I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 12 December 2018

04:00pm

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Ann Hartley, JP

 

 

Kay McIntyre, QSM

 

 

Anne-Elise Smithson

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

Lindsay Waugh

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda  Short

Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

 

5 December 2018

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: jacinda.short@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Māori naming of parks and places in the Kaipātiki Local Board area                     7

12        Approval of kauri dieback management actions in local parks in the Kaipātiki Local Board area                                                                                                                    27

13        Marlborough Park Skate Park Playspace Concept Design                                     63

14        Kaipātiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment                                  85

15        Kaipātiki Local Grant Round Two 2018/2019 grant allocations                           131

16        Kaipātiki Age Friendly Community Report                                                             233

17        Auckland Transport Monthly Update                                                                      301

18        Renewal of community lease to Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners Association Incorporated at Gold Hole, Northcote Point                                                           313

19        Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation                                                                  319

20        Local board feedback on resource consent for six new ferry berths at Queens Wharf, Auckland Central                                                                                           327

21        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Regional Public Transport Plan 341

22        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report                                                          361

23        Members' Reports                                                                                                      363

24        Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update    365

25        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - November 2018                             367

26        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      375  

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

 

                  i.        A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

 

                 ii.        A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 21 November 2018, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Māori naming of parks and places in the Kaipātiki Local Board area

 

File No.: CP2018/12906

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To agree the initial scope, priorities and work programme for Te Kete Rukuruku, a Māori naming and storytelling programme for the Kaipātiki Local Board. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Te Kete Rukuruku is a programme involving the collection and telling of the unique stories of Tāmaki Makaurau. A subset of this programme is the Māori naming of parks and places which involves the reclamation or identification of new Māori names and narratives across Tāmaki Makaurau. 

3.       Te Kete Rukuruku is a programme that responds to strong feedback from mana whenua about the current naming practices across Council which are somewhat unpredictable and appear to place low priority and visibility on Māori naming and narratives. 

4.       The programme also responds to the Auckland Council Māori Language Policy adopted in 2016 (refer Attachment A).

5.       Te Kete Rukuruku is a partnership between the Auckland Council and the 19 mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau. Mana whenua have been actively working on the programme over 2017/18 and have now agreed on a new Māori naming process. 

6.       All local boards were invited to join this programme in 2017. The Kaipātiki Local Board were one of nine local boards who chose to join the programme. Two more boards have joined the programme in 2018/2019. The first phase of the programme is focussed on libraries and local parks. This report is specifically seeking direction on the number of local parks to be included within this first phase.

7.       Kaipātiki Local Board have held four workshops over 2017/18 where the scope of the programme has been discussed and the research showing known history of existing park names has been considered. Of the 164 local parks in Kaipātiki, it is recommended mana whenua are invited to identify a suitable Māori name for the list of local parks identified in Attachment B.

8.       It is expected that a follow up report, to confirm the gifted names and narratives will be delivered to the local board, in partnership with mana whenua, in 2019. Prior to adoption of any of the gifted names, a focussed communications approach will be developed to inform the local community of the project and raise awareness and understanding of the rich Māori history and values in the local board area.

9.       Where the local board consider more community engagement is required for specific parks, then this engagement will be developed with the local board and undertaken prior to the proposed Māori names being adopted for specific parks. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Council Māori Language Policy 2016 (Attachment A).

b)      endorse the Te Kete Rukuruku programme, including the Māori naming of parks and places, noting that it supports the visibility of te reo Māori and seeks to capture and tell the unique Māori stories of Kaipātiki and Tāmaki Makaurau.

c)      invite mana whenua to provide a Māori name and narrative for the list of parks detailed in Attachment B of this report.

d)      note it is expected that the gifted names and narratives will be adopted by the local board for use as dual names to enrich the stories of parks and support the Māori language to be visible, heard, spoken and learnt.

Horopaki / Context

Strategic context

10.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within an Auckland local government context.

11.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents – the Auckland Plan, the Long-Term Plan, local board plans and the Unitary Plan.

12.     Whakaotinga 1: He Kāinga a Kaipātiki ki tō tatou iwi o reira (Outcome 1: Our people identify Kaipātiki as their kāinga) within the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 states “Our heritage is protected and celebrated”.  

13.     Whiria Te Muka Tangata – The Māori Responsiveness Framework has been developed in response to Council's commitments and obligations to Māori in a way that will improve outcomes for all. Its purpose is to enhance and guide Auckland Council’s responsiveness to Māori. The framework articulates that council will work to ensure its policies and its actions consider:

·    the recognition and protection of Māori rights and interests within Tāmaki Makaurau

·    how to address and contribute to the needs and aspirations of Māori.

14.     Auckland Council’s Māori Language Policy was adopted by the Governing Body in 2016 (resolution number REG/2016/89).  The policy recognises council’s commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. This policy recognises that the Māori language is a cultural treasure and an official language of Aotearoa. It notes that the Māori language and culture forms a critical part of a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. Reclaiming or identifying new Māori names for local parks within the Kaipātiki Local Board area provides a significant opportunity to fulfil the policy intent.

15.     Key outcome areas of the Māori language policy are:

·    Te reo tē kitea - Māori language that is visible

·    Te reo tē rongohia - Māori language that is heard

·    Te reo tē kōrerohia - Māori language that is spoken

·    Te reo tē ākona - Māori language that is learnt.

16.     The Māori language policy acknowledges that te reo Māori is an official language of Aotearoa and should receive equal status to English and NZ Sign Language.

17.     All local boards were consulted on the Māori Language Policy. The Kaipātiki Local Boards’ leadership in choosing to participate in Te Kete Rukuruku, in particular the Māori naming of parks and places programme provides the opportunity for the Kaipātiki Local Board to give effect to the Māori naming policy in a meaningful way within the local board area. 

18.     Te Kete Rukuruku is a programme involving the collection and telling of the unique stories of Tāmaki Makaurau. A subset of this programme is the Māori naming of parks and places which involves the reclamation or identification of new Māori names for parks and facilities across Tāmaki Makaurau.

19.     The programme represents a partnership between Auckland Council and the 19 mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau.

20.     The programme directly responds to the Auckland Council Māori Language Policy adopted in 2016

21.     Local boards are delegated decision-making authority for naming most local parks and facilities.

Project scope

22.     The scope of Te Kete Rukuruku programme, and particularly the Māori naming of parks and places, is defined as the naming, renaming or dual naming of parks and places throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

23.     The programme recognises there was a rich layer of Māori names that existed across Tāmaki Makaurau. The programme provides an opportunity for Aucklander’s to learn te reo, Māori history and Māori values relevant to places throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

24.     In line with the Māori Language Policy, reclaiming or identifying new Māori names for parks and places will have the following benefits:

·    accelerate the public visibility of the Māori language as a cultural treasure which is at the heart of Māori identity

·    contribute to the Māori language being visible, heard, spoken and learnt

·    celebrate and create connections with the rich Māori heritage of Tāmaki Makaurau

·    enable or support storytelling and interpretation of place and communities

·    provide a practical means for Council to fulfil its commitments and obligations to Māori.

25.     It is expected that, in most cases, Māori naming will be dual naming. Dual naming means that a Māori name is added to the existing name thereby enriching the stories about that place or facility and not taking away from an existing name. For the public this means signs will present both names and in line with the Māori language policy and signage guidelines the te reo Māori name will be presented first.  

26.     Dual naming also means that a Māori name, which is appropriate to the place, sits alongside another name that is not related in its meaning. In other words, the two names are not translations of each other but independent and unique.

Year one of the programme

27.     The first phase of the project is focussed on local parks and libraries. This report focuses on the proposed approach for local parks. A separate report will follow regarding library names for Birkenhead, Glenfield and Northcote libraries. 

28.     Options for creating new or dual Māori names for leisure centres and other community facilities will be delivered as part of this programme in later years.

29.     The Māori naming project demonstrates a best practice approach for naming in partnership with mana whenua. This practice enables a commitment to a consistent process and a strong relationship between mana whenua and the local boards as decision makers of local parks and facilities.

30.     The following aspects are not included in the scope of the Te Kete Rukuruku programme although some of these may be progressed as separate projects parallel or following on from the programme:

·    the naming of features or assets within a park or facility e.g. bridges and walkways

·    English translations of messages within parks and facilities

·    capital development

·    gazetting of the name via the Geographic Board

·    any change to Council brand. 

31.     The scale of the programme is significant. It is estimated there are 4130 parks and facilities across Tāmaki Makaurau and there are 22 council governance entities and 19 mana whenua governance entities. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

32.     Within the Kaipātiki Local Board area there are a total of 164 parks, of which eleven have an existing Māori name (7%), that is unique to the place. Note: a larger number are named after streets or localities that have a Māori name e.g. Manuka Road and Manuka Reserve. This compares with a regional average of 9% of parks and places with a Māori name.  A total of 106 parks (65%) in Kaipātiki are either not named or named after the street.

33.     The current approach to Māori naming (in most cases) is to look for opportunities to identify a Māori name as part of capital development works or when acquiring new parks or facilities.  This approach (the status quo) is likely to result in no change in percentage or only a few percentage points change in any given year noting that across the region there is a lot of growth and new parks many of which are not being given a Māori name.

34.     The current approach to Māori naming is seen as ad hoc and presents the following challenges:

·    it is often too late i.e. the naming occurs at the end of a project thereby losing the opportunity to settle the name in hearts and minds of all those involved in the project.  The opportunity is also lost for the name to inform the design and development of a place.

·    the process is often not clear and mana whenua may select a name only for it to compete with another name suggested from elsewhere in the community. It is difficult and disrespectful to create a process whereby names that are gifted by mana whenua, being the Māori people with mana or authority in an area, to have their names considered as part of a naming competition. 

35.     This programme is about moving away from the status quo and supporting local boards to make a transformational shift in the number of Māori names and the associated visibility of te reo Māori and the unique Māori narratives. The options within the programme relate to pacing and the options for using various supporting processes.

36.     The high-level process for the project is outlined in Attachment C. 

37.     As this process shows the number of parks and facilities where mana whenua are invited to gift a name and narrative is at the discretion of the local board.

38.     It is not yet clear how far the funding that the local board has already committed to the project is likely to go as this will vary based on the significance to mana whenua of the sites chosen and their history. 

39.     The funding the local board has already committed to the project is likely to support between 20-50 names and narratives being identified for each of the nine local boards. However, the level of resourcing required for each site will vary based on the significance of the site and its history. 

40.     As a general rule it is recommended that the first list of parks or places (tranche one) are local parks where the parks are named after a street, not named or are new parks. It is also likely that in adopting new Māori names these will be applied as dual names rather than replacing an existing name although this needs to be assessed on a case by case basis.

41.     The Kaipātiki Local Board has had the opportunity to review the research that is available for all local parks in their rohe (area). Mana whenua have also had this opportunity. This has enabled both parties to understand where there might be greater levels of complexity and also consider their capacity. 

42.     Based on this review, the local parks in Kaipātiki that are considered appropriate for inviting mana whenua to identify Māori names for are provided in Attachment B. 

43.     This would represent a transformational shift in the first phase of the project. A lesser number of parks is also appropriate however a minimum number of 20 parks are recommended to be considered in the first phase in order to achieve a transformational shift.  For the reasons outlined in the section on the scope of this project this is anticipated to bring a number of benefits to the community and is recommended over the status quo.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

44.     Four workshops have been held with the Kaipātiki local board to date.

45.     Workshop one, on 8 Nov 2017, focussed on introducing the project and seeking feedback on the approach.

46.     Workshop two, on 14 March 2018, provided an update on the high level communications approach and provided the local board with the research of the existing park names for review.

47.     Workshop three on 11 July 2018, direction was sought from the board on a potential list of parks for dual naming. During September 2018, further refinement of the potential list was undertaken with the Chair and parks specialists. 

48.     The final workshop on 14 November 2018 confirmed the draft tranche 1 list in Attachment B. The local board also requested the inclusion of three sites, namely Richardson Pocket Park, Cadness Loop and Local purpose reserve Drainage Reserve-Unnamed. These reserves are part of the Northcote Awataha Greenway reserves which are in the developing design phase (resolution number KT/2018/210). These reserves should be named together once the reserves are confirmed to allow interested mana whenua to consider the area as a whole. These three sites have not been included in the tranche 1 list. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

49.     As discussed in tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu (the analysis and advice section of the report) the Māori naming of parks and places programme is a response to feedback from mana whenua.

50.     The proposed programme seeks to develop a good practice approach to Māori naming, through an agreed process in partnership between mana whenua and local boards.   Through this partnership it is envisaged that relationships between mana whenua and their local boards will be strengthened.

51.     The role of providing Māori names in Tāmaki Makaurau rests with mana whenua. This is Māori who have mana and for which Tāmaki Makaurau is their tūrangawaewae (standing place) and they have whakapapa (a genealogical link) to the place.

52.     This programme is expected to provide significant benefits to mātāwaka Māori and mātāwaka Māori organisations will be engaged and potentially become partners in the communication plan for the programme. The increase in Māori language and stories will enable matawaka Māori to see and hear their culture and language being used in their community. This is expected to increase their sense of belonging and connection. It is also recognised that many Māori are yet to learn or in the process of learning their language is in a phase of revitalisation and many Māori are not yet able to speak their language.  This is programme will play a role in supporting this.

53.     Approximately 20 hui have occurred with mana whenua where the issues, opportunities and the scope of the programme have been discussed. Through this regular engagement with up to 17 of the 19 mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau has occurred.

54.     On 16 May 2018 this programme was formally and fully supported by 12 out of the 19 mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau.

55.     The project team also provide regular programme updates to the Independent Māori Statutory Board secretariat on progress.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

56.     The Kaipātiki Local Board participated in this programme in the first year and contributed $10,000. This funded a programme manager, mana whenua engagement, research and database development as well as supporting resources to progress the programme.

57.     In the 2018/19 year and beyond budget estimates have been provided to local boards at a rate of $23,000. This is only likely to support a limited number of names being provided by mana whenua but the exact cost can only be confirmed once the names are confirmed and the level of significance of the sites and the number of mana whenua with an interest in the site is known. It is recommended that the board consider options for additional funding later in the year or in 2019/20 otherwise the naming is likely to need to be distributed over several years.  Staff will report back to the board to provide further advice on funding as we progress with this programme over the course of 2018/19. 

58.     The programme involves the gifting of names and narratives for nominated parks. It does not include any capital expenditure. Any new signage or capital works would occur over a number of years as signage renewals occur or if the local board sets aside budget to fast track upgrades to signage.

59.     The project team are working closely with the signage renewals team to align the signage renewals work programme with the adoption of Māori names to enable the names to be seen, heard, learnt and spoken as soon as practicable.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

60.     A number of risks have been discussed during the scoping of this programme and most of these have been mitigated through project design.

a.    The volume of names and narratives and the capacity to deliver on these. The process to mitigate this is discussed at paragraph 39 and 40.

b.    Māori translation of functional names for parks or facilities for example domain or esplanade adds a lot of complexity and could make Māori names quite long. As noted above a principle of the project is that the Māori name will not be a translation of the existing name. There is therefore no need to apply the functional name and in general it is not expected that this will occur for park names. However, this has occurred with libraries and may be considered for other facilities. This will be discussed in future reports as part of the next phase of the programme.

c.    Where there are multiple iwi interests there may be no agreement. There are overlapping iwi interests throughout much of Tāmaki Makaurau. In recognition of this, a principle of the project as agreed by mana whenua is that mana whenua will work together to provide a single name except where there is more than one traditional name for a site. However, it is noted that many of the Tūpuna Maunga (volcanic cones) have several traditional names (for example Puketāpapa and Pukewiwi are both gazetted names that sit alongside the English name Mt Roskill, so Auckland Council and the community now has a history of supporting multiple Māori names.

d.    Digital naming only won’t gain traction and names will be lost. It may take some time for the names to be ‘seen’ through signage renewals. As an interim measure a Geographic Information System (GIS) database and web page is in development that can be easily searched that will provide information on the origin of the existing name and the Māori name and narrative. The communications strategy will promote the website and database so that the community can have access to it. It will also look to celebrate new names through publications, events and other means. It is noted that many of the Tūpuna Maunga have Māori names that are not yet all on signs, yet through the work of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority, media and events the Māori names have been widely used. 

e.    Navigation confusion / way finding – this is a potential or perceived risk but given the significant growth in Auckland and the number of new names popping up on a regular basis the placement of names in GIS and other digital forums as well as an effective communication plan is expected to mitigate any actual or perceived risk.

f.     Some local boards have had negative experiences with changing the names of parks within their local area. In response to this concern the programme includes a research phase to ensure the origins of the existing names are well understood. Where current names have a significant history, they are not included in the first phase. In addition, the predominant outcome is going to be the addition of names and associated rich narratives and will not involve the removal of names. Where it is considered appropriate to replace a name the board will also need to carefully consider who the affected parties are and determine if community engagement is appropriate. In all other cases we are proposing that a strong public communications approach to enable the community to understand the process and enjoy the benefits of the additional name and narrative.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

61.     The list of parks that is endorsed by the Kaipātiki local board will be provided to mana whenua inviting them to gift names and narratives.

62.     Those mana whenua with an interest in these parks will undertake research and, where necessary, will work together to agree a single name and narrative to be gifted to the local board.

63.     In parallel with the mana whenua naming process, the project team will work closely with local board communications team to develop a tailored communications plan for the local board area.

64.     The project team will also continue to work closely with the signage renewals delivery team to seek opportunities for new Māori names to be part of signage renewals.

65.     The decision as to dual naming or replacing names with a Māori name does not need to occur until the names and narratives are gifted by mana whenua and first considered by the local board. It is proposed that this occur at a non-decision making meeting. At this time the local board can finalise the option of dual naming or not and also consider if the proposed naming is likely to trigger the need for community engagement.

66.     Dual naming is expected to make up the largest number of new Māori names and, in general, it is expected that an effective communications programme to inform the community of the new names and narratives will be the appropriate approach.

67.     A report to confirm the gifted names and narratives is anticipated during 2019.  

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Māori Language Policy 2016

15

b

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Kaipātiki Local Board draft Tranche 1 - Nov 2018

23

c

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Māori naming of parks and facilities:  High level process outline

25

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jane Aickin - Paeurungi Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

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Approval of kauri dieback management actions in local parks in the Kaipātiki Local Board area

 

File No.: CP2018/23480

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a further update to the Kaipātiki Local Board on the kauri dieback challenge and management within the local board area.

2.       To seek endorsement for actions to prevent kauri dieback spread and protect healthy kauri in local parks and reserves within the Kaipātiki Local Board area, ahead of the development of detailed work programmes in early 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

3.       The Kaipātiki Local Board has expressed strong support for managing the impact of kauri dieback within its local parks and reserves and has passed several resolutions to support its decision making and advocacy on this topic.

4.       More recently at its 17 October 2018 business meeting the Kaipātiki Local Board endorsed the proposed response to kauri dieback in local parks and reserves within the local board area (resolution number KT/2018/186). Specifically, it endorsed the continuation of current closures and the development of recommendations for the long-term management of tracks in the Kaipātiki area.

5.       This report presents the results of the parks and track prioritisation work relevant to the Kaipātiki Local Board area local parks undertaken as part of the regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme.

6.       There are approximately 200 local parks throughout the Auckland region that contain kauri. Funding has been identified within the plant pathogen workstream of the natural environment targeted rate to support kauri dieback management. This funding will allow for upgrades of tracks and closures of parks with high value kauri across the local parks and reserves network. However, the funding available from the natural environment targeted rate will not be able to provide for the protection of all kauri in the region and a risk-based prioritisation approach has been applied.

7.       To manage investment across the region, local parks were analysed in terms of kauri ecosystem value, recreational value and kauri health status, noting that the primary objective of the kauri dieback parks mitigation programme is the protection of healthy kauri.

8.       In the Kaipātiki Local Board area there are 31 local parks and or reserves that contain kauri or kauri ecosystems. All 31 parks have been analysed and allocated to one of four categories for management. Thirteen local parks within the Kaipātiki Local Board are classified as Category A under the prioritisation categories for the region-wide kauri dieback parks mitigation programme. This means that these parks contain a high value kauri ecosystem, have high recreational values and to keep them open require investment to bring them to ‘kauri-safe’ standard or to protect them from either infection or spread.

9.       At this stage, recommendations for these thirteen parks are high-level only, focusing on potential asset solutions (track upgrades, re-alignment or re-routing of tracks, other works such as installation of boardwalks, and installation of hygiene stations) and non-asset solutions (closure of tracks or – in some cases - parks). Detailed investigations by a team of asset management experts and biosecurity staff are required to determine the exact nature of the works required, costs and achievable timelines. Planning for these investigations is underway and they are expected to take place in early 2019.

10.     The recommended actions for the thirteen Category A parks can likely be funded from within the natural environment targeted rate budget, but there may be further enabling works that would require use of existing renewal budgets. Future work and recommendations, to be informed by asset management investigations and categorised according to their funding source, whether it be the renewals budget or natural environment targeted rate, will be prepared for formal consideration by the Kaipātiki Local Board in early 2019.

11.     This report seeks endorsement from the local board in regards to the recommended actions for the Category A parks within the Kaipātiki Local Board area ahead of more detailed investigations and feasibility studies.

12.     This report is part of the ongoing discussion and kauri dieback work being undertaken with the Kaipātiki Local Board and responds to the relevant resolutions passed by the Kaipātiki Local Board on this topic. Given advances in the understanding of the disease instance, spread and risk in the Kaipātiki Local Board area parks some resolutions are no longer relevant, specifically resolutions KT/2018/97 (d)(i), (ii), (iii), (iv), and (vi), and KAI/2018/65 (d), or are covered by previous reports or advances, namely resolution KT/2018/131.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         note the regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme and approach for assessing and recommending actions for kauri dieback management in local parks, and the specific assessment for local parks within the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

b)         endorse in principle the following recommended actions to mitigate kauri dieback in local parks and reserves in the Kaipātiki Local Board area, noting that the proposed solution will be refined through the development of a detailed work programme, and will include the amount of funding required through either the natural environment targeted rate budget or the local board’s renewals budgets:

i)     Lynn Reserve and Leigh Scenic Reserve - upgrade tracks to protect kauri or undertake similar works so that tracks can be re-opened

ii)     Eskdale and Francis Kendall Reserve - upgrade tracks to protect kauri or undertake similar works so that tracks can be re-opened, and install hygiene stations

iii)    Kauri Glen Reserve - upgrade tracks to protect kauri and keep the reserve open, but close the adjacent City View Reserve indefinitely

iv)    Le Roys Bush Reserve, Dudding Park Sportsfield and Little Shoal Bay Reserve - upgrade tracks to protect kauri or undertake similar works so that tracks can continue to be used, and install hygiene stations

v)     Birkenhead War Memorial Park - close the north-eastern part of the ‘horseshoe track’ (cemetery track) indefinitely and upgrade other tracks where needed to protect kauri

vi)   Chatswood Reserve and Chelsea Estate Heritage Park - rationalise entrances, close some tracks and upgrade other tracks (commuter routes) to protect kauri, and install hygiene stations

vii)   Kauri Point Centennial Park – investigate to determine appropriate upgrade solution to protect kauri

viii)  Fernglen Reserve, Kauri Park and Muriel Fisher Reserve - upgrade tracks in Fernglen Reserve to retain access to the botanical garden, and close Kauri Park and Muriel Fisher Reserve indefinitely

ix)    Hadfield Street and Odin Place reserves – keep Hadfield Street Reserve open but close the eastern part of this reserve as well as Odin Place Reserve indefinitely

x)     Rangatira Reserve - keep park open and close the track through the kauri stand indefinitely.

c)         note that while some funding for protection of high value kauri ecosystems in high             recreational use local parks may be provided for within the plant pathogen budget             of the region-wide natural environment targeted rate, some renewals funding may             be required to complete works and keep parks open.

Horopaki / Context

13.     To reduce the spread of kauri dieback, the council’s main objective is to protect healthy kauri using a precautionary approach. To ensure that the natural environment targeted rate funding is allocated region-wide and based on risk, council established a regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme in July 2018.

14.     This programme provides funding over and above any renewals funding that has already or may be identified and that may be beneficial in terms of protecting kauri. To optimise return for investment, natural environment targeted rate funding will be considered in conjunction with other funding available (such as investment in renewals) and be focused on those tracks or sections of tracks where kauri are located within 30 metres of the track and that have been identified as high priority (Category A) in accordance with the process set out below.

15.     The local board has previously been advised of this programme, which commenced in July 2018 and is summarised in the diagram below (Figure 1). Activities that have been completed are shown in green. The activities that are the focus of this report are shown in red.

Figure 1. Overview of regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

16.     The risk assessment for local parks in the Kaipātiki Local Board area was completed in October 2018. Each park was assessed by council subject matter experts, and prioritised on the following basis:

·     value of the kauri ecosystem, which was identified as high, medium or low.
Parks known not to contain kauri were not assessed. Kauri ecosystem value was assigned by council ecologists on the basis of the work undertaken by Singers et al (2017): Indigenous terrestrial and wetland ecosystems of Auckland.

·     the health status of the kauri, which was noted as infected, possibly infected or symptom free. This information is derived from council’s active surveillance programme, which includes soil sampling.

·     the recreational value of the park, which was described as high, medium or low. Staff analysed key recreational activities such as recreational trails, active transport, visitor destinations, volunteer activity and sports and recreation. Reviews of the reserve management plan (if applicable), the Kaipātiki Network Connections Plan (Greenways plan) and any other relevant strategic documents were undertaken. Mana whenua with interest in the parks and any other key stakeholders were also identified. For high and medium recreational value sites, key service outcomes were described, for example key connections, access to existing leased areas/ facilities and any future planned development. Recreational assessments are provided as attachments to this report.

17.     Based on the above, each park was assigned to one of the following four categories, which are also shown in Figure 2:

·     Category A: High to medium kauri ecosystem value and high to medium recreational value. Selected tracks in these parks will be upgraded and/or provided with asset solution(s) that meet recreational outcomes and are considered to be ‘kauri-safe’. Where necessary, parks or tracks may be closed temporarily until works have been completed.

·     Category B: High to medium kauri ecosystem value and low recreational value. Tracks (or parks) in this category are recommended for indefinite closure.

·     Category C: Low kauri ecosystem value and high to medium recreational value. The installation of hygiene station(s) at strategic locations is recommended for parks or tracks in this category. Some track upgrades may also be required.

·     Category D: Low kauri ecosystem value and low recreational value. No action is recommended for these locations.

Figure 2. Prioritisation categories for regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme

 

18.     In the context of the regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme, ‘kauri-safe’ means that a track has a dry, mud-free surface 100m before and after the location of kauri or kauri roots. This can be achieved in a variety of ways including board-walks, box steps, applying geoweb soil confinement membranes and providing aggregate cover.

19.     Recommended mitigation measures also considered the following:

·     accessibility of kauri

·     track condition

·     commuter use of tracks

·     distance to infected areas

·     community concern

·     potential ease of implementing works

·     roadblocks and opportunities.

20.     To facilitate a ‘network’ approach rather than considering each park in isolation, parks that are near each other and/or have shared boundaries were grouped together. Altogether, nine groups were identified.

21.     Thirteen local parks were identified as being Category A, and these will be further investigated early in 2019 to determine the most appropriate specific mitigation measures. These parks are:

·     Leigh Scenic Reserve

·     Lynn Reserve

·     Eskdale Reserve

·     Kauri Glen Reserve

·     Dudding Park Sportsfield

·     Le Roys Bush Reserve

·     Birkenhead War Memorial Park

·     Chatswood Reserve

·     Chelsea Estate Heritage Park

·     Kauri Point Centennial Park

·     Fernglen Reserve

·     Kauri Park

·     Rangatira Reserve.

22.     The table in Attachment A provides an overview of all Kaipātiki local parks, listed by group. The table notes the prioritisation category (A, B and C), and the recommended high-level mitigation measures. Category D parks are only shown where they form part of a group.

23.     At this stage, recommendations are high-level only, focusing on asset solutions (which includes track upgrades, re-alignment or re-routing of tracks, other works such as installation of boardwalks, and installation of hygiene stations) and non-asset solutions (closure of individual tracks or – in some cases – all tracks in a park). Detailed investigations by a team of asset management experts and biosecurity staff are required to determine the exact nature of the works required, costs and achievable timelines. These investigations are currently being scheduled and are expected to take place in early 2019.

24.     The local board will receive a report on the findings of these investigations for approval after their completion, which is currently expected to be within the first quarter of 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

25.     The Kaipātiki Local Board has expressed strong support for managing the impact of kauri dieback on this taonga species.

26.     As per the regionwide risk-based kauri dieback mitigation response programme process, staff have developed high-level options for local parks in the Kaipātiki area.

27.     For many parks, various asset-based solutions will be developed early in 2019 and reported to the board for approval.

28.     Indefinite closure is recommended for some parks, including Kauri Park and Muriel Fisher Reserve. The tracks in these parks are generally unofficial tracks and/or in very poor condition, and costs to upgrade them to a standard that would protect kauri could be significant.

29.     Closing parks and reserves or tracks will have an impact on the recreational activities available in the Kaipātiki area. These impacts have been considered, and track upgrades or similar works are recommended to minimise these.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

30.     Kauri is a keystone species that supports a distinct New Zealand forest ecosystem, sustaining indigenous flora and fauna. Kauri is a taonga species and Auckland Council, in partnership with Māori, have a responsibility for the protection of the spiritual, economic and ecological values associated with this taonga and the ecosystems it supports.

31.     Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua kaitiaki kaimahi representatives have stressed the importance of the kauri species and a desire to work more closely with council and the Department of Conservation on this kaupapa. Staff will work with mana whenua on the regional approach to kauri dieback on a site by site basis.

32.     Te Kawerau ā Maki hold kauri in very high regard and have offered to assist the Kaipātiki Local Board, if necessary, by placing a rāhui across local parks and reserves in the local board area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

33.     The mitigation measures specifically proposed in this report will be largely funded by the natural environment targeted rate. Where possible, existing council budget will be used, for example, where track works are already programmed in the renewals budget, and the local board will be informed at each instance of this to allow for reprioritisation of allocated funding.

34.     In some cases, there may be extra track upgrade works required to remove muddy sections on lengths of track away from kauri.  Some of these works may need to be funded from the renewals budget if they are to be kept open.  Detailed design work will clarify these further needs.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

35.     Closing parks and reserves or their tracks will have an impact on the recreational activities available in the Kaipātiki area. This may put extra pressure on open parks and reserves. However, the parks in Category B and recommended for indefinite closure contain poor quality and/or unofficial tracks only. Alternatives for recreational use can be publicised as part of the public education component of the council’s kauri dieback programme.

36.     Achieving high levels of compliance with closed tracks and the use of cleaning stations will require considerable effort and resource. Public education and compliance is an integral part of council’s kauri dieback programme, and improved resourcing for this task is currently under way.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

37.     Following the local board’s decision on the recommendations provided in this report, staff will develop recommended works packages for each park, including indicative cost and delivery times, in early 2019 and report these recommendations to the local board within the first quarter of 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Attachment A Mitigation for local parks

35

b

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Attachment B Kaipātiki local maps

39

c

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Attachment C Kaipātiki recreational assessments

51

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Phil Brown – Biosecurity Manager

Authorisers

Gael Ogilvie – General Manager Environmental Services

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


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Marlborough Park Skate Park Playspace Concept Design

 

File No.: CP2018/23648

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board of the concept designs for both the renewal of the skate park and the adjoining senior youth play zone at Marlborough Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Marlborough Park – renew skate park including the adjoining youth play zone has been identified within the Kaipatiki 2018/2019 Work Programme as a renewal (resolution number KT/2018/142).

3.       The skatepark and youth play area were assessed to be in poor condition in 2016. The skatepark floods following significant rain events, creating a health and safety hazard. The renewal follows on from the paths, drainage and junior playspace renewal projects completed in 2017.

4.       The total current allocated project budget is $1,169,481 compared to an overall budget forecast of $1,700,000, leaving a shortfall of $530,519 to be funded from CAPEX Renewals. This shortfall will need to be addressed through the 2019/2020 work programme, with consideration given to prioritising the projects.

5.       The renewal of the youth play zone can be delivered in the current 2018/2019 financial year, while the renewal of the skate park will be undertaken in the 2019/2020 financial year, to avoid winter works on site. The works will be scheduled for summer and autumn time to avoid the boggy winter conditions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the Marlborough Park design concepts for the skate park renewal and the adjoining youth play space, as in Attachments A and B of the agenda report.

b)      approve the proposed works programme to complete the renewal of the youth play space zone in the current financial year ending 30 June 2019.

c)      approve the proposed design and build procurement for the renewal of the skate park to be delivered in the 2019/20 financial year, noting that there is a current shortfall of $530,519 required to be funded from 2019/2020 works renewal CAPEX programme.

d)      allocate $20,000 from its locally driven initiative capital budget line of additional play items at Marlborough Park to enhance the renewal of the youth play zone, as detailed in Attachment B of the agenda report.

Horopaki / Context

6.       The renewal of the skate park and the adjoining youth play space zone is the next stage of the renewal of major recreational assets in Marlborough Park, to provide additional play within this destination park that is suitable for all ages and abilities. The first stage was the renewal and upgrade of the network of paths with drainage, the junior play area with the addition of shade, the replacement of the basketball courts with a bigger dual use court for basketball and netball, and the youth hub plaza area with landscape planting. This was completed in November 2017.

7.       A condition assessment of the skate park facility was undertaken by Rich Landscapes in January 2016 that identified that the control joint movement adjacent to the lower miniramp was exceptionally bad, along with other minor issues and flooding of the lower bowl area was a regular occurrence. The overall assessment for renewal was given as medium – high while the overall skate value was assessed as poor.

Decision-making authority

8.       The local board has decision-making authority over recreation facilities and initiatives. These include specific location, design, build and fit-out of new local recreation and sports facilities, within budget parameters agreed with the Governing Body, and the use of local recreation facilities and initiatives, including leasing and changes of use.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

The Skate Park

9.       The design concept for the skate park (refer Attachment A) was developed in December 2016, in consultation with the public and local skaters. The local board members were provided an early concept design for feedback at a workshop on 18 May 2016.

10.     The detailed design is proposed to be included in a ‘Design and Build’ contract. The design and build option is preferred as it offers scale of economy as there will be savings on the detailed design and the successful supplier will have a set budget to complete the works within.

11.     The physical works will be scheduled to start summer 2019/2020 to best avoid the wet and boggy site conditions.

The Youth Play Zone

12.     The preliminary concept design for the youth play space (refer Attachment B) was presented to the Kaipātiki Local Board at a workshop on 10 October 2018.

13.     The youth play space is designed to cater for the upper end of primary school/intermediate age children and youth, to be able to climb up/hangout/view and engage directly with the adjoining skate park space.

14.     The climbing net is a custom made high quality structure supplied by Playco, with dimensions of 11 metres long x 9 metres at its widest point, that will sit some two metres higher than the existing lower retaining wall. It will be the first of its kind in the Auckland Region. The hammock cable net rope is high quality that provides good viewing into and through it, but is not be comfortable enough for sleeping in.

15.     While the climbing wall timber structure is being retained, the climbing handholds are to be removed as there will not be a sufficient safe fall zone with the climbing net alongside it. The climbing net is compensating for the loss of the climbing activity on the wall.

16.     Multicoloured strips of ‘Wet Pour’ safety under surfacing, similar to the new junior playground, is proposed for the entire youth space including under the existing set of swings.  The colours are to be similar to the colours used for the surface of the renewed basketball court.

17.     Additional seating is being provided with the new concrete steps and the new concrete bench seat next to the existing viewing platform.

18.     While the concept plans do not contain details for landscape planting, there is opportunity for landscape planting around the north western side of the play space, as indicated on sheet three of the concept plan.

19.     An existing storm water overland flow path, that currently runs into the youth play space, is to be diverted and reconnected to the new overland flow path that runs down the western side of the skate park. New cesspits at the bottom of the overland flow path are to be installed as part of the renewal of the skate park works, to intercept the surface water currently flowing into the new junior playground and around the new basketball court area.

20.     While the proposed graphic artwork on the existing rear wall is not detailed in the concept plans, it needs to have a youth vibe. Some suggestions have been provided in sheet five of the concept plans, however the playground designer is happy to work with the local board or leave it out completely.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

21.     The Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 includes the following outcome: Our community facilities and infrastructure are high quality and well managed. An identified objective within that outcome area is that – Our playing surfaces, sports fields and recreational facilities are accessible, well maintained, open to the public, of high quality for all standards of play and sufficient for our recreational needs. The renewal of the skate park and the adjoining senior youth play zone at Marlborough Park align to this outcome and objective.

22.     The design concept for the skate park was developed in December 2016, in consultation with the public and local skaters. An early concept design was presented to the local board at a workshop on 18 May 2016 for comment and feedback.

23.     The attached preliminary concept design for the youth play space was presented to the Kaipātiki Local Board at a workshop on 10 October 2018.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

24.     No culturally significant factors have been identified in this project. Therefore, it is proposed that no further consultation with the Parks and Recreation North West Mana Whenua Engagement Forum is required.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

25.     The total current allocated project budget is $1,169,481 as follows:

·     Financial Year 2018/2019 - $873,318

·     Financial Year 2019/2020 - $560,000

26.     The current budget forecasts for the sub-projects are:

·     Skate Park - $1,200,000

·     Youth Play Zone - $500,000

27.     This leaves a current budget shortfall of around $530,519 to be funded from CAPEX Renewals. Prioritising the project in the wider programme should be considered as other projects may be affected by this.

28.     As part of the allocation of locally driven initiatives capital budget on 10 August 2016, the local board assigned a total budget of $215,000 towards additional play items at Marlborough Park (resolution number KT/2016/103). In February 2017 the local board allocated $195,000 of the $215,000 towards the enhancement of the junior playspace and basketball court renewal projects (resolution number KT/2017/14), leaving a balance of $20,000 to be allocated to the youth space at Marlborough Park. This report seeks the local board allocate the remaining $20,000 of locally driven initiatives capital budget to upgrade the youth play area and deliver an increased level of service for the community to enjoy.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

29.     Because Marlborough Park is a very wet site during the winter season, it is not recommended to commence construction on the renewal of the skate park in the autumn going into the winter period. Construction works may take up to six months to complete, including the construction of a temporary access haul road from Archers Road, and demolition of the existing concrete structure. The removed concrete will be taken to a crushing plant for recycling of the material.

30.     Physical works are best undertaken in summer therefore the youth play area is scheduled late summer 2019 and the skatepark summer 2019/2020.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

31.     Once the Marlborough Park concept plans have been approved by the Kaipātiki Local Board, detailed design for the renewal of the youth play zone will be completed by December 2018, for construction to commence from March 2019. Detailed design for the skate park will commence in December 2018, while construction will not commence until after the winter period ending September/October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Marlborough Skate Park Concept Design

67

b

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Marlborough Youth Zone Concept

77

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Peter Bilton – Senior Project Manager

Julie Crabb – Principal Project Manager

Authorisers

Mark Culpan – Manager Project Delivery

John Schermbrucker – Head of Project Delivery

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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Kaipātiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment

 

File No.: CP2018/23166

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Kaipātiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment September 2018 and seek approval to commence investigation and design of Monarch Park recommendations contained in the assessment.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       As part of the approved Parks, Sports and Recreation work programme 2017/18, the Kaipātiki Local Board approved funding of $20,000 to complete a feasibility assessment which will inform the development of nature and space trails in the local board area.

3.       The Kaipātiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment (refer Attachment A) has grouped nature play into three broad play typologies:

·     Movement

·     Education

·     Unstructured.

4.       The purpose of the Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment is to:

a)    provide a basis for local board and council staff to make informed decisions on proposed network, locations and extents of nature play spaces and trails in the Kaipātiki area.

b)    understand key opportunities and constraints and where further work is required to validate potential outcomes.

5.       The assessment utilised network analysis mapping to explore overall patterns and synergies between existing nature reserves, ecosystems, well-known walking routes such as those included in the Kaipātiki Explorer booklet and playspace provision to evaluate opportunities at a network level. 

6.       Preferred sites identified out of this process were then assessed for their intrinsic nature play opportunities, with schematic site plans prepared to spatially articulate recommendations for future implementation. The following preferred sites were discussed at workshops with local board members:

·     Monarch Park

·     Lauderdale Reserve

·     Spinella Reserve

·     Shepherds Park.

7.       The feasibility assessment proposes a number of recommendations to improve levels of service and provision, responding to key outcomes in the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 and other Auckland Council and nationally/internationally accepted strategic documents. The assessment is the guiding document for the provision of nature spaces and trails within Kaipātiki Local Board area.

8.       The feasibility assessment will inform the investigation and design phase of the individual nature spaces and trail developments in the Kaipātiki area.

9.       Feedback received from the local board has been incorporated into the assessment and has informed the next steps that will enable projects, particularly Monarch Park, to progress to investigation and design, including detailed engagement with the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      adopt the Kaipātiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment September 2018, as provided in Attachment A to this report, to assist the local board, recoginsed community groups associated with sites,  and council staff in making decisions to improve nature spaces and trails within the Kaipātiki area.

b)      approve the Monarch Park nature spaces and trails proceeding to the investigation and design stage based on the recommendations contained in the Kaipātiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment September 2018. 

Horopaki / Context

10.     Nature play is typically defined as child-led, unstructured play outdoors, in natural and sensory-rich environments for children of all ages and abilities. Nature play nurtures cognitive, social and emotional development whilst developing creativity, problem-solving and resilience. Nature experiences in childhood are also thought to lead to greater environmental awareness and stewardship later in life.

11.     The implementation of nature play spaces within wider urban and suburban settings provides opportunities to harness accessible natural environments for their intrinsic capacity to support and generate valuable play and education outcomes.

12.     Nature play spaces typically comprise a blend of movement-focused, nature trail interventions with more unstructured, loose play and education-focused interventions.

13.     The Kaipātiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment has grouped nature play into three broad play typologies:

·     Movement:  Nature play stimulates full-body engagement, increasing gross motor skills and encourages exploration; increasing opportunities for walking, running, jumping and climbing.

·     Education:  Nature play spaces are living systems, facilitating engagement with constantly changing environments and emphasising cumulative learning experiences across seasons.

·     Unstructured:  Most nature play activities, whether education or movement-focused, involve aspects of unstructured or child-led play, through encouraging freedom of expression, creativity, collaboration and exploration; enabling hands-on manipulation and discovery; allowing children to shape their environment.

14.     The feasibility assessment was executed in several stages to identify specific nature play intervention sites and establish feasibility of future development. The assessment process in sequence was as follows:

i)     Network analysis mapping (refer Attachment A, page 3 ‘Nature Play Sites Assessed’)

ii)    Desktop evaluation of potential sites, with a view to discounting and determining sites suitable for further assessment.  Potential sites identified were visited and recorded with photos and key observations.

iii)    ‘Individual Site Assessment Sheets’ prepared for selected sites (refer Appendix A of the attached feasibility assessment).

iv)   Preparation of schematic site plans;

v)    Preparation of character imagery sheets.

15.     The feasibility assessment is aligned strategically to the following Auckland Council guiding documents:

·     Kaipātiki Local Board (2017). Kaipātiki Local Board Plan.

·     Auckland Council (2018). Draft Auckland Plan 2050.

·     Auckland Council (2017). Indigenous terrestrial and wetland ecosystems of Auckland.

·     Auckland Council (2017). Tākaro: Investing in Play documents

·     Auckland Council Regional Development and Operations Committee (2013). Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan.

·     Auckland Council Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (2016). Open Space Provision Policy.

16.     The purpose of the feasibility assessment is to provide a starting point for discussion with the local board and community regarding development options. In general, these potential development options are high-level only and require further investigation to fully understand the site opportunities and constraints.

17.     The assessment process and engagement with local board and community has highlighted Monarch Park as the most preferred and ready site for initiating investigation and design, in line with noted recommendations within the feasibility assessment.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

18.     The Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment has identified preferred sites to be considered for future nature play investment within the Kaipātiki area by combination of network mapping, desktop review and individual site verification.

19.     Sites chosen at the network mapping and desktop review stages generally had several of the following attributes:

a.    association with an existing Council-owned play space 

b.    relationship with well-known walking tracks, such as those included in the Kaipātiki Explorer booklet produced by the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust

c.    location within an identified gap in the play space network (assessed within the Kaipātiki Play and SunSmart Provision Assessment)

d.    proximity to school, kindergarten and / or wider community facilities

e.    proximity to residential neighbourhoods

f.     natural features and bush cover, whether as part of an established ecosystem or marginal, regenerating bush environment, with potential for further improvement

g.    appropriate topography and space to support intervention (noting CPtED requirements and visibility)

h.    supporting amenity / built features such as toilet facilities, walkways, seating etc

i.     existing community group involvement.

20.     Sites deemed unsuitable for development were discounted due to specific site constraints, typically one or more of the following:

a.    limited or poor-quality natural features or forest cover

b.    poor access visibility from the road (CPtED)

c.    difficult access for less able visitors, caregivers with prams and young children, including significant stairs or steep drops

d.    potential kauri dieback restrictions and / or significant ecological constraints

e.    unsuitable distance from community and school facilities

f.     lack of space for activities due to steep topography or significant wetland areas.

21.     Final locations proposed will provide additional unstructured play opportunities within the current play space network and are located within a range of natural /ecosystem experiences.

22.     Specific areas of opportunity are outlined in detail in the ‘Individual Sites’ assessment (pages 11-15) and ‘Appendix A: Individual Site Assessment Sheets’.

23.     Staff are recommending that the local board resolves to adopt the Kaipātiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment to:

i)     provide a basis for local board and council staff to make informed decisions on proposed locations and extents of nature play spaces and trails;

ii)    understand key opportunities and constraints and where further work is required to validate potential outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

24.     The individual projects align to the following outcomes in the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan:

·     Outcome 6: Our community facilities and infrastructure are high quality and well managed.

·     Outcome 7: Services are well managed and meet community needs.

25.     The Parks Sport and Recreation 2017/18 work programme was approved by the Kaipatiki Local Board on 21 June 2017 (resolution number KT/2017/75).

26.     A workshop was held with the local board on 11 July (90% draft) and 12 September 2018, when the Parks and Places Specialist presented the draft Monarch Park and Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessments (combined in Attachment A).  Based on feedback received at these workshops, staff prepared the attached amended draft for adoption.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

27.     The Parks Sport and Recreation 2017/18 work programme was presented to the Parks Sport and Recreation North-western area Mana whenua Hui on 2 September 2017.

28.     The work undertaken in the work programme has been designed to enable meaningful engagement with Iwi by outlining the potential project and the how it will deliver on the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The intention is to provide enough information for Iwi to efficiently provide input into the direction of the project before the design process begins.

29.     The projects that are initiated will be presented again to the North-western area Hui. Iwi will have the opportunity to express interest in the projects and indicate how they would like to be involved in the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

30.     To initiate projects from the feasibility assessment, investment of capital locally driven initiative (LDI) may be required. If the feasibility assessment is adopted, staff will work with the local board to identify possible opportunities for including individual projects as part of the proposed Community Facilities work programme.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

31.     There is an inherent risk in investing in investigation and design to initiate a project when there is no capital funding identified to deliver the physical work components. The capital funding will need to be identified and agreed as part of a future work programme.

32.     The investigation and design phase of project delivery may identify issues that require the feasibility of the project to be reassessed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

33.     The feasibility assessment is designed to agree on desired nature play space and trails locations and outcomes across the Kaipātiki area.

34.     Detail on the activities that will deliver on the agreed outcomes are provided in the feasibility assessment on page 4 ‘Recommended Next Steps’, these will require detailed investigation and design and funding allocation.

35.     Subject to formal local board approval of the outcomes defined for nature spaces and trails in the Kaipātiki Local board area, and inclusion within the Community Facilities Work Programme, detailed investigation and design will be initiated.

36.     The adopted Community Facilities FY2018/19 Work Programme includes investigation and design across a number of renewal activities that potentially align with the recommendations e.g. path/ tracks, playgrounds, signs and furniture. Staff will continue to work with the Local Board to progress the projects and where applicable undertake public engagement to refine the scope of each project and inform design elements.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Kaipatiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment

91

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

George McMahon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



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Kaipātiki Local Grant Round Two 2018/2019 grant allocations

 

File No.: CP2018/21981

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to fund, part-fund or decline applications received for the Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted the Kaipātiki Local Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 18 April 2018 (refer Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

3.       This report presents applications received for the Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 (refer Attachment B).

4.       The Kaipātiki Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $189,900 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $20,000 was also reallocated to the community grants budget (resolution number KT/2018/223) at the November 2018 Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting. This leaves the total community grants budget at $209,900.

5.       A total of $79,869.45 was allocated in Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019. This leaves a total of $130,030.55 to be allocated for two remaining local grant rounds.

6.       Twenty-one applications were received for consideration in Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 with a total requested of $175,905.00.

7.       Three applications, deferred from local grants round one to local grants round two, are also to be considered by the local board in this report. A total of $17,626 is requested for the three deferred applications.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 grant applications as outlined in Table One:

Table One: Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 applications

Application Identification

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1908-204

Environment

The Auckland King Tides Initiative

under the umbrella of The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Incorporated".

Towards costs for tidal wave signage, installation of tidal gauges, administration, reporting and coordination of a public launch for the programme at Little Shoal Bay Reserve for the period 1 January 2019 to 31 March 2019.

$5,736.00

Eligible

LG1908-205

Community

Birkenhead Playcentre Society Incorporated

Towards the purchase of a laptop computer and a tablet.

$2,432.00

Eligible

LG1908-207

Events

Harbour Sport Trust

Towards costs of buses, traffic management and timing chips for the 2019 Shore to Shore five-kilometre fun run and walk.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG1908-208

Community

Auckland North Newcomers Network

under the umbrella of Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Incorporated

Towards hireage of meeting spaces, and network costs including marketing and administration costs.

$18,000.00

Eligible

LG1908-210

Community

Literacy Auckland North Incorporated

Towards the programme delivery of four family literacy groups in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

$6,400.00

Eligible

LG1908-211

Sport and Recreation

North Shore Artistic Roller Skating Club Incorporated

Towards rink hirecosts at ActivZone Glenfield from 8 February to 14 December 2019.

$5,400.00

Eligible

LG1908-212

Community

North Shore Woodturners Guild Incorporated

Towards purchase costs for a new demonstrator lathe and equipment.

$4,369.00

Eligible

LG1908-213

Community

Beach Haven Scout Group

under the umbrella of The Scout Association of New Zealand

Towards the expenses for 150 scouts to attend the annual scout camp at Camp Adair in 2019.

$5,200.00

Eligible

LG1908-214

Community

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Towards salary cost of the Wise collective hub at Northcote De Paul House.

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG1908-216

Sport and Recreation

Birkenhead United Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated

Towards costs of repairing and fixing the club-room roof for the Birkenhead United Football Club.

$30,000.00

Eligible

LG1908-217

Sport and Recreation

Marlborough Park Tennis Club Incorporated

Towards coaching of the senior nights for 24 sessions for two hours per session.

$2,921.00

Eligible

LG1908-218

Community

Willow Christian Trust

Towards 20 folding tables and a trolley for the Rawene Community Centre in Birkenhead.

$3,230.00

Eligible

LG1908-219

Community

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards a portion of the salary costs for the Youthline helpline for calls in the Kaipātiki area.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG1908-220

Community

Hearts and Minds New Zealand Incorporated

Towards the operational expenses for the Hearts and Minds community hub in Northcote.

$20,000.00

 

LG1908-221

Community

Beach Haven Placemaking Group

under the umbrella of Beach Haven Birkdale Residents Association

Towards the installing of a wharf themed garden including wharf piles and native plants at the entrance of the Beach Haven Hall.

$1,500.00

Eligible

LG1908-222

Arts and Culture

The Operating Theatre Trust (trading as Tim Bray Productions).

Towards the "Gift a seat" outreach programme for the "Man Whose Mother was a Pirate" play in April 2019.

$7,597.00

Eligible

LG1908-223

Environment

Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Society Incorporated

Towards tools, resources, education and engagement (coordinator time, collateral, printing, volunteer events, contractors for key sites, educator time and media release for weed bins and administration.

$13,230.00

Eligible

LG1908-224

Community

Netball North Harbour Incorporated

Towards costs for the collection of waste for the period 2 January 2019 to 30 December 2019 at the netball centre.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG1908-225

Arts and Culture

Northart Society Incorporated

Towards the salary of a Mandarin speaking arts co-ordinator at the Northart gallery.

$17,940.00

Eligible

LG1908-226

Community

Alcohol Healthwatch Trust

Towards conducting an audit of off-licence alcohol signage to assess compliance in the local board area including printing of factsheets, mileage, koha for peer review, venue hire and catering.

$1,750.00

 Ineligible

LG1908-227

Community

Birkenhead Residents Association Incorporated

Towards competition prizes, cultural advice and travel expenses for a school story telling competition about mana whenua to bring Birkenhead's Maori history to life.

$5,700.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

$175,905.00

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 deferred grant applications as outlined in Table Two:

Table Two:  Kaipātiki Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 deferred applications

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1908-131

Glenfield Community Centre Incorporated

Towards the purchase and installation of a bike rack and repair station at the Glenfield Community Centre.

$5,363.00

Eligible

LG1908-125

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Towards staffing the stalls, developing community relationships and developing collateral (stalls and quizzes).

$5,373.00

Eligible

LG1908-105

Northcote Point Community Creche Incorporated

Towards materials and labour costs to paint the interior of the Northcote Point Community Creche.

$6,890.00

Eligible

 

 

Total

$17,626.00

 

 

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

9.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

10.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

11.     The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2018/2019 on 17 April 2018 and will operate three local grant rounds for this financial year.

12.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

13.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

14.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Kaipātiki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

15.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applications about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

16.     A summary of each application received through Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019 (refer Attachment B) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

17.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

18.     Five applicants applying to Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

19.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

20.     The Kaipātiki Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $189,900 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $20,000 was also reallocated to the community grants budget (resolution number KT/2018/223) at the November 2018 Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting.

21.     A total of $79,869.45 was allocated in Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round One 2018/2019. This leaves a total of $130,030.55 to be allocated for two remaining local grant rounds.

22.     Twenty-one applications were received for consideration in Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 with a total requested of $175,905.00.

23.     Three applications, deferred from local grants round one to local grants round two are requesting a total of $17,626.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local boards programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

25.     Following the Kaipātiki Local Board allocation of funding for local grants round two, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision and facilitate payment of the grant.

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Kaipātiki Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019

137

b

Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 grant applications

141

c

Kaipātiki Local Grants Round One 2018/2019 deferred grant applications

223

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Grant Operations Manager

Authorisers

Shane King - Head of Operations Support

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


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Kaipātiki Age Friendly Community Report

 

File No.: CP2018/23579

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Kaipātiki Age-friendly Community Report (refer Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In December 2017, Age Concern North Shore was commissioned by the Kaipātiki Local Board to investigate the ‘age-friendliness’ of the Kaipātiki community with a focus on housing and services for older people.

3.       Between 15 December 2017 and 30 June 2018, Age Concern carried out research using the World Health Organization (WHO) Age-friendly City and Community Model (2007) framework. The WHO model encourages each community to identify what needs to happen to make the community a good place for older people to live.

4.       In an age-friendly community, people can actively participate in their community and are treated with respect, regardless of their age. The research included a qualitative survey that was distributed via 37 groups, organisations and places across Kaipātiki. Two hundred and ninety-eight eligible surveys were completed.

5.       The report identifies specific local challenges and makes recommendations about ways in which these might be addressed, drawing from both resident feedback and examples of successful practice drawn from other locations.

6.       The Kaipātiki Age-friendly Community Report was presented for discussion at a local board workshop in October 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Kaipātiki Age-friendly Community Report (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

Horopaki / Context

7.       The 2017/2018 local board work programme line 588 – Increase diverse participation: Manaaki Matua Age Friendly Service, had an allocated budget of $10,000.

8.       This was used to commission Age Concern to carry out research into the age-friendliness of local services and accommodation for seniors living in the local board area. The research was carried out between 15 December 2017 and 30 June 2018.

9.       Age Concern identified local services and accommodation and administered a qualitative survey amongst Kaipātiki residents aged 60 plus. Findings were used to produce a research report, received by staff in September 2018.

10.     On 24 October 2018, staff and the lead researcher presented the research report to the local board for discussion at a workshop.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

11.     Approximately 300 residents aged 60 plus from a range of Kaipātiki neighbourhoods completed the survey. Attention was paid to accessibility including translation of the survey into Chinese to accommodate the high proportion of older Chinese living in the area.

12.     Ninety-five per cent of respondents rated their suburb broadly as an ‘excellent’, ‘very good’ or ‘good’ place for people to live as they age

13.     The research highlights the need for greater attention to be given to the following areas:

·     cleanliness, maintenance and accessibility of public toilets

·     maintenance and accessibility of footpaths

·     the provision of seating and shelter

·     improvements to council and local board information

·     the relationship with the local board

·     access to activities or groups, with issues such as location, transport and finance currently present barriers to participation. 

14.     Along with quantitative analysis, qualitative feedback from residents is included in the report, providing an insight into the concerns and aspirations of seniors living in Kaipātiki. The report identifies barriers experienced by seniors which impact on their social inclusion, social and civic participation, transport and housing needs, and health and wellbeing.

15.     Eighty-seven per cent of respondents considered it important for them to remain living in their community as they age. Sixty-two per cent believed there are suitable accommodation/housing options for them as they age. Thirty-three per cent of respondents believe that there is affordable housing for older people available locally.

16.     Most respondents believe that there are well maintained and safe, green public spaces.

17.     Respondents identified locations where improvements are needed, including: repairs to hazardous and inaccessible footpaths, availability of seating in key public spaces, the provision of separate cycle lanes to reduce safety hazards and improved street lighting.

18.     Advocacy with key stakeholders including Auckland Transport is recommended to address these issues.

19.     Sixty-three per cent of respondents believe that community buildings and facilities are well-maintained and are accessible to people of different physical abilities. The report highlights the dependence of ageing communities on public toilets. Age Concern suggest that community toilet schemes, whereby local businesses offer their facilities in return for a financial incentive, could potentially be used to address this issue.

20.     Access to transport was raised as a barrier to social participation and independence. The report recommends that the local board advocate on behalf of seniors to ensure that the needs of this population are met in planning local transport.

21.     Fifty-four per cent of respondents believe that information provided by council is in an accessible format. Less than half of the participants felt comfortable to contact the local board with concerns. The report recommends consideration of actions that the local board might take to increase civic participation amongst seniors including targeted information.

22.     Involvement in social activities that are meaningful and stimulating is important to many older people. The report makes several recommendations about improvements that could be made, including the provision of more intergenerational activities, consideration of locations that are accessible to all, and free or low-cost activities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

23.     Approximately fifteen per cent of the current Kaipātiki population (14,610) is aged 60 plus[1] . The ageing population in Kaipātiki is increasing faster than any other age group, consistent with Auckland-wide trends where it is predicted to increase from 11 per cent in 2013 to 19 per cent by 2046.

24.     The Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 makes a commitment to promoting the wellbeing of its community through access to quality services and places, inclusive opportunities to participate and connect.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

25.     In the 2013 Census, nine per cent of the Kaipātiki population identified as Māori. Focusing efforts on the wellbeing of older Māori could make a positive impact.

26.     Statistically, older Māori have lower levels of equity and health than non-Māori. It is acknowledged that many of the identified challenges particularly impact on communities who experience greater health and socio-economic disparities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

27.     The local board allocated $10,000 from its 2017/2018 work programme to commission the research to support seniors in the local board area (resolution number KT/2017/91).

28.     Staff will consider the recommendations from this report when planning for the 2019/2020 work programme and budget.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

29.     Older people experience significantly high levels of isolation and loneliness. Recent social trends indicate an increase in the risk of loneliness and there is now much greater understanding about how this can cause significant detriment to health and wellbeing.

30.     The report makes recommendations which the local board, council and other local agencies can respond to in order to address challenges faced by the growing ageing population.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

31.     Staff will bring recommendations to 2019/2020 work programme discussions to advise on ways the research can be utilised towards age-friendly services and accommodation in Kaipātiki.

32.     The report has been shared with council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department and Community Places unit, who will consider the findings when planning the work programme.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Age-friendly Community Report

237

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Amber Walls – Advisor, Community Empowerment

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update

 

File No.: CP2018/23145

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The Auckland Transport Monthly Update Kaipātiki Local Board December 2018 report is attached.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Transport Monthly Update Kaipātiki Local Board December 2018.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Auckland Transport Monthly Update December 2018

303

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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12 December 2018

 

 

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12 December 2018

 

 

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12 December 2018

 

 

Renewal of community lease to Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners Association Incorporated at Gold Hole, Northcote Point

 

File No.: CP2018/23413

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a renewal of the community lease to the Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners Association Incorporated at Gold Hole, Princes Street, Northcote Point.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners Association Incorporated hold a community lease for the site at the reclamation south of Gold Hole on Princes Street, Northcote Point. The lease commenced 1 January 1996 for a term of 11 years and provided two rights of renewal of 11 years each, effecting final expiry on 31 December 2028. The first renewal term expired on 31 December 2017. The lease is still operative on a month-by-month basis.

3.       The association now seeks to exercise the second and final 11-year term of the lease. The building and improvements on the site are owned by the association.

4.       Under the operative terms, the lease renewal is subject to the group informing Auckland Council of its intention to exercise the right of renewal, the association not being in breach of its obligations under the lease, and a sufficient need for the activity in the public interest. The association has met the requirements for renewal of its lease.

5.       The current leased site does not have direct road access and access is gained over the council-owned land formalized by way of a licence dated 15 April 1978 for an indefinite term. The licence is revocable by the council on three months’ notice. It is noted the land is also subject to a right of way over part of the air space in favour of Auckland Harbour Bridge under designation 6748.

6.       Staff recommend that the second and final renewal of the lease be granted to the Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners Association Incorporated for a term of 11 years effecting final expiry on 31 December 2028.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      grant the second and final renewal of the community lease with no variations to Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners Association Incorporated at the reclamation south of Gold Hole on Princes Street, Northcote Point, described as part bed of Waitemata Harbour on survey office plan 45029 and contained in certificate of title 93D/704 (refer Attachment A) on the following terms and conditions:

i)     term - 11 years commencing 1 January 2018, with final expiry on 31 December 2028

ii)     rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum, if demanded;

b)      note all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the original lease agreement dated 1 January 1996. 

 

 

Horopaki / Context

7.       This report considers the renewal of the lease to Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners Association Incorporated. The association has applied to renew the lease to continue their activities at the boatyard.

Land

8.       The land locally identified as Gold Hole is legally described as part bed of Waitemata Harbour as shown on survey office plan 45029 and contained in certificate of title 93D/704. The land is owned in fee simple by Auckland Council subject to the Local Government Act 2002

Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners Association Incorporated

9.       Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners Association Incorporated was incorporated on 25 June 1958 and has occupied the site for over 60 years. The land was reclaimed for the purposes of the association with permission granted in 1958 by the former Auckland Harbour Board.

10.     The lease area consists of a hard stand boatyard with a slipway, winch shed, two storage sheds and a toilet block which are all maintained by the association. The private vehicular driveway leading down to the boat yard is also owned and maintained by the association.

11.     The association has 52 active members, who as part of the association, must commit to working together to keep the yard clean and safe. For a small fee, casual members are also welcome should they wish to haul out their boats. The yard is the only remaining non-commercial yard of its type in Auckland and its members work hard to ensure its continued use.

12.     In the past 12 months, the group has spent approximately $54,000 replacing and rebuilding the slipway. The group also contribute to keeping parts of the Gold Hole reserve clean and tidy even though this area does not form part of the leased area

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

13.     A renewal process has been undertaken and includes:

·     a review of the lessee’s performance to ensure that all lease conditions are being met 

·     a review to ascertain if there is a continued and sufficient need for the group to use the premises and that in the public interest, the premises is not required for any other purpose.  

·     that the organisation holds sufficient funds to meet its financial liabilities and is financially sustainable 

·     that the services or programmes offered align with the objectives in the local board plan.

14.     Following receipt of the association’s application, a site visit was undertaken in May 2018. The site was found to be well maintained and tidy.

15.     The objective of the yard is to provide a place for members to maintain and operate a hauling out and hard stand area and other facilities for privately owned pleasure craft. This facility then allows people to maintain and work on the boats themselves. Many members have also built their own boats from scratch.

16.     All activities and operational costs are funded by boat storage, salvage sales and subscriptions. The financial accounts provided indicate that the association’s funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately. The group has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

17.     Additionally, the association has complied with the terms of the lease and is not in breach of the lease.

Access Licence

18.     The current leased site does not have direct road access (refer Attachment A). Access over the adjoining council-owned land is formalised by way of a licence dated 15 April 1978 for an indefinite term. The licence is revocable by the council on three months’ notice. It is noted the land is also subject to a right of way over part of the air space in favour of Auckland Harbour Bridge under designation 6748.

19.     Conditions of the licence for access include that the use of the access strip be available to the general public for pedestrian access only. A chain barrier at the Princes Street entrance excludes public vehicles from the access strip.  A full gate has been added to the entrance of the boatyard to enhance public safety. For health and safety reasons, the public have pedestrian access to the yard only when a member of the group is on-site, and no boats are being moved.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

20.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local boards’ allocated authority relating to local recreation, sports and community facilities. The lease renewal to the boatowners association club is an item on the Kaipātiki Community Lease Work Programme 2018/2019.

21.     The renewal was discussed with the local board at its workshop on 22 August 2018. The board requested clarification on access to the boatyard and the status of this land.

22.     The recommendation supports the Kaipātiki Local Board 2017 Plan outcome of “Our people are active and healthy”.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

23.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tamaki Makaurau context.

24.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan, the Unitary Plan and Local Board Plans. The purpose of community leases is to encourage participation and create local benefits for all communities.

25.     There is no statutory requirement for public notification or iwi engagement for this lease renewal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

26.     The site improvements are owned and maintained by the tenant and there will be no change to the status of the property.

27.     There is no direct cost to council associated with the proposed renewal

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

28      Where provided for under the lease, council has a contractual obligation to renew the lease if the renewal provisions have been met.     

29      If the Kaipātiki Local Board resolves not to grant the club its final right of renewal, this decision may materially affect the group’s ability to undertake its core activities

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

30      Subject to the grant of renewal of the community lease, council staff will work with the club to finalise the deed of renewal.

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Site Plan Northcote and Birkenhead Boatowners

317

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Phillipa Carroll - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation

 

File No.: CP2018/23672

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To consider a local engagement event and adopt local content and supporting information for consultation as part of the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the relevant local board) for each local board area for each financial year. The local board agreement will be included in the Council’s Annual Budget 2019/2020.

3.       Consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 will take place from 17 February – 17 March 2019. Local boards will be consulting on their areas of focus for their 2019/2020 local board agreement.

4.       In December, the Governing Body will consider whether to consult on a proposal to transfer legal ownership of waterfront land and related assets to the council parent.  If the Governing Body decides to consult on that proposal, the consultation would take place at the same time as the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.  As a result, the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 would require the use of the special consultative procedure.

5.       There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Water Strategy discussion document. A report will be going to the Environment and Community Committee on 4 December 2018 to approve the discussion document for public consultation.

6.       This report seeks consideration from local boards regarding the Have Your Say event that will be held in their local board area during the consultation period, to give Aucklanders an opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback. It also seeks approval of their local content and supporting information for consultation.

7.       The Governing Body and local boards will agree regional and local items respectively for consultation by December 13. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the annual budget consultation document and supporting information, which will be approved by the Governing Body on 13 February 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      consider, subject to approval by the Governing Body, to holding a Have Your Say event in the local board area during the Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation period.

b)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events during the consultation period for the Annual Budget 2019/2020:

i)     local board members and Chairperson;

ii)    General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor; or

iii)    any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Chief Financial Officer.

c)      adopt Attachment A to the agenda report: local content for consultation and Attachment B: local supporting information for consultation.

d)      delegate authority to the Chairperson to approve any final changes required following review by the council’s legal team of the consultation content of the Annual Budget 2019/2020 prior to publication, including online consultation content.

Horopaki / Context

8.       Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the relevant local board) for each local board area for each financial year. The local board agreement will be included in the Council’s Annual Budget 2019/2020.

9.       Local Board agreements set out (among other things) how the council will, in the year to which the agreement relates, reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board’s plan in respect of the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

10.     For the purposes of consulting on each local board agreement to be included in the council’s Annual Budget, the consultation document for the Annual Budget must include content relating to each agreement.

11.     Public consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 will take place from 17 February – 17 March 2019.

12.     In December, the Governing Body will consider whether to consult on a proposal to transfer legal ownership of waterfront land and related assets to the council parent.  If the Governing Body decides to consult on that proposal, the consultation would take place at the same time as the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.  As a result, the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 would require the use of the special consultative procedure, as a decision to proceed with the proposal would require an amendment to the council’s long-term plan.  Where an amendment to the long-term plan is being consulted on at the same time as consultation on the Annual Budget, the Local Government Act 2002 requires the council to use the special consultative procedure in relation to both matters.

13.     There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Water Strategy discussion document. A report will be going to the Environment and Community Committee on 4 December 2018 to approve the discussion document for public consultation.

14.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation process through a variety of channels which include verbal (or face-to-face), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

15.     The special consultative procedure requires the council to provide an opportunity for people to present their views to the council in a manner that enables “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” between the person and the council’s decision-makers, or their official delegates.   The council provides for this through its ‘Have Your Say’ events where people can have a face-to-face dialogue with elected members or other council representatives with an appropriate delegation. The local board is requested to consider holding a Have Your Say event in its area.

16.     Local boards held workshops during October and November 2018 to determine their key activities for their 2019/2020 local board agreement. Boards are now requested to agree their local content and supporting information for consultation, as attached in Attachment A and B.

17.     Any new local BID targeted rates must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are therefore also requested to agree any new proposals for consultation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

19.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the Annual Budget 2019/2020. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the board, prior to finalising their local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

20.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were adopted in September and October of 2017, form the basis for local priorities.

21.     The approach to Māori engagement for the Annual Budget will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget.

22.     Regionally supported local Māori engagement in the South and West will be provided subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget, this will be integrated with Water Strategy engagement.

23.     Mana whenua engagement on the Water Strategy is already underway, and will run throughout the March consultation period, annual budget discussions will be integrated with this process.             

24.     There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in the council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

25.     Event associated costs include venue hire and catering.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

26.     Local boards must agree their local consultation content and supporting information by 13 December 2018, in order for it to be formatted and reviewed in time to be incorporated into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation document and supporting information.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

27.     The Governing Body will approve the consultation document, supporting information and consultation process for the Annual Budget 2019/2020 on 13 February 2019.

28.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and local boards will make decisions on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and Local Board Agreements 2019/2020 respectively.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Consultation document

323

b

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Supporting information

325

      Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Beth Corlett – Strategic Project Advisor

Authorisers

Anna Bray – Policy and Planning Manager – Local Boards

Louise Mason – GM Local Boards

Eric Perry – Relationship Manager  

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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12 December 2018

 

 

Local board feedback on resource consent for six new ferry berths at Queens Wharf, Auckland Central

 

File No.: CP2018/24077

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback on the resource consent for six new ferry berths at Queens Wharf, Auckland Central.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) has applied for resource consent to construct, operate and maintain six new ferry berths on the western side of Queens Wharf within the Downtown Ferry Basin (Piers A-F).

3.       The resource consent proposes to undertake modifications to the existing ferry terminal buildings (located at existing Pier one and Pier two) and historic shelter, and the removal of the existing Piers three and four.

4.       The construction, establishment, operation and maintenance of Piers A-F will require the installation of:

·    a concrete piled breakwater located immediately adjacent to the west of Queens Wharf

·    the installation of reverse saw-tooth shaped pontoons

·    three gangways, three fixed shelter structures, piles, pile guard markers and fenders.

5.       Street furniture will also be installed along Queens Wharf to demarcate pedestrian-only and vehicle zones between the western edge of Queens Wharf and ‘the Cloud’.

6.       Modifications to the existing ferry terminal building at Pier one includes the:

·    removal of the East Annexe Building

·    construction of new façades

·    removal of the ticket gates

·    replacement of the upper louvres

·    the construction of new retail / food and beverage facilities within the existing terminal building. 

7.       Modifications are also proposed to the:

·    historic shelter, including altering the northern face and the insertion of skylights in the roof

·    open spaces to the east and south of the building

·    terminal building at Pier two, including relocating ancillary office space and repositioning passenger waiting space.

8.       Demolition of existing Piers three and four will involve the removal of gangways, pontoons and piles.  The timing of the demolition is dependent on the new berths being fully operational and whether additional layover/decant space may be required for future Stage two works.

9.       Overall, the proposal is a discretionary activity.

10.     A copy of the perspective plans are provided for reference as Attachment A to this report. Further information, including all relevant supporting documents can be viewed on the Auckland Council Resource Consents webpage: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/have-your-say/have-your-say-notified-resource-consent/notified-resource-consent-applications-open-submissions/Pages/ResourceConsentApplication.aspx?itemId=262&applNum=BUN60327622

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the resource consent for six new ferry berths at Queens Wharf, Auckland Central.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Downtown Ferry Basin Redevelopment Stage 1. Resource Consent - Perspective plans

329

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Paul Edwards - Senior Local Board Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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12 December 2018

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Regional Public Transport Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/24080

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback on Auckland Transport’s (AT) draft Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The draft Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Part 5 of the Land Transport Management Act 2003 (LTMA). It sets out the changes that will occur to Auckland’s public transport system.

3.       The RPTP describes the public transport network that AT proposes for the region, identifies the services that are integral to that network and sets out the objectives and policies that apply to those services. It is a 10-year plan, focusing on the next three years.

4.       The scope of the RPTP is to:

·    identify all public transport services in the Auckland region that are integral to the public transport (PT) network and that receive financial support from AT

·    focus on the metropolitan area and parts of the region where Public Transport (PT) services operate

·    include school bus services that receive AT subsidies as part of the urban network, and nonscheduled targeted passenger services such as total mobility services

·    describe some existing services that are deemed exempt services under the LTMA but are considered integral to the PT network. Unless specifically identified, the policies and actions in the RPTP do not apply to exempt services

·    include provision for integration of non-financially supported, complementary services into the public transport system.

5.       The scope of the RPTP does not include services provided primarily as tourist services, charter services, or school bus services provided by the Ministry of Education. These services are excluded under the LTMA but are considered in wider strategic planning for transport.

6.       It is important to note that this plan is not a full transport plan for Auckland, nor does it allocate budget to specific projects or programmes. The budget allocation for public transport is already outlined in the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP), Auckland Transport Alignment Project and council’s 10-year Budget. Instead, the core focus of this document outlines:

·    what changes will be made to each specific public transport service

·    policies and actions that will be used by AT to drive our approach to public transport planning

·    design, implementation and operation.


 

Key focus areas

7.       The follow section details the key focus areas of the RPTP:

Focus area

Outcome

Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

·      Delivering a step-change in the rapid transit network.

·      Integrated Corridor Priority Programme.

·      Increasing services on the RTN and FTN: goal of 10-minute frequencies.

·      Funded service improvements.

Improving customer access to public transport

·      Wayfinding.

·      Walking and cycling.

·      Park and ride facilities.

·      Placemaking.

Improving Māori responsiveness

·      Services.

·      Te Reo Māori.

·      Te Aranga Māori Design Principles.

Harnessing emerging technologies

·      Insights and forecasting.

·      Digital customer interface.

·      Next-generation payments.

·      Trial on-demand services.

·      Future-proof for mobility as a service.

Other areas

·      Ferry services.

·      Moving to a low emissions public transport network.

·      Wider initiatives.

 

Implementation and policies

8.       The RLTP includes a 10-year prioritised delivery programme of transport services and activities for Auckland. It combines transport programmes of the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA), AT and KiwiRail. 

9.       The RLTP allocates anticipated funding from Auckland Council, revenue from transport services and forms the prioritisation process for seeking funds from the National Land Transport Fund. It is a statutory requirement that NZTA and AT revise the RLTP every three years. 

10.     The RLTP outlines and prioritises the public transport infrastructure projects that will be funded over the next three years. 

11.     The bulk of major infrastructure outlined in this RPTP will be delivered and operational post 2024.

12.     Nine policy areas are outlined in the following sections

·    Network design

·    Network Infrastructure

·    Network Operation and Service Quality

·    Fares and ticketing

·    Customer interface

·    Assisting the transport-disadvantaged

·    Procurement and exempt services

·    Funding and prioritisation

·    Monitoring and review.

13.     AT have reviewed the policies to improve clarity and specificity. Some policies have had significant changes, which include:

·    restructuring of the policies around services and infrastructure to reflect the changes to the network which have occurred in the last three. The new categories are Network Design, Network Operations and Service Quality, replacing Network Structure, Integrated Service Network and Service Quality

·    amendments to the Infrastructure policy area to broaden the scope of the infrastructure elements which will be considered and prioritised

·    minor changes to the Service Quality area to reflect the changes to the network and to articulate the revised quality priorities

·    a broader section of elements within the Customer Interface section, to reflect its central focus across the PT operation

·    procurement and exempt services – change of focus from establishing and enforcing Public Transport Operating Mode (PTOM)

·    funding and Prioritisation – amending focus on farebox recovery to include revenue protection requirement.

Feedback

14.     The local board has the opportunity to provide feedback to inform the development and preparation of the final RPTP. The consultation period on the RPTP closes on 14 December 2018.

15.     A summary of the RPTP is provided as Attachment A to this report. The full version of the RPTP and other supporting information can be found on the AT website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/regional-public-transport-plan-rptp/ 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on Auckland Transport’s Regional Public Transport Plan, noting that feedback is required by 14 December 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of the Auckland Transport Regional Public Transport Plan

345

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Paul Edwards - Senior Local Board Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2018/23146

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to update members on recent activities, projects and issues since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2018/23147

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note any verbal reports of members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update

 

File No.: CP2018/23148

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members to update the board on Governing Body or Independent Maori Statutory Board issues, or issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members’ verbal updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - November 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/23149

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board workshops held on Wednesday 7 November, Wednesday 14 November and Wednesday 28 November 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 7 November 2018, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·     Auckland Transport

·     Auckland Regional Services Trust (ARST) Fund

·     Auckland Tourism Events & Economic Development (ATEED).

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 14 November 2018, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·     Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR)

-     Te Keke Rukuruku and Maori naming of parks and places

·     Local Board Agreement workshop two/consultation

·     Community Facilities

-     Tuff Crater – review developed design and budget

-     Telephone Road Reserve, Chelsea Bay – installing dog gating project

-     Leasing update.

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 28 November, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·     Draft Golf Facilities Investment Plan 2018 – 2038

·     Birkenhead War Memorial Park

·     Community Facilities

-     Leasing

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the records for the Kaipātiki Local Board workshops held on Wednesday 7 November, Wednesday 14 November and Wednesday 28 November 2018.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Wednesday 7 November Workshop Record

369

b

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Wednesday 14 November Workshop Record

371

c

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Wednesday 28 November Workshop Record

373

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/23150

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2019 and an overview of workshops scheduled for the month ahead.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local board’s governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The February – March 2019 governance forward work calendar for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment A.

5.       The February – March 2019 workshop forward work plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B. Scheduled items may change at short notice depending on the urgency of matters presented to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Kaipātiki Local Board February – March 2019 governance forward work calendar and February – March 2019 workshop forward work plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Governance Forward Work Calendar February - March 2019

377

b

12 December 2018 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Workshop Forward Work Plan February - March 2019

379

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 December 2018

 

 

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[1] Kaipātiki Economic Profile, Auckland Council, 2017