I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 12 December 2018

4:30pm

Council Chamber
Orewa Service Centre
50 Centreway Road
Orewa

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

Members

Chris Bettany

 

 

David Cooper

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Caitlin Watson

 

 

Vicki Watson

 

 

Mike Williamson

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Vivienne Sullivan

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

6 December 2018

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 427 3317

Email: vivienne.sullivan@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 DELEGATIONS HIBISCUS AND BAYS LOCAL BOARD 2016-2019

 

Portfolio

Description

Resolution

Local Board Members

Minor landowner approvals and landlord approvals including events

To confirm if the matter is minor for staff to exercise their delegation for landowner approvals

To approve minor landlord approvals

HB/2016/190

Julia Parfitt -Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald - Deputy Chairperson  

Gary Holmes - Alternate

Transport Information Group

Discuss transport issues/projects

HB/2016/190

Julia Parfitt -Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald - Deputy Chairperson  

David Cooper - Alternate

Resource consent applications 

Input into notification decisions for resource consent applications 

HB/2016/190

Gary Holmes 

Janet Fitzgerald  - Deputy Chairperson

David Cooper - Alternate

Notified Resource Consents

Notified Plan Changes

Notices of Requirement

To prepare and submit local board views and speak to those local board views at any hearings

HB/2018/55

Gary Holmes or

Julia Parfitt –Chairperson or

Janet Fitzgerald - Deputy Chairperson  

 

Urgent Decision Making

To make decisions on matters that cannot wait until the next ordinary meeting of the local board

HB/2016/195

Julia Parfitt – Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald-Deputy Chairperson

Christina Bettany - Alternates

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

HB/2018/96

Chris Bettany

Julia Parfitt – Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald - Deputy Chairperson

Arts, Community and Events

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

HB/2018/99

Chris Bettany

Caitlin Watson

Mike Williamson - Alternates

Parks, Sport and Recreation

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

HB/2018/99

David Cooper

Mike Williamson

Caitlin Watson - Alternate-

Service, Strategy and Information

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

HB/2018/99

Gary Holmes

Julia Parfitt – Chairperson

Vicki Watson - Alternate

Economic Development

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

HB/2018/100

Janet Fitzgerald – Deputy Chairperson

Gary Holmes

Vicki Watson - Alternate

Community Facilities and CF: Leases

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme/s

HB/2018/122

Julia Parfitt – Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald-Deputy Chairperson

Caitlin Watson - Alternates

Silverdale Led Heritage Character Design Guidelines

To approve any minor changes

 

Janet Fitzgerald – Deputy Chairperson

Caitlin Watson

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report 2017/2018

To approve any minor changes

 

Janet Fitzgerald – Deputy Chairperson

 

 

Appointments to outside organisations

 

Organisation

Local Board Member

Vaughan Homestead (Torbay Historical Society)

Julia Parfitt - Chairperson

Chris Bettany - Alternate

Victor Eaves Management Committee

Mike Williamson

Local Government New Zealand Zone One (Auckland and Northland)

Janet Fitzgerald  - Deputy Chairperson

 

Business Improvement Districts (BIDS)

 

Destination Orewa Beach

Vicki Watson

David Cooper - Alternate

Torbay

Chris Bettany

Julia Parfitt - Chairperson- Alternate

Browns Bay

Chris Bettany

Gary Holmes - Alternate

Mairangi Bay

David Cooper

Julia Parfitt - Chairperson- Alternate

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         7

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          7

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       7

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          7

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

11        Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board December 2018 9

12        Proposed Regional Public Transport Plan                                                               17

13        Land owner application for Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club Incorporated - storage in Montrose Terrace Reserve                                                                                         37

14        Adoption of the Whangaparāoa Centre Plan                                                           47

15        Orewa Citizens Advice Bureau – extensive internal refurbishment.                    87

16        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Facility Grant 2018/2019                                      99

17        Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation                                                                  109

18        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 May - 31 October 2018                                                                                                                                     117

19        Ward Councillors Update                                                                                         125

20        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     127

21        Record of Workshop Meetings                                                                                131  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 21 November 2018, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board December 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/23174

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board members on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2        This report covers:

·        A summary of the board’s transport capital fund

·        A summary of consultation activity

·        Traffic Control Committee decisions

·        An update on issues raised

·        Update - Speed Limits Bylaw

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport December 2018 update report.

 

Horopaki / Context

3        This report updates the local board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.  It summarises consultations and Traffic Control Committee results and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

4        AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

5        The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·        be safe

·        not impede network efficiency

·        be in the road corridor (although projects running in parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

6.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s share of the LBTCF allocated with effect from 1 July 2018, as per the funding policy, is $1,237,015 per annum.

 

 

7.       The total remaining in the current electoral term to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is $1,144,389. However, at the end of the previous term the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board elected to spend just 50 per cent of the election year’s allocation. Should the local board choose to do so again, with 50 percent of $1,237,015 being $618,507.50, the balance available would be $525,881.50.

8.       The table below reflects the status of projects to which LBTCF has already been committed.

 

Status update on current of Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

 

Project

Description

Current status

Changes since last  update

Funds allocated in current political term

091 – Mairangi Bay Art Walk

Construction of footpath amenities on Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay from the retail centre to Mairangi Bay Reserve.

Completed

No

$17,508

411 – Torbay Revitalisation

Upgrade of Torbay town centre.

Completed

No

$598,787

558 - Orewa Pedestrian Crossings

Facilities to improve pedestrian safety at the intersections of Moana and Moenui Avenues with the Hibiscus Coast Highway.

Completed

No

$127,510

578 - Orewa Boulevard Stage 3

Extension of existing Boulevard concept from Riverside Road to Empire Road.

Discussed at a workshop on 25 October. A second workshop to be scheduled for early 2019.

Yes

$1,330,000

579 - Torbay Parking Stage 2

Construction of 5 car park spaces on the Auckland Council reserve at 1022 Beach Road, Torbay.

 

Detailed design completed and contractor appointed. Work commenced in October was completed mid-November.

Yes

$56,000

580 – Town Centre Slow Zones

Traffic Calming in the town centres of Mairangi Bay and Torbay

Discussed at a workshop on 1 November.

Yes

$689,731

644 - Centennial Park Path

Auckland Council led Greenways project

in Centennial Park, Campbells Bay.

Detailed design and

construction

Yes

$220,000

 

 

 

9.       Post construction safety audits following the completion of Project 558 - Orewa Pedestrian Crossings, have been undertaken for each of the intersections involved. Recommendations for minor changes at the intersection of Hibiscus Coast Highway / Moana Avenue have been addressed and this report has been shared with the local board and Destination Orewa Beach. The report on the Hibiscus Coast Highway / Moenui Avenue intersection will also be circulated once this becomes available.

10.     Construction of Project 579 - Torbay Parking Stage 2 began in early October 2018 and was completed in mid-November 2018.

11.     The photographs below show the completed work area:

 

 

12.     Project 578 - Orewa Boulevard Stage 3, was discussed with members at a workshop on 25 October 2018, with members suggesting changes to the draft design presented. A speed reduction on Hibiscus Coast Highway and those roads intersecting within the Boulevard area will be included in AT’s Speed Limit Bylaw Review which will be subject to public consultation during early 2019. A further update on this, design options and indicative costings will be discussed with members in early 2019.

13.     Project 580 – Town Centre Slow Zones for Mairangi Bay and Torbay were discussed with members at a workshop on 1 November 2018. Speed reductions in these town centres will be included in AT’s Speed Limit Bylaw Review which will be subject to public consultation during early 2019. A further update on this, design options and indicative costings will also be discussed with members in early 2019.

14.     At its meeting on 19 September 2018 the local board resolved to allocate $5,400 from the funds remaining in its LBTCF towards the supply and installation of 14 arm rests on seven seats located in the area between 292 and 350 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa (Resolution number HB/2018/171). Manufacture of the armrests is proceeding and it is anticipated that they will be installed prior to Christmas 2018.

 

 

15.     At its meeting on 17 October 2018 the local board resolved to allocate $220,000 from the funds remaining in its LBTCF to detailed design and construction for a Greenways path in Centennial Park, Campbells Bay (Resolution number HB/2018/166). The project is being led by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities team, which will provide progress updates to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

16.     Over the last reporting period, AT has invited the local board to provide their feedback on the following proposal:

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

Bankside/Manuel Roads and Stoney Butler Crescent in Silverdale

Proposed pedestrian safety and connectivity improvements

Documentation describing changes to improve pedestrian safety and connectivity at the intersection of Bankside/Manuel Roads and Stoney Butler Crescent, Silverdale, was sent to Hibiscus Coast subdivision members on 21 November 2018 with a request for comment no later than 5 December 2018.

 

Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale

Proposed footpath

Documentation describing the installation of footpath on Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale, was forwarded to members on 22 November with a request for comments no later than 5 December 2018.

 

Maire Road, Orewa

Proposed footpath

Documentation describing a proposal to install a footpath on Maire Road, Orewa, to improve pedestrian connectivity and safety, was forwarded to members on 22 November with a request for comment no later than Wednesday, 5 December 2018.

 

Traffic Control Committee decisions

17.     AT's resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced. Decisions made by AT’s Traffic Control Committee in relation to regulatory processes relevant to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board during November are listed below:

 

Decision

Report Type

Nature of Restriction

Decision

Ramsgate Terrace, Matipo Road, Torbay

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Bus Shelter, Road Hump, Give-Way Control, Edge Lines

Carried

Fitzwilliam Drive, Stredwick Drive, Mairangi Bay

Temporary Traffic and Parking Controls

Bus stop

Carried

Beach Road, Anzac Road, Clyde Road, Whitby Crescent, Ramsgate Terrace, Browns Bay Road, Sidmouth Street, Mairangi Bay

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

No Stopping At All Times, P60 Parking, Motorcycle Parking, P120 Parking, P90 Parking, Mobility Parking, Angle Parking, Loading Zone, Traffic Island, Roundabout, Pedestrian Crossing, No Passing

Carried

Beach Road / Ramsgate Terrace / Sidmouth Street, Mairangi Bay

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

Carried

Edward Avenue, Alice Avenue, George Lowe Place, Orewa

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

Carried

 

Issues Raised by Elected Members

18.     Most issues raised by elected members and local board staff are resolved promptly by AT’s Elected Member Relationship Manager. Those which require further investigation are responded to by the relevant department of AT through its customer response team. The following list summarises these issues to 23 November 2018:

 

 

Location

Issue

Status

1

Nor’East Drive, Northcross

Footpath damage on Nor’East Drive, Northcross.

Member Bettany raised concerns about extensive damage to the footpath on Nor’East Drive, Northcross, on 21 August 2018. Member Bettany was advised on 22 November 2018 that the trip hazard had been repaired and the area made safe.

2

Inverness Road, Browns Bay

Loading Zone at 8 Inverness Road, Browns Bay.

Member Cooper advised on 17 October 2018 that New World staff are using the loading zone adjacent to the supermarket at 8 Inverness Road, Browns Bay, for the storage of forklifts and waste bins, creating health and safety issues. AT's parking enforcement team advise that their warrants limit them to ticketing registered vehicles only, and that forklifts are not registered vehicles so they are not able to intervene in this instance. Referred on to Compliance Team/Network Operations for further assistance.

3

East Coast Road, Torbay

Request for interim safety improvements at the intersection of East Coast and Glenvar Roads, Torbay.

On 2 November 2018 Member Parfitt requested an investigation into safety improvements at the intersection of Glenvar and East Coast Roads, Torbay, ahead of the realignment and upgrade of Glenvar Road, following reports that drivers were taking risks when exiting Glenvar Road onto East Coast Road. On 23 November 2018 Member Parfitt was advised that AT's engineers understand that the current situation can be frustrating, and they do not condone members of the public putting themselves at risk, but given that an upgrade of the intersection is identified in the Regional Land Transport Programme and scheduled for implementation in 2020, the cost of interim safety improvements can’t be justified at this time. It was noted that the speed limit of 50km/h is marked by both road signage and road markings to remind motorists of the speed limit at this location.

4

Spur / Duck Creek Roads, Stillwater

Request for safety improvements on Spur / Duck Creek Roads, Stillwater.

Member Parfitt asked on 9 November 2018 on behalf of the Stillwater Community Association that the road into Stillwater from East Coast Road (Spur/Duck Creek) be double yellow lined all the way, making it a no passing road. The Association also asked for the selective placement of speed humps, the installation of No Overtaking signage at strategic points along the road, the installation of signage to warn motorists against cutting corners, and a focused social media campaign to get this message across, the Association offering to assist with the latter.  Referred to Traffic Engineering for investigation.

5

Beach Road, Torbay

Request for improved footpath safety on Beach Road, Torbay.

On 20 November 2018 Member Parfitt asked for assistance to resolve a request from a Torbay resident that safety on the footpath on Beach Road, between Long Street and the beach, be investigated. The customer advises that footpath has been subject to a lack of repair and maintenance for some time and now (and most likely for decades) poses a risk to pedestrian safety. Referred to RCD initially, and then referred on to Traffic Operations for further assistance.

 

Other Auckland Transport news

Update – Speed Limits Bylaw

19.     AT is fast-tracking implementation of a speed management plan for Auckland and delivering an ambitious $700 million safety infrastructure acceleration programme, estimated to reduce deaths and serious injury by up to 18% over an initial three-year period, and by up to 60% by 2028. It will deliver major, minor and mass-action safety engineering projects, including speed management on high-risk routes and locations across the network.

20.     This work is being enabled by the Regional Fuel Tax (RFT), which contributes $210 million of the total $700 million capital expenditure.

21.     The speed management programme is being delivered through two main tranches of work:

·        An accelerated Safe Speed Programme – to be delivered from December 2018, involving projects that were implemented prior to the development of the bylaw. This tranche has already been communicated to all local boards. 

·        The safe speed programme – to be delivered through the Speed Limits Bylaw. The bylaw will be consulted on Auckland-wide early in 2019.

22.     There will also be associated projects such as the Residential Speed Management programme in:

·        Te Atatu South

·        Papakura (Rosehill area).

23.     In addition to the Bylaw and Accelerated Speed Programmes, improvements are also proposed along Dairy Flat Highway as a result of AT’s road safety network review. Details of this work and project updates are available on AT's website.

24.     The Speed Limits Bylaw is the legal process for changing speed limits, as per Section 27.1 of the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017.

25.     The process involves AT:

·        setting the urban boundary (which determines the areas of standard urban and rural speed limits)

·        listing exceptions to these standard speeds, which include special circumstances such as School Zones. 

26.     After determining the proposed changes, and in accordance with the special consultative procedure governed by the Local Government Act 2002, and the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, AT will be consulting on the bylaw as a whole, not on individual roads, in late 2018/early 2019.

27.     The consultation will last for approximately one month and members of the public will be able to submit their views on the proposed changes. Those who wish to be heard by a Hearing Panel will also be given the opportunity to do so.

28.     Following consultation, the feedback will be analysed and any required changes made. The AT Board will make and pass the new bylaw with the recommended changes.

29.     Once consultation on the bylaw is complete and the bylaw is adopted, there will be further steps before the new speed limits can be implemented. Speed limit changes will require changes of signage and sometimes supporting engineering measures to encourage driving at slower speeds. These measures could include installing raised zebra crossings, raised tables, speed humps and narrowing roads.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

30.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

31.     There are no financial implications in receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

32.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

33.     AT will provide a further report to the local board in February 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Ellen Barrett - Elected Member Relationship Manage, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Proposed Regional Public Transport Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/23816

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board the opportunity to provide formal feedback on the proposed Regional Public Transport Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport is required to review its ten-year Regional Public Transport Plan every three years. The plan describes the services that are integral to Auckland’s public transport network for the next 10-year period. This report requests the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board give feedback on the plan, with special emphasis on the following four focus areas:

·        Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

·        Improving customer access to public transport

·        Improving Māori responsiveness

·        Harnessing emerging technologies

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the Regional Public Transport Plan focus areas of:

i)        Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

ii)       Improving customer access to public transport

iii)      Improving Māori responsiveness

iv)      Harnessing emerging technologies

b)      provide additional feedback on local specific interests.

 

Horopaki / Context

3.       The Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act. It sets out the changes to Auckland’s public transport. Transport is a key component of a city’s success. Auckland is growing and as more people live and visit here, the number of trips taken on our transport networks is increasing. The space available for transport networks is finite. This means that we need as many people as possible to travel using efficient forms of transport; such as walking, cycling and public transport. These alternative transport options take less space and are more environmentally sustainable than private motor vehicles. With less pressure on the road network there is more capacity available for critical vehicles that need the road, including road-based public transport, emergency services and freight.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

4.       Attached is the summary document for the Regional Public Transport Plans. This document outlines the main changes proposed over the next ten years by focusing on four key areas:

Focus area one - Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

5.       Planning an enhanced rapid transit network through four main city-shaping projects to dramatically increase the speed and coverage of the rapid transit network:

·        City Rail Link

·        City to Mangere Light Rail and Northwest Light Rail

·        SH20B upgrade and Puhinui Interchange

·        Eastern Busway.

6.       Implementing improvements on key arterial routes to move more people. This will include bus priority, safety improvements and cycling and walking facilities. Increasing services on the rapid and frequent networks, with the aim to have services every 10 minutes during peak travel times. Using the rapid and frequent networks to help make great public spaces.

Focus area two - Improving customer access to public transport

7.       Continuing to deliver improved wayfinding sign systems across the public transport network to make it easier for people to find their way across the network. Increasing and improving the walking and cycling and other choices for access to public transport services, focussing on improving safety. Changing park and ride facilities to meet public demand.

Focus area three - Improving Māori responsiveness

8.       Partnering with mana whenua to trial services such as on-demand ride share connecting to marae, which are hard to access by conventional public transport. Ensuring te reo Māori audio announcements and signs for rapid transit stations (train and busway) and extending this across all public transport.

9.       Applying Te Aranga Principles when designing major interchanges and stations, with future potential to apply in the planning and design of the Light Rail Transit projects, Puhinui upgrade and stormwater management. Securing opportunities for Māori and local community employment, training and business development when constructing major public transport projects.

Focus area four - Harnessing emerging technologies

10.     Improving customer insights and data, and undertaking more thorough analytics of travel data to directly inform service improvements. Continuing to evolve AT mobile apps to meet increasing customer needs. Providing simpler and improved payment options for fares to make travel easier. Using new transport modes generated by new digital technology to supplement and complement existing services, increasing access. Ensuring we future proof for mobility-as-a-service models, which will change how people make travel choices.

11.     The full text of the proposed Regional Public Transport Plan can be accessed through Auckland Transport’s website on www.at.govt.nz/rptp.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

12.     Public transport has an impact right across the Auckland Region and therefore impacts all local boards in some way. This report seeks feedback from local boards on the most appropriate enhancements to Auckland’s public transport over the next ten years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

13.     The proposed Regional Public Transport Plan has a focus area of Improving Maori Responsiveness and includes initiatives such as: trialing new modes connecting marae with the public transport system, te reo announcements and signage across the public transport system and incorporating Te Aranga design principles into new facilities, such as bus and rail stations.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

14.     The report has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

15.     The report has no direct risks for local boards. Each individual project has its own set of unique risks and these will be dealt with as these projects are developed and implemented.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

16.     In terms of what happens to the proposed plan.

·        Public consultation runs until December 14

·        Feedback will be analysed over mid to late January 2019

·        The draft plan will be amended

·        The final proposed plan will go to the Auckland Transport Board in February or March 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Land Transport Plan summary document

21

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Stuart Knarston – Planning Projects Manager, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Land owner application for Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club Incorporated - storage in Montrose Terrace Reserve

 

File No.: CP2018/23464

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To request land owner approval from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for the Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club Incorporated to relocate from the Watercare Services Limited site that is being re-developed at 19 Sidmouth Street, Mairangi Bay, to store patrol safety boats and equipment on the Montrose Terrace Reserve, Mairangi Bay. The request is to temporarily store the boats and equipment in containers on the Montrose Terrace Reserve for an 18-month period.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The existing boatshed built in the1980’s belonging to the Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club Incorporated, is to be demolished by Watercare Services Limited to make way for the re-development of the site at 10 Sidmouth Street, Mairangi Bay, for Watercare purposes. The removal of the boatshed is in accordance with the terms of the licence entered into between Watercare Services Limited and Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club Incorporated in April 2017. The license contained an understanding that the occupation was for a specified term before the storage shed and containers were required to be removed for the construction of the new wastewater pump station. In addition to the boatshed, the Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club Incorporated store safety equipment for patrols and services for their programmes, which will need to be relocated to adequately meet the needs of their 1,200 plus members. 

3.       The Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan was approved by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in 2015 after extensive consultation with the community. The Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club Incorporated presented a deputation outlining their proposal for storage in containers within Montrose Terrace Reserve to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board business meeting on 21 November 2018.  Initial discussions focused on the proposal outlined in Option A, (attached to this report) with an estimated footprint of 149m2.

4.       Option A presents a configuration with two containers placed at the front edge of the reserve for ease of access to the water for the rescue boats and operations.  This is different to what was contemplated in the concept plan in the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan.  Various configurations were considered by the Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club Incorporated and the original footprint presented to the local board has been rationalised to better align to the concept plan in the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan and to meet expectations of the nearby residents and other users of the reserve.

5.       Consultation was undertaken by the Mairangi Bay Surf Club Incorporated with the Georgian Apartments Body Corporate Chairman on Thursday, 29 November 2018. A different layout was requested. The layout requested is not presented as an option due to the lack of time to check the proposal with specialists.

6.       19 Montrose Terrace in Mairangi Bay is described as Lot 155 DP 13311 and is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. Approval can be accommodated under section 53 (1) (c) as a permit and by way of a letter to the Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club Incorporated subject to specific conditions and including the need for the eight containers to be removed from the site in 18 months, and the site fully reinstated.

7.       This report recommends that the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board grants landowner approval to Mairangi Bay Surf Life Club Incorporated for the storage of the rescue boats and other equipment in the containers as indicated in Option A attached to this report for an 18-month period.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the land owner application from Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club Incorporated for the storage of rescue boats and equipment in eight containers as indicated in Option A in the presentation to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board business meeting dated 21 November 2018 for a period of eighteen months, at 19 Montrose Terrace Reserve legally described as Lot 155 DP 13311, as detailed in Attachment A to the agenda report

b)      approve the following conditions to be included in the land owner approval:

i)        prior to placement of containers or structures within the root zone of Auckland Council trees, a minimum depth of 150mm of aged tree mulch shall be installed

ii)       where vehicle movements are required within the root zone of Auckland Council trees, appropriate ground protection must be temporarily installed – the ground protection device must be appropriate to the size and weight of the vehicle

iii)      no pruning or damage is to occur to any Auckland Council trees

iv)      should it become apparent that any trees are becoming adversely affected by the placement of structures or activities within their root zone, then the activities must cease and Auckland Council’s arborist will review and outline what action is required

v)      health and safety conditions

vi)      no equipment to be left on the reserve outside of the containers

vii)     ensuring the applicant controls rubbish at the site

viii)    the applicant is responsible for all graffiti removal

ix)      compliance with all regulatory documents

x)      reinstatement of Montrose Terrace Reserve land, the grass reinstated and the remainder of the reserve to at least it original condition.

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       19 Montrose Terrace in Mairangi Bay is described as Lot 155 DP 13311. Lot 155 is currently held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

9.       The Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club Incorporated (the club) has been in existence for over 50 years and currently holds a community lease with Auckland Council, over the area that their clubrooms are situated on, being part of Pt Allot 182 Parish of Takapuna across the road from Montrose Terrace Reserve. The community lease is for a term of 10 years commencing 1 June 2013 until 30 May 2023.

10.     The club provides a professional and experienced life guard service from Long Bay to Takapuna and runs a safe water education programme for schools, public and surf lifesaving club members. The club is in the process of developing a plan for new facilities to keep pace with the growth and demands of their club and to meet the expectations of the community.

11.     The club currently have a boat shed, container and various boats stored on the adjoining Watercare site but due to the redevelopment of the wastewater pump station on this site, the shed is to be demolished as advised by Watercare Services Limited in April 2017 and access for storage for the club will no longer be available. Watercare are decommissioning the existing infrastructure (including a biofilter) and building a new pump station.

12.     The Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan (the plan) was adopted by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in March 2015 after extensive stakeholder and public consultation regarding concept design options for the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves. This management plan contemplates an extended lease area to provide for redevelopment of the clubrooms and for boat storage. The concept plan in the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan indicates an additional proposed lease area for storage in the location contemplated for the temporary storage containers at the back of the reserve as indicated in Attachment B.

13.     An alternative configuration for storage containers was presented to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in June 2018, but after discussions the club were requested to rationalise the container storage. The revised layout for the storage containers has been reduced compared to the original request by the club. This footprint is for one 40-foot container less and a more condensed layout. The revised version results in a total foot print of 149m2 whereas the concept plan indicates approximately 150m2. There are two containers at the front of the reserve (included in the total footprint).  Containers will be suitably camouflaged, in consultation with Auckland Council and neighbours to reduce visual pollution.

14.     Another configuration was requested by the Georgian Apartments Body Corporate Chairman on 29 November 2018. However, due to reporting timeframes, it was not possible for this to be reviewed by specialists, so this configuration is not presented as an option in this report.

15.     The club will continue to investigate off-site storage options for low use items.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

16.     The options available to the local board are to approve or decline the land owner application.

Option 1

17.     The local board approve the land owner application for temporary storage of containers at Montrose Terrace from Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club Incorporated.

18.     Alternative options were canvassed including stacking the containers in a thin strip along the extent of the fence line bordering the Watercare site and Sidmouth Reserve. This configuration dominated the site and residents approached preferred the space between the containers to reduce the bulk and form and increase the available reserve access and use.

19.     The storage space was rationalised, and a gap provided between the containers to meet the expectations of the adjoining neighbours. 

          The advantage of approving the land owner application with the revised footprint is:

·        the access for the rescue boats to the beach provides a quick and safe egress from the site

·        the recommended storage area is closely aligned with the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan – Concept Plan and would meet the expectations of the local board and the community

·        the future re-instatement of the reserve will be at the club’s expense and will reduce maintenance expenses for council.

          This is the recommended option.

Option 2

20.     The local board declines the land owner application for temporary storage of containers at Montrose Terrace from Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club Incorporated.

21.     If the local board declines the application, this will preclude the applicant in having adequate storage for the safety rescue boats and associated equipment at the preferred location. The disadvantages of this option are:

·        the club will be required to find alternative storage which could be a greater distance away and could possibly increase rescue response time.

22.     There are no obvious advantages of declining the land owner application. The recommended smaller footprint proposed in Option A aligns reasonably closely with the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan – Concept Plan.

Specialists comments/consultation

23.     The parks and places specialists preferred option is to support a configuration and layout that coincides with the concept in the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan 2015. The senior maintenance coordinator supports Option A – proposed layout because it allows for other scheduled uses for this reserve and reinstatement will improve the condition of the grassed area.  The senior arboriculture and eco-specialist has provided feedback and specific conditions to protect the trees.

Recommendation

24.     The recommendation to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is to approve the temporary storage in containers at Montrose Terrace Reserve for a period of 18 months while the plans for the redevelopment of the clubrooms and for boat storage are completed. This will coincide with the Watercare site demolition and upgrade of infrastructure on the adjoining site.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

25.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board have been an integral part of the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan 2015 process and have a good understanding of the public opinions for the development and use of these local reserves. Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club Incorporated presented the initial option including an alternative configuration of containers to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in June 2018. Another option was discussed in October 2018 and the local board requested further rationalisation of the storage area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

26.     There are no recorded archaeological sites registered by council, however early settlement of the area by Māori means that it is likely that there are archaeological sites within the reserve. The conditions of the land owner approval will include the following:

·        “Should any items and/or artefacts of significance or value to Mana Whenua surface during the works, all works must cease immediately and accidental discovery protocol and notification procedures must be administered and followed”.

27.     As outlined in the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Plan 2015, a tikanga Māori approach to knowledge and wisdom to the sustainable management of the natural environment will befostered for all reserves including sustainable management practices and appropriate native, eco-sourced plantings. Work with iwi to agree on appropriate interpretation of Māori heritage on the reserves (this may include carvings, signage and interpretation boards) is planned.

 

28.     Iwi consultation was not undertaken at this point due to the temporary nature of the application.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

29.     There will be no financial implications to council from the storage application.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

30.     Any risks associated with the granting of landowner approval are considered to be relatively minor. By granting approval the club will be able to focus on the development of their plans for new facilities, permanent storage and associated capital development costs.

31.     There is a risk that the club will not have re-built their new facilities and permanent storage within the 18-month timeframe and an extension of time will be required.

32.     If the  larger footprint and number of containers was approved as originally proposed by the applicant there would be considerable risk to council as they would not be compliant with the approved concept plan for the reserves in this location. 

33.     The current bulk and scale of containers from the applicant could create the perception that these are going to be permanent fixtures on Montrose Terrace Reserve.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

34.     If the application is approved the decision will be communicated to the applicant with a formal land owner approval letter indicating the location and scale for the eight storage containers at Montrose Terrace Reserve. Conditions will be placed on the land owner approval regarding (but not limited to): 

·        compliance with the conditions listed in the recommendations

·        health and safety conditions

·        no equipment to be left on the reserve outside of the containers

·        ensuring the applicant controls rubbish at the site 

·        compliance with all regulatory documents 

·        removal of the containers within 18 months

·        reinstatement of Montrose Terrace Reserve land, the grass reinstated and the remainder of the reserve to at least its original condition.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Option A

43

b

Concept Plan extract from Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan

45

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Raewyn  Sendles - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Adoption of the Whangaparāoa Centre Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/21748

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the final Whangaparāoa Centre Plan for approval by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area Plan 2014 recognised that a centre plan is needed to enable the business area of Whangaparāoa to develop into a town centre with a vibrant commercial heart and high-quality developments and public spaces.

3.       A draft plan was developed for the Whangaparāoa centre as a basis on which to engage with landowners, developers, business community and community groups including Future Whangaparāoa to develop a way towards a shared vision.

4.       The local community has contributed to the plan through initial engagement and provided  feedback on the draft Whangaparāoa Centre Plan. Refinements were made based on feedback from the community and input from the internal council stakeholders and Auckland Transport. This report outlines the key changes from the draft plan to the final plan based on the feedback received

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the Whangaparāoa Centre Plan

b)      delegate approval of any minor edits and changes to the final Whangaparāoa Centre Plan to the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson before publication

c)      request that the Plans and Places Department investigate the incorporation of the guidelines within or as an associated document to the Auckland Design Manual and advise the Resource Consent Department that the Whangaparāoa Centre Plan is available for use when assessing relevant resource consents within the Whangaparaoa town centre area.

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       The Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan published in 2014 outlines how the Hibiscus and Bays area is likely to change over the next 30 years.  It sets out key moves, desired outcomes and supporting actions to assist in achieving the vision for Auckland and Hibiscus and Bays, as set out in the Auckland Plan and by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board within their local board plan.

6.       One of the six key moves provides for focusing growth in centres, in areas with high amenity and good access to efficient public transport, and restricting new growth in rural sensitive coastal and estuarine needs.

7.       Whangaparāoa is one of four town centres in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area which provides job prospects and residential growth.

8.       The local board plan recognises the need for a centre plan to guide Whangaparāoa to develop into a town with a vibrant commercial heart, high-quality developments and public spaces.

9.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board commissioned the draft Whangaparāoa Centre Plan (the plan) to provide ideas and options for potential improvements to the town that may be prioritised for funding in future long-term plans and in partnership with the Governing Body and Council Controlled Organisations.

10.     The plan benefited from a good level of public engagement with the community group Future Whangaparāoa, in particular being of great assistance in organising local workshops and displays to promote feedback on the draft plan. It is hoped this plan will succeed by involving more people in the plan-making process to realise progress.

Draft plan consultation 

11.     The feedback and ideas received from the community helped inform the draft Whangaparāoa Centre Plan, which was approved (HB/2017/285) by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for consultation in March 2018. Public consultation on the draft plan was undertaken from 19 February 2018 to 26 March 2018. This included a series of drop-in sessions, staff presence at the Coast Plaza, Whangaparāoa, and information on the council’s Have Your Say website. .

12.     Information on the draft Whangaparaoa Centre Plan and events to provide feedback were publicised through Our Auckland print and online, in the Hibiscus Coast Matters and Rodney Times and on the local board Facebook page.

13.     In total 86 formal responses were received.  In addition a Facebook survey by one respondent generated another 440 responses around the specific issue of a ‘slow zone’ concept.

14.    The plan is structured around three key themes and within each a series of specific projects/package of works. Out of these  the most popular actions were:

·        Improved pedestrian connections and safe crossing routes across roads– with more reserved support for future cycling given the character of the topography.

·        Environmental enhancement through the construction and detailing of public spaces and the introduction of more street trees.

·        Developing a strong plan around future parking requirements in the town centre.

15.     Through the feedback forms, there were recurring negative comments about the slow zone concept and to a lesser degree future cycling.  With regard to the first matter the plan has been reworded to provide better clarity surrounding the intent of the environmental improvements that capitalise on the already slow vehicle movements passed the town centre.  It was not proposed to further slow vehicle movements through an area that already has reduced speed and flow and the initial drafting on this point was not clear.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and adviceVision

16.     The defining vision for Whangaparāoa is to develop and provide a vibrant and accessible town centre for everyone. The beach side character and human scale of the town can be protected and enhanced by new development and improvements to streets and other public spaces. Commercial and residential development will be high quality and provide a full range of services, residential  choice and employment opportunities for the community. 

Key Opportunities

17.     Key opportunities identified align closely with  the 2015 assessment of community development needs and priorities in the Hibiscus Coast subdivision area:

i)        Infrastructure

ii)       Community connectedness (reducing isolation)

iii)      Place-making

iv)      Economic development

v)      Youth development

vi)      Transport

18.     In addition the following priorities already defined by the local board and other agencies were identified that will positively influence the regeneration:

vii)     Penlink

viii)    Greenways Plan

ix)      D’Oyly Reserve Enhancement

19.     The final Whangaparāoa Centre Plan seeks to capture the views of the community, key stakeholders and mana whenua through its vision, principles, outcomes and actions that will guide funding decisions for the next 30 years. The final plan has been updated based on feedback received on the draft plan from the community, Future Whangaparāoa, Auckland Transport and relevant council departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

20.     The plan is sponsored by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. The local board have worked  to ensure local views are adequately considered when drafting and finalising the plan.

21.     The delivery of the actions proposed in the Whangaparāoa Centre Plan will have a broad range of positive economic, social and environmental impacts for a growing community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

22.     The council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori. As part of this commitment, the local board recognises there are specific outcomes in which Māori have a keen interest and we welcome engagement with them on these.

23.     A joint hui was held 19 March 2018 at Te Herenga Waka o Orewa Marae, Silverdale.  The focus of the hui was to discuss the Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2018-2028, Auckland Plan refresh and the local board agreement, which included the plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

24.     The Whangaparāoa Centre Plan identifies a number of actions that contribute to achieving the outcomes and the vision of the centre plan. The timeframe identified for delivering each action is based on advice provided from relevant council departments and Auckland Transport but further work will be required with the departments to finalise timeframes.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

25.     For longer term spatial plans such as the Whangaparāoa Centre Plan, there is a significant strategic and reputational risk of not maintaining momentum for the implementation of actions. To avoid this risk, an implementation plan and monitoring programme should be developed so that the relevant delivery agents remain accountable for, and committed to, following through on the centre plan’s short, medium and long-term actions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

26.     Staff are working with the council’s design studio to finalise the layout and design of the Whangaparāoa Centre Plan for final publication. An implementation and monitoring programme will also be prepared as a guidance tool for the local board, council stakeholders and other delivery agencies for delivering the actions. As part of the wider monitoring programme of spatial plans, there will also be six-monthly monitoring reports to the local boards to provide progress updates on implementation of the actions.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whangaparaoa Centre Plan

51

    

 

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Michelle Sanderson – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Orewa Citizens Advice Bureau – extensive internal refurbishment. 

 

File No.: CP2018/22087

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the latest concept design for the internal refurbishment of the Citizens Advice Bureau offices in Orewa and to progress the project to detailed design, building consent, procurement and physical works.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The current internal layout of the Citizens Advice Bureau Orewa offices does not allow for the effective use of limited space and a concept design has been prepared to upgrade the facility. An initial concept design was developed approximately two and a half years ago which was further amended and replaced by the latest concept design (Attachment A).

3.       The latest design has been discussed with and agreed to by the Citizens Advice Bureau Orewa management.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         approve the concept design dated 12 November 2018 for the renewal of the Citizens Advice Bureau Orewa office and request staff to progress to detailed design, consenting and construction.

Horopaki / Context

4.       The Citizens Advice Bureau Orewa (CAB Orewa) office has been identified for renewal in the 2018/2019 financial year.

5.       A concept design has been developed over the past two months in consultation with the CAB Orewa management and staff.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

6.       The need for internal refurbishment of the CAB Orewa offices was identified by the local board in 2015. The current layout of the office does not utilise the limited space effectively, especially in the administration area at the back of the office. An earlier concept design (done approximately two and a half years ago by Paul Murphy) has been further amended and developed with input from council staff and CAB Orewa staff.

7.       The current space in the front of the office is also not well laid out as there are two separate waiting areas which is not practical. The new layout will open up the reception area and create more storage. The waiting area will also be opened up to form one space. There will be two offices with a sound proof divider that can be opened up into one larger space.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /

Local impacts and local board views

8.       Council has worked collaboratively with CAB Orewa representatives to refine the design to meet the needs of the group.

9.       The local board has been keen to assist the CAB Orewa in the redesign of their footprint to enable a more efficient use of space.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

10.     No culturally significant factors have been identified in the projects identified in this report.

11.     Therefore, it is proposed that no further consultation with the Parks and Recreation North West Mana Whenua Engagement Forum is required.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

12.     The project will be funded through the Asset Based Services capex renewal programme.

13.     Estimated total cost of the project will be $340,000 based on a quantity surveyor estimate. This figure includes the temporary re-location of the CAB Orewa operations during the construction period.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     There is a moderate risk that it might be harder to find suitable contractors to deliver this work in a reasonable timeframe due to the construction industry being so busy at the moment.

15.     There are currently no other risks identified.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

16.     If the recommendation is supported by the local board, the project will be progressed through the detailed design, consent and procurement phases to enable construction this financial year. 

17.     Further discussions are required to finalise options around the temporary office re-location for the CAB Orewa.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

CAB Hibiscus Coast Design

89

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Nicolaas Viljoen – Senior Programme Managerr

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Facility Grant 2018/2019

 

File No.: CP2018/22387

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the scope and criteria for grant allocations for local-facilities in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area in 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has a total budget of $694,120 for the Hibiscus and Bays Grant Programme for 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       The local board have indicated they would like to support the development of local-facilities through a contestable grant process. An allocation of $150,000 is proposed, with the ability of groups to apply for a maximum of $50,000.

4.       Two options are proposed for the allocation of grants for facilities in the local board area.

5.       Option one is to incorporate funding for the renovation and development of local facilities within the existing contestable local grant rounds for 2018/2019.

6.       Option two is to create a new dedicated grant round in 2018/2019, for the allocation of grants for the renovation and development of facilities.

7.       Option two, to create a new contestable grant round for the 2018/2019 financial year is recommended, with a review of this grant round in June 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve a new contestable grant round of $150,000, to support the development of local-facilities, including the scope and criteria, with an opening date of 29 January 2019, a closing date of 8 March 2019 and a decision date of 15 May 2019.

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted the Hibiscus and Bays Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 7 June 2018 (see Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

9.       In addition to the grants programme, the local board have indicated they would like to support local facilities, through a contestable grants process, for the development or renovation of sport and recreation, arts or community facilities in the local board area. This would enable groups to further leverage local board funding to seek other sources of funding for the renovation or development of the facilities.

10.     Grants would be for the completion of:

·        needs assessments

·        feasibility studies

·        investigation and design

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

11.     Hibiscus and Bays Local Board have a total budget of $694,120 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

12.     The local board have indicated they would like to support the development of local facilities through a contestable grants process and two options are proposed for the allocation of grants for this purpose.

13.     Option one is to incorporate funding for the renovation and development of facilities in the existing contestable local grant round. Community groups who apply in the remaining local grant round could apply for a maximum of $50,000. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Grant Round Two 2018/2019, would be promoted to community groups who own their facilities in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. This would enable eligible groups to apply in this grant round.

14.     Option two is to create a new dedicated grant round in early 2019, for the allocation of grants for the renovation and development of sport and recreation, arts and community facilities. This grant round would receive applications for assistance with the development of these facilities. Grant applications would be assessed against some agreed criteria to maximise the outcomes the local board is seeking (see Attachment B). In particular, higher priority will be given to grant applicants who are able to leverage local board funding to seek other sources of funding for their proposed project. For example, a needs assessment could be funded by the local board, to enable the group to apply for Foundation North or Lotteries funding for the completion of the construction costs.

15.     The assessment criteria (see Attachment B) will cover the areas of:

·        evidence of an increase in participation

·        strategic alignment with council plans

·        working in partnership and sharing of facilities

·        capability of groups, including ability to leverage the local board funding to obtain other sources of funding.

16.     Out of scope for this grant round is:

·        the improvement of council facilities or council land or property

·        sports fields, as the supply and demand for sports fields is within the scope of the Sports Infrastructure Development Project.

18,     The opening date for the new grant round would be 29 January 2019, with the closing date 8 March 2019. The decision date would be 15 May 2019.

17.     Option two, to create a new contestable round for the 2018/2019 financial year, is recommended, with a review of this round in June 2019, to determine whether this grant round could be incorporated into the Hibiscus and Bays Grant Programme for 2019/2020.

18.     A new contestable grant round would enable a tailored approach to the allocation of grants for community facilities with separate criteria and guidelines. A separate grant round would also enable targeted promotion for community groups who own their own facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

19.     The local board have indicated they would like to allocate up to $150,000 for the contestable grants for community facilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted 2018-2028 Long-Term Plan and 2018/2019 local board agreement.

22.     A maximum of $50,000 is recommended for allocation for each application.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

23.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with this grant proposal.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

24.     Following the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approval of the process to allocate grants to local facilities, Commercial and Finance staff will promote the new grant opportunity through the appropriate media channels and community groups.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Grant Programme 2018/2019.

103

b

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board  Facility Grant criteria

107

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Marion Davies - Grant Operations Manager

Authorisers

Shane King - Head of Operations Support

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation

 

File No.: CP2018/23807

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To agree a local engagement event and adopt local content and supporting information for consultation as part of the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the relevant local board) for each local board area for each financial year. The local board agreement will be included in the Auckland Council’s Annual Budget 2019/2020.

3.       Consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 will take place from 17 February – 17 March 2019. Local boards will be consulting on their areas of focus for their 2019/2020 local board agreement.

4.       In December 2018, the Governing Body will consider whether to consult on a proposal to transfer legal ownership of waterfront land and related assets to the council parent.  If the Governing Body decides to consult on that proposal, the consultation would take place at the same time as the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.  As a result, the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 would require the use of the special consultative procedure.

5.       There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Water Strategy discussion document. A report will be going to the Environment and Community Committee on 4 December 2018 to approve the discussion document for public consultation.

6.       This report seeks agreement from local boards on the Have Your Say event that will be held in their local board area during the consultation period, to give Aucklanders an opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback. It also seeks approval of their local content and supporting information for consultation.

7.       The Governing Body and local boards will agree regional and local items respectively for consultation by December 13. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the annual budget consultation document and supporting information, which will be approved by the Governing Body on 13 February 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      agree, subject to approval by the Governing Body, to hold the following Have Your Say events in the local board area during the Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation period:

i)        East Coast Bays Subdivision, Sunday, 3 March 2019, 1.30pm – 4.30pm in conjunction with Kite Day to be held at Ridgeline Park, 21 Te Oneroa Way, Long Bay

ii)       Hibiscus Coast Subdivision, Saturday, 23 February 2019, 10.00am- 2.00pm, in conjunction with the Estuary Arts and Youth Centre – Open Day

b)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events during the consultation period for the Annual Budget 2019/2020:

i)        local board members and chairperson

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Chief Financial Officer.        

c)      adopt Attachment A: local content for consultation and Attachment B: local supporting information for consultation.

d)      delegate authority to the local board chair to approve any final changes required following review by the council’s legal team of the consultation content of the Annual Budget 2019/2020 prior to publication, including online consultation content.

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the relevant local board) for each local board area for each financial year. The local board agreement will be included in the Council’s Annual Budget 2019/2020.

9.       Local board agreements set out (among other things) how the council will, in the year to which the agreement relates, reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board’s plan in respect of the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

10.     For the purposes of consulting on each local board agreement to be included in the council’s Annual Budget, the consultation document for the Annual Budget must include content relating to each agreement.

11.     Public consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 will take place from 17 February – 17 March 2019.

12.     In December 2018, the Governing Body will consider whether to consult on a proposal to transfer legal ownership of waterfront land and related assets to the council parent.  If the Governing Body decides to consult on that proposal, the consultation would take place at the same time as the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.  As a result, the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 would require the use of the special consultative procedure, as a decision to proceed with the proposal would require an amendment to the council’s long-term plan.  Where an amendment to the long-term plan is being consulted on at the same time as consultation on the Annual Budget, the Local Government Act 2002 requires the council to use the special consultative procedure in relation to both matters.

13.     There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Water Strategy discussion document. A report will be going to the Environment and Community Committee on 4 December 2018 to approve the discussion document for public consultation.

14.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation process through a variety of channels which include verbal (or face-to-face), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

15.     The special consultative procedure requires the council to provide an opportunity for people to present their views to the council in a manner that enables “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” between the person and the council’s decision-makers, or their official delegates.   The council provides for this through its ‘Have Your Say’ events where people can have a face-to-face dialogue with elected members or other council representatives with an appropriate delegation. The Have Your Say event recommended to be held in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area are:

·        East Coast Bays Subdivision, Sunday, 3 March 2019, 1.30pm – 4.30pm in conjunction with Kite Day to be held at Ridgeline Park, 21 Te Oneroa Way, Long Bay

·        Hibiscus Coast Subdivision, Saturday, 23 February 2019, 10.00am- 2.00pm, in conjunction with the Estuary Arts and Youth Centre – Open Day

16.     Local boards held workshops during October and November 2018 to determine their key activities for their 2019/2020 local board agreement. Local boards are now requested to agree their local content and supporting information for consultation, as attached in Attachment A and B.

17.     Any new local Business Improvement District targeted rates must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are therefore also requested to agree any new proposals for consultation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

19.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the Annual Budget 2019/2020. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to finalising their local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

20.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were adopted in September and October of 2017, form the basis for local priorities.

21.     The approach to Māori engagement for the Annual Budget will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget.

22.     Regionally supported local Māori engagement in the South and West will be provided subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget, this will be integrated with Water Strategy engagement.

23.     Mana Whenua engagement on the Water Strategy is already underway, and will run throughout the March consultation period; annual budget discussions will be integrated with this process.             

24.     There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in the council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

25.     Event associated costs include venue hire and catering.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

26.     Local boards must agree their local consultation content and supporting information by 13 December 2018, in order for it to be formatted and reviewed in time to be incorporated into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation document and supporting information.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

27.     The Governing Body will approve the consultation document, supporting information and consultation process for the Annual Budget 2019/2020 on 13 February 2019.

28.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and local boards will make decisions on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and Local Board Agreements 2019/2020 respectively.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local content for consultation

113

b

Local supporting information for consultation

115

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Beth Corlett - Business Process Coordinator

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 May - 31 October 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/22117

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland  activities within the local board area for the six months from 1 May to 31 October 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Panuku Development Auckland was established in September 2015 by the merger of two council controlled organisations, Waterfront Auckland and Auckland Council Property Limited.

3.       Panuku Development Auckland helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

4.       Panuku Development Auckland manages around $2 billion of council’s property portfolio; which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 May to 31 October 2018.

 

Ngā Mahi ā-Hapori / Local Activities

Development

5.       Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) is contributing commercial input into approximately 50 region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

6.       Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best practice project delivery, to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

7.       Below is a high-level update on development activities in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area:

20 Link Crescent, Whangaparaoa

8.       Named “Mariner Rise” the subdivision provides 60 Sections along with a reserve and playground. Work has advanced on 18 homes all of which will be completed by mid-2019.

9.       The subdivision has resource consent for a mix of two, three and four-bedroom terrace and standalone family homes with a focus on design quality. The homes are being built and marketed by Signature Homes, Mike Greer Homes and New Dreamland, priced $650,000 to $800,000.

 

 

 

D’Oyly Reserve

10.     The environment enhancement project has been proactively managed by Healthy Waters and is now complete. The works extend 750m along the boundary of Stanmore Bay Primary School; involves extensive native planting and the creation of an overland waterway with wetlands. A project that will encourage and foster bird and fish life.

The Hammerhead

11.     The work undertaken by Panuku, on behalf of Auckland Council investigating council’s property interests in Gulf Harbour Marina for a possible future recommendation for sale has been put on hold, pending completion of the council’s marina strategy.


Portfolio Management

12.     Panuku manages ‘non-service’ properties owned by the council and Auckland Transport (AT). Non-service properties are those that are not currently needed for service or infrastructure purposes. These properties were generally being held for planned future projects that are no longer required, such as road construction, park expansion or development of future town centres.

13.     As at 30 June 2018, the property portfolio comprises 1437 properties, containing 1119 leases. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

14.     The return on the property portfolio for the period ending 30 June 2018 was above budget, with a net surplus to council and AT shareholders of $3.9 million ahead of budget.

15.     The average monthly tenantable occupancy rate for the six-month period is more than 98 per cent, which is above the statement of intent target of 95 per cent.

Properties managed in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area

16.     Panuku currently manages 53 commercial and 16 residential interests within the local board area.

Business interests

17.     Panuku also manages the commercial return from business interests on the council’s behalf. This includes two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

18.     There are currently no managed business interests in the Hibiscus and Bays local board area.

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

19.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets approved in 2015. The process is a tri-party agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

20.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, with lower maintenance and operating costs as well as improved service delivery benefiting from co-location of other complimentary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a vast range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites and in many cases will result in intensification of land use, particularly residential, supporting Auckland Plan implementation.

21.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

22.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

23.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (AT) to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

24.     Target for July 2017 to June 2018:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$60 million disposal recommendations

$88 million as at 30 June 2018

(includes $62 million from the Papatoetoe, Avondale and Panmure priority locations)

25.     Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal recommendations

$4.8 million as at 31 October 2018.

Process

26.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Under review

27.     Properties currently under review in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body.

Property

Details

8 Hiwi Crescent, Stanmore Bay

The vacant former residential site was acquired by the former Rodney District Council (RDC) in 1998 for the purpose of Whangaparaoa Road Widening Project.  The widening of Whangaparaoa Road remains a "live project" but the property is not included in the Whangaparaoa Road upgrade project (between Hibiscus Coast Highway to Red Beach Road).

AT resolved in November 2015 that 8 Hiwi Crescent, Stanmore Bay was no longer required for current or future transport related purposes and the property was subsequently subject to the Panuku led rationalisation process.

No alternate service uses for the subject site were identified during the internal consultation.

The local board endorsed the proposed disposal of 8 Hiwi Crescent, Stanmore Bay at its 16 May 2018 business meeting. The local board also requested that any sale proceeds be allocated to a relevant Weiti Crossing (Penlink) transport infrastructure budget, as the property was originally acquired for transport purposes.

The Finance and Performance Committee considered the local board’s request in September 2018 and advised that in accordance with council‘s Revenue and Financing Policy 2017, proceeds from the approved disposal of the site will be used to repay council debt or fund investment in another priority strategic asset.

 

Acquisitions and disposals

28.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

29.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

30.     Panuku purchased 12 properties for open space across Auckland in the last financial year at a cost of $27 million, and bought eight properties for storm water use at a value of $4.9 million.

31.     Panuku purchased eight properties for open space across Auckland in the 2018-2019 financial year at a cost of $33 million and bought one property for storm water use at a value of $188,000.

32.     One property was purchased in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area during the reporting period for open space purposes.

33.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 

Disposals

34.     The disposals team has sold six properties, realising $31.8 million of unconditional net sales proceeds, in the current financial year.  The Panuku 2018/2019 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. The disposals team achieved $15.06 million of net sale proceeds in 2017/2018.

35.     One of the properties sold during the report period is in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, 19 Anzac Road, Browns Bay.

Housing for Older People

36.     The council owns 1412 units located in 62 villages across Auckland, which provide rental housing to low income older people in Auckland.

37.     The Housing for Older People (HfOP) project involved the council partnering with a third-party organisation, The Selwyn Foundation, to deliver social rental housing services for older people across Auckland.

38.     The joint venture business, named Haumaru Housing, took over the tenancy, facilities and asset management of the portfolio, under a long-term lease arrangement from 1 July 2017.

39.     Haumaru Housing was granted community housing provider (CHP) status in April 2017. Having CHP registration enables Haumaru to access the government’s Income Related Rent Subsidy (IRRS) scheme.

40.     Auckland Council has delegated Panuku to lead a new multi-year residential development programme.

41.     The first new development project is a 40-unit apartment building on the former Wilsher Village site on 33 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson. Once completed in mid-2019, this development will increase the council’s portfolio to 1452 units.

42.     The following HfOP villages are located within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area:

Village

Address

Number of units

Torbay Flats

2 Wairere Road, Torbay

18

Ngā Mahi ā-Rohe / Regional Activities

43.     Over the year, Panuku achieved key project milestones and performance results in our priority development locations. Panuku categorises three types of priority locations:

·        Transform locations – Panuku ‘transforms’ locations by creating change through urban regeneration. Panuku leads the transformation of select parts of the Auckland region working alongside others and using the custodianship of land and planning expertise. The catalytic work Waterfront Auckland led at Wynyard Quarter is a great example of the transformation of urban locations

·        Unlock locations – Panuku ‘unlocks’ development potential for others. By acting as a facilitator; using relationships to break down barriers and influence others, including the council family, to create development opportunities

·        Support locations – Panuku plays a ‘support’ role to ensure council is making the most of what it already has. Intensification is a key driver in the Auckland Plan. Panuku will support housing demands by enabling development of council-owned land.

Transform locations                                                                  

44.     The Wynyard Quarter is undergoing rapid change both commercially and residentially, with thousands of Aucklanders using this space every week.

45.     Panuku has partnered with Willis Bond to deliver a total of 500 homes in Wynyard Quarter over several stages, the first of which – Wynyard Central Pavilions – is now complete. This first stage of the new precinct offers a mix of 113 residencies comprising 25 free-stranding pavilions, eight townhouses and 80 apartments with retail space on the ground floor. Willis Bond is also leading the delivery of 51 apartments at 132 Halsey, which is expected to be complete in spring 2018. At the same time it is anticipated that works will begin on the second stage of Willis Bond’s residential development at 30 Madden Street with the construction of 90 apartments and six townhouses as well as ground floor retail. This residential construction is due to be completed by the end of 2020.

46.     Precinct are due to commence construction on their next commercial building at 10 Madden Street in spring 2018, with an anticipated completion date towards the end of 2020. This seven level building will provide approximately 8,500m2  of commercial space including ground floor retail.

47.     The east-west connection between Halsey and Daldy Streets, Tiramarama Way, was completed in June of this year, with the street opening on Friday 29 June 2018 receiving much positive feedback.

48.     Transform Manukau covers over 600 hectares and is the largest of the Panuku priority locations. The Auckland Plan sees Manukau as the commercial centre of southern Auckland, but the significant investment in transport and community amenities has not been matched by intensification of the adjacent land to provide more homes and jobs. The area contains over six hectares of undeveloped council land in the town centre that is suitable for residential and commercial development. There is also significant Crown land held by both Housing Corporation New Zealand  (HNZC) and the Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMDHB) that can provide significant additional housing.

49.     Panuku is focusing on taking the development sites to market to test the appetite for private sector investment. Currently there is a 300 home development on Barrowcliffe Place already underway. We are also focussing on public realm projects that will enhance the overall environment and liveability of the area. Panuku is working closely with The Southern Initiative and Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) to develop integrated actions to benefit the local community.

50.     The Framework Plan to guide the Onehunga transformation on a similar scale to Wynyard Quarter and Manukau was approved in May 2018. The plan was completed involving significant consultation with the community. Panuku is leading the redevelopment of strategic council-owned land, and works in partnership with government and others, to deliver positive outcomes for the local community. The East-West link and proposed light rail, which affects the wharf and southern parts of the area, is currently being reassessed by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA).  Panuku is expecting amended plans later this year. Further refinement of the framework plan will occur once this can be reviewed. Working with the local board and key stakeholders, Panuku has advanced plans on the town centre and the Onehunga wharf precinct where possible.

Unlock locations

51.     In the unlock Takapuna project, results from recent consultation and independent representative survey have shown support for a new town square and revitalisation on the central Takapuna car park 40 Anzac Street. The project led by Panuku will now progress with a town square between Hurstmere Road and Lake Road.

52.     In Northcote, Panuku are continuing to build on the urban regeneration concepts outlined in the November 2016 framework plan, and have progressed our engagement and co-design with Homes, Land Community for the Awataha Greenway project and other key projects. The information kiosk continues to provide a ‘shop front’ for the community to walk in and ask any questions. With the 2018-2028 Long-term Plan signed off by council in late-June2018, Panuku is now able to commence implementation of the first-year’s projects including the Greenslade Reserve stormwater detention project.

53.     At the Airfields, Hobsonville Point, six of the seven super-lots have now settled with AV Jennings with the remaining super-lot due for settlement in October 2018. Forty-two housing units have been completed to the end of June 2018. In stage 2, the development by Avanda will result in 510 dwellings. The tier one roads which are Wallace Road, Waka Moana Drive and Commanders Avenue are progressing well and are on target for practical completion December 2018. The first housing development is anticipated to start in December 2018. 

54.     Council’s Planning Committee approved the over-arching plans to redevelop Old Papatoetoe in June. Construction on the mall has been completed and we are now focused on leasing the remaining tenancies. The supermarket construction is progressing, however we have been advised that this is unlikely to be completed by Christmas. We are working closely with Foodstuffs on the new plaza space. The Panuku board has now approved the programme business case which details how new housing in the town centre will be enabled.  The temporary food hub proposal for the old netball clubrooms is progressing well.  

55.     The overall plan for Henderson was approved in May 2017 by Governing Body. The 2018-2021 Unlock Henderson work programme was endorsed by the local board and approved by the Panuku board in June 2018. The vision is for Henderson is for it to grow into an urban eco-centre. This vision will guide planning and development with an outcome towards ‘liveable growth’ by creating a safe, attractive and vibrant mixed-use environment with a uniquely west Auckland identity.

56.     The opportunity to revitalise Avondale was given the green light in November 2017 with the approval of the over-arching plan for its regeneration by the Planning Committee. The vision for Avondale will be enabled through a number of key moves. Panuku will work closely with the local board and community to implement a retail strategy that attracts new businesses, increasing diversity of products and services. The train station, upgraded bus network and new cycle ways offer great transport options and we will continue to strengthen connections between these activity hubs and the town. A focus for the regeneration of Avondale is working with developers to build quality residential neighbourhoods that offer a mix of housing types, including terraces and apartments. A number of significant developments are already underway in the area.

57.     Located within the Tāmaki Transformation area, Panmure town centre is well positioned with excellent public transport links to the wider Auckland area. Panmure was chosen as a location for regeneration due to large areas of underused, council-owned land in the town centre that represent significant redevelopment opportunities. The project area covers 43ha and encompasses land owned by council, Tamaki Regeneration Company, the Crown and Auckland Transport (AT), who Panuku will work in partnership with to facilitate the staged transition of sites for development.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

58.     This report is for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s information.

59.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries relating to a property in the local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

60.     Tāmaki Makaurau has the highest Māori population in the world with one in four Māori in Aotearoa living here. 

61.     Māori, who make up 12% of the region’s total population, mainly live in Manurewa, Henderson-Massey, Papakura, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Māngere-Ōtahuhu and Franklin. Māori have a youthful demographic with 50% of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau under the age of 25 years. Five percent of the Māori population in the region are currently 65 years and over.      

62.     There are 19 Mana Whenua in the region, with 15 having indicated an interest in Panuku lead activities within the local board area. 

63.     Māori make up six percent of the local board population, and there is one matawaaka marae located within the local board area.   

64.     Panuku work collaboratively with Mana Whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

65.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sven Mol - Corporate Affairs Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Carlos Rahman - Senior Engagement Advisor

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2018/23130

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillors, Councillor Wayne Walker and Councillor John Watson, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Councillors Walker and Watson for their update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/23135

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the local board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar: a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings.  It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme

129

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Record of Workshop Meetings

 

File No.: CP2018/23136

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board held workshop meetings on 15 and 29 November  2018.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the record of the workshop meetings held on 15 and 29 November 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Record of Workshop Meeting,15 November 2018

133

b

Record of Workshop Meeting, 29 November 2018

135

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

12 December 2018