I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 27 February 2019

3.00pm

Room 1, Level 26
135 Albert Street
Auckland

 

Ngā Hui a te Poari Kaitohutohu mō te Pokapū o Te Tāone Nui o Tāmaki Makaurau /
Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Ms Viv Beck

Business Improvement District

Deputy Chair

Mr Andrew Gaukrodger

Corporate sector

Members

Ms Noelene Buckland

City Centre Residents Group

 

Member Shale Chambers

Waitemata Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Mr Greg Cohen

Tourism/Travel

 

Mr Ben Corban

Arts and Cultural Sector

 

Mr Terry Cornelius, JP

Retail sector

 

Mr George Crawford

Property Council of NZ

 

Cr Chris Darby

Auckland Council (Mayor’s alternate)

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Auckland Council

 

Mr Dane Grey/ Mr Ngarimu Blair

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

 

Mr Mark Kingsford

Corporate sector

 

Cr Mike Lee

Liaison councillor, Auckland Council

 

Ms Amy Malcolm

Tertiary Education (University of Auckland & Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr James Mooney

Urban design/institute of architects

 

Mr Nigel Murphy

Tertiary Education (University of Auckland & Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr Adam  Parkinson

City Centre Residents Group

 

Mr Patrick Reynolds

Transport representative

 

Mr Michael Richardson

Business Improvement District

 

(Quorum 10 members)

 

 

Sonya Inger, Governance Advisor

 

21 February 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 9776050

Email: sonya.inger@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


Terms of Reference

 

(Excerpt –full terms of reference available as a separate document)

 

1.       These terms of reference set out the roles, responsibilities and working arrangements for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

2.       The board is a key advisory body, with no decision-making or autonomous budgetary authority.

3.       The board will assist the Auckland Council, specifically the Governing Body and the Waitematā Local Board and Auckland Council Controlled Organisations to oversee and be a key advisor to the Auckland Council on achieving the vision and strategic outcomes of the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan, the expenditure of the city centre targeted rate and city centre issues.

 

Membership:

Includes one councillor and one local board member.

 

The board should include members who can provide expert advice on many areas including transport, landscape, environment and youth sectors. The membership includes a position for Mana Whenua. Representatives from CCOs may be board members without voting rights. The number of the board members should be between 16 and 21 at any time.

 

The new panel’s term should end one month prior to the next local government elections in 2019. The membership of the panel may be rolled over for more than one electoral term of three years.

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

5          Presentation - Air quality in the city centre                                                                7

6          City Centre Masterplan                                                                                                11

7          Albert Street bus update                                                                                             21

8          2019 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme                33 

9          Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 21 November 2018 as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 

Presentation - Air quality in the city centre

File No.: CP2019/00670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the findings of the impacts of transport emissions on air quality in Auckland’s city centre.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The overview of the monitoring air quality impacts in the city centre report is attached.

3.       Dr Nick Talbot will provide a PowerPoint presentation at the meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      note the air quality report in the city centre, receive the presentation and thank Dr Nick Talbot for his attendance.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Impacts of transport emissions - Auckland city centre overview

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sonya Inger – Governance Advisor

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 

City Centre Masterplan

File No.: CP2019/01801

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on Auckland Council’s work programme for producing the Auckland City Centre Masterplan (CCMP) 2040 vision.

2.       To seek feedback from the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board (ACCAB) on the following work programmes:

i)         Māori Outcomes – integrating mana whenua values, aspirations and expectations

ii)        Grafton Gully Boulevard (working title) – new precinct for the east of the city centre

iii)       Access for Everyone – transformation of city centre access, informed by trials.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The report on the proposed process for updating the Auckland City Centre Masterplan 2040 was approved unanimously by the Planning Committee at its meeting held on 27 November 2018; resolution PLA/2018/12.

4.       The Auckland CCMP is to be updated to become a digital document that is able to inform Auckland Council’s 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

5.       As part of the new digital document, new content is under development for public consultation. This includes Māori Outcomes, Grafton Gully Boulevard and Access for Everyone.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the information regarding the City Centre Masterplan 2040 vision.

b)      provide feedback on the development of the following city centre work programmes; Māori Outcomes, Grafton Gully Boulevard and Access for Everyone.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Council is in the process of updating the City Centre Masterplan. The overall intentions are to:

·        Update the document to reflect significant changes that have occurred since 2012

·        Deliver a bold city centre vision for 2040

·        Align the CCMP with the concurrent update and digitisation of the Waterfront Plan into a single document.

7.       On 27 November 2018, this approach was unanimously approved by Planning Committee. The existing City Centre Masterplan and Waterfront Plan will be superseded with a new digital document, consistent with the Auckland Plan.

8.       The new Masterplan will be kept up to date via a programme of rolling updates. These will replace the existing six-year refresh period with more frequent updates, while retaining the eight transformative moves and delivering the city centre vision.

9.       For the current round of updates, Council is proposing to produce content on:

i)        Māori Outcomes: Strategies and principles set out as a physical plan that can be included into the Masterplan

ii)       Grafton Gully Boulevard (working title): Integrating existing plans to shape a vision for a new precinct at the eastern edge of Auckland city centre

iii)      Access for Everyone: A new approach to managing city centre access and pedestrianisation of some streets, coordinated with proposed Light Rail Transit along Queen Street.

10.     Further details will be covered in a presentation at the ACCAB meeting on 27 February 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The above programmes have been identified as necessary because they coordinate existing and future work from the Auckland Council family, central government and other actors. They deliver multiple benefits in support of the Masterplan vision.

12.     This is consistent with progress over the past two years. Since March 2017, city centre work has focused on coordinating various work programmes for the city (e.g. seawall rebuilding, ferry infrastructure, Quay Street public realm) into larger, cohesive work programmes that are both implementable and deliverable. This has informed the direction of the Masterplan refresh.

13.     Auckland is the world’s largest Māori city. We are helping the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum to produce an Outcomes Plan that provides space for Te Ao Māori to flourish as an integrated and integral part of the City Centre. Once this vision document is complete, we will work with them to determine the content that is included in the City Centre Masterplan.

14.     Grafton Gully Boulevard is at the centre of a proposal for a new precinct at the eastern edge of Auckland city centre. It envisages a surface-level, multiway boulevard between the Port of Auckland and the Northwestern Motorway, flanked by mid-rise frontage development. This would provide space for homes, workplaces and new connections between the city centre, Parnell and the Port. 

15.     Grafton Gully Boulevard addresses the following aims:

·        better Port-Motorway links for freight

·        improved connections to eastern suburbs

·        improved walking & cycling environment

·        greater access by public transport, including regional rail

·        unlocking landholdings and enable land value capture

·        delivering new workspaces

·        responding to Ports Master Plan, Parnell Plan and other plans.

16.     Grafton Gully Boulevard could look like the following concept:

17.     Access for Everyone is a new concept for Auckland City Centre. It allocates private transport in Auckland city centre into a series of zones. Private motor traffic is able to get into and out of a zone by a specific route.

18.     Access for Everyone has been prompted by the proposed reconfiguration of Queen Street for construction and operation of light rail. This will transform movement patterns, not just in Queen Street, but in adjoining streets. This in turn will have knock-on effects on east-west traffic movement across the Queen Street valley, and throughout Auckland city centre. This presents the challenge of maintaining access to and around the city centre with less space available. 

19.     Access for Everyone prioritises non-discretionary trips. These include, but are not limited to, emergency vehicles, servicing, deliveries, rubbish removal, existing access to buildings, people with specific mobility requirements and other critical business trips.


 

20.     It enables many trips that are currently made by private vehicle to be made by other modes. Buses, light rail vehicles, pedestrians and people on bikes would be able to move freely through the city. Car drivers would generally access the city centre from its edge, not via the core.

21.     Access for Everyone and Grafton Gully would both influence how people use the city Council is interested in working with the ACCAB to shape the proposals and this meeting will be the first in a series of opportunities to provide feedback. Areas of interest include (but are not limited to (the following:

·        How would ACCAB like to engage with Council over the coming year to refine these concepts?

·        Which particular issues would the ACCAB be most keen to discuss?

·        What other information do you feel needs to be considered as part of developing these concepts?

22.     Due to the tight timeframe a series of engagement sessions will be organised for the development of the content. A system of consultation via on-street trials is being developed to inform Access for Everyone. A high-level timeline is attached as Attachment A.   

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Planning Committee endorsed the proposed process for updating the CCMP Masterplan 2040 unanimously at the 27 November Planning Committee meeting [PLA/2018/121].

24.     The proposed updates have been developed through working closely with Council family. Access for Everyone has received significant input from Auckland Transport (AT) teams, including:

·        City Centre Network Development

·        Road Safety

·        Public Transport Network Development

·        Parking Design

·        Travel Demand Management

·        Transport Modelling

25.     In Council’s engagements with AT it has become apparent that Access for Everyone is consistent with existing AT strategies and that there are opportunities for alignment. This has informed the development of the concept and we are continuing to work closely with AT. 

26.     The Grafton Gully Boulevard concept has similarly been developed through close working with AT, particularly City Centre Network Development. It also has direct bearing on ports operations and this has also led to engagement with representatives from Ports of Auckland Limited (POAL).

27.     Following November’s Planning Committee meeting, the proposed CCMP updates were unanimously supported at the AT Board meeting held on 11 December 2018.

28.     Council and Panuku are working together to develop a framework for merging and digitising the CCMP and Waterfront Plan. This has been developed into a Strategic Assessment, with input from Panuku. It is due for presentation at the Council Investment Group on 27 February 2019. Further information will be available in the Strategic Assessment document.

29.     Within the Council family, this workstream will report to the City Centre and Waterfront Project Steering Group and Executive Steering Group. Staff from the council family will continue to collaborate on the development of the content prior to reporting back to Planning Committee in July 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     Staff are liaising with Local Boards, stakeholders and Advisory Panels between now and 28 February 2019 to discuss and develop the programme.

31.     The city centre is within the Waitematā Local Board area and is adjacent to Ōrākei Local Board. The CCMP update was previously presented at a previous Waitematā Local Board workshop on 31 July 2018. Representatives of the Waitematā Local Board spoke in favour of the proposed refresh at Planning Committee on 27 November 2018.

32.     Staff will update both Waitematā and Orakei Local Boards in February 2019 on progress to date and will continue to engage with both local boards and ACCAB on the CCMP development.

33.     Council is also working closely with city centre representative groups, including Heart of the City, Auckland City Centre Residents Group, Greater Auckland and Generation Zero. This is shaping the design process and informing plans for consultations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The inclusion of Māori outcomes in the CCMP update provides the opportunity to make provision for mana whenua values, aspirations and expectations as an integral and integrated part of planning for a future Auckland city centre as part of the CCMP.

35.     Council has worked with the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum (MWKF) Culture and Identity Pou to establish a shared understanding of the initial ideas and opportunities for a MWKF Outcomes Plan document. This is currently in production.

36.     This initial Outcomes Plan will in turn shape the development of the CCMP, both in terms of themes and tangible outcomes. The result will be a masterplan that reflects and celebrates Auckland’s status as the world’s largest Māori city.

37.     This work will also be informed by the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The updated vision for the City Centre and Waterfront may identify new or revised priorities for investment. Digitisation of the Masterplan is based on the existing architecture and processes developed for the Auckland Plan. Further details on the scope and content will be developed this year. The business case cost is estimated at $75,085.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     The merging and digitisation of the Masterplan and Waterfront Plans will have resourcing, cost and technical risks associated with it. We will mitigate these risks through clear project management, scope definition and lessons learned from the digitisation of the Auckland Plan 2050. We are working closely with Digital to ensure clear communications.

40.     Both the Grafton Gully and Access for Everyone pose risks for the council as they represent a new direction and way of managing street space and access into, out of and within the city centre.

41.     The biggest risk is that the concepts fail to enthuse and be adopted by the public and users of the city centre in all forms. The table overleaf splits the risks down. Ultimately effective comms, engagement and positive experience combined with understanding will drive adoption and success.

 

Risk

Mitigation

People misunderstand what is happening

Video and visual media to present a clear view of intentions so people can understand what the vision(s) are

Funding

Working with AT to understand the operational and funding implications

People misunderstand the timing

Messaging needs to explain that concepts represent future visualisations, are not for implementation now but explain what we are working towards

People misunderstand the objectives

Messaging explains that the purpose of the initiatives is to increase the ability for people to access and enjoy the city centre and at the same time put in place schemes that can accommodate expected disruption from light rail construction in advance so that when it happens it is no longer an issue

Media misrepresents the objectives and intended purpose and timing of the activities

Messaging and engagement with media ensures that reporters and commentators in the press, social media and political voices understand the purpose and objectives of the exercise

Politicians decide the schemes are too risky

Involve politicians in the trials programme and keep them well briefed

The schemes are not acceptable to users of the city centre

Messaging; story outcomes are presented coherently alongside all the other development  in the city centre

Adapt the concepts to include feedback and address legitimate concerns.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Will take feedback from the workshop and consider it alongside feedback from targeted engagement with Partners, stakeholders and local boards prior to wider public engagement.

43.     Together this information will inform revised concepts and recommendations presented to Planning Committee in July when we seek approval to move to phase 2.

44.     Timeframe:

Timeframe

Activities

Phase 1

Feb to Mar

Targeted engagement with Local Boards, Partners and stakeholders on Grafton Gully and Access for Everyone concepts

Develop Queen Street trials programme

Present Queen Street trial programme to Planning committee workshop

Apr

Grafton Gully consultation

Develop and test Queen Street trial programme

May

Evaluating feedback

June

Presenting revised concepts and findings to Planning Committee workshop

July

Report back to Planning Committee to gain approval to progress to Phase 2 – content development

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

High-level timeline

19

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

George Weeks - Principal Urban Design

Tam White - Senior Governance and Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Ludo Campbell-Reid - GM - Auckland Design Office

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 

Albert Street bus update

File No.: CP2019/01658

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on recent discussions and material produced regarding plans for two indented busbays as part of the post-City Rail Link reinstatement of Albert Street.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board had queried the rationale for two proposed indented busbays (offset, one in each direction) on part of Albert Street, as this was considered to impact upon the pedestrian experience. A sub-group of the board, consisting of Chairperson V Beck, Mr S Chambers and Mr P Reynolds, has met twice with Auckland Transport (AT) staff to discuss the matter. There is now a common understanding of the bus volumes and routing on Albert Street proposed through to 2028, which allows the matter to be considered more clearly.

3.       Whilst acknowledging that the busbays will reduce the possible footpath width at two locations, AT maintains that the footpath (at approximately 4.5m) will still be wider than previously, and that the two busbays are required for bus operational reliability. The available footpath width will be substantially wider than other areas in the city centre with high pedestrian footfall.

Figure 1 – Indicative layout of future Albert St between Swanson St and Wyndham St showing busbay

4.       AT considers that the safety of bus passengers and pedestrians could be compromised if indented bus bays are not provided, as buses may be unable to pull up properly to the kerb, meaning passengers may have to step onto the road to board or alight amidst busy bus traffic.

5.       AT has prepared additional material to support this position, including having an independent peer review of the bus volumes and the need for the two busbays. AT has already agreed a monitoring regime with Auckland Council for the two busbays and agreed to remove them (i.e. fill the bays in and replace them with inline bus stops) if bus operational performance shows they are not needed.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the Albert Street bus update report and associated presentation.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       In November 2018 the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board received an update on Albert Street bus planning. The board queried the transport assumptions and sought both an independent peer review and meetings with a sub-group comprising of Chairperson V Beck, Mr S Chambers and Mr P Reynolds.

7.       Buses currently provide, and will continue to provide into the future (after the provision of the City Rail Link and light rail), the backbone of Auckland’s public transport system. Data from AT’s HOP ticketing system shows that currently an average of 31,000 trips are made by bus customers daily on the services that are planned to use this section of Albert Street (in both directions), a number which will continue to grow. Lower Albert Street Bus Interchange is the second busiest public transport facility in New Zealand, behind only Britomart.

8.       In this context, AT believes it is critical that safe, efficient and effective bus services are provided on Albert St. The two proposed busbays allow buses the ability to safely pass each other around bus stops, to ensure the customer experience is reliable and bus operations are efficient (see Figure 1).

9.       AT plans for bus services to return to Albert Street immediately upon completion of the C2 contract for CRL (likely to be 2019/2020). Long-term planning highlights that significant numbers of bus services will utilise Albert Street until Northwest Light Rail is in operation. The Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP) 2018 proposes that Northwest Light Rail is completed by 2028, meaning at least eight years of sufficiently high bus volumes to justify the two busbays. It is worth noting that the number of Albert Street bus stops has been reduced compared to previous proposals, so, in the future, each stop will be busier and it is therefore more critical that they operate reliably.

10.     In November 2018, the board queried some of the projected bus volumes in AT’s presentation material. These were checked, peer reviewed and it was found that all 2018 figures were correct, there were some slight errors or mislabeling of future figures, but the high volumes were correct. The figures are consistent with and based upon those within the Regional Public Transport Plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Current bus network planning indicates that Albert Street bus volumes will be between 54-64 buses/hour until Northwest Light Rail commences[1]. Due to the reduced number of lanes on Albert Street, the volume of buses and the narrowness of these lanes, buses will not be able to pull out easily into the traffic lane adjacent to the bus lane; without dedicated busbays, any stationary bus will effectively trap any other following bus. The absence of busbays may result in:

·        delays and unreliable journeys for thousands of Aucklanders (including those well away from Albert Street)

·        increased safety risks for pedestrians walking onto the road to reach a bus not able to stop in the right place

·        a potential impact on the patronage growth and bus reliability targets set by Auckland Council, which will be critical to the mode shift and achieving key objectives in the Auckland Plan.

12.     AT is aware of the concerns raised regarding the two proposed indented busbays so, for robustness, AT’s analysis has been independently peer reviewed and shared with the sub-group of the board.

13.     The sub-group requested analysis as to whether traffic could be removed from all or parts of Albert St, thereby negating the need for the two busbays as buses could pass each other more easily. There are over 2,000 car parks accessed off Albert Street, which severely limits AT’s ability to remove the proposed single traffic lane in each direction, and with Queen Street proposed to be pedestrianised in the future, there is likely to be further need for local traffic to be able to use Albert Street. Along with this there is a legal requirement to permit property access to any property fronting Albert St, so full traffic removal is unlikely, even for short sections. Despite this, AT has modelled various traffic restriction options for the section of Albert St where the two busbays are planned (e.g. one-way operation), and each scenario found difficulties in traffic taking convoluted routes and diverting through quiet sidestreets to reach an Albert St destination.

14.     Hence, the mix of bus, other vehicle movements, and pedestrian movements in Albert Street is the basis for AT’s view that the two (offset) indented busbays are the safest and most effective way to move people to, through, and from the Albert Street precinct.

15.     As noted earlier, AT has already committed to a bus operations monitoring regime in collaboration with Auckland Council and will continue to look for opportunities to improve the way Albert Street works for the range of users. Should the monitoring regime highlight that the two indented busbays are not required for either safety or operational reasons, AT has committed to remove them.  Tree pits for possible future tree-planting within the two busbays are being provided.

16.     It is worth noting that Albert Street previously had a six-lane cross section and will primarily be a four-lane arrangement in the future, however even where a busbay is proposed, the footpath will still be substantially wider than previously. This effect is illustrated in Attachment A. At these two locations Albert Street will effectively be five lanes wide, leaving approximately 4.5m for pedestrians and street furniture.

17.     The sub-group and other stakeholders also queried whether it would be possible to reinstate Albert St post-CRL without the two indented busbays and build them later if required. As noted above, AT will commence operating high bus volumes immediately upon completion of the C2 Contract. If bus performance is unreliable or a safety risk crystalises, AT would be required to dig up brand new footpaths to create the two indented busbays, all whilst trying to operate busy bus services. This is clearly likely to result in a poor customer experience and cause further disruption to businesses which would have been hoping that that construction activities in Albert Street had been completed.

18.     AT remains supportive of creating high quality pedestrian spaces along Albert St and is cognisant of the fact that these pedestrians are also very often also bus customers. AT considers that a high-quality pedestrian environment can be created with the two indented busbays in place, through careful placement of street furniture to maximise movement space. By comparison, Attachment B shows the available space outside the Civic theatre, an area that accommodates in excess of 3,000 pedestrians per hour[2] adjacent to a busy bus corridor (>45 buses per hour, per direction), which is comparable to the future Albert St situation. This space operates with pedestrian footpath width, approximately the same or slightly narrower than is planned at the two Albert St locations with indented busbays. 

19.     AT reiterates the offer to work with the Board, City Rail Link Ltd and Auckland Council on design options to give more usable space, greenery and shelter at the two busbays.

20.     There has also been correspondence between the Mayor and AT regarding the Albert Street busbays and this is attached as Attachment C.


 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The design of Albert Street has been developed through collaboration between City Rail Link Limited, Auckland Transport and the Auckland Design Office of Auckland Council. All agencies are seeking better urban outcomes, and the monitoring agreement between AT and the ADO represents a desire to remove the two bus bays if possible and gain more pedestrian space.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The Waitematā Local Board is being kept informed of City Rail Link development and Albert Street matters by City Rail Link Limited, as well as AT and the ADO as required. Mr S Chambers has been representing the Waitematā Local Board in the subgroup meeting on this subject.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The board has agreed that a $20 million targeted rate contribution will go towards an enhanced Albert Street streetscape.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The risks of building or not building the two proposed busbays are discussed within this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     AT will, in conjunction with City Rail Link Ltd and Auckland Council, continue to meet with board representatives to discuss Albert Street issues and remains committed to an outcome for Albert Street which achieves optimal place and movement outcomes for both the street and the broader city centre.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Comparison of previous and proposed kerblines on Albert Street

25

b

Example of pedestrian environment at the Civic

27

c

Correspondence between Auckland Transport and the Mayor regarding Albert Street

29

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Daniel Newcombe - Manager Strategic Projects Central, North and West

Pete Moth - Manager Network Development – Auckland Transport.

Authorisers

Mark Lambert Executive General Manager – Integrated Networks – Auckland Transport

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 

2019 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme

File No.: CP2019/01489

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the new structured approach to reporting on city centre programmes and initiatives.

2.       To note that the 2019 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme (Attachment A) will be updated to reflect the new structure and schedule following the board’s February 2019 meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board provides key stakeholder feedback and advice around development and initiatives being undertaken in the city centre and contributes to growing the city centre’s international reputation. The board’s role also includes providing advice on the priorities for the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio (see Attachment B).

4.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meets monthly. In consideration of feedback received from board members and elected members, staff propose a new structured approach to reporting that is coordinated across the council group and presents a holistic view of the city centre.

5.       Regular city centre reporting will be structured on a portfolio, programme and focus area basis. Day to day project updates and board member queries will be addressed via email or memo on an ‘as required’ basis, and will be added to a query register available to all board members.

6.       The reporting will be scheduled to align with committee and local board reporting cycles, as well as key project milestones to enable board members to note or provide feedback on key committee decisions relating to city centre projects.

7.       The 2019 forward work programme for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board is included as Attachment A, and will be updated to reflect the above reporting approach following the board’s February 2019 meeting. Any significant changes to the forward work programme will be reported to the board as required.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      note the new structured approach to reporting on city centre programmes and initiatives

b)      note that the 2019 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme will be updated following the board’s February 2019 meeting to reflect the new structure and schedule.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Auckland’s city centre is a major centre of business, employment, tourism, arts and culture, and has a growing residential population, and requires significant consideration and support from Auckland Council.

9.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board provides key stakeholder feedback and advice around development and initiatives being undertaken in the city centre and contributes to growing the city centre’s international reputation. The board’s role also includes providing advice on the priorities for the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio.

10.     The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meets monthly. To utilise these meetings fully and to effectively support the board to provide strategic advice on council projects and initiatives, staff have undertaken a review of the reporting to the board, in the context other committee and the local board reporting.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The council group will be delivering over $1 billion of capital projects in the city centre over the next ten years. These projects are being delivered by a number of different council groups, such as Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Panuku, and the City Rail Link.

12.     Each council group is currently responsible for reporting on projects under its management. The inter-related nature of projects in the city centre is not reflected in the current Auckland City Centre Advisory Board reporting approach.

13.     Consistent feedback themes received from the board as well as the elected members associated with city centre reporting relate to:

·        siloed reporting from individual council groups, resulting in fragmented and inconsistent information

·        a lack of a holistic and comprehensive view of the city centre

·        the level of information provided is often operational focused and not aligned with the board’s role to provide strategic advice

·        the information provided is not current due to the council’s reporting timeline and the board’s meeting cycle

·        the board reporting is not coordinated with the committees and the Waitemata Local Board’s reporting cycle

·        the lack of visibility regarding progress on actions and requests from the board.

14.     In consideration of feedback received, staff propose a new structured approach to reporting that is coordinated across the council group and presents a holistic view of the city centre.

15.     The reporting will be scheduled to align with committee and local board reporting cycles, as well as key project milestones to enable board members to note or provide feedback on key committee decisions relating to city centre projects.

16.     Staff propose the following reporting structure:

City Centre Portfolio reporting - quarterly

17.     This report will present a holistic and comprehensive view of all council group projects across in the city centre, covering key progress and milestones, issues and opportunities.

18.     The portfolio report will be scheduled quarterly.

Programmes reporting

19.     These reports will provide a more in-depth updates on key city centre programmes and initiatives, such as the Downtown programme, the City Centre Masterplan refresh and the America’s Cup.

20.     These reports will be scheduled regularly and aligned to key programme milestones.

Focus area reporting

21.     These reports will provide updates on the board’s specific focus areas (to be agreed by the board), such as homelessness, and environmental sustainability.

22.     These reports will be scheduled regularly and aligned to key programme milestones.

23.     A dedicated city centre targeted rate-funded projects update will be reported to the board on a quarterly basis, providing an update of all projects and initiatives funded by the city centre targeted rate.

24.     In response to the board’s request, programme and project updates will identify projects that are funded or partially funded by the city centre targeted rate.

25.     It is proposed that day to day project updates and board member queries will be addressed via email or memo on an ‘as required’ basis, and will be added to a query register available to all board members. This will enable agile and real time progress updates outside of the board meeting cycles.

26.     The existing city centre monthly update report will be discontinued and replaced by the above reports.

27.     The 2019 forward work programme for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will be updated to reflect the above reporting approach following the board’s February 2019 meeting, and the current forward work programme has been included as Attachment A for the board’s information.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The council family is made up of Auckland Council and council controlled organisations, all of which contribute to the development of the city centre.

29.     Each group within the council family previously reported to the board on an ‘as required’ basis. However, the review of the update approach as outlined in this report will provide more comprehensive updates being provided on all council group projects in the city centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     Auckland’s city centre falls within the Waitematā Local Board boundaries. As such, the Waitematā Local Board have a strong interest in city centre developments and initiatives and are consulted on a project by project basis.

31.     The provision of information to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board as detailed in this report will be aligned with the Waitematā Local Board’s reporting cycle.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Mana whenua consultation occurs as part of all city centre projects, via the monthly Infrastructure and Environmental Services mana whenua hui and other site or project specific hui.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     There are no financial implications relating to the board’s 2019 forward work programme (Attachment A). Updates will be provided to the board as part of the revised update approach detailed in this report, in relation to projects being funded through the city centre targeted rate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     A collective reporting process from across the council family will minimise risks of conflicting and inconsistent information.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The 2019 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme will be updated to reflect the revised reporting approach following the board’s February 2019 meeting. Any significant changes to the forward work programme will be reported to the board as required.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

February 2019 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board forward work programme

37

b

City centre targeted rate portfolio 2018-2019

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tam White - Senior Governance and Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Jenny Larking - Head of City Centre Programmes

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 

 

 

AUCKLAND CITY CENTRE ADVISORY BOARD FORWARD WORK PROGRAMME 2019

Edited February 2019

 

 

Area of work

Description of work

Board’s role

Expected timeframes

IN PROGRESS / UPCOMING AGENDA ITEMS

City Centre Targeted Rate Portfolio

The city centre targeted rate portfolio of works is the schedule of projects that are funded by the city centre targeted rate that formed part of the long-term plan.  They are endorsed by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board and approved by the Finance and Performance Committee. The current version of the work programme is known as TR7

·    To provide feedback and endorse the city centre targeted rate portfolio of work, for recommendation to the Finance and Performance Committee.

Progress to date:

-     A report was considered on 21/11/18 on the prioritisation of projects requiring strategic assessment. Res CEN/2018/66

-     report to Finance and Performance Committee

-     final report to ACCAB for allocation.

-     The board also noted that further discussion regarding the St Matthews request will be considered at the CCTR review round clause b) iv) res CEN/2018/64

 

 

 

 

April 2019

 

Downtown programme of works (including transport)

The Downtown programme of works delivers a connected and accessible waterfront, prepare for the growth of cruise and ferry services and support further activation of Queens Wharf.  The programme has been brought forward to align with the America’s Cup event (AC36) in 2021.

·    To receive update and provide feedback on the Downtown programme of works.

Progress to date:

-     A report was considered on 18/7/18 on the Downtown Infrastructure Development programme. Resolution CEN/2018/40. A copy of the response to the board’s requests is attached below.

-     For information the current delivery programme report was agreed by the Planning Committee on 5/9/17. Resolution PLA/2017/111

-     An update on options on Quay Street East public amenity and accessibility will be provided to the ACCAB early 2019.

March 2019

Karangahape Road precinct programme of works (including transport)

The Karangahape Road will deliver improved pedestrian spaces around key transport hubs while leveraging off development opportunities from the City Rail Link.

·    To receive update on the Karangahape Road project.

·    To receive update on Myers Park Underpass (stage 2b)

March 2019

April 2019

City Centre Masterplan 2040

The 2012 CCMP set out a compelling vision for the heart of Auckland. PLA/2-18/121(a) directs council to produce an online masterplan. This provides an opportunity to replace the existing six-year refresh period with a programme of rolling updates, while retaining the core vision for the city centre.

·    To provide input and provide feedback on the City Centre Master Plan.

Progress to date:

-     A report approved by the Planning Committee  Resolution PLA/2018/121

-     Staff will present to the ACCAB Feb 2019 meeting on the City Centre Master Plan Refresh.

February 2019

Learning quarter programme of works

Including works in Albert Park and streetscape upgrades in the areas around city centre university campuses.

·    To provide input and feedback on the learning quarter programme of works.

April 2019

Midtown programme of works (including transport)

The Midtown programme of works is a coordinated programme to deliver improved pedestrian and public spaces around key transport hubs while leveraging off development opportunities from the City Rail Link, bus infrastructure and the New Zealand International Convention Centre.

·    To receive update and provide feedback on the Midtown programme of works.

Federal Street upgrade stage two project:

Progress to date:

-     The update report was considered on 21/11/18 seeking feedback on the preliminary design. Resolution CEN/2018/64.

-     The board requested staff to follow up on the Waitematā Local Board feedback to ensure cycle access isn’t lost on Federal Street. Staff have advised that a cycle access ramp between Federal Street and Mayoral Drive has been detailed in the preliminary design, separated from the area of the existing footpath by a new concrete wall.

Wellesley Street bus improvements project:

Progress to-date

-     A report was presented on 24/10/18 meeting on progress and upcoming next steps for the Wellesley Street bus improvements project. Resolution: CEN/2018/60. The next phase: commence a business case and once detailed designs are developed, these will be brought back to the board for feedback.

City Rail Link: Albert Street reinstatement

Progress to date:

-     A presentation was provided on 21/11/18. Resolution CEN/2018/65

-     Further update will be provided in February 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 2019

 

 

 

 

February 2019

 

 

February 2019

City Rail Link update

The City Rail Link Project is a significant infrastructure project to enhance the capacity and performance of Auckland rail services and improve transport outcomes in Auckland. There will be four new and reconfigured station as part of the project - Britomart Station, Aotea Station, Karangahape Station and Mt Eden Station.

·    To be informed of the City Rail Link project

Progress to date:

-     An update on the City Rail Link delivery presentation was provided on 24/10/18.

To be advised 2019

Homelessness

The council is developing its position and role on affordable housing including homelessness, and will engage with the board on the development and implementation plan.  

·    To provide city centre community input on the council’s homelessness programmes.

Progress to date:

-     A report was presented on 22/08/18 on Auckland Council’s operational response to homelessness. Resolution CEN/2018/46 . The board also noted that options for funding homelessness to be considered as part of the city centre targeted rate review process.

April/May 2019

Public amenities

Including toilets, showers, lockers, and drinking fountains.

·    To receive update and provide feedback for the city centre public amenities project.

April 2019

Activate Auckland Programme (including Tactical Urbanisation)

This programme enables a people-led place activation process which aims to transform visitor, resident and business experiences in the city centre. This is achieved by providing temporary, low-cost built form interventions to trial projects in the public realm, while providing support to people and the economy during this period of significant development. The Activate Auckland programme complements the council’s existing strategic delivery initiatives and maximises collaborations on existing and new projects.

·    To receive update and provide feedback on the Activate Auckland Programme, as part of the city centre targeted rate programme of works.

March 2019

May 2019

July 2019

September 2019

America’s Cup 2021

Planning and development of areas to host America’s Cup 36 (AC36).

·    To be informed around plans for the America’s Cup 2021, including their potential impact on the city centre programme of works.

March 2019

City Centre Public Art Plan

The City Centre Public Art Plan aims to provide the vision and rationale for investment in public art in the centre city through to 2025. It takes into account all other relevant existing strategies and plans for the city centre area including the public art work floor scheme bonus.

·    To receive update and provide feedback on deliverables arising from the City Centre Art Plan, towards which the city centre targeted rates makes a contribution.

To be advised 2019

City Centre Cleaning Services

Town centre cleaning and maintenance services will be transferred to Community Facilities from Auckland Transport and Waste Solutions, as part of the rationalisation of these services across Auckland. This was originally scheduled to go live on 1 July 2018, but has been postponed until 1 July 2019.

·    To provide feedback for the city centre cleaning and maintenance services.

Progress to date:

A report was considered on 27/6/18 Res CEN/201832

-     A further update on streetscapes pertaining to the city centre cleaning services will be provided.

 

April/May 2019



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 

Attachment – response to board queries regarding the Downtown Programme – January 2019

Memo

18 January 2019

To:

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

Subject:

Written response to queries raised regarding the Downtown Programme

From:

Simon Oddie, Principal Programme Manager, Development Programme Office

Purpose

1.      To respond to questions raised at the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board (ACCAB) workshop in November 2018 regarding the downtown programme update.

Context/Background

2.      At the ACCAB workshop in November, questions were raised in relation to the Downtown Programme update. The queries raised were related directly to the minutes of the 18 July 2018 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting, Agenda Item 7:

Resolution number CEN/2018/40

MOVED by Mr JMooney, seconded by Mr A Parkinson:

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)   receive the update on the progress and next steps for the Downtown programme

b)   provide the following feedback on the conceptual design of Quay Street and the Downtown public spaces project:

i)      to see projects in wider context including Queens Wharf at a workshop

ii)     to ensure the alignment and interface of individual projects

iii)    to ensure that the public amenity and accessibility of Customs Street is considered

iv)    specifically address the Quay Street East public amenity and accessibility

v)     reference to the Waterfront Plan to be included

c)   receive the update on planning for traffic movements around Quay Street and the Downtown area, in relation to planned transport upgrades.

3.      It should be noted that post the 18 July 2018 ACCAB meeting, a further workshop was held with the Advisory Board to update them on the integrated downtown waterfront planning and vision, as well as the development plan for how this vision is to be implemented over the next 10 years. This workshop was in response to minute b) i) and ii) as noted above.


 

Responses to queries raised at the 18 July ACCAB meeting:

Query 1:         To see projects in wider context including Queens Wharf at a workshop

4.      As noted above, the wider context of how the various projects across the City Centre waterfront deliver on the agreed strategic direction for the waterfront was presented at the workshop on the 22 August 2018 and was further reiterated as part of the presentations at the 30 October Planning Committee meeting (which the ACCAB Chair was in attendance), and the 21 November ACCAB workshop.

5.      These workshops set out how the waterfront will develop over the next 10+ years to deliver on the vision of a much more people-friendly and welcoming waterfront, in line with the aspirations set out in the City Centre Masterplan (2012) and the Waterfront Plan (2012). These workshops included an overview of how the Central Wharves Strategy and the recently released 30 Year Port Development plan were integrated into and informed the implementation strategy for the development of downtown, as agreed at the September 2017 Planning Committee meeting. This included an overview of the interfaces and interdependencies which dictate the order and timing of the various projects within the overarching development programme over the next 10 years.

6.      With respect to Queens Wharf, the development of the wharf into a public oriented space that provides for quiet relaxation as well as a number of other public use functions is dependent on the removal of the Cloud and the eventual relocation of cruise from Queens Wharf to the proposed dedicated cruise facility on Captain Cook Wharf.

7.      We understand that the future of Queens Wharf is a key issue for the ACCAB. While the role of the wharf as a premier public space is recognised as part of the current implementation strategy, in line with the vision set out in the Waterfront Plan and City Centre Master Plan, it is acknowledged that details regarding the future vision and design for Queens Wharf are high-level. This reflects the fact that the timing of this development is not currently proposed to start until approximately 2022/23. We will engage with the Board on the future development of Queens Wharf as part of the Downtown Development programme for the waterfront.

Query 2:         to ensure the alignment and interface of individual projects

8.      As per Q1) above, this was covered as part of the workshop on 22 August 2018, where we set out the key interfaces between the various projects and how this influenced and informed the development programme for the next 10 years.

9.      The current delivery programme, delivering key outcomes ahead of the 36th Americas Cup, was part of the implementation strategy presented to and agreed by the Planning Committee in September 2017. The implementation strategy, as it was presented to the ACCAB in June 2017 in the build up to the September Planning Committee meeting, set out how the Council Group would deliver on the transformational outcomes for the City Centre Waterfront, as set out in the City Centre Masterplan and Waterfront Plan. The strategy considered the alignment and interfaces of individual projects to ensure that they would deliver on the agreed vision and would be delivered in a sequence which reduces redundant work and enables the delivery of future outcomes. This is the principle behind the current delivery programme.

Query 3:         to ensure that the public amenity and accessibility of Customs Street is considered

10.    While the public amenity and accessibility of Customs Street is not part of the current delivery scope for the Downtown Programme, and is not funded within the current LTP, it is part of the long-term vision set out in the CCMP, and as such is considered as part of the longer-term planning for Downtown. To this effect, the City Centre Design Collective scope for the Downtown Programme does include a Britomart Precinct Reference Design that establishes a foundation for this precinct and its relationship to Customs Street. The Downtown Programme Team are working closely with the Auckland Design Office to ensure that the downtown designs take into account the current CCMP refresh work and the Access for Everyone concept for Auckland City. The designs do not preclude the future vision for Customs Street.

11.    The Auckland Design Office will present its update on the CCMP at the Board’s February meeting.

Query 4:         specifically address the Quay Street East public amenity and accessibility

12.    Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have received significant feedback from stakeholders both internal and external to the Council organisation on the proposed Britomart East Bus Interchange, in particular around the proposed location on Quay Street adjacent to the Britomart Precinct.

13.    Providing more and better opportunities for people to access the City Centre via public transport and active modes is a key outcome aligned with the Council organisations vision for the City Centre, and is a key outcome for the Downtown Programme. We are also striving to deliver great public amenity and urban design outcomes which integrate with our need to improve access to the City Centre.

14.    To ensure that we are in fact providing the right solution and delivering an outcome that is best for Auckland, the Downtown Programme Team, in discussion with key internal stakeholders, has put the Britomart East Bus Interchange project on hold to review and update the fundamentals associated with this project.

15.    The purpose of this review is to ensure that we are solving the right problem, have clear objectives, and are working from the latest information relating to bus requirements in the City Centre, and therefore developing options that reflect these and take into account stakeholder feedback to date. As part of this process, alternative locations and options will be developed, and the Programme Team are committed to bringing these options back to the ACCAB when we’re at shortlist phase (approximately mid-April this year).

16.    In the event that the Britomart East Bus Interchange does not end up on the Quay Street East block between Commerce Street and Britomart Place, the design team is investigating a series of detuning and amenity enhancement options for the section of Quay Street which ties into the Quay Street Enhancement project planned between Lower Hobson and Commerce Street. The Programme Team is also committed to bringing these concepts back to the ACCAB for feedback and advice.


 

Query 5:         receive the update on planning for traffic movements around Quay Street and the Downtown area, in relation to planned transport upgrades

17.    As noted in this resolution, a traffic planning update was provided at the 18 July 2018 ACCAB meeting. We assume that the ACCAB have no further concerns or queries regarding how traffic along Quay Street will function, however to recap, we have outlined some of the key points below. As the designs for Quay Street move through developed and detailed design, we will keep the ACCAB updated on any changes to the traffic planning as part of our regular updates.

What changes are planned?

·    The Quay Streetscape works will transform Quay Street from vehicle dominated to a people-focused harbour edge place.

·    A significant increase in pedestrian movement through and across the corridor is predicted with increased public transport usage, bike, bus, ferry and rail, and an increase in tourists.

What are the public transport changes?

·    With a new Lower Albert Street bus interchange, increased bus patronage will result. Bus stops on both the western and eastern sides of Lower Albert Street are complimented with the provision of bus lanes on Quay Street in both directions.

·    Operating clockwise on Quay Street, the Northwestern services will utilise the eastern side of Lower Albert Street, with the Northern Express buses operating counter-clockwise, as they currently operate today.

What are the planned changes to traffic?

·    A reduction in the number of general traffic lanes to one eastbound lane and one westbound lane will be provided.

·    The reduction in traffic lanes is predicted to result in traffic flows on Quay Street reducing by between 40 to 50% along the corridor. 

·    Traffic flows into and out of Princes Wharf, and Te Wero Bridge (Viaduct) are assumed to remain relatively constant (as currently today).

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

27 February 2019

 

 

    

    



[1] Research has suggested that inline bus bays can accommodate around 42-48 buses per hour – see Appendix D

[2] Source: Heart of the City pedestrian counts https://www.hotcity.co.nz/city-centre/results-and-statistics/pedestrian-counts