silent Disco Citywalk                                                              5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                              7

12        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                    9

13        Board Member's Report                                                                                              15

14        Proposed New Community Facilities lease to Panmure Squash Rackets Club Incorporated                                                                                                                 17

15        Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund towards the Tamaki Path Project.                                                                                                                                       47

16        Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 grant allocations     83

17        Trial of Online Voting at the 2019 Local Elections                                                 161

18        Local Government Elections 2019 - order of names on voting documents       173

19        Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan consultation feedback and recommended changes                                                                                            183

20        Feedback on proposed topics for inclusion in the Auckland Water Strategy   229

21        Draft Contributions Policy                                                                                        247

22        Disposal recommendations report - 22 and 28A Waipuna Road, Mt Wellington 393

23        Request to rename a private road (Whiro Lane) within Fenchurch Stage 2B (Stage 3).                                                                                                                                 401

24        Road Name Approval: New Roads in the regeneration of Hinaki Neighbourhood in Point England                                                                                                             413

25        Road Name Approval: 3 New Roads in the regeneration of the Line Road and Epping Street Neighbourhood in Glen Innes.                                                        423

26        Quarter One Performance Report: Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board              431

27        Regional Facilities Auckland First Quarter Performance Report For the Quarter Ending 30 September 2018                                                                                       463

28        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      493

29        Record of Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Workshops                                  497  

30        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 23 October 2018, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Papaya Stories - Silent Disco Citywalk

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Yana Papaya the opportunity to present to the local board on the Papaya Stories project called the Silent Disco Citywalk.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Yana of Papaya Stories.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Thank Yana Papaya for their attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

 

File No.: CP2018/20784

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board an update on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Opportunity for the Governing Body representative to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on projects, meetings, events and issues of interest to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board and its community.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2018/20785

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson's Report October/November 2018

11

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 

Board Member's Report

 

File No.: CP2018/20786

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the board member’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 

Proposed New Community Facilities lease to Panmure Squash Rackets Club Incorporated

 

File No.: CP2018/21831

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Panmure Squash Rackets Club Incorporated at 44 Lagoon Drive, Panmure.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The lease has reached final expiry and is currently holding over on a month by month basis on the same terms and conditions.

3.       The club applied to council for a new community lease in May 2015 for the part of the building it occupies at 44 Lagoon Drive, Panmure.

4.       Council will undertake the maintenance of the building under the new lease agreement, these costs will be categorised as operational expenditure (OPEX) and will affect the local board’s Asset Based Services (ABS) budget.

5.       The building is within Domain Reserve sited at 36-46 Lagoon Drive in Panmure.  The total area of Domain Reserve is 1.1116 hectares.  The land is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as a classified recreational reserve and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

6.       A lease to the club is anticipated in the reserve management plan for the site.

7.       This report recommends the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board grant a new community lease to Panmure Squash Rackets Club Incorporated for five years, commencing 1 December 2018 subject to conditions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

1.   approve a new community lease to Panmure Squash Rackets Club Incorporated at 44 Lagoon Drive, Panmure, legally described as Part Allotment 64, Allotment 45, Allotment 79 and Part Allotment 78, Section 2 Village of Panmure, for the part of the building being 180 m2 (more or less) it occupies at Domain Reserve, on the following terms and conditions:

a)   term – one term of five years commencing 1 December 2018 

b)   rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum 

c)   maintenance fee - $1000.00 plus GST per annum 

d)   council will undertake on-going maintenance of the exterior and structural condition of the building 

e)   the club to repair all the wall and playing surfaces of the squash courts 

f)    the club to maintain all of the interior of the building including squash playing areas

g)   the club unequivocally accepts the current condition of the building without further recourse to council for assistance to remedy building defects and repairs 

h)   a Community Outcomes Plan to be agreed with the club to be attached as a schedule to the new lease

i)    an early termination clause allowing council, in its sole discretion, to terminate the lease at any time by giving the club not less than six (6) months’ written notice.

j)     all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

 

2.   the arrears owing under the current lease to be backdated to the end of March 2016 which amounts to $23,475; and the rent from April 2016 to present date be charged at $1 per annum; 

3.   the board use $6,000 from Community Response Fund and $17,477 from Parks Response Fund to write off the arrears owed by the club which totals $23,477.00. 

 

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       The Panmure Squash Rackets Club Incorporated has requested a new lease of the premises it occupies at Domain Reserve, 44 Lagoon Drive, Panmure. 

9.       Processing of the new lease was delayed as maintenance and condition issues with the building were investigated together with other matters affecting the club and council.

10.     These matters have now been progressed and this report discusses and makes recommendations in this regard.

11.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is the delegated authority in matters relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

12.     The Panmure Squash Rackets Club was incorporated on 23 February 1978. The club is an incorporated society, and is affiliated to, Squash Auckland and Squash New Zealand.  It was founded in 1965 by a group of local residents who shared the vision of fostering squash in East Auckland.

13.     The club has a rich history of successful players who have represented Auckland in national events and New Zealand in world championship events.  Ross Norman (who is still a current member of the club) was World Squash Champion in 1986 and inducted into the New Zealand Sports Hall Of Fame.

14.     The club’s purpose is: “To raise the profile of squash, to promote a healthy and active lifestyle by enabling the local and wider community to embrace and maximise the use of the club’s squash facility.”  This purpose aligns directly with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2017, supporting more Aucklanders to be more active.

15.     The club is committed to full utilisation of the facility.  It consists of five squash courts, a gymnasium, showers and changing areas, a licensed bar, lounge and deck area.  Events are run for members and non-members throughout the year.

16.     The financial accounts provided indicate that the club’s funds are sufficient to meet its current and future liabilities and are being managed appropriately.  The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

The land and building 

17.     The land at 36-44 Lagoon Drive, Panmure consists of four separately defined but adjoining land parcels described as Part Allotment 64, Allotment 45, Allotment 79 and Part Allotment 78, Section 2 Village of Panmure. The total area of Domain Reserve is 1.1116 hectares.

18.     The Domain Road Reserve Management Plan, adopted in 1989 contemplates the lease to the Panmure Squash and Rackets Club.

19.     The club has been based at the present site for over 53 years.  It is the largest ‘squash only’ facility in Auckland with 280 members, and the second largest squash club in New Zealand.

20.     The building on the land is owned by Auckland Council and houses the YMCA on the northern side and the squash club on the southern end. 

21.     A building assessment was undertaken by Community Facilities, Asset Management Intelligence Support team (AMIS) to assess the overall condition of the building and provide options for the continued use of the facility (Attachment B).

22.     The report graded the overall condition of the building as a three, being average. However, some parts of the building, particularly the building wall component in the squash courts, were graded four, being in poor condition.  

23.     Cracking of the squash court walls, along with moisture damage has been an ongoing issue with the building dating back 20 years.  Five consultant reports have been commissioned over time to identify the cause of the cracks and remedial action.  Despite repairs, cracks continued to appear and this has adversely affected the performance requirement of the squash courts.

24.     The cracking of the interior plaster surface of the walls is believed to be the result of a number of factors ranging from:

(i)         poor workmanship such as joints between old and new plaster works

(ii)        deflection of walls from grout infill of the hollow block walls and shrinkage movement; and 

(iii)       possible intrusion from the pohutukawa tree roots located on the south side of the building growing into the building foundation and walls.

25.     A mechanical and electrical (M&E) report commissioned in 2012 has also confirmed the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system in the squash court building is at the end of its economic life.

26.     AMIS advise that it is not economical to continue to repair the cracks to the playing surface walls, as these continue to resurface shortly after repair, as has been evidenced in previous years. The cost to council to renew the building is unreasonably high and several options in this regard was provided to the board for information and consideration.

27.     The options provided by AMIS were:

Option 

Description  

Cost 

Option 1 

Repair and replace the existing court walls by demolishing the existing blockwork and replace with light weight block or a glass wall system that can be used as the court playing surface. Further studies need to be carried out to confirm the cost estimate 

$15,000-$20,000 per court. 

Option 2 

Convert the affected courts to other usage where structural walls are not a functional requirement of the use. The remaining courts can be upgraded. This also requires further investigation and design. 

The estimated construction cost based on Quotable Value for this is in the region of $600,000. 

Option 3 

Demolish and rebuild facility.  This is not an option until an alternative facility for squash is built. 

Estimated cost of $2,000,000. 

Option 4 

Do nothing and continue on a monthly lease with the squash club. 

 

 

28.     The cost incurred by option 4 which has not been included in AMIS’ report, would include the growing arrears which would remain an issue with the club, and maintenance costs for the building which council would have to undertake given the condition issues of the building.

29.     The building is not technically fit for its current purpose (for playing squash), as the internal court surfaces need renewal/replacement and the HVAC system needs replacing. A breakdown of the internal and external issues is detailed in Appendix 5 of the building assessment report (pages 15 to 16), along with recommendations to address these.

30.     If the structural walls are not used for squash, or if a glass panel wall is built in front of them for squash, this removes the issue of the building not being fit for purpose. The club is agreeable to fix the squash courts at its own cost to remedy this issue.

31.     The club has confirmed that it has been successful with an application for a grant to purchase the glass fronts for the squash walls, pending the granting of a new lease.  It has also confirmed approval from club management to proceed with the installation. 

32.     Removing this building from the network of squash facilities in Auckland would leave a network gap for squash. As noted earlier in the report, Panmure is one of the largest squash clubs and there are little or no alternative options to use other facilities such as schools or amalgamation with another club.  The club want to remain at the present site. A new lease will allow them to continue their activities and service the needs of members on the current site.

33.     Options for a replacement facility either at this location or elsewhere have not been advanced. Discussion between council and the club are yet to commence.

34.     The inclusion of an early termination clause will address the future proposals underway with the site and provide flexibility with the lease should those developments be brought forward.

Arrears

35.     Issues with arrears date back to 2012.  Between 5 April 2012 and 30 March 2016 no payments were made by the club as required by the lease.  Council issued the club with two breach notices dated 2 February 2016, and 23 March 2016 pursuant to the provisions of the lease.

36.     Council and the club came to an agreement on the arrears, and payments recommenced in March 2016 and stopped again in May 2017.

37.     On the 1 July 2017, the outstanding arrears for rent and maintenance charges owed by the club totalled $35,011.

38.     At the workshops on 3 April and 17 July 2018, the local board requested that the invoicing for rent be deferred until the building and leasing issues with the club were resolved.

39.     If the board adopts the recommendations of this report, all arrears and rent accrued to the present date, will be paid prior to the formalisation of any new lease agreement. 

Advice

40.     The terms in the new lease will be sufficient to address the issues related to the condition of the building, squash courts and outstanding arrears.  Staff advise there is a required need for the activities undertaken by the club, and the club’s goals are well supported by the community.

41.     Staff recommend that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approve a new lease to Panmure Squash Rackets Club Incorporated subject to conditions.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

42.     Discussions between the club and council began in April 2018 with a meeting between the club, officers from council, and some members of the local board.  The result of that meeting is detailed in the proposed terms of the new lease stated in the recommendations. 

43.     Following that meeting other issues related to maintenance; the legal effects relating to the condition of the building, and public engagement process for a new lease, required further investigation and consideration by council. Once these matters were determined, the proposed new lease was workshopped with the local board in August 2018. 

44.     The local board indicated granting a new lease to the club, and using Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) funds ($6,000 from Community Response Fund and $17,477 from Parks Response Fund) to write off the arrears owed, which totals $23,477.

45.     It is within the local board’s delegated authority to write off the debt using their LDI funding.

46.     The recommendations in this report fall the under local boards’ delegated authority relating to local recreation, sports and community facilities.

47.     The recommendations also support outcomes in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2017, being an active and engaged community. The recommendation to approve the new lease ensures facility accessibility to cater to the needs of the club as well as those of other groups and the public who use the facility.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

48.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.  The Council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tamaki Makaurau context.  

49.     These commitments are also articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 10-year Budget, the Auckland Unitary Plan and local board plans.

50.     Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Te Toa Takitini, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

51.     The building is currently part of the community facilities portfolio and there will be no change to the status of the property.  Current budgets will continue to apply. 

52.     The club will be funding the cost of remedial works to the courts from their own resources, and will meet the ongoing maintenance cost for these works, and for the internal maintenance of the building for the duration of the new lease.  

53.     There is a direct financial cost of $23,477 in forgiving the arrears. This needs to be funded and cannot be written off in terms of the council financial policies. The report recommends that the cost of this be met from the LDI funding allowance of $6,000 from Community Response Fund and $17,477 from Parks Response Fund.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

54.     Should the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board resolve not to grant a new community lease, this decision will materially affect the club’s ability to provide its services to the local community and undertake its core activities.  There is significant risk that the club’s eligibility for future grant funding will also be affected, which would inhibit the club’s future development and erode recreational benefits derived by the wider community. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

55.     Subject to the grant of a new community lease, council staff will work with the squash club to finalise Community Outcome Plan and the Deed of Lease. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

23

b

AMIS Building Assessment Report

25

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Valerie Vui - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 

Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund towards the Tamaki Path Project

 

File No.: CP2018/22599

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To revoke clause E of resolution MT/2017/30, approve the allocation of the Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) to complete the link from Omaru Creek to Kiano Place as part of the Tāmaki Path and approve the allocation of the LBTCF to undertake investigation design on the link to Kotae Road.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In March 2017, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board resolved to approve the Tāmaki Path project to proceed to detailed design and delivery (MT/2017/30). As part of this resolution, the board placed a hold on the path proposed for Section B - Point England Reserve coastal Local Path (from end of new Omaru Bridge to Kotae Road and Kiano Place).

3.       Staff recommend that the board complete the link from Omaru Creek to Kiano Place so that the Tāmaki Path does not come to an abrupt end after the bridge and cost savings can be made. Staff also recommend undertaking investigation design on the link to Kotae Road.

4.       Local boards can use the LBTCF to deliver transport infrastructure projects that are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. There is $1,609,391 in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s LBTCF that needs to be allocated by June 2019.

5.       This report recommends that the board approve the allocation of the LBTCF towards the link from Omaru Creek to Kiano Place as part of the Tāmaki Path project, and towards investigation design on the link to Kotae Road.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      revoke clause E of resolution MT/2017/30:

e.   place on hold the path proposed for section B - Point England Reserve coastal Local Path (from end of new Omaru Bridge to Kotae Road and Kiano Place) at this time in response to objection from local residents.

b)      approve the allocation of $320,000 from the local board transport capital fund to complete the link from Omaru Creek to Kiano Place, providing connection for the Tāmaki Path after the bridge.

c)         approve the allocation of $60,000 from the local board transport capital fund to             investigate, consult, consent and provide a fixed cost estimate to allow the board to             make a final decision on the link to Kotae Rd.

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The Tāmaki Estuary Walkway Plan was developed in 2012 and adopted by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board in 2013.

7.       In April 2016, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved the Tāmaki Path project (also referred to as the Tāmaki Estuary Greenway) to proceed to the stage of developed design and consent planning (MT/2016/54).

8.       During public consultation a petition was received from the Wai-o-taiki Residents Association (WRA), which outlined residents’ concerns for Wai-o-taiki Reserve.

9.       The petition data was not included in the analysis of the consultation data as the petition raised various issues that were outside the scope of the Tāmaki Path project. Staff recommended the local board facilitate a separate response to the WRA and their concerns.

10.     Complete analysis of the consultation feedback is attached in Appendix B.

11.     In March 2017, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved the Tāmaki Path project to proceed to detailed design and delivery (MT/2017/30). As part of this resolution, the board placed a hold on the path proposed for Section B - Point England Reserve coastal Local Path (from end of new Omaru Bridge to Kotae Road and Kiano Place) in response to objection from local residents. The full resolution is attached.

12.     The Tāmaki Path project is now in the construction phase and works are currently underway. 

13.     Contractors have built a temporary road from Kiano Place to the new Omaru Creek Bridge to transport materials for the construction of the bridge. There is an opportunity to convert this temporary road into a concrete path connection from the Omaru Creek Bridge to the reserve entrance at Kiano Place.

14.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important, but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must:

·        be safe;

·        not impede network efficiency;

·        be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

15.     There is currently $1,609,391 remaining in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki LBTCF, which must be allocated by June 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

16.     Options for the link from the Tāmaki Path - Omaru Creek bridge include:

Option

Notes

Cost

Option 1 (recommended) – revoke the existing resolution and complete the link from Omaru Creek Bridge to Kiano Place so that the Tāmaki Path does not come to an abrupt end after the bridge.

The link to Kotae Road will also be investigated, consulted upon and consented for future connection opportunities and to provide the board with a fixed price estimate of the works which will allow them to make a final decision on the link to Kotae Rd.

 

 

Estimate cost for a separate project to link the Tāmaki Path to Kiano Place is $550,000, however if the works are approved to be carried out by the existing contractors onsite before they finish, the estimate cost of the works is $320,000.Estimate cost for investigation, consultation and consent application for the link to Kotae Road is $60,000.

 

Option 2 – revoke the existing resolution and complete both the links to Kiano Place and Kotae Road as per the original proposed routes.

This will need further investigation to determine whether it is feasible and seek mana whenua’s support.

Estimate cost for these works is $780,000, which will only be completed once a new consent has been granted. This allows for the temporary haul road to remain onsite, however the contractor will have to disestablish from site and therefore additional preliminary and general costs will be incurred by the project.

Option 3 - rescind the existing resolution and complete both the links to Kiano Pl and Kotae Rd as per the alternative proposed routes.

This will need further investigation to determine if this is feasible and seek mana whenua’s support.

Estimate cost for these works is $880,000, which will only be completed once a new consent has been granted. This allows for the temporary haul road to remain onsite, however the contractor will have to disestablish from site and therefore additional preliminary and general costs will be incurred by the project.

 

17.     Extending the proposed path as per Option 1 from the Omaru Creek Bridge to Kiano Place would have the following benefits:

·        Less chance of contamination of the various shell middens onsite as no further disturbance is necessary to carry out these works

·        A formed concrete shared path access from Kiano Place to Pt England Reserve, Riverside Reserve, Dunkirk Reserve, Mt Wellington War Memorial Reserve and Panmure Wharf Reserve, as well as an on-road link from Mt Wellington War Memorial Reserve to Panmure Town Centre and Panmure Basin Reserve

18.     Staff recommend proceeding with Option 1, which also allows for investigation, design and consents for a future link to Kotae Road.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

19.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has supported this project by adoption of the Local Board Greenways Plan, and the development of the Tāmaki Estuary Walkway Plan which was adopted by the local board in 2013. It is also captured as a priority project in the Local Board Plan 2014.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

Māori views have been heard through the consultation process and Te Ao Māori values have influenced:

·        path alignment

·        inclusion of cultural artwork into the pedestrian bridge


 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

20.     Current summary of the LBTCF:

21.     Estimate cost for a separate project to link the Tāmaki Path to Kiano Place is $550,000. However, if the works are approved to be carried out by the existing contractors onsite before they finish the estimate cost of the works is $320,000, resulting in cost savings of up to $230,000.

22.     Estimate cost for investigation, consultation and consent application for the link to Kotae Road for future connection opportunities is $60,000.

23.     The total cost of Option 1 is $380,000, to be allocated from the LBTCF. This leaves $1,229,391 remaining.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

24.     Auckland Transport is not delivering this project and has no ability to impact or change the scope or cost of the project, meaning that additional cost to the completion of this project will need to be allocated from other budgets or a new application to the LBTCF will need to be made.

25.     The decision not to approve the path while the project is under construction would increase the cost of completing this project in the future by $230,000 taking the total cost $550,000.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

26.     Following approval from the board, next steps is to complete the link to Kiano Place and start investigation design for the connection to the maki Path from Kotae Road.

27.     The board will receive monthly updates on the progress of this project through regular Community Facilities reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Tamaki Path Options Background and Photos

53

b

Tamaki Path Public Consultation Analysis

63

c

Tamaki Path Resolution

81

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Melanie Dale -  Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager, Elected Members

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 grant allocations

 

File No.: CP2018/21632

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Local Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 24 April 2018 (see Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

3.       This report presents applications received in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019 (see Attachment B).

4.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $58,748.00 was allocated in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round One 2018/2019. This leaves a total of $61,252.00 for two remaining local grant rounds in 2018/2019.

5.       Fifteen applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round Two 2018/2019, requesting a total of $106,413.00.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round Two 2018/2019.

Table One: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round Two 2018/2019 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1911-203

The Synergy Project Trust

Community

Towards the Oranga Family Christmas festival costs.

$9,200.00

Eligible

LG1911-205

The Operating Theatre Trust, trading as Tim Bray Productions

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of tickets and bus transport.

$2,716.00

Eligible

LG1911-212

Tamaki Community Development Trust

Community

Towards counselling, transport, food and prizes for programme costs for vulnerable families.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-214

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Community

Towards transport cost s for the safari multicultural playgroup project

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-215

Mount Wellington Playcentre

Community

Toward operations costs for the Mt Wellington playgroup.

$4,072.00

Eligible

LG1911-218

KidsCan Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of raincoats for children in schools in the local board area.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-220

Panmure Business Association

Events

Towards management event costs for the Panmure Basin Fun Day.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-223

Parenting Place

Community

Towards programme subsidies for participants, volunteer expenses, course manuals and co-ordinator expenses.

$4,516.00

Eligible

LG1911-224

Kāhui Tū Kaha

Community

Towards costs for the Oranga wellbeing and lifestyle programme.

$12,958.00

Eligible

LG1911-225

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards a contribution for the Youthline helpline cost.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1911-226

Chinese Conservation Education Trust

Community

Towards transport costs and refreshments for the New Zealand Chinese environment education programme.

$9,060.00

Eligible

LG1911-227

Country Magic and Friends Club Incorporated

Events

Towards costs for the “Elvis in Polynesia” event.

$13,455.00

Eligible

LG1911-228

Shakti Asian Women's Centre Incorporated.

Community

Towards costs for the family violence awareness workshops for new migrants.

$4,012.00

Eligible

LG1911-229

Ellerslie Toy Library

Environment

Towards the purchase of technology that would enable the toy library to go paperless.

$874.00

Eligible

LG1911-230

Alcohol Healthwatch Trust

Community

Towards costs associated with conducting a compliance audit of off-licence premises.

$1,750.00

Ineligible

Total

 

 

 

$106,413.00

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

 

8.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2018/2019 on 24 April 2018 and will operate three local grants rounds for this financial year. 

9.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

12.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

13.     A summary of each application received through Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 is provided (see Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

14.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted 10-year budget 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

16.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000.00 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $58,748.00 was allocated in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round One 2018/2019. This leaves a total of $61,252.00 for two remaining local grant rounds in 2018/2019.

17.     Fifteen applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round Two 2018/2019, requesting a total of $106,413.00.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

18.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

19.     Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocating funding for round two local grants, commercial and finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Grants Programme 2018/2019

89

b

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Grant Round Two 2018/2019 grant applications

91

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Helen Taimarangai - Senior Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grant Operations Manager

Shane King - Head of Operations Support

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

27 November 2018

 

 

 

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two       

LG1911-203

 

The Synergy Project Trust

 

 

 

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

 

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

 

Project: Oranga Family Christmas Festival

 

Location:

Oranga Community Centre & Fergusson Park

 

Summary:

Family fun day which offers activities which families can participate in and enjoy. Bouncy castles, inflatable obstacle courses, inflatable soccer course, top town traditional team games, live music, free BBQ, outdoor basketball/netball/touch competition. Encourages the community to meet their neighbours, use their parks and buildings, help facilitate some of the activities, community to adopt a custodian role in making the community safer and remove the negative stigma being associated with so far.

 

Dates:

08/12/2018 - 08/12/2018

Rain dates:

 -

 

People delivering:

Team of 15 Facilitators

People reached:

1200

 

% of participants from Local Board

100%

 

Promotion:

Facebook, Instagram, Radio, Billboards around community, newspaper article and advertising. Tv on local community shows.

 

Community benefits

 

Identified need:

 

 

We have been working for approximately three years now in the community. We have identified that with more activities in and around the community being delivered it has help decrease the safety issue that has plagued the community for years. The people are voicing to us as we work with their children and youth, they would like to see more community/family events in their area. More families are coming out and use the parks. The highlight is they see their neighbours and kids facilitating these small events and activities. The opportunity to provide a platform where the locals can showcase their own cultures and identity has made a huge positive impact in the Oranga/Onehunga Community

 

Identified community outcomes:

 

 

Increase physical and mental wellbeing of young people. Reduction in crime and safety issues in and around Oranga and Fergusson Park through increase activities. Create a safe environment for youth to participate, celebrate and express their talents and gifts in a safe

environment. Youth and Community have a sense of ownership and become role models for others through mentorship and life skills workshop offered by Synergy Projects. Building local leadership capacity in the neighbourhood. Pathways created into education and business for young people and the community.  Community getting to know their neighbours by attending these events and supporting

them in providing for the needy and vulnerable families of Oranga.

 

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

putting people first - People are cared for and enabled to participate, celebrate and contribute to the community

 

The Festival is an integral part of the community which happens every year.  The local community attend to celebrate their diversity, their culture, contribute by operating stalls, performing on the main stage, and help facilitate workshops and sites of the festival.

 

 

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

 

To Wahi Community Shop

Facilitators

 

Reflectionz

Stalls and Facilitators

 

Oranga Society

Entertainment

 

Te Papapa Rugby

Facilitate Games

 

Demographics

 

Māori outcomes:

Māori focus - tikanga (practises), mātauranga (knowledge), reo (language)

Our many facilitators are well versed in Te Reo Maori and also run programmes in the community which address and connect with the local Maori Community.

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - All areas are disabled friendly.  Site assigned for wheel chair access only.

 

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

 

Promoting SmokeFree:

The whole venue both the Centre and Fergusson park are smoke free areas. Well signage but hope the Council.  Have also ordered signs from the HPA agency.

 

Zero waste minimisation

Have contacted the Zero Waste Events team for bins and recycling stations on the day

 

 

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

 

100%

100%

100%

 

 

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

 

10%

50%

50%

50%

%

50%

100%

 

Financial information

 

Amount requested:

$9200.00

 

Requesting grant for:

We require funding for the entertainment, artists to perform, staging costs, outdoor PA system for sound, signage for event, advertising costs with paper and radio, administration cost and facilitation costs.

 

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Reduce costs where possible, scale down the activities and seek further sponsorship elsewhere.

 

Cost of participation:

Stallholders fee of $20

 

 

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

 

$10,400

$200

$0

$1,200

 

 

 

Expenditure item

Amount

 

Equipment, Marquee, Staging

$2,650

 

Permits, Advertising, Signage, Uniforms

$1,470

 

Artist & Performers

$2,000

 

Bouncy Castle, Kids Zone

$2,480

 

Facilitation Cost & Admin

$1,800

 

 

 

Income description

Amount

 

Stall Holders paying $20 per stall (10 Stalls)

$200

 

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

 

 

$

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

 

$

 

Total number volunteer hours

Total number specialised volunteer hours

Amount

 

 

80 hours

40

$800

 

Funding history

 

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

 

NCE1911-005

Oranga Family Christmas Festival

2018/2019 Non-Contestable Events - Maungakiekie-Tamaki -  Awaiting funding agreement

Approved

$5,000.00

 

LG1911-119

E3 Triple Ex Youth Mentoring & Training

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

NCE1811-010

Oranga Community Open Day

2017/2018 Events - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki -  Project in progress

Approved

$3,000.00

 

LG1811-307

Music Lab

2017/2018 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$3,000.00

 

LG1811-233

Driveway Mural

2017/2018 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

 

CCS18_1_148

Music Lab

Creative Communities Scheme 18_1 -  Central 18_1

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1811-129

Family & Kids Day Out

2017/2018 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

 

Applications prior to the 2015/2016 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

 

 

 


 

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two       

LG1911-205

The Operating Theatre Trust, trading as Tim Bray Productions

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Gift a Seat Outreach Programme

Location:

The PumpHouse Theatre, 2A Manurere Ave, Takapuna Auckland 0622

Summary:

We will invite eighty-six students and four teachers from Ruapotaka School to attend 'The Man Whose Mother was a Pirate' during our Education season in April 2019. We are applying for funding to support for show tickets and bus fares to alleviate the financial barriers, and make theatre accessible.

Dates:

08/04/2019 - 12/04/2019

Rain dates:

 -

People delivering:

20

People reached:

90

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

In promoting the show we’ll follow our comprehensive promotional timetable including

social media campaigns, digital EDM campaigns to our extensive databases. We have a database of 5,260 contacts.

We‘ll work with Sally Woodfield (SWPR) our publicist who will contact long-lead as well as

weekly and daily publications and media outlets.

Advertising will be booked in local and regional media.

As a charity, we have $10,000 a month in Google AdWords to utilise for free.

Community benefits

Identified need:

 

Numerous studies around the world have shown that access to theatre helps boost literacy and cultivates imaginative thinking in children. A study conducted at UCLA in the US, for instance, which looked at 25,000 students involved in the performing arts, showed consistent participation helped improve academic performance and even bumped up standardised test scores.

 

Low Decile Schools have expressed the need directly to us in communication around the project. The schools and their families can't afford the cost of tickets and transport, and therefore don't have access to the quality live professional productions that we offer.

Identified community outcomes:

 

The aim is to unlock children's imaginations of today so we can ignite the creative minds of tomorrow. 

 

By making theatre accessible to all children, we are realising one of our values as an organisation.

 

A chance for the school to participate in a learning experience outside the classroom, assisted by a free Teachers’ Resource Guide we create which has cross curricula activity ideas. 

 

"The productions always blend in with the English and Arts curriculum in al strands and so it is a very good learning aid. The teacher's resource guide before and after provides lots of ideas and ways to follow up so bringing this into the classroom."  Gael Vickers, Principal Ruapotaka.

 

We offer active participation of children and young people through the associated Theatre

Workshops that are geared around each of the shows.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

active participation - Our young people are engaged in the community and have access to a wide range of opportunities

 

Unlocking imaginations today ignites the creative minds of tomorrow.

 

Since 2005 we have been offering free tickets (Gift a Seats) to our theatre performances to low decile schools, many come from the Maungakiekie - Tamaki. 

 

Through our Gift a Seat outreach programme the young people from Ruapotaka School in Panmure will have access to our live professional theatre performance of "The Man Whose Mother was a Pirate" by Margaret Mahy in April 2019 at the Pumphouse Theatre in Takapuna. 

 

Teachers will receive The Man Whose Mother was a Pirate's free Teachers Resource Guide before and after the show which aligns with the school curriculum, it is jam packed full of cross curricular activities to use inside the classroom, and enhances their literacy, comprehension and reading outcomes.

 

The cost of tickets for the show and the bus fare is generally prohibitive for these children and the schools, many of the students have never been over the harbour bridge let alone to a live theatre performance, so as you can imagine, by the time they get to the theatre in Takapuna they are incredibly excited.

 

As explained in the thank you letters attached from local schools in the Maungakiekie - Tamaki area.The response and encouragement  from the teachers and students are heartfelt and encouraging affirming that these performances is not just entertainment but are a vital part for children’s development; socially, educationally and building confidence - often sparking ideas for their own performances and getting involved in the arts themselves.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

The PumpHouse Theatre

Since 2004, venue partnership and sponsor of our Educational Seasons

Volunteering Auckland

Assisting with aligning volunteers with our theatre company - ushering.

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

 

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - In 2017 we were given an award in the Creative New Zealand Arts Access Aotearoa Awards - "Tim Bray Productions is Highly Commended for pioneering NZSL interpreted performances for Deaf children and providing audio described performances for blind and low-vision audiences. The company is an outstanding model of inclusion."

Since 2004 we’ve offered New Zealand Sign Language interpreted performances and we were at the forefront of this arts accessibilty amongst New Zealand theatre companies.

Since 2015, we have provided Audio-Described performances for blind and visually-impaired audiences.

Our Gift a Seat programme allows these children to attend with pre-paid tickets

We offer discounted Companion Tickets to carers.

PumpHouse Theatre is accessible by wheelchairs

Wairau Valley Special School teenage students volunteer as ushers.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Promoting SmokeFree:

We request that any of our cast or crew who smoke do not smoke in view of the audience

coming to see our shows as they are role models to our young audiences.

The PumpHouse Theatre is a smoke-free environment.

Zero waste minimisation

We will store the newly built set, costumes and props for The Man Whose Mother was a Pirate till we stage the show again or tour it. In the effort to reduce waste the majority of our marketing material has gone to digital. Pumphouse theatre are working towards electronic ticketing we hope this will be in effect by April next year. Any children that come to the show with their lunches are encouraged to take all waste home with them.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

100%

%

%

%

%

%

Financial information

Amount requested:

$2716.00

Requesting grant for:

Tickets costs and transport for 90 students from Ruapotaka School to 'A Man whose Mother was a Pirate' by Margaret Mahy (Education Season 8 - 12 April 2019).

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

 

Cost of participation:

Yes $25.00 for A reserve seating

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$3,766.52

$0

$250

$1,050

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Show ticket cost: 90 people @ 21.74

$1,956.52

Bus transport: 2 buses for 90 people

$760

Project support BDM 25 hours @30.00

$750

Teachers Resource Guide

$300

 

Income description

Amount

No project income for the Gift a Seat outreach

$

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

10 Individual donations @ $25.00

$250

Approved

Donated materials

Amount

 

$

 

 

Total number volunteer hours

Total number specialised volunteer hours

Amount

 

5

 

$102.75

Funding history

 

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

 

LG1911-205

Gift a Seat Outreach Programme

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two -  SME assessment completed

Undecided

$0.00

 

MB1819-144

(changed to one) theatre production for children – The Man Whose Mother Was A Pirate by Margaret Mahy

2018/2019 Multi-board Local Grants, Round One -  Awaiting payment

Approved

$5,000.00

 

RegPr19_1_00054

Annual Season of Theatre for Children

Regional Arts and Culture Grant Programme 19_1 Projects -  Assessment 19_1

Approved

$10,000.00

 

LG1802-217

Two productions: The Great White Man-Eating Shark And Other Stories by Margaret Mahy and Bad jelly The Witch

2017/2018 Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$6,000.00

 

RegPr18_200032

Margaret Mahy's 'The Great White Man-Eating Shark and Other Stories'

Regional Arts & Culture Grants Programme 18_2 Projects -  Assessment 18_2

Declined

$0.00

 

RegPr18_200024

 

Regional Arts & Culture Grants Programme 18_2 Projects -  Project in Progress

Approved

$12,600.00

 

CCS18_2_219

Audio Described Performances and Touch Tours

Creative Communities Scheme 18_2 -  North 18_2

Approved

$3,570.00

 

RegAC18_1_00047

 

Regional Arts & Culture Grants Programme 18_1 Projects -  Assessment 18_1

Declined

$0.00

 

CCS18_1_228

Audio Described Performances and Touch Tours

Creative Communities Scheme 18_1 -  North 18_1

Approved

$5,565.00

 

RegAC18_1_00054

2018 Season of Theatre for Children

Regional Arts & Culture Grants Programme 18_1 Projects -  Project in Progress

Approved

$5,000.00

 

LG1802-136

Two Productions: The Santa Claus Show '17 / Pippi Long stocking

2017/2018 Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,500.00

 

LG1702-232

The Great Piratical Rum bustification / Mrs Wishy-Washy

Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants, Round Two 2016/2017 -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

 

RegAC17_2_069

 

Regional Arts and Culture Grant Programme 17_2 Project -  Assessment 17_2

Approved

$7,000.00

 

CCS17_2_252

Audio Described Performances and Touch Tours

Creative Communities Scheme 2017_2 -  North Committee 17_2

Approved

$5,480.00

 

REF17S00037

The Great Piratical Rum bustification by Margaret Mahy

Regional Event Fund 2016/2017 - Round 2 Strategic Priorities -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

CCS17_1_201

Audio Described Performances and Touch Tours

Creative Communities Scheme 2017_1 -  North Assessment Committee Round 1 2017

Approved

$5,480.00

 

LG1702-121

"The Santa Claus Show '16" and "Puff the Magic Dragon" (note permission to change the Piratical show to Puff was granted by Kim Hammond 7/12/16)

Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants, Round One 2016/2017 -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

 

17_1_032

 

Regional Arts and Culture Grants Programme 17_1 Project -  Assessment 17_1

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1602-218

Bad jelly the Witch  / A Lion in the Meadow and Other Stories

Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants, Round Two, 2015/16 -  Acquitted

Approved

$10,000.00

 

QR1602-405

Celebrating 25 Years - 2016 Season of Theatre for Children

Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response, Round Four, 2015/16 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

CCS16_2_197

Audio Described Performances and Touch Tours

Creative Communities Scheme 2016_2 -  North/West Assessment Committee Round 2 2016

Approved

$4,000.00

 

REF16S00027

The Whale Rider

Regional Event Fund 2015/2016 - Round 2 Strategic Priorities -  Application

Approved

$0.00

 

LG1602-151

Jane and the Dragon

Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants, Round One, 2015/16 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

CCS16_1_186

NZSL Interpreted Performances and Audio Described Performance.

Creative Communities Scheme 2016_1 -  North/West Assessment Committee Round 1 2016

Approved

$5,673.48

 

RegAC16_1_040

2016 Season of Theatre for Children

Regional Arts and Culture Grants Programme 16_1 -  Assessment 16_1

Approved

$16,300.00

 

REF1600051

The Santa Claus Show '15

Regional Event Fund 2015/2016 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

Applications prior to the 2015/2016 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

 

 

 

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two       

LG1911-212

Tamaki Community Development Trust

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Counselling and Program Costs

Location:

4A Court Crescent, Panmure, Auckland 1072

Summary:

Counselling for women and children who have been through trauma, domestic violence and abuse, and abusive relationships. Many women still experience the impacts of abuse even when they have left the relationship. Some are badly broken and healing can take a long time. Our aim is that we provide that support to women in a safe environment and that women and children are able to heal from this trauma, believe in themselves and move on to a better place in life.

 

Group programs for women and children that are part of the wrap around support that we offer to families and women to help them develop pro-social skills, self-efficacy, and self-worth.

 

Our maths club aims to help children with maths.

Dates:

01/11/2018 - 31/10/2019

Rain dates:

 -

People delivering:

5

People reached:

200

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

The work that we do is advertised on our website, our facebook page and our brochures.

Community benefits

Identified need:

 

We receive referrals from Oranga Tamariki and from local schools of families that are needing support. We work with for e.g. families who split up because Mum is drug dependent and Dad is now taking care of the children on his own, but he also wears an ankle bracelet and has his own issues. Counselling is part of the wrap around support that we provide for children and families who are victims of this.

 

In February of this year an Education Review report found that NZ children's confidence to do Maths fell between years 4 and 8 and Chief Review Officer, Nicolas Pole found that it had been dropping "alarmingly" for some time.

Identified community outcomes:

 

We want mums to have better self-esteem, improve in self-efficacy and be better mums/parents to their children. We also want to see children attending school, doing well at it, at least enough so that they can be in gainful employment or even attain Tertiary education.

 

Children attending school programs are assured of a bright spot in their week - helping to combat the sadness that they may be experiencing at home. They also learn pro-social skills  and skills such as cooking that will help in their future in terms of healthy and cheaper meals. Obesity among children and adults because of unhealthy consumption of food is a problem among many Maori and Pasifika communities and also financial issues. Learning to cook, practicing their maths skills with one on one help is a means of enabling children to know that there is another better way to live their lives.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

putting people first - People are cared for and enabled to participate, celebrate and contribute to the community

 

The following needs that will be met are illustrated through our key outcomes that we have achieved:

 

Providing wrap around support to families that meet their needs in a holistic way, often outside the specific issue that is sited at the beginning of the referral. We provide counselling for women and children mainly, but are open to counselling men also.  Marked improvements are seen in children who have behavioural issues such as a child no longer lying and stealing because she is getting attention and being listened to and given guidance.

 

Clear behavioural and emotional regulation changes in children that help them to stay in class longer and being taken off "daily reports" and other behavioural management lists in schools. This work includes finding what makes a child really engage and what motivates them to improve their behaviour.  We have found that among other things, community activities such as cooking classes (one of our programs) really help to facilitate this change in children.

 

Facilitating increased stability, improved education engagement and outcomes and increased positive peer groups in children.

 

Working alongside mothers to address their own health issues and those of their families.  Empowering mothers is a big part of the Family Workers' mahi and Counselling is a significant help to this.

 

We act as a translator and facilitator for families when engaging with other organisations particularly with OT through care and protection and youth justice Family Group Conferences (FGC's). This helps families to feel less threatened by the process and more readily able to engage and take ownership of the issues presenting.

 

We provide transport to Counselling for a lot of our women, especially those who may have a very young baby in their care and need this type of support i.e. do not have their own transport or a baby sitter.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Glen Innes Family Centre

Run Parenting programs and Anger Management programs

Dunkirk Activity Centre and Dance Therapy

Provide the venue and Therapists for ART programs for children

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

Māori participation - Māori priority group, target group, high representation or Māori staff delivering

We have 2 Maori family workers out of a total of 6 staff, but the majority of clients we work with are Maori.

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Our counselling work is open to anyone and everyone needing counselling support or counselling therapy and includes those with disabilities who could and would benefit from counselling therapy. If a person seeks counselling support and they are unable to afford counselling elsewhere, we are able to provide them with this support, as long as there are spaces available, otherwise they will go on the waiting list and will be seen in chronological order or depending on the urgency of their situation.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Promoting SmokeFree:

We don't actively promote smoke-free messages but our promotion of healthy lifestyles is incidental to our work. None of

our workers smoke.

Zero waste minimisation

We have just joined the Zero Waste Network of NZ. However, our normal practices is saving compost for the gardens and ensuring that we use the Council blue bins for paper products only.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

Financial information

Amount requested:

$10000.00

Requesting grant for:

We are requesting funding for Counselling costs, and program costs.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would continue with the whole project by seeking funding elsewhere. This project is part of the core services that we offer.

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$17,760

$0

$0

$0

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Counselling Costs $29*440hours

$12,760

Program Costs-Transport

$4,000

Program Costs - Snacks

$500

Program Costs - Prizes

$500

Income description

Amount

 

$

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

 

$

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

$

 

 

Total number volunteer hours

Total number specialised volunteer hours

Amount

 

 

 

$

 

Funding history

 

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

 

LG1911-212

Counselling and Program Costs

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two - Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

 

LG1811-203

Mentoring support for boys or boys and their Dad's.

2017/2018 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two - Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1811-132

Paddle Boarding for the Summer.

2017/2018 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One - Project in progress

Approved

$1,500.00

 

LG1711-218

Printer for Family Workers

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two, 2016/17 - Project in progress

Approved

$1,642.00

 

QR1712-202

Robotics

2016/2017 Ōrākei Quick Response, Round Two - Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

Applications prior to the 2015/2016 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

 

 


 

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two       

LG1911-214

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: 1. WISE Collective 2. Safari Playgroup

Location:

Panmure Community Centre, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure, Auckland

Summary:

1. WISE Collective

The project empowers refugee background women and isolated migrants with the skills, experience and confidence, to create positive networks and also share their own skills and culture in the community, seek employment and take entrepreneurial ventures that help them generate income for their families (e.g. WISE Catering). Women are positively impacted through both educational and recreational activities resulting in overall wellbeing. 

 

2. Safari Multicultural Playgroup Project: 

A safe space for both children and mothers to learn; children learn through play whilst their mothers learn English, NZ parenting, education and other skills/information. It also offers workshops and speakers from key service providers to help prepare families and empower mothers for life in Auckland e.g. Plunket.

Dates:

07/12/2018 - 30/06/2019

Rain dates:

 -

People delivering:

7

People reached:

WISE:40 women from refugee background or isolated migrants. SAFARI: 20 families per playgroup (242 enrolled families across Auckland)

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

•           E-Newsletter sent to our networks 

•           Social Media (Facebook, Twitter - ARMS social media, group community pages and local area social media)

•           Digital channels (ARMS website, ARCC Website, Google Adwords and SEO)

•           Through our existing relationships and their networks with agencies, other NGOs and community groups (MOE, Plunket) 

•           Word of mouth

•           Traditional advertising (print media e.g. local, regional and national newspaper such as Multicultural Times and Manukau Courier) 

•           Flyers and posters distributed in key touch points (e.g. Local libraries, CABs)

Community benefits

Identified need:

 

ARMS conducted a study involving over 1000 migrant and refugee backgrounds, showing several issues around the need for meaningful employment, education, community safety and wellbeing, English language skills, poverty, housing, social support and outlets for recreation, leisure and cultural expression. 

 

This community is disadvantaged and face issues such as isolation and poor social cohesion. The need for WISE has grown, resulting in two new hubs. WISE not only empowers these women with skills, networks and resources to pursue new careers and further education, but has also resulted in a new sense belonging and connectedness to their community; improving their mental, emotional and social wellbeing. Safari addresses similar needs, taking into account the needs of both women and their children.

Identified community outcomes:

 

1. Less social isolation and increased social cohesion and connections for the communities involved in these projects to the wider community in which they live. 

2. Greater knowledge and use of support agencies, community facilities, community activities.

3. Better settlement and integration of the communities taking part in WISE and Safari project, that celebrates their diversity through business ventures and celebrations.

 

By taking part in English language lessons, informative workshops and seminars and recreational activities, these communities will build their support networks in the wider community and increase their social cohesion, becoming less isolated. With service providers invited to deliver specific workshops based on the needs of the community, they are not only informed but gain a new contact in the community. 

 

An essential part to helping these communities gain the confidence in actively participating in their local communities involves ensuring that their culture is valued and the diversity they bring to their communities is celebrated. This means continuing to give opportunities for them to share and celebrate their culture through food, song, dance and even generate income as seen with WISE Catering.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

putting people first - People are cared for and enabled to participate, celebrate and contribute to the community

 

WISE (Women Inspired, Strong and Enterprising) Project:

• This is a partnership project with ARCC (Auckland resettled community coalition) that brings together former refugee and isolated migrant women to connect with each other, key service providers and their wider community in a safe space. The project is tailored to their specific needs giving them opportunities to develop a range of skills that help them network, get socially connected, share their own skills and even provide them with the opportunity to generate income for their families through entrepreneurial ventures. At the project the women are able to practice in a safe social setting, their newly learnt English language helping them gain confidence to participate more in the project but also in their wider communities.  

 

Safari Multicultural Playgroup Project: 

• The Safari Playgroups is a partnership project with ARCC and were set up to respond to the needs of mothers from refugee and isolated migrant backgrounds, often recently arrived in NZ, who have minimal English and connections in the community. Such families can often have 2 – 4 children, no transport, and very little if any family support. All of the children who attend are from low-socio economic backgrounds with the majority of the family’s experiencing high needs in terms of not only lack of transportation, but also financial, social and health issues. Most of the children do not speaking English and some children have developmental delay. 

 

The model is unique as it provides multiple benefits, for mothers and their children, as well as for service providers who seek to connect with hard-to-reach families. Mothers who are involved in the Safari Playgroups benefit not only from English classes run by trained ESOL teachers but they also benefit from the workshops and speakers who visit from key service providers; which helps foster relationships and connections with the wider community especially in key areas. The families find out about our playgroup through being referred by DHBs, maternal mental health, midwives, emergency family housing, Family start and Plunket.

 

Both projects put people first by making sure the services delivered meet their unique needs, walking alongside them and empowering them to participate in their local communities, by showing them the value of their contribution, their culture and the benefits to themselves and their families of getting involved.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Auckland Resettled Community Coalition

Programme started as partnership project and they continue to refer women and families to them.

Red Cross

They refer women and families to our projects

Refugees as Survivors NZ

They refer women and families to our projects

Plunket

Delivers information sessions and workshops as well as provide referrals.

English Language Partners

They provide English Lessons and referrals.

NZ Police

Delivers information sessions and workshops as well as provide referrals.

Family Start

Delivers information sessions and workshops as well as provide referrals.

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

 

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Our project ensures we are accessible to people to disabilities by holding it in locations that have disability access (e.g. ramps and/or elevators). We also are accessible through the delivery of our project which is purposely delivered where our communities live, making transport less of a barrier.

Target ethnic groups:

Specific ethnic group Māori, Pacific Peoples, Chinese, Korean, Indian, Other Asian, Middle Eastern, Latin American, African, Other: Burmese

Promoting SmokeFree:

WISE and Safari invite different service providers that help inform participants of locally available services as well as promoting healthy living including being smoke-free. Service providers provide take-away resources that give participants information about the importance of being smoke-free for themselves and their families and also if need be, what they can do and where they can go to get support if they wish to quit. All our projects operate on premises that are smoke-free as well which we ensure is reiterated.

Zero waste minimisation

Yes we have. We have invited Auckland Council representatives that work in the area of waste minimisation to deliver information sessions and workshops, in particular for our WISE project. This has resulted in participants being equipped with the necessary information to start their own compost bins at home and adopt behaviours that help minimise waste e.g. bringing their own shopping bags and reducing their consumption of single use plastics like drink bottles. In addition, our projects try to operate in a way that reduces waste, by choosing recycled or eco-friendly products, reducing our printing and reusing resources beyond their original usage.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

0%

100%

0%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

20%

%

%

80%

%

15%

%

Financial information

Amount requested:

$6000.00

Requesting grant for:

We are requesting contribution to salary and project costs including koha for our volunteers (travel reimbursements etc).

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

A contribution to project coordination, travel costs and associated overheads.

Cost of participation:

There is no cost for participants involved in either WISE or Safari.

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$92,602

$0

$44,440

$0

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Projects Coordinator($58,240 full time) time allocated on this projects, 12 hrs

$17,472

Project worker 15 hrs

$15,600

WISE project worker 6 hrs

$6,240

Van transport (for families) for 40 weeks @ $80 per day, 4 days per week

$12,800

Volunteer expense including travel reimburse.

$2,300

Vehicle mileage

$980

Programme materials/resources for 12 months

$14,400

Charges for English Language tutor ($37 per hour x 3 hours per week x 40 weeks)

$4,440

Admin cost including office, space , HR contribution to audit, accounts insurance etc.

$9,410

Rental for premises for 4 terms

$4,800

Cell phone

$360

Evaluation

$3,000

Professional development expenses for the Project Supervisor/ Worker/ Assistant

$800

 

Income description

Amount

 

$

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

MoE operational grant for Safari

$24,000

Approved

Local board funding (yet to be secured)

$5,000

Approved

Foundation North for contribution to WISE

$11,000

Approved

Adult education funding for English class

$4,440

Approved

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

 

$

 

Total number volunteer hours

Total number specialised volunteer hours

Amount

 

 

 

 

$

 

Funding history

 

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

 

LG1911-214

1. WISE Collective 2. Safari Playgroup

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

 

PKTSRG1819021

 

Puketāpapa Strategic Relationships Grant 2018-2019 -  Submitted

Approved

$15,115.00

 

LG1801-243

WISE

2017/2018 Albert-Eden Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$3,600.00

 

WMIF1702-099

WISE Collective Waste Minimisation Project

WMIF September 2017 -  5a. Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

REGCD18-50

WISE CATERING/KITCHEN

Regional Community Development 2017/2018 -  Project in progress

Approved

$15,000.00

 

LG1805-126

Safari Playgroup West

2017/2018 Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,300.00

 

LG1808-129

WISE Collective Hub - North

2017/2018 Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$5,000.00

 

LG1820-137

Cafe training for women

2017/2018 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,800.00

 

QR1801-113

International Migrants Day 2017

2017/2018 Albert-Eden Quick Response, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

PKTSRG1718010

 

Puketāpapa Strategic Relationships Grant 2017-2018 -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1708-228

WISE Collective Hub - North

Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round Two, 2016/2017 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1701-222

ARMS and WISE Collective

2016/2017 Albert-Eden Local Grants, Round Two -  Refund requested

Approved

$3,636.00

 

REGCD17-30

The WISE Collective Project.

Regional Community Development 2016/2017 -  Acquitted

Approved

$35,000.00

 

WMIF1602-106

ARMS Waste Minimisation Project

WMIF September 2016 -  5a. Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

PKTSRG16175

WISE Collective Hub

Puketāpapa Strategic Relationships Grant 2016/17 -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

 

LFHW1601-30

WISE Collective Catering and Foodstall Team

2016/17 Love Food Hate Waste Fund  -  Aquitted

Approved

$780.00

 

LG1713-114

Safari Multicultural Playgroup - South

2016/2017 Ōtara-Papatoetoe  Local Grant, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

 

LG1708-113

WISE Collective Hub - North

Kaipatiki Local Grants, Round One, 2016/2017 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1712-109

Ethnic Communities 10th Commemoration of Tangata Tiriti  Programme

2016/2017 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

Applications prior to the 2015/2016 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

 

 


 

 

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two       

LG1911-215

Mt Wellington Playcentre

Legal status:

Other: Affiliated to an Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Continued running of Mt Wellington Playcentre for 2019 (part funding)

Location:

174 Penrose Road, Mount Wellington, Auckland 1060

Summary:

We run six sessions per week per term. A typical day would include providing our children with activities like painting, playdough, water play, sandpit, collage, baking and carpentry - all of which require consumables and varied resources.

 

Several times a term we also host formal adult training sessions for our families - to maintain our licensed status and deepen our knowledge. These ensure sessions are engaging and adhere to Te Whariki early childhood curriculum.

 

As we expand our membership, especially in the under twos category of children, we are required to provide a safe sleeping space for our youngest members - therefore we need to upgrade our sleeping room in early 2019 from having two cots to four sleeping spaces in cot bunks.

Dates:

01/01/2019 - 31/12/2019

Rain dates:

 -

People delivering:

35

People reached:

135 children and their families if the project goes ahead at the increased capacity.

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

We always look for ways to grow our Playcentre membership by promoting our centre. Our centre is listed on the main Playentre website www.playentre.org.uk and we run a public facing Facebook page which will be regularly refreshed with new content. We also work in partnership with the SPACE programme, so that when its members graduate we look to transition them on to Playcentre sessions - this has worked particularly well in 2018.

Community benefits

Identified need:

 

Our Playcentre is busy and utilised every weekday of term time. 

 

We run Playcentre sessions Monday, Wednesday and Friday for mixed-age children from birth up to school age. On Tuesday and Thursday we host three parent and baby/toddler sessions (SPACE sessions run by SPACE NZ Trust) which also use our site and resources. 

Our enrolments have grown in 2018 and we currently have 32 children attending over the three Playcentre sessions. SPACE sessions have been so successful that they are increasing their capacity from 15 to 20 children for each session in 2019.

Identified community outcomes:

 

Playcentre benefits the children who attend by allowing them to learn and grow through play - preparing them for a confident entry into school. 

 

The Playcentre is parent-led and creates a sense of belonging and support for local families - the relationships and friendships we make last for years beyond Playcentre. We also help to develop new parenting skills which are underpinned by a formal education programme. We firmly believe these skills are taken into the family home and beyond by our parents.

 

Additionally as a self-managed centre, the organisational and business skills parents learn also benefit the wider community - including areas like finance, planning, budget management, fundraising, property management, administration, education provision, and leadership.

 

The SPACE programme also benefits parents and babies/toddlers, offering support, practical advice and parenting skills for new parents. Increasing the capacity of these sessions with the installation of new cot bunks will allow this positive effect to reach further into the growing community.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

creating opportunities for our young people - Our community is a safer place

 

At Playcentre we believe that children learn best through their play. It enables them to explore the world, develop their own theories on how things work and get along with children of mixed ages and adults - all in an environment where they are valued and feel safe. 

 

Playcentre children have families who are supporting their learning and maintaining the link between the centre and home environment - something the Ministry of Education and the Education Review Office have highlighted as being a major contributing factor to their future success at school.

 

Playcentre also creates a small community for the families who attend, with opportunities for families to socialise together. Our Playcentre is open to everyone and we believe the positive impact on the families who attend is carried through to the wider community.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

 

 

 

 

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

Māori focus - tikanga (practises), mātauranga (knowledge), reo (language)

Te Whare Tikanga Māori, is a governance body within Playcentre Aotearoa and is recognised as the organisations Partner; this is enabled through Playcentre's commitment to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. 

 

Te Whare Tikanga Māori has identified that ngā mātāpono of Rangatiratanga, Mana, Whanaungatanga and Wairuatanga underpin Playcentre philosophy and ngā wāriu of Aroha, Kaitiakitanga, Manaakitanga, Te Reo, Pono, Tika and Maramatanga guide our actions and behaviours. 

 

Our Playcentre in Mount Wellington incorporates tikanga, mātauranga and reo in all sessions and practices, for example we do karakia, pakiwaitara and waiata for our children regularly and we have adults attending who are proficient in te reo.  We also host Te Kimiora o Tamaki hui (our regional Māori rōpū).

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Our centre is gated for children's safety, but we have an access ramp and an accessible toilet.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Promoting SmokeFree:

Our Playcentre is a smoke free environment. There is signage on the entrance way to support this.

Zero waste minimisation

As standard we minimise water wastage during water play, and all food scraps are composted and used in the vegetable patch. We also recycle materials wherever possible.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

60%

%

%

40%

%

%

%

Financial information

Amount requested:

$4072.00

Requesting grant for:

We are requesting funding for two key element for our Playcentre - both of which are required to meed our Ministry of Education licensing criteria:

 1. The one-off purchase of two bunk cots to enable our under twos capacity to grow from 15 to 20.

2. The funding for education enrichment supplies for 2019 to facilitate a wide variety of painting, craft, collage, carpentry, baking, dress up and reading activities for our children - this is part of our annual expenditure.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

As the cots are a licensing requirement we would go ahead with this critical up-front purchase. We also have a list of required consumable education resources to make available for our children's learning, but this can be managed as a staggered cost throughout the year.

 

For the project to continue we would need to reprioratise centre activities and look for areas to make savings in order to enable us to purchase the cot bunks at the start of 2019. We would then approach other organisations and hold fundraising activities throughout the year to make up the shortfall.

Cost of participation:

Members who attend once a week pay $50 per term per family, members who attend twice a week with $35 koha per term per family.

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$4,071.55

$1,500

$0

$0

 

Expenditure item

Amount

2 x cot bunks

$2,871.55

General education supplies

$1,200

 

Income description

Amount

Member donations

$1,500

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

 

$

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

$

 

 

Total number volunteer hours

Total number specialised volunteer hours

Amount

 

6240

 

$128,232

 

Funding history

 

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

 

Applications prior to the 2015/2016 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

 


 

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two       

LG1911-218

 

KidsCan Charitable Trust

 

Legal status:

Incorporated Society, Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

 

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

 

Project: Raincoats for Kids

 

Location:

Across 18 KidsCan partner schools, located in the Maungakiekie-Tamaki region.

 

Summary:

Raincoats for Kids programme gives children in low decile schools their very own “Warriors” branded raincoats. Often this raincoat is the first new item of clothing a child has ever had, we hear of children sleeping in their coats as they are the warmest piece of clothing they own. Shoes and socks are also available for schools to order if needed.

 

Dates:

04/02/2019 - 30/06/2019

Rain dates:

 -

 

People delivering:

26

People reached:

5361

 

% of participants from Local Board

100%

 

Promotion:

 

 

Community benefits

 

Identified need:

 

 

KidsCan constantly receives feedback from principals and teachers in the community who have children in their classes with no food, footwear, warm or dry clothing and very limited access to healthcare or health items.

 

Identified community outcomes:

 

 

Community well-being and in particular the well being of children is extremely important to KidsCan.  By running our programmes through schools we are encouraging disadvantaged children to attend school, improving their educational outcomes and allowing them the greatest opportunity to reach their full potential in life. This leads to a happier community with more educated young people.  Our programmes are proven to reduce anger, theft and violence - supporting youth who may be at risk can change lives and help break the poverty cycle.

 

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

active participation - Our young people are engaged in the community and have access to a wide range of opportunities

 

Community well-being and in particular the well being of children is extremely important to KidsCan.  By running our programmes through schools we are encouraging disadvantaged children to attend school, improving their educational outcomes and allowing them the greatest opportunity to reach their full potential in life. This leads to a happier community with more educated young people.  Our programmes are proven to reduce anger, theft and violence - supporting youth who may be at risk can change lives and help break the poverty cycle.

 

 

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

 

 

 

 

Demographics

 

Māori outcomes:

Māori participation - Māori priority group, target group, high representation or Māori staff delivering

Maori and Pacifika children make up 74.52% of children attending KidsCan partner schools.   Our programmes significantly improve the well being and educational outcomes for these children.

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - KidsCan partner schools are decile 1-4, if a child is attending one of these partner schools they can take part in our programmes regardless whether they are able bodied or have disabilities.

 

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

 

Promoting SmokeFree:

 

 

Zero waste minimisation

 

 

 

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

 

%

%

100%

 

 

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

 

%

95%

5%

%

%

%

%

 

Financial information

 

Amount requested:

$8000.00

 

Requesting grant for:

We would love funding to purchase raincoats for the children.  Children who are cold and hungry are not able to learn very well, they are distracted, irritable and light headed.  A Massey University study completed in 2010 has proven that our programmes reduce theft and anger - as well as improving attention in class and attendance rates in schools.

 

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Any funding would be greatly appreciated and can be utilised to purchase raincoats for the children.

 

Cost of participation:

Not Applicable

 

 

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

 

$17,423

$9,423

$0

$0

 

 

 

Expenditure item

Amount

 

Raincoats for Kids

$17,423

 

Income description

Amount

 

IOOBY members

$6,138

 

General donations

$2,485

 

Other funding

$800

 

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

 

 

$

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

$

 

 

Total number volunteer hours

Total number specialised volunteer hours

Amount

 

 

 

$

 

Funding history

 

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

 

LG1801-235

Food for Kids

2017/2018 Albert-Eden Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1821-211

Food for Kids

2017/2018 Whau Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$4,000.00

 

LG1820-233

Food for Kids

2017/2018 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$3,000.00

 

LG1808-316

Food for Kids

2017/2018 Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$4,854.00

 

LG1809-233

Food for Kids

2017/2018 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$4,000.00

 

LG1810-230

Food for Kids

2017/2018 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1813-209

Food for Kids

2017/2018 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two  -  Project in progress

Approved

$5,000.00

 

LG1805-231

Food for Kids

2017/2018 Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,000.00

 

LG1811-209

Children's Programmes - Maungakiekie-Tamaki

2017/2018 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

 

LG1710-225

Food for Kids

2016/2017 Manurewa Local Grant, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1708-230

Food for Kids

Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round Two, 2016/2017 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1713-228

Food for Kids

2016/2017 Otara-Papatoetoe Local Grant, Round Two -  Review accountability

Approved

$5,000.00

 

REGCD17-53

Orchards in Schools

Regional Community Development 2016/2017 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

Applications prior to the 2015/2016 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

 

 

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two       

LG1911-220

Panmure Business Association

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Events

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Panmure Basin Fun Day

Location:

On, in and around the Panmure Basin

Summary:

The aim of the day is to showcase the clubs that utilise this area for recreational activity as well as give local community groups and organisation the opportunity to be involved.  Children and family free fun activities are situated at intervals around the Panmure Basin giving children the opportunity to be creative and active as they explore the 3.1 km path that surrounds the Basin.  In 2018, a Recycle Raft Race was added and 5 groups built and competed in the race. The event also highlights the little known natural feature of the Basin to families in greater Auckland.

Dates:

10/02/2019 - 10/02/2019

Rain dates:

 -

People delivering:

200

People reached:

5000

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

Social media

Household flyers

AO sized posters in the town centre

Corflute signs at the Panmure Basin 

Panmure Business Association Newsletter

Community benefits

Identified need:

 

This event has been going since the 1960's and is part of the local history.  In 2016, the original organisers, the Panmure Basin Advisory Committee, were unable to find volunteers who would pull the event together.  The Panmure Business Association had long recognised the value of the event and rallied support from 12 local businesses and organisations.  The group applied to the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board to cover the cost of and event organiser, which they did.  The first event following the new model was in 2017 and proved to be successful.  The event earlier this year had an increased public turnout and was very well received.

Identified community outcomes:

 

Community groups and organisation participation.

Increased public involvement and enjoyment of the activities on offer.

Increased understanding about Panmure Basin as a great recreational facility that is centrally located and accessible to all.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

putting people first - People are cared for and enabled to participate, celebrate and contribute to the community

 

The Panmure Basin Fun Day has been held on the Panmure Basin since the 1960's. The aim of the day is to showcase the clubs  that utilise this area for recreational activity as well as give local community groups and organisation the opportunity to be involved and give the children of Tamaki an interactive fun free day out. The event also highlights the little known natural feature of the Basin to family's in greater Auckland.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Fresh Concept

Event permit, infrastructure, pack in and out

Panmure Lagoon Yacht Club

Sailing on the Basin, the Recycle Raft Race

The Men's Shed

Making and racing cars

YMCA Pool and Stadium

Bouncy castle, kids games

Rotary Club of South Auckland

Pirate activity trail

Panmure Library

Library bus and kids activities

Panmure Historic Society

Informing people about the history of the Basin

Uriera Performing Cultural Group

Performance and Maori cultural activities

Tamaki Estuary Protection Society

Environmental awareness, promoting Panmure Basin clean ups

Tamaki WRAP

Recycling and environmental information

Skate School

Skate Board Competition

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - The Panmure Basin walkway is accessible to people with disabilities with the exception of the steep hill that leads to Ireland Rd.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Promoting SmokeFree:

This is a large, open space area that would be extremely difficult to ensure that it was smoke free.

We would be happy for Auckland Council to supply us with Smoke Free signs that we would place at strategic locations such as the entry/exit points around the 3.1km pathway.

Zero waste minimisation

Waste and recycle bins will be placed in the main activation points.  On the day we have litter cleaners make sure there is no loose rubbish lying around.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

Financial information

Amount requested:

$15000.00

Requesting grant for:

Event Management

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

 

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$15,000

$0

$25,185

$2,000

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Event Management

$15,000

Income description

Amount

 

$

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Mt Wellington Foundation Ltd

$25,185

Pending

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

$

 

 

Total number volunteer hours

Total number specialised volunteer hours

Amount

 

200

 

$4,110

Funding history

 

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

 

LG1911-220

Panmure Basin Fun Day

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

 

NCE1811-003

Panmure Basin Fun Day

2017/2018 Events - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki -  Acquitted

Approved

$15,000.00

 

NCE1811-002

Panmure Christmas Street Party

2017/2018 Events - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

 

LG1711-240

Panmure's Christmas Street Party

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two, 2016/17 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

NCE1711-001

Panmure Basin Fun Day

Events - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki non-contestable, 2016/2017 -  Review accountability

Approved

$15,000.00

 


 

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two       

LG1911-223

 

Parenting Place

 

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

 

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

 

Project: Toolbox parenting groups in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

 

Location:

Community venues, social service agencies, churches, and private homes within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area.  A large proportion of these courses will happen at the Parenting Place, 300 Great South Road, Greenlane.

 

Summary:

Through our range of six-session Toolbox parenting courses, we provide practical parenting skills & strategies that can be implemented in any family situation, regardless of income, ethnicity, education, or ability.  In the Building Awesome Whānau Toolbox course, evidence-informed parenting techniques are presented in a way that is understandable, relevant and culturally appropriate.  This course is being widely utilised with at-risk and vulnerable families in conjunction with the many social service agencies we collaborate with.  Our aim is to increase the number of at-risk families completing a parenting programme and reduce disparities in health and social outcomes within this sector.  We plan to run 28 courses in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki over the next 12 months benefitting 252 parents and their families.

 

Dates:

01/01/2019 - 13/12/2019

Rain dates:

 -

 

People delivering:

16

People reached:

252

 

% of participants from Local Board

100%

 

Promotion:

We will promote all the Toolbox courses on the Parenting Place website, social media, community notice boards, ECE centres, schools, and other places in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki community.  Toolbox courses are well known and don't require high amounts of promotion.  The social service agencies and community partners we work with also promote courses on our behalf to their contacts.

 

Community benefits

 

Identified need:

 

 

Studies show raising the confidence and competence of parents through parenting programmes has positive effects in reducing negative outcomes like child abuse, teenage pregnancy, and youth suicide.  Sustained increase in demand by participants, as well as the continued enthusiasm and support for our programmes by our community partners, is evidence Toolbox parenting courses are meeting an important need.  Each year more community groups request we train their people as Toolbox facilitators, or run Toolbox courses on their behalf.  Last year 75% of courses were run through community and social service organisations.

 

Identified community outcomes:

 

 

The community outcomes Toolbox courses in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki will provide are:

1. A foundation for long-term systematic social change through its impact upon families involved.  For an alarmingly large number of attendees, the material is completely new.  They may be several generations removed from functional family life and for them, the knowledge presented is revolutionary.  As individual lives are transformed through parenting education, the community is transformed.  

2. Ensuring that every person who wants to improve their wellbeing through parenting by attending a Toolbox course is able to.  

3. Ensuring the courses are engaging, relevant, up-to-date, applicabole to life and enjoyable so that most participants attend at least 5 out of 6 sessions.

 

It is our firm belief that our delivery of effective, empowering programmes and resources makes a measurable difference to the lives of children and parents. This is evidenced in feedback from recipients, community groups and social service agencies we collaborate with along with and external reviews of the Toolbox programme.

 

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

putting people first - People are cared for and enabled to participate, celebrate and contribute to the community

 

The aim of the Toolbox parenting programme is to help parents create strong and healthy families, by providing them with a 'toolbox' of parenting education skills and strategies.  These skills enable parents to provide a safe, caring and nurturing environment in which to raise their family.  As parents' lives are transformed through receiving parenting education, neighbourhoods will also be transformed.  Over the six weeks of a Toolbox course, the participants often form connections and bonds that extend past the end of the course.  In this way, Toolbox courses have a flow-on effect that increases participation in and contributes to building strong communities.

 

 

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

 

Solomon Group - Panmure

Social service agency hosting & promoting Toolbox parenting courses.

 

Tamaki Community Development Trust

Social service agency hosting & promoting Toolbox parenting courses.

 

Roskill South Oasis

Social service agency hosting & promoting Toolbox parenting courses.

 

Merivale Onehunga

Social service agency hosting & promoting Toolbox parenting courses.

 

Glen Innes Family Centre

Social service agency hosting & promoting Toolbox parenting courses.

 

St Mary's Church

Community venue hosting & promoting Toolbox parenting courses.

 

Demographics

 

Māori outcomes:

Māori participation - Māori priority group, target group, high representation or Māori staff delivering

The Building Awesome Whānau Toolbox course is designed specifically for Māori families.

It was developed in collaboration with Māori staff, Toolbox facilitators, educators, kaumātua, social service agencies and Māori families. This Toolbox considers needs, strengths, and socio-economic nature of Māori. The best evidence-informed parenting techniques and insights are presented in a way that is understandable, relevant and culturally appropriate.

Particular attention is paid to using appropriate and understandable language in all material.

Although designed for Māori it has proven to have appeal and efficacy with a wide range of vulnerable families. Our ultimate aim is that it will increase the number of at-risk families completing a parenting programme and reduce disparities in health and social outcomes within this sector.

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Toolbox parenting course are open and accessible to any parent seeking help and support.

 

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

 

Promoting SmokeFree:

Toolbox courses aim to put the wellbeing of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki families and young people first.  Toolbox participants receive messages about the importance of creating family values and living by them.  Through this process, parents are encouraged to examine their beliefs, habits, routines and home life and this often leads to a reduction in negative habits such as smoking and drinking happening in the home.

 

Zero waste minimisation

Not specifically.

 

 

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

 

%

%

100%

 

 

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

 

%

%

30%

70%

%

%

%

 

Financial information

 

Amount requested:

$4516.00

 

Requesting grant for:

If successful, a grant from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board would be used to contribute towards additional fee subsidies for low income parents, course manuals, coordinator manuals and volunteer facilitator expenses.

 

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

If only part of our project is funded, we will still run Toolbox courses in Maungakiekie-Tāmaiki however we may deliver fewer courses than the number requested by the community and will not be able to offer as many subsidies as needed.

 

Cost of participation:

Toolbox course fees are subsidised by our fundraising - participants are charged $75 per individual and $110 per couple (incl. GST).  We often subsidise this fee further, sometimes up to 100%, if funding allows.

 

 

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

 

$15,279

$14,487

$18,765

$1,500

 

 

 

Expenditure item

Amount

 

Subsidies for low-income participants

$5,070

 

Volunteer expenses

$5,880

 

Course manuals

$2,621

 

Coordinator expenses

$1,708

 

Income description

Amount

 

Fees from participants

$14,487

 

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

 

Ministry of Social Development funding

$13,765

Approved

 

COGS - Auckland City

$1,000

Approved

 

David Levene Foundation

$1,500

Approved

 

Foundation North

$1,000

Pending

 

CR Stead Trust

$1,500

Approved

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

$

 

 

Total number volunteer hours

Total number specialised volunteer hours

Amount

 

 

504

$10,338

Funding history

 

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

 

QR1913-3-1022

Provision of Toolbox parenting courses, focusing on Maori & vulnerable families

2018/2019 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1918-106

Attitude Life Skills Presentations for Waiheke High School 2019

2018/2019 Waiheke Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$500.00

 

QR1905-105

Attitude LifeSkills and Well Being Programmes for Henderson-Massey Schools 2019

2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Quick Response, Round One -  Awaiting funding agreement

Approved

$1,500.00

 

QR1920-118

Attitude Lifeskills & Wellbeing Programmes for Waitemata Schools 2019

2018/2019 Waitematā Quick Response, Round One -  SME assessment completed

Declined

$0.00

 

QR1821-316

Provision of Toolbox parenting courses

2017/2018 Whau Quick Response, Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,987.00

 

LG1809-230

Provision of Toolbox parenting courses, focusing on Maori & vulnerable families.

2017/2018 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,707.00

 

LG1813-230

Provision of Toolbox parenting courses, focusing on Maori & vulnerable families.

2017/2018 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two  -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1813-225

Attitude Mental Health & Wellbeing Presentations for Otara-Papatoetoe Schools

2017/2018 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two  -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

 

LG1801-212

Attitude Mental Health and wellbeing presentations in Albert-Eden schools 2018

2017/2018 Albert-Eden Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,505.00

 

LG1814-214

Mental health & wellbeing presentations for Papakura High Schools

2017/2018 Papakura Local Grant, Round 2 -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,500.00

 

LG1806-208

Mental Health and Wellbeing Presentations for Hibiscus and Bay Schools

2017/2018 Hibiscus and Bays Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,073.00

 

QR1817-207

Attitude Mental Health and Wellbeing Presentations at Upper Harbour Schools

2017/2018 Upper Harbour Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1807-301

Attitude Mental Health & Wellbeing Presentations for Howick Schools

2017/2018 Howick Local Grants, Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$5,000.00

 

QR1803-303

Toolbox parenting courses in Franklin

2017/2018 Franklin Quick Response, Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1811-308

Attitude Mental Health and Wellbeing Presentations in Maungakiekie/Tamaki schools 2018

2017/2018 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00

 

QR1815-305

Attitude Mental Health and Wellbeing Presentations in Puketapapa Schools

2017/2018 Puketāpapa Quick Response, Round Three -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

 

LG1810-207

Provision of Toolbox parenting courses, focusing on Maori & vulnerable families.

2017/2018 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,400.00

 

LG1807-309

Provision of Toolbox parenting courses in Howick.

2017/2018 Howick Local Grants, Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

QR1812-208

Attitude Life-Skills Presentations in Orakei District High Schools

2017/2018 Ōrākei Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$3,000.00

 

LG1810-201

Mental health & wellbeing presentations for Manurewa High Schools

2017/2018 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,420.00

 

QR1809-204

Mental health & wellbeing presentations for young people in Mangere-Otahuhu schools.

2017/2018 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

 

LG1801-138

Delivery of Attitude life-skills presentations in Albert-Eden schools

2017/2018 Albert-Eden Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1811-116

Attitude life-skills and wellbeing presentations in Maungakiekie/Tamaki schools for 2018

2017/2018 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

QR1805-107

Attitude Mental Health & Wellbeing Presentations for Henderson & Massey High Schools

2017/2018 Henderson-Massey Quick Response, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

 

LG1815-101

Attitude life-skills and wellbeing presentations in Puketāpapa schools for 2018

2017/2018 Puketāpapa Local Grants, Round One -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1714-206

Attitude Life Skills presentations for Papakura Schools

2016/2017 Papakura Local Grant, Round Two -  Review accountability

Approved

$3,000.00

 

LG1710-215

Provision of Toolbox Parenting Courses, focusing on Māori & vulnerable families

2016/2017 Manurewa Local Grant, Round Two -  Review accountability

Approved

$3,000.00

 

LG1707-204

Mental health & wellbeing presentations for Howick Local Board High Schools

2016/2017 Howick Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

 

QR1706-310

Attitude Life Skills Training Presentations at Hibiscus Coast and Bay High Schools

Hibiscus and Bays Quick Response, Round Three, 2016/2017 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1710-208

Mental health & wellbeing presentations for Manurewa schools

2016/2017 Manurewa Local Grant, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$3,671.00

 

QR1718-304

Attitude Life Skills Presentations at Waiheke High School

Waiheke Quick Response, Round Three, 2016/2017 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

QR1720-309

Attitude life-skills presentations at Waitemata High Schools

2016/2017 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

QR1717-303

Attitude Life Skills Training Presentations at Upper Harbour High Schools

Upper Harbour Quick Response, Round Three, 2016/17 -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,000.00

 

REGCD17-26

Building Awesome Whanau Toolbox parenting groups in 2017

Regional Community Development 2016/2017 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

QR1713-222

Toolbox parenting courses especially targeting Maori and vulnerable families in Manukau.

2016/2017 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,975.00

 

QR1721-233

Parenting courses specifically developed for high needs, at-risk parents and caregivers.

2016/2017 Whau Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$500.00

 

QR1712-208

Attitude Life-Skills Presentations in Orakei District High Schools

2016/2017 Ōrākei Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

 

QR1718-205

Attitude Life Skills Presentations at Waiheke High School

Waiheke Quick Response, Round Two, 2016/2017 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

QR1706-201

Attitude Life Skills Training Presentations at Hibiscus Coast and Bay High Schools

Hibiscus and Bays Quick Response, Round Two, 2016/2017 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

QR1720-214

Attitude life-skills presentations at Waitemata High Schools

2016/2017 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1709-116

Mental health and wellbeing presentations for young people in Mangere-Otahuhu schools.

2016/2017 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grant, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,800.00

 

LG1715-102

Attitude life-skills and wellbeing presentations in Puketāpapa schools

Puketāpapa Local Grants, Round One, 2016/17 -  Review accountability

Approved

$1,000.00

 

LG1611-239

Mental health & wellbeing presentations and resources designed to increase wellbeing in young people.

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two, 2015/16 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1607-245

Mental health & wellbeing presentations and resources designed to build resilience in young people.

2015/2016 Howick Local Grant, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,353.00

 

QR1620-539

Attitude life-skills presentations at Waitemata High Schools

2015/2016 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Four -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1606-231

Mental health & wellbeing presentations and resources designed to increase wellbeing in young people.

Hibiscus and Bays Local Grants, Round Two, 2015/16  -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1617-209

Attitude life-skills presentations at Upper Harbour Local Board high schools.

Upper Harbour Local Grants, Round Two, 2015/16 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1614-204

Mental health and wellbeing presentations and resources designed to build resilience in young people

2015/2016 Papakura Local Grant, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,400.00

 

QR1601-433

Attitude life-skills presentations at Albert-Eden high schools

2015/2016 Albert-Eden Quick Response, Round Five -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,100.00

 

QR1618-325

Attitude presentations at Waiheke High School

Waiheke Quick Response, Round Three, 2015/16 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1610-219

Provision of Toolbox parenting courses, especially targeting Māori and vulnerable families

2015/2016 Manurewa Local Grant, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,640.00

 

LG1610-209

Mental health and wellbeing presentations and resources designed to build resilience in young people.

2015/2016 Manurewa Local Grant, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,797.00

 

LG1603-239

Provision of Toolbox Parenting Courses, especially targeting vulnerable families

2015/2016 Franklin Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

LG1621-115

Provision of parenting courses specifically developed for high needs, at-risk parents and caregivers

2015/2016 Whau Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,000.00

 

LG1606-153

Youth development and mental health programmes for Auckland region schools 2015/16

Hibiscus and Bays Local Grants, Round One, 2015/16 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

 

Applications prior to the 2015/2016 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

 

 


 

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two       

LG1911-224

 

Kāhui Tū Kaha

 

Legal status:

Charitable Trust, Limited Liability Company, Other: Kahui Tū Kaha is a Registered Charity and Limited Liability Company owned by Affinity Services Charitable Trust. Affinity Services Charitable Trust is under the auspices of Te Runanga o Ngati Whatua

Activity focus:

Community

 

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

 

Project: Oranga: Wellbeing and Lifestyle

 

Location:

Auckland Council community venues:  Onehunga Community Centre Kitchen Hub, Church Street, Onehunga; Te Oro Arts Centre, Line Road, Glen Innes;  Royal Oak Community Gardens, Erson Ave, Royal Oak; other venues and locations as required.

 

Summary:

Pathways to healthier living, greater skills and confidence, community inclusion and employment, for adults who have mental health concerns, through Te Whare Tapa Wha and the core values of Kāhui Tū Kaha:  manaakitanga, rangatiratanga and whakawanaungatanga.  Providing community based programmes that meet the needs and interests of Maori, Pasifika peoples and migrant and refugee groups, cater for diversity and are inclusive of all.  Participants will develop skills and knowledge in areas that enhance health and lifestyle, including healthy cooking, organic growing and recycling, personal development, health topics and pre-employment skills.  Specific content will be arrived at through targeting the needs of different groups and all programmes will include skill and knowledge-based certificates that will contribute to CVs for employment.

 

Dates:

14/01/2019 - 20/12/2019

Rain dates:

 -

 

People delivering:

Four experienced staff

People reached:

100

 

% of participants from Local Board

100%

 

Promotion:

Through our networks via email, brochures, on websites, and if possible, newspaper articles

 

Community benefits

 

Identified need:

 

 

We have been involved in a pilot study through which we have established where there are accessible, existing classes and groups for people with mental health concerns and where there are a lack of opportunities, and what some of the barriers might be to accessing existing programmes.  The three programmes that will be included in the project are not currently well catered for in a way that is accessible for people who are recovering from mental health issues.  We have trialled pilot programmes to establish needs and interests, and found that they were well attended.  Some areas that we will target and address relate to establishing confidence through safe practices (eg. in cooking) and social abilities within different contexts.

 

Identified community outcomes:

 

 

Participants attending the programme will gain knowledge and skills which improve their wellbeing, confidence and social connection within the community.  They will have the knowledge and resources to create a healthier lifestyle through the topic areas of the project and will have benefited from the environment provided which is enhanced through the core principles of Kahui Tū Kaha services. This will lead to greater community confidence and participation.

 

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

putting people first - People are cared for and enabled to participate, celebrate and contribute to the community

 

Our programmes are based on the core principles of Kāhui Tū Kaha:  manaakitanga, enhancing the mana of others; rangatiratanga, supporting people's self-determination; and whakawhanaungatanga, establishing relationships, sense of belonging, family connections and kinship.  Our project is to further develop selected programmes that have been piloted and proven successful, in order to create greater opportunities for skill development, subject knowledge and community connection, leading to community confidence, integration and greater wellbeing.  Three programmes are targeted for development:  "Cooking: Around the World Healthy Eating - Levels 1 and 2",  "Oranga: Organic Gardening and Recycling", and  "Living the Vision: Tūruapō Tumeke - personal development, health topics and pre-employment skills".  Programmes in the project will be based in Onehunga, Royal Oak, and Glen Innes/ Panmure.  Participants in the programmes of the project will be adults 18 years and over who have mental health needs ranging from mild to significant.  Referral will take place through ADHB Community Mental Health facilities of Manaaki House, Cornwall House, Loto Fale and Manawanui; and through our multi-team referral process.  Others will be self-referring under their GP, as anyone over 18 years is eligible to attend to improve their holistic wellbeing.  People who attend our programmes find existing community programmes inaccessible without support.  Barriers can include lower functioning cognition and coordination due to symptoms and medication; social anxiety, lack of finance, and lack of confidence in abilities.  Our project will provide greater adherence in pathways that lead to full on-going participation and inclusion.

 

 

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

 

N/A

 

 

Demographics

 

Māori outcomes:

Māori led - either a Māori organisation that is applying or Māori directed (came about as a request from Māori).

We are an iwi organisation and all of our programmes are delivered using Māori frameworks and kaupapa.  This includes Māori practices of karakia, waiata, manaakitanga, rangatiratanga and whakawhanaungatanga within the course of our sessions, and use of Te Whare Tapa Wha model of health.  Approaches used are based on the research of Dr Mason Durie and other Māori health researchers.  Two of four team members are Maori and the project leader has a bicultural upbringing and background.  We have access to ongoing advice from our Pou Tāhuhu Kaupapa Māori Development Manager, kaumatua and kuia within the organisation.  Our team have a proven record of assisting Māori people into fuller lives beyond our service, which has been documented in evaluations.

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Our primary client group includes people with psychiatric disabilities and have physical disabilities.  Venues chosen are accessible and we are inclusive of all people.

 *Please note regarding next question:  Ngāti Whātua have stated that they seek to use Kāhui Tū Kaha as a means of discharging their responsibility to manaakitanga to all people in their rohe.

 

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

 

Promoting SmokeFree:

Our team are all certificated in smoking cessation and the project leader is certified to prescribe nicotine replacement products.  Our organisation requires us to actively promote options to gain support in quit-line initiatives each three months with each person involved in our programmes.  The risks of smoking and the benefits of being a non-smoker will be included as a topic in the "Oranga: Wellbeing and Lifestyle programmes, as this is a natural fit.  In our focus on Te Whare Tapa Whā, the role of smoking in disease and benefits of being smoke free will be explored through each of the four taha.  Healthy smoke-free city environments will also be included as a topic.

 

Zero waste minimisation

Our "Oranga: Organic Gardening and Recycling" programme of the project will directly target the transformation of waste products into useful/ reusable resources

 

 

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

 

%

%

100%

 

 

 

0-5 years