I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 18 February 2019

6.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

David Collings

 

Deputy Chairperson

Katrina Bungard

 

Members

Garry Boles

 

 

Jim Donald, JP

 

 

John Spiller

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Adele White

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Vanessa Phillips

Democracy Advisor

 

8 February 2019

 

Contact Telephone:  021 891 378

Email: vanessa.phillips@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Bike East Auckland                                                                        5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum- John McDermott, Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan    6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                    7

12        Councillor Update                                                                                                          9

13        Auckland Transport February 2019 update to the Howick Local Board               11

14        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board quarter two 2018/2019                                                                                                                      21

15        Howick Local Board three year engagement strategy February 2019                  69

16        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 July - 31 December 2018                                                                                                             83

17        Coastal erosion issues and options analysis report for Bucklands Beach, Little Bucklands and Cockle Bay                                                                                         91

18        Feedback on draft Increasing Aucklanders' participation in sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039                                                                                                                      93

19        Proposal to grant new community leases to Pakuranga Croquet Club, Harlequin Musical Theatre and The Scout Association of New Zealand (Cockle Bay)       103

20        Workshop Records                                                                                                    115

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      127  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 10 December 2018, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Bike East Auckland

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Bike East Auckland and thank them for their presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum- John McDermott, Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       John McDermott will be in attendance to present feedback to the Board on the Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank John McDermott for his attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2019/00317

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the Board on any announcements and note the Chairperson’s written report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Chairperson’s verbal update and written report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Councillor Update

 

File No.: CP2019/00318

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity for the Ward Councillor to update the Board on regional matters of interest.

2.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Ward Councillor to update the Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the verbal and written report from Councillor Sharon Stewart and Councillor Paul Young.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport February 2019 update to the Howick Local Board

File No.: CP2019/00598

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Howick Local Board (HLB) on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month but the report contains information about the following:

·   The wider ‘context’ involving a summary of the strategic projects or issues effecting the HLB’s Area including information about the Road Safety and Speed Management Programme

·   An update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

·   Progress on HLB advocacy initiatives

·   A summary of consultation about future Auckland Transport activities is included as an attachment.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport February 2019 update report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. Auckland Transport reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

4.       Auckland Transport continues to deliver a number of strategic projects in the HLB area, discussed below.

 

Integrated Corridor Management Programme (ICP)

5.       Auckland Transport is working hard to develop a more integrated strategic approach to the delivery of Auckland’s transport network.  An early example of this approach was the New Network that re-modelled public transport services across Auckland.

6.       The ICP continues this approach aiming to improve Auckland’s network of arterial roads in a planned and coordinated way.  Figure 1 is a map showing the network of road ‘corridors’. 

Figure 1 – Overview of the Integrated Corridor Management Plan

7.       The ICP’s project in the HLB area are the AMETI- Eastern Busway and Pakuranga Road.  AMETI – Eastern Busway work will start this year and the plan is well developed. Planning for Pakuranga Road is much less developed and the speed it progresses at will be based on its overall priority within the wider project.

8.       The work will also have significant indirect benefits for the HLB area when arterial routes in nearby areas are upgraded. It is important that people know about the plan and especially that upgrades are planned and coordinated. The ICP is a development of the Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP). After defining the transport infrastructure required to support growth in the ATAP, Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and central government worked together to develop the Regional Land Transport Plan that funds building infrastructure. The ICP project is Auckland Transport’s method for maximizing economy and effectiveness in delivering transport infrastructure.

Road Safety and Speed Management

9.       Road safety across Auckland and in the HLB area has got worse over the last five years for a variety of reasons, including population growth, new demands on the road network, and more people walking, cycling and motorcycling.

10.     In 2018 New Zealand’s Government committed to deliver a new road safety strategy outlined in the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport, Auckland Transport is supporting this by moving to a Vision Zero approach to traffic safety.

11.     Auckland Transport’s Board and Executive Leadership Team have recently endorsed an increased three-year investment in road safety engineering, a Speed Management Plan and behaviour change activities to reduce road trauma, including in the HLB area.

12.     In December 2018, the Auckland Transport Board gave permission to consult on proposed speed limit changes across the Auckland Region including in the HLB area. This consultation will culminate in a set of changes to speed limit bylaws.

13.     Last year Auckland Transport staff meet with the HLB and provided information about the proposals.  The proposals align with national policy that that is designed to introduce safer speeds across the country. 

14.     The HLB and the wider Howick community will have an opportunity to provide their thoughts on the new speed bylaw soon. Consultation will start in mid-February and runs for four weeks. Auckland Transport will make sure that it is well advertised.  It is very important that the HLB and community take advantage of this opportunity to state their views of the proposed changes because changes will start in August 2019

15.     On the Auckland Transport web site there is lots of detailed information about the whole plan - https://at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/reducing-speed-limits/

 

 AMETI - Eastern Busway

16.     AMETI – Eastern Busway is a very large project that will build New Zealand’s first urban busway providing congestion free ‘bus only’ lanes for commuters running from Panmure Station all the way to Botany. When it is completed, people will be able to commute easily and quickly from Botany to Panmure and vice versa.

 

17.     Late last year demolition of the 61 properties on the AMETI - Eastern Busway route between Panmure and Pakuranga started. The plan is that early this year the properties on the north side of Lagoon Drive and Pakuranga Road will be finished so that construction can start in March or April 2019.

 

18.     On 25 January 2019 the construction contract was signed in a ceremony that included the Minister of Transport and His Worship the Mayor of Auckland.

 

 

Airport to Botany Rapid Transport Network (RTN)

19.     A key part of Auckland Transport’s public transport strategy is the plan to provide an east-west RTN that links Auckland Airport with Botany via Manukau.   This project involves the New Zealand Transport Agency, Auckland Airport and Auckland Transport working together over a number of years to plan and build a bus or light rail link between these points.  

20.     After briefing Southern Local Boards Auckland Transport spent late 2018 analysing the merits of a shortlist of routes. Then during November and December 2018, the project team attended nine community open days across south and east Auckland

21.     Approximately 850 people attended and recorded around 500 written comments. The team had staff who spoke English, Tongan, Samoan, Maori, Chinese, Hindi and Urdu to ensure a variety of languages were available for people not fluent in English.

22.     Key themes captured in the engagement feedback included; safety, connectivity, integration of the projects with other infrastructure in the southeast and southwest Auckland, and the impacts of growth and development. There was strong support for the future RTN route to run from Botany to the Airport.

23.     Technical work to confirm the preferred rapid transit route is ongoing. 

24.     The project team will be updating the Local Boards in February, the confirmed date for HLB is 21 February 2019.

25.     The project also includes early improvements projects, including the new Puhinui Interchange and the project has progressed from concept to preliminary design. The preliminary design process will be finished at the end February 2019.

26.     The aim is that cost estimates and draft Business Case are completed in the first quarter of 2019.

27.     In summary, the Howick area will benefit from the project providing east-west connectivity linking Manukau, Botany and the Airport significantly improving transport options and making commuting to work in these areas, by public transport, much more viable.

28.     This RTN combined with the proposed Airport to CBD light rail route and the AMETI – Eastern Busway will give Howick local locals the ability to move quickly and efficiently both north-south to the Airport and CBD as well as east-west across this part of the city improving transport options in the area. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

29.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   Be safe.

·   Not impede network efficiency.

·   Be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

30.     The fund allows local boards to build transport focused local improvements in their areas. HLB’s total funding in this term is approx. $3.8 million (including new money allocated during the recent Council budget process and shown in the ‘Financial Summary’). The following table provides an overall summary of the current LBTCF position, including the increased LBTCF approved by Council and applying from 1 July 2018.

 

Table 1: Howick LBTCF Financial Summary

 

31.     At the October HLB business meeting new work was authorised and is listed in the table below. 

32.     The current projects that the HLB are working on are also summarised in the table below:

Table 2: Local Board Transport Capital Fund Projects

General Overview

Project

Current Status

Discussion

Half Moon Bay Ferry Pier and Bus Turnaround

 

Completed.

.

Howick Village Centre Plan

 

Supporting the Howick Village Centre Plan.

Cascades Walkway

 

Building a footpath on Cascade Road that will provide access under the bridge on the western edge of the golf course to the walking track that follows the stream.

 

Aviemore Drive Pathway

 

Building a walking and cycling pathway in reserve land running parallel with Aviemore Stream.

Information Plinth at Half Moon Bay

 

Installing a visitor information plinth at Half Moon Bay.

Footpath on The Parade

 

Raising the height of the footpath in the section ‘The Parade’ roughly opposite Numbers 15-19, to improve pedestrian amenity and to help prevent inundation during storms

Botany Downs Secondary College Crossing

 

Improving the ability for Botany Downs Secondary School pupils to cross Chapel Road

Notes: A ‘traffic light’ code is used to summarize the status of projects. The colours are used as follows:

Green – Project progressing ‘on time’ and on budget.

Orange – An issue has been identified that may need to be resolved.

Red - A major issue has been identified that needs to be resolved

 

Detailed Project Progress Report

Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal

Completed. 

Howick Village Centre Plan

On 20 August 2018, the HLB decided to support ‘detailed design’ and authorised use of up to $ 400,000 to plan and design the transport-orientated aspects of the project.

Council has appointed a project manager and Auckland Transport representatives had an initial meeting with them in late December 2018.

A further meeting is being scheduled in February 2019 and will be an opportunity for Auckland Transport’s technical staff to discuss the project in detail with the project manager.

Cascades Walkway

On 20 August 2018, HLB approved construction of the project based on a Firm Cost Estimate of $ 389,698

Auckland Transport provided a rough timeline last year and the plan is still that construction will start in March 2019.

The project team are also investigating the cost of building a footpath from the new walkway to the nearest bus stop. The plan being that if the cost of the pathway can be absorbed within, the project it will be if not the HLB will need to authorise an increase in funding.

Aviemore Drive Pathway

Endorsement, of the Howick Walking and Cycling Pathways Plan has made this project more complicated as the proposal is within one of the proposed routes. Therefore, it needs review within the wider Howick Walking and Cycling Pathways Plan.  A workshop to do this is scheduled on 19 February 2019.

Information Plinth at Half Moon Bay

The Signage Team and AT Metro are supportive of this project. Auckland Transport provided a Rough Order of Cost of $ 8000 for installing a plinth last year.

The map produced by Howick Tourism is being displayed on the existing Auckland Transport noticeboards at the terminal. 

Footpath on The Parade

This project was authorised last year and at this time, there is nothing significant to report.  Auckland Transport is also keen to check that the HLB still wishes to pursue this project now that the Howick Walking and Cycling Pathways Plan is available and is strongly supported by the HLB.  

Botany Downs Secondary College Crossing

This project was authorised last year and engineers have started considering it. However, at this time, there is nothing significant to report.  Auckland Transport is also keen to check that the HLB still wishes to pursue this project now that the Howick Walking and Cycling Pathways Plan is available and is strongly supported by the HLB.  

Points for consideration

33.     The LBTCF discussion has changed since the last report. The HLB’s endorsement and strong support for the Howick Walking and Cycling Pathways Plan could significantly change the board’s strategy for using the LBTCF.  The Howick Walking and Cycling Pathways Plan has an enormous amount of potential work much of which the LBTCF could be used to fund.

34.     The HLB has also recently contracted the services of a programme manager to work with the board and develop an integrated approach to project funding.  All LBTCF projects are included in this approach.

35.     On 19 February 2019 Auckland Transport and Auckland Council, staff plan to meet with the HLB and workshop all proposed projects. Prioritise them and plan the best way to fund the ones supported by the board.

New Projects

36.     In this reporting period three new projects have been identified that the HLB has been asked to consider and they are listed below:

·   Developing pedestrian access to Te Uho o Te Nikau School. This school is located on Flat Bush School Road and its main walking access is across a narrow bridge that does not have a safe footpath. The school’s Board of Trustees has approached HLB and members expressed a willingness to consider funding the work from the LBTCF. This is because Auckland Transport cannot fund this work but its engineers have been to the area and are investigating a series of options to provide better access.  This project will be discussed at a workshop the HLB on 19 February 2019.

·   A Pakuranga Road resident approached the Howick Ward Councillors recently because their front fence has been impacted by cars skidding at a nearby intersection.  The resident would like a barrier built in front of the house. Auckland Transport staff visited the site and agreed that a barrier could be built but that the organisation could not fund it. The Ward Councillor therefore requested that the board fund the work using the LBTCF. This project will be discussed at a workshop with the board on 19 February 2019.

·   Point View Drive. The residents of Point View Drive have discussed safety concerns with HLB members. Auckland Transport engineers have visited the area and met with residents. The project is not able to be funded by Auckland Transport because there are other areas with worse safety issues. HLB members have requested that a safety project in this area is investigated for funding using the LBTCF. This project will be discussed at a workshop the board on 19 February 2019.

Local board advocacy

37.     The following table provides a summary of progress made towards the HLB’s ‘Advocacy Initiatives’. 

Table 3: Howick Advocacy Initiative Summary

Advocacy Initiative

Key Initiative

Status

A well-integrated efficient public transportation system

Advocate to Auckland Transport to maintain and upgrade existing transportation systems, including improving safety at congestion hot spots.

 

Since the last report Auckland Transport has supported this ‘Key Initiative’ by:

·    AMETI – Eastern Busway demolition of houses on properties that will be used is progressing

·    The contract for construction of the AMETI – Eastern Busway was signed on 24 January 2019.

·    Public consultation on the Airport – Botany project starts soon.

Well designed and quality development in Howick

 

Continue to partner with Auckland Transport to develop the Half Moon Bay area as a transport hub

Auckland Transport has finished the ferry terminal.

HLB are discussing funding installation of tourist information plinth at the terminal.

Continue to develop integrated planning solutions which co-ordinate the planning, design and management of public spaces

Auckland Council has appointed a project manager and Auckland Transport staff are working with them. 

Parks and open spaces allow for a wide variety of recreational activities.

Continue to extend existing walkways and cycle ways, including informative signage.

Construction of a walking and cycling path that will provide access from Cascades Road to the Cascades Walkway is planned to start in March 2019.

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     There are no impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of other council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

39.     Over the last reporting period, Auckland Transport has not invited the local board to provide their feedback on any proposals because of the Christmas period.

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

40.     This sections records Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions. In this reporting period, the TCC passed the following resolutions in Howick.

 

Road

Area

Activity

Decision

Baverstock Road, Stornaway Drive, Erica Road

 

Howick

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

 

Carried

Ormiston Road / Peihinga Road / Tinaku Road / Hangahai Road / Haku Road / Tipu Road / Road 2

 

Flatbush

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

 

Approved in Principle

Picton Street / Uxbridge Road / Moore Street

 

Howick

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

 

Carried

Fencible Drive, Waterloo Street, Abercrombie Street, Nelson Street, Moore Street, Drake Street

 

Howick

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

 

Carried

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     In this reporting period no projects required iwi liaison.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is still the most significant financial implication this month because there is still a significant amount of money in this fund. Approx. $ 3.1 million.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     The proposed decision to receive the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all of its projects.

44.     Previous reports have highlighted the risks associated with the large amount of LBTCF (approx. $3.1 million) still unallocated. Auckland Transport has suggested that the HLB consider steps to mitigate the risk of money being spent without due consideration, including a ‘freeze’ on use of the fund.

45.     The current risk management strategy is integrating planning for the LBTCF with the board’s project to coordinate Local Development Initiative funding.  All LBTCF projects will be included in this discussion. The board will discuss the options at a workshop on 19 February 2019. The aim of the project is to confirm a prioritised list of projects and allocate funding.

46.     Even with a planning process there is a large a sum of money to allocate within the short time until the next local body election.  It may be possible to allocate some of it but delivery of projects within this period is now very unlikely.

47.     Another option for managing this risk is the to ‘freeze’ the fund.  A ‘freeze’ provides Auckland Council and Auckland Transport staff to start planning for the next term in a measured manner based on firm figures. This would allow for the development of high quality advice for the next HLB.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board quarter two 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/00539

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Howick Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2018/2019 work programme. This is a retrospective report intended to provide a transparent overview and reflect the progress of how the Howick Local Board Work Programme is tracking at the end of quarter two 2018/2019.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Howick Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·    The Sir John Walker Promenade dawn blessing and official opening was held on 6 December 2018. The Highbrook Walkway Dawn Blessing was held on 13 December 2018 (ID 124)

·    The annual event to celebrate the lighting of the Stockade Hill Christmas tree lights occurred (ID 128)

·    In quarter two the contractor worked with the Adopt a Spot groups to progress the delivery of their restoration plans, helping to organise regular clean-up events and working bees for streams in the area (ID 171)

·    The Lloyd Elsmore Park multi-sport project is progressing.  Work is underway with the various stakeholders to develop a project that is likely to fit within the funding envelope (ID 1216)

·    Work has commenced again on the Howick Heritage Plan implementation with an external project manager appointed in quarter two (ID 1562)

·    Following advocacy from the board the Finance and Performance Committee has resolved to retain 34 Moore Street for a period of 12 months to allow the board to work on a development proposal.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Most activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·   The development of the existing carpark adjacent to the culture lawn on Chapel Road (ID 2758); and

·   Glenlea Park wall and wheel stop renewal (ID 2936).

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2018/2019 is attached. The key points to note are:

·   The overall operational net cost of service was $10.8 million, which is within 1 percent of the year to date budget

·     Capital investment of $5 million took place in the Howick Local Board Area during the first half of the current financial year. Major capital projects underway are the implementation of the Master Plan at Barry Curtis Park and renewal of local assets. Leisure Centre renewals at Lloyd Elsmore Park are also complete.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter ending 31 December 2018.

b)      approve $7,000 of funding to be allocated into work programme line #515 Skate Park Custodians from the Parks Response Fund.

c)      acknowledge that $105,000 of funding has been freed up in LDI opex and has been allocated into the Park’s Response Fund.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·   Arts, Community and Events

·   Parks, Sport and Recreation

·   Libraries and Information

·   Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration

·   Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·   Community Leases

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·   Local Economic Development and

·   Plans and Places.

8.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the board outcomes identified in the three-year Howick Local Board Plan. The Local Board Plan outcomes are:

·   Involved and connected communities;

·   Our future growth is managed effectively

·   Valuing our cultural diversity

·   A treasured environment

·   Our people are active and healthy and

·   A prosperous local economy.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the board outcomes, such as advocacy by the board, are not captured in this graph.

 

 

Graph 1: Work Programme Activities by Outcome

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

10.     The work programme activities have two statuses; RAG status which measures the performance of the activity (amber and red show issues and risks); and activity status which shows the stage the activity. These two statuses create a snapshot of the progress of the work programmes.

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey). has been added to show). It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme Activities by RAG status

 

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by activity status and department. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

 

Graph 3: Work Programme Activities by Activity Status and Department

Key activity updates from quarter two

13.     The following are a snapshot of the key activities for the last quarter:

·   ID 124 – Local Civic Events. The Sir John Walker Promenade dawn blessing and official opening was held on 6 December 2018. The Highbrook Walkway Dawn Blessing was held on 13 December 2018

·   ID 128 – Stockade Hill & Mainstreet Lights. The annual event to celebrate the lighting of the Stockade Hill Christmas tree lights occurred. It included musical entertainment from the local community and coincided with Howick’s Midnight Madness in Picton Street

·   ID 171 – Howick Stream Improvement. In quarter two the contractor worked with the Adopt a Spot groups to progress the delivery of their restoration plans, helping to organise regular clean-up events and working bees. Healthy Waters staff and the council’s targeted initiatives compliance team are developing a workshop aimed at demonstrating best practice on small building sites and will target the Flat Bush small site builders. This will be held in quarter three. A quarter three community planting event on the Ōtara Creek has been planned at a suitable site alongside Sancta Maria College

·   ID 1216 – HW: Facility Partnership 2016 Howick Gymsports. The Lloyd Elsmore Park multi-sport project is progressing.  Work is underway with the various stakeholders to develop a project that is likely to fit within the funding envelope

·   ID 1562 – Howick Heritage Plan implementation. Work has commenced again on this activity with an external project manager appointed in quarter two. Their initial focus is on developing a draft work programme

·   34 Moore Street. Following advocacy from the board the Finance and Performance Committee has resolved to retain this property for a period of 12 months to allow the board to work on a development proposal.

 

Activities with significant issues

14.  These activities have been identified by operating departments as having a red RAG status:

·   ID 2758 - Barry Curtis Park - develop existing Culture Lawn Chapel Rd metal carpark. This has now been planned for the year 2024 to align with Barry Curtis Park Master Planning

·   ID 2936 - Glenlea Park wall and wheel stop renewal. Tender evaluations for this are now in progress and the contract will be awarded by the end of February. Works are scheduled to begin in March 2019.

Activities on hold

15.  The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·   ID 2351 – Ti Rakau Park Playground Renewal. This project is on hold until Community Services and Auckland Transport agree on best options for the playground renewal, taking into consideration the AMETI Stage 2 works, the playground strategy being developed for Howick Local Board Area and the concept plans proposed by the Active Recreation team

·   ID 2758 - Barry Curtis Park - develop existing culture lawn Chapel Rd metal carpark. This project is on hold and is now been planned for the year 2024 to align with Barry Curtis Park Master Planning

·   ID 3004 – Buckland Beach Develop Walkway. This project was placed on hold following Auckland Transport's one-way system feasibility study. Discussion is required with the board on how they wish to proceed with development of the walkway.

Changes to the local board work programme

Changed activities

17. These activities are changed from the 18/19 work programme:

·   ID 515 HW Skate Park Custodians. This work programme activity requires additional funding for new initiatives to help to improve and enhance engagement and participation in skateboarding. The Parks, Sport and Recreation Team have recommended $7,000 would be suitable to cover additional costs. This can be found by transferring unallocated funds in the Park’s Response Fund. An additional $14,000 would be required per annum going forward under the terms of the new agreement to be signed

·   A Parks Response Fund has been created from additional LDI opex.  

Deferred activities

18. These activities are deferred from the 18/19 work programme:

·   ID 2489 - 563R Pakuranga Road: Lease to The Scout Association of NZ (Minerva). At the request of the board this matter is deferred until at the start of the 2019/2020 financial year to allow the tenant time to re-establish themselves and submit and prepare an application for a new lease.

Cancelled activities

19.     No activities have been identified by operating departments as having been cancelled from the 18/19 work programme.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

20.     No activities from the 18/19 work programme have been identified by operating departments as having been merged with other activities for efficient delivery.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Other than the proposed recommendations that impact the Parks Sport and Recreation Department and Finance Department, there are no impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This report informs the board of the performance for the quarter ending 31 December 2018.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     This activity had a direct Maori outcome focus:

·   ID 859 - Local Maori Responsiveness Plan Work Programme Activity. Te Tahawai Marae have completed their strategic plan and are ready to present their findings to the board as soon as a time can be found to do this. This model of working with Māori organisations and ascertaining their needs and working with them to develop plans will be replicated with other Māori groups, which will then lead to developing a Māori responsiveness plan for the board.

 

24.     This activity aligns with the local board plan:

·   ID 1116 - Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori - Howick Work Programme Activity. The fourth Te Kākano programme supporting literacy initiatives for Māori pre-schoolers and their caregivers was hosted by staff from Howick Library, Uxbridge Centre for the Arts and Te Whare Wānanga O Matariki Marae. This kete was themed around Kirihimete and featured stories, rhymes and activities delivered in Māori and English. With the growing interest in, and demand for, bilingual knowledge the Kia Māia te Whai/Dare to Explore 2018/19 also offered challenges in te reo.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     There are two financial implications proposed in this report which are:

·   That the board acknowledges $105,000 of LDI opex is moved to the Parks, Response Fund; and

·   That $7,000 of the Parks Response Fund is to be moved to activity #515 Skate Park Custodian.

Financial Performance

26.     The board’s net cost of service for the September quarter was $10.8 million, which is within 1 percent of the year to date budget.  

27.     Operating revenue is for the six-month period is in line with budget. Leisure operations revenue was slightly lower. This was made up for by slightly higher revenue from Early Childhood Education activities. Active visits at leisure centres showed a reduction compared to active visits during the same period for last year. Active Recreation management are in the process of enhancing the operations models at Pakuranga and Howick Leisure Centres as discussed with board in the previous quarter.

28.     Operating expenditure for asset-based services is within budget. Environmental programmes under the locally driven initiatives are progressing quicker than expected. This was offset by slower than expected progress and spend in local economic development projects.

29.     Capital investment of $5 million for the first six months has been 42 percent over the year to date capital budget of $3.5 million. $1.1 million more was spent, on the implementation of the Master Plan at Barry Curtis, more that was budgeted for in the first six months of the financial year. Other major projects include Eastern Beach Play renewals and the renewal of the carpark at Mangemangeroa & Point View. The enhancement of the splashpad at Lloyd Elsmore Park, which was funded from LDI capital budget has been completed. Other LDI funded projects are in progress.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

31.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three (31 March 2019).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Quarterly Performance Report December 2018 - Financial Appendix

29

b

Howick Q2 - WP Update

35

c

Memo on Skate Park Custodian 2019

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Phoebe Peguero - Local Board Advisor - Howick

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 



 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

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Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Howick Local Board three year engagement strategy February 2019

File No.: CP2019/00888

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Howick Local Board three-year engagement strategy February 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Howick Local Board (HLB) is required by legislation to engage with the local community and consider their views and preferences.

3.       The community has a low level of engagement with HLB, and with the wider Auckland Council. 

4.       The engagement advisor is tasked with developing a three-year engagement strategy for the local board. This strategy will cover the three years immediately following adoption (2019-2021) and will be supported by an annual programme of engagement.

5.       The amount and timing of engagement activities each year will be influenced by the three-year electoral cycle, existing regional special consultative procedures, availability of subject matter experts and commitment of the HLB members.

6.       The three-year engagement strategy will include special consultative procedures relating to the Annual Plan, 10-year budget and the Howick Local Board Plan.

7.       The proposed new engagement activities for the HLB include:

·   talk to the board – whole board session during existing workshop time allowing people to have an open conversation with the board

·   let’s talk local – elected member led sessions in each subdivision to allow people to engage with their representatives in their local community

·   community forum – topic or sector-based information sharing sessions run by local board services in conjunction with council departments and council-controlled organisations

·   ethnic forum – a forum for all ethnic communities supported by an ethnic roundtable which will generate topics for the wider forum.

8.       Engagement will be evaluated to ensure effectiveness and to identify improvements.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the Howick Local Board three-year engagement strategy February 2019.

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires local boards to:

·   communicate with community organisations

·   communicate the interests and preferences of people in relation to strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws (to the governing body)

·   consider the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in, a local board decision

·   use the local board plan process to provide an opportunity for people to participate in decision-making processes on the nature and level of local activities to be provided by council within the local board area.

10.     The Local Government Act 2002 establishes engagement principles:

·   a local authority should conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner, and give effect to its identified priorities and desired outcomes in an efficient and effective manner

·   a local authority should make itself aware of, and should have regard to, the views of all its communities

·   when deciding, a local authority should take account of the diversity of the community, and the community’s interests, within its district or region; and the interest of future as well as current communities; and the likely impact of any decision on them

·   a local authority should provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes.

11.     The Auckland Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy 2014:

·   identified how and when communities can expect to be engaged in, or specifically consulted on, decisions about issues, proposals, assets, decisions and activities

·   enabled the council and our communities to understand the significance that council places on certain issues, proposals, assets, decisions, and activities.

12.     Auckland Council’s strategy to become a great council has six steps up.  Step 1 relates directly to engagement: “Engage and Enable our Communities”.

Figure 1 – Auckland Councils Strategy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13.     Engaged and enabled communities will be measured through trust and confidence in council. This is measured quarterly through a survey conducted by an independent agency.                                The engagement strategy for HLB will help to meet the council wide target of 35 per cent trust in council for 2018-2019.

14.     Local Board Services has an agreed approach to improve engagement undertaken by local boards during the 2017-2019 electoral term. Engagement undertaken by specific local boards needs to be informed by this approach. The approach has three parts:

·   establish an engagement evaluation framework

·   identify approaches to improve engagement practice

·   identify approaches to co-ordinate engagement activities.

15.     Local government has obligations to Māori through legislation and Auckland Council is committed to honouring te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi. 

16.     Māori are a diverse group, with local boards having responsibilities to two key groups:

·   mana whenua – currently represented by 19 tribal authorities in Auckland

·   matāwaka - which includes individuals, whanau and organisations.

17.     Evaluation of engagement across the wider council and at the local board level is needed to ensure reflective practice and ongoing improvement.

18.     Engagement Advisors have been employed permanently in 2018 across the 21 local boards.  A key responsibility is to develop a three-year engagement strategy and an annual programme of engagement for each local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Analysis

19.     In 2013 the population of the HLB was 127,125. It is anticipated that data from the 2018 census will show population growth overall and possible changes to the ethnic and age profiles of the population.

20.     Demographic data from submissions on the 10-year budget 2018 and Local Board Plan 2017 demonstrates a low level of engagement with council and the HLB.  There were 1301 local submissions on the 10-year budget 2018, representing 1.0 per cent of the population. For the Local Board Plan 2017 the board received 412 submissions, representing 0.32 per cent of the population.

21.     A summary of submitters by ethnicity in relation to percentage of the population can be found below:

Ethnicity

Population in Howick Local Board area (per cent)

Submitters on 10-year budget 2018 (per cent)

Submitters on Local Board Plan 2017 (per cent) *

European

55

55

64

Māori

5.2

4

3

Pacific

4.6

4

1

Asian

38.8

33

39

Middle Eastern, Latin American, African

1.2

2

0

Other

1.7

2

1

*Total adds to more than 100 as submitters listed more than one ethnicity

 

22.     This data shows that all ethnicities are represented proportionally. Partnership events with existing ethnic community groups have been successful at engaging the Chinese community, which is the largest ethnic group representing 21 per cent of the population at the last census in 2013.

23.     A summary of submitters by age in relation to percentage of the population can be found below:

Age (years)

Population in Howick Local Board area (per cent)

Submitters on 10-year budget 2018 (per cent)

Submitters on Local Board Plan 2017 (per cent)

0-15

19.8

1

12

15-24

14.1

10

18

25-34

12.5

10

5

35-44

14.3

16

9

45-54

15.1

19

12

55-64

11.3

15

13

65-74

7.3

19

2

75+

5.1

9

11

 

24.     This data shows that people in all age groups are submitting on the 10-year budget and Local Board Plan. People over 45 are well represented as submitters, with significant representation from the 65+ age group. 

25.     A summary of attendance at board run engagement events for the 10-year budget can be found below:

Event

Format

No. of engagements or attendees

Botany Community Day

Raising Awareness

50

Howick Village Market

Raising Awareness

78

Picton Centre HYS

Roundtable

5

Movies in the Park

Raising Awareness

13

Kotahi Centre HYS

Roundtable

7

Music in the Park

Raising Awareness

15

Pakuranga Meeting Room HYS

Hearing style

9

 

26.     This data shows that attendance at board run face to face engagement events is very low.  Raising awareness at existing events generates the highest level of face to face interactions. 

27.     An increasing proportion of submitters are now doing so online.  Online submitters made up 62 per cent of submissions for the HLB area for the 10-year budget 2018. This compares with 44 per cent of online submission for the Local Board Plan 2017. Paper forms are still preferred by a significant part of the population including 48 per cent of submitters on the Local Board Plan and 36 per cent of submitters for the 10-year budget.

Advice

28.     The proposed Howick Local Board three-year engagement strategy February 2019 identifies five objectives (Attachment A):

·   take a strategic approach to engagement

·   increase the reach of engagement

·   strengthen relationships

·   inform communities

·   evaluate effectiveness.

29.     The amount and timing of engagement activities each year will be influenced by the three-year electoral cycle, annual special consultative procedures, work programme related consultation, the availability of subject matter experts and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) related project engagement.

30.     The HLB will continue engagement in relation to the Annual Plan (incorporating the Local Board Agreement), the 10-year budget (three yearly) and the Local Board Plan (three yearly). The Board will, where necessary, support council departments and CCOs doing project specific engagement within the local board area.

31.     The strategy introduces new engagement activities, which will require commitment from board members as follows:

·   Talk to the Board – a monthly session in the Pakuranga meeting room during existing workshop times with capacity to book a time slot.  The purpose of this session is to provide already engaged members of the public with a forum in which they can speak directly and openly with board members, with the opportunity for two-way discussion.

·   Let’s talk Local – sessions run by board members at locations within each subdivision.  The purpose of these sessions is to provide an opportunity for local people to meet with their local members in an informal way. Members will provide information about what the board is doing in the local area, answer question and listen to people’s issues and requests.  Local Board Services will provide administrative support.

·   Community Forums – topic or sector-based information sessions where the Board partners with other council departments or CCOs to present information about topics of interest to the community or hear from a specific sector group. These sessions will be in response to need and will require significant co-operation from staff outside of Local Board Services.

·   Ethnic Forum – the board has expressed a desire to have regular and ongoing engagement with all the ethnic groups that comprise the ‘Asian’ community.   This forum will allow the ethnic population to learn about what the HLB does and discuss relevant local issues for ethnic communities. The content of such forums will be informed by the related Ethnic Roundtable. These will be run in conjunction with the Strategic Broker.

32.     Greater youth representation will be addressed by supporting Howick Youth Council’s engagement activities, identifying other youth focussed community groups, and developing relationships with local primary and intermediate schools. The Engagement Advisor will collaborate with other parts of the council organisation to encourage the use of digital and innovative engagement strategies.

33.     Improving engagement with Māori will address two groups – mana whenua and matāwaka.

34.     The mana whenua groups whose role includes the HLB are:

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Whātua o Orakei, Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ta Akitai Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngāti Paoa, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Tamatera, Te Patukirikiri.

35.     The Engagement Advisor will liaise with Te Waka Angamua to support the local board in developing relationships with mana whenua.

36.     Improved engagement with matāwaka will be achieved by collaborating with the Strategic Broker to identify and build relationships with local matāwaka groups.

37.     The Engagement Advisor will deliver targeted engagement with Māori during development of the Local Board Plan.

38.     There is a need to educate the wider community about the Auckland Governance model, the role of local boards, as well as decisions that are the responsibility of the regional governing body and central government agencies. This will be addressed initially through static display resources circulated around community venues.

39.     The Engagement Advisor will collaborate with the Local Communications Advisor to align local engagement activities with a planned approach to local communications that makes proactive use of available communications channels.

40.     Growing the database of people who receive the HLB e-newsletter and follow the HLB Facebook page will be a key focus.

41.     Evaluation of engagement activities annually and in response to ineffectiveness will ensure a constant focus on improvement.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     This strategy has been circulated with the following council departments:  Local Communications, Arts Culture and Events, Citizen Insights and Engagement, Digital Services, Community Facilities, Parks Sport and Recreation, Te Waka Anga Mua, RIMU, and the Peoples Panel.

43.     Amendments were made to align the strategy with key priorities for other departments, and to ensure departments can deliver on aspects of the strategy.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     The local board is committed to engagement and has delivered local engagement events across all subdivisions for the Local Board Plan, Annual plan and the 10-year budget.

45.     The board has expressed the desire to improve engagement in the HLB area and recognises that new and innovative approaches will be needed, including the use of digital strategies.

46.     The HLB has been involved in the development of the Howick Local Board engagement strategy February 2019 through the following activities facilitated by the Engagement Advisor:

·   completing an online survey post the 2018 long term plan

·   completing an online survey about their existing engagement activities in the community

·   attending an initial engagement workshop in July 2018 where the board gave feedback and direction

·   receiving information about the range of engagement activities currently being undertaken by other local boards

·   attending a subsequent engagement workshop in September 2018 at which the board indicated support for the proposed engagement activities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     Improved engagement with Māori will allow more Māori input into local decision making to address the views and preferences of the Māori community, and ensure the local board meets its statutory obligations to Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     The board’s engagement activities are supported by the Engagement Advisor on a half time basis shared with Franklin Local Board.

49.     A modest budget to purchase prudent innovative engagement resources, static display materials and produce a short video will be made available from the board’s governance budget.

50.     Any additional expenses beyond this relating to purchase of equipment or materials for board members to use at local events will need to be allocated by resolution from the board’s Local Development Initiative funding.

51.     Additional promotion and communication costs associated with promotion of the board’s engagement activities in the community will be met through the Local Communications budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     Poor engagement can lead to poor decision making when the HLB does not understand the needs and aspirations of all the groups of people within the local board area.

53.     The board could suffer a loss of reputation, if the local population perceives the board is out of touch with the community.

54.     Failure to meet statutory obligations regarding consultation could lead to disruption and delay in delivery of work programmes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     The Engagement Advisor will develop an annual calendar of engagement activities for the 2019 calendar year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Board three-year engagement strategy 2019

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lucy Stallworthy - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 



Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 July - 31 December 2018

File No.: CP2018/24419

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Howick Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area and the region for the six months from 1 July to 31 December 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Panuku is charged with balancing financial and non-financial outcomes in order to create and manage sustainable and resilient places where people want to live, work, invest, learn and visit. The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·   Redevelopment of urban locations, leveraging off council owned land assets, mostly within existing suburbs.

·   Review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property.

·   Management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure.

·   Other property related services such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function, strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

3.       Panuku currently manages 269 commercial and residential interests in the Howick Local Board area.

4.       Development activities in the local board area include Flat Bush School Road, Ormiston Town Centre and the Ormiston Residential Finger.

5.       Four properties are currently under review as part of our rationalisation process.

6.       No properties in the Howick Local Board were sold or purchased during the last six months.

7.       Panuku leads a multi-year redevelopment programme of the council’s Housing for Older People (HfOP) portfolio (Haumaru). There are 4 HfOP villages in the Howick Local Board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 July to 31 December 2018.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

9.       The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world class city, Panuku will play a significant role in achieving the Homes and Places and Belonging and Participation outcomes.

10.     Panuku is leading urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Papatoetoe, Ormiston and Flat Bush, Panmure, Pukekohe, City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

11.     Panuku manages around $2 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

12.     As at 30 December 2018, the property portfolio comprises 1636 properties, containing 1062 leases. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

13.     The net surplus for the council and Auckland Transport (AT) property portfolio for the period ending 31 December 2018 was $13.8m. This provided an additional YTD return of $1.178m against the budgeted figure.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Ngā Mahi ā-Hapori / Local Activities

Development

14.     Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately 50 region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

15.     Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best practice project delivery to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

16.     Below is a high-level update on development activities in the Howick Local Board area:

17.     Flat Bush School Road (Lot 1-5):

a.  Lot 1: This site has been sold to Neil Construction who has created a 30-lot residential subdivision. The construction of these homes has now commenced.

b.  Lot 2: This land has been purchased by the Ministry of Education for the development of a primary school. The school has been completed and opens for the first school term of 2019.

c.  Lot 3: This 6934m2 site has been sold unconditionally to a purchaser who intends to develop terraced housing. Settlement of the sale will take place in December 2019.

d.  Lot 4 & 5: The two lots now have subdivision consents and titles. Panuku are preparing to sell these parcels and are currently in discussions with the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development (Kiwibuild), prior to going to the open market.

18.     Ormiston Town Centre – Development activity is underway on several residential blocks at Ormiston Town Centre. Panuku is working closely with Todd Property Group to develop the 20-hectare area. Todd Property acquired Block E in June 2017 and is looking to progress the residential component on Block E and is making significant progress on leasing to a Medical Centre. Construction is progressing on blocks F and J, with completion programmed for end 2020.

19.     66 Flat Bush School Road (Ormiston Residential Finger) – A development agreement between Panuku and Todd Property Group (Todd) was established in August 2016. Todd are progressing with the construction of Stage 1 of this residential development (101 units) now consented, the infrastructure is due for completion Jan 2019, with the main works programmed to commence April 2019.

Properties managed in the Howick Local Board Area

20.     Panuku currently manages 65 commercial and 204 residential interests within the local board area.

Business interests

21.     Panuku also manages the commercial return from business interests on the council’s behalf. This includes two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

22.     The closure of Greenmount Landfill continues. Consent for importing additional topsoil was obtained in April 2018, but only a portion of the work was completed during the earthworks season. The stormwater consent application was delayed due to design changes and was submitted in December. Consent is expected to be obtained in February 2019 with works commencing shortly thereafter.

23.     EnviroWaste have committed to complete the works by the end of June 2019. However there remains a real risk that due to the late start in the current construction season, that completion of these works may be delayed. Council is taking an active role in managing and monitoring EnviroWaste, in particular around quality of the final surfaces, compliance with consents, and preparation of the site for safe long-term operations and maintenance.

24.     The conditions of the subdivision consent application for 80 Smales Road have been agreed between Council and EnviroWaste.

 

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

25.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets approved in 2015. The process involves an agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

26.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, lower maintenance and operating costs, as well as improved service delivery benefiting from co-location of other complimentary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites.

27.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

28.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes.

29.     Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

30.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

31.     Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal recommendations

$8.6 million as at 31 December 2018.

 

Process

32.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors, the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Under review

33.     Properties currently under review in the Howick Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the Governing Body.

Property

Details

1 Ara Tai - Half Moon Bay Marina

Ground lease only. Panuku commenced the rationalisation process to evaluate future use options. The rationalisation process commenced in June 2014.

Panuku is awaiting confirmation by the lessee of its long-term plans before progressing further.

16 Fencible Drive, Howick

Under review for future uses - potential to explore idea of developing hybrid commercial/community space including residential housing outcomes.

Further engagement with the board is dependent on AT confirming transport infrastructure requirements for the property.

The property is not available for leasing purposes.

34 Moore Street, Howick

In response to the Howick Local Board’s presentation, the council’s Finance and Performance Committee resolved at its November 2018 meeting to retain the property for 12 months to allow further future use investigations.

Panuku is continuing to work with the council’s departments and engage with the board as part of the rationalisation process.

303 (Part) Te Irirangi Drive, Clover Park

Vacant portion of a larger site originally held for flood remediation or roading purposes.

The majority of the site is subject to an EOI for planned and funded transport infrastructure purposes.

The internal department consultation commenced in September 2018. No alternate service use requirements were identified for the subject area.

Panuku engagement with the board is scheduled for 26 February 2019.

 

Acquisitions and disposals

34.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

35.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

36.     Panuku purchased 12 properties for open space across Auckland in the 2018-19 financial year at a cost of $35 million and bought one property for stormwater use at a value of $188,000.

37.     No properties were purchased in the Howick Local Board area during the reporting period.

Disposals

38.     The disposals team has sold 13 properties, realising $40.9 million of unconditional net sales proceeds, in the current financial year.  The Panuku 2018/19 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

39.     No properties were sold in the Howick Local Board area.


Housing for Older People

40.     The council owns 1412 units located in 62 villages across Auckland, which provide rental housing to low income older people in Auckland.

41.     The Housing for Older People (HfOP) project involved the council partnering with a third-party organisation, The Selwyn Foundation, to deliver social rental housing services for older people across Auckland.

42.     The joint venture business, named Haumaru Housing, took over the tenancy, facilities and asset management of the portfolio, under a long-term lease arrangement from 1 July 2017.

43.     Haumaru Housing was granted community housing provider (CHP) status in April 2017. Having CHP registration enables Haumaru to access the government’s Income Related Rent Subsidy (IRRS) scheme.

44.     Auckland Council has delegated Panuku to lead a new multi-year residential development programme.

45.     The first new development project is a 40-unit apartment building on the former Wilsher Village site on 33 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson. Once completed in mid-2019, this development will increase the council’s portfolio to 1452 units.

46.     The following HfOP villages are located within the Howick Local Board area:

Village

Address

Number of units

Dale Court

33 Dale Crescent, Pakuranga

26

Marriott Court

3R Marriott Road, Pakuranga Heights

8

Mattson Court

22 Mattson Road, Pakuranga

10

Minerva Court

3 Gibraltar Street, Howick

27

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.     The proposed decision has no impacts on the council group. The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has no impacts. Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

49.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries relating to a property in the local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no significant impacts on Māori.

51.     Panuku work collaboratively with Mana Whenua on a range projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

52.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.         

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     The next six-monthly update is scheduled for August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sven Mol - Corporate Affairs Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Helga  Sonier - Senior Engagement Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Coastal erosion issues and options analysis report for Bucklands Beach, Little Bucklands and Cockle Bay

File No.: CP2019/00892

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Bucklands Beach, Little Bucklands and Cockle Bay erosion issues and options analysis report prepared by Tonkin and Talyor dated November 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its June 2017 business meeting the board allocated $106,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards addressing erosion in Howick as part of its 2017/2018 Parks, Sports and Recreational work programme. Of this budget, $60,000 was agreed to be used to prepare a planning and investigation report of coastal erosion management options for Howick beaches, specifically Bucklands Beach, Little Bucklands Beach and Cockle Bay.

3.       Auckland Council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation team, supported by the coastal management services team, commissioned Tonkin and Taylor Ltd to develop potential management options to manage coastal erosion at Bucklands Beach, Little Bucklands Beach and Cockle Bay.

4.       In November 2018, Tonkin and Taylor completed the Bucklands Beach, Little Bucklands and Cockle Bay erosion issues and options analysis report. The report was discussed with the board at its 13 November 2018 workshop.

5.       The report provides high level physical works options to manage the effects of erosion for each beach. It also includes an assessment with indicative construction costs to assist in the comparison of options. This information will be used to inform any future decision making in regard to coastal erosion management for Howick beaches.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the Bucklands Beach, Little Bucklands and Cockle Bay erosion issues and options analysis report prepared by Tonkin and Talyor dated November 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Bucklands Beach, Little Bucklands and Cockle Bay erosion issues and options analysis report prepared by Tonkin + Taylor (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Morriss – Senior Coastal Specialist

Authorisers

Barry Potter – Director Infrastructure & Enviro Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Feedback on draft Increasing Aucklanders' participation in sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039

File No.: CP2019/00886

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Increasing Aucklanders’ participation in sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To respond to population growth and demographic change, Auckland Council has developed a plan for how it will invest in sport for the next 20 years.

3.       The Increasing Aucklanders’ participation in sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 seeks to:

·   increase participation in sport by targeting communities of greatest need and addressing disparities

·   deliver a broad range of programmes, services and facilities that respond to the diverse needs of Auckland’s communities

·   address population growth and changing sport preferences through regular assessments of, and changes to, programmes, services and facilities to maximise participation. 

4.       The draft plan was endorsed by the Environment and Community Committee in December 2018 for public consultation [CP2018/07771].

5.       This report invites local boards to formally indicate their support for the draft plan and any additional feedback on the draft plan they would like the committee to consider prior to the plan’s adoption.

6.       Staff have engaged with local boards informally at various stages throughout the development of the plan. Local boards members’ views and concerns have helped shape the key components of the plan.

7.       A summary of consultation feedback will be prepared for the Environment and Community Committee for consideration. Final decision on the adoption of the plan will be sought in May 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      endorse the draft Increasing Aucklanders’ participation in sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 and provide any additional feedback for consideration of the Environment and Community Committee.

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

The plan sets out a new investment approach, which better responds to growth and the changing needs of Aucklanders

8.       Auckland is experiencing rapid population growth and social change. Our diverse communities have different preferences and requirements for sport and recreation activities.

9.       The draft Increasing Aucklanders’ participation in sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 is the council’s response to these changes. It sets out a new approach to regional investment in sports facilities, programmes and services for Aucklanders over the next 20 years.

10.     The plan will:

·   target communities of greatest need and address disparities

·   deliver a broad range of programmes, services and facilities that respond to the diverse needs of Auckland’s communities

·   address population growth and changing sport preferences through regular assessments of, and changes to, programmes, services and facilities. 

11.     The draft plan has three main sections:

·   Section one: ‘Why we invest’ explains the reasons for having an investment plan and the strategic context.

·   Section two: ‘What we invest in’ explains the outcomes sought from the council’s sports investment, the scope and focus of that investment and the principles that will guide future investment decisions.

·   Section three: ‘How we will work’ explains the investment framework that will be adopted to achieve the outcomes.

12.     The development of the draft plan involved several Governing Body decisions, local board engagement, public consultation and research.  The attached draft plan provides the chronological timeline for developing the plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Adoption of the plan will contribute to multiple strategic outcomes

13.     Sport is one of the key areas the council invests in to deliver on the ‘Belonging and Participation’ outcome in Auckland Plan 2050.

Belonging and Participation

·    Focus Area 7 – Recognise the value of arts, culture, sports and recreation to quality of life

·    Direction 1 – Foster an inclusive Auckland where everyone belongs

·    Direction 2 – Improve health and wellbeing for all Aucklanders by reducing disparities in opportunities.

 

14.     The draft plan focuses on delivering a single outcome: increasing Aucklanders’ participation in community sport. This aligns with the vision of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2014-2024: ‘Aucklanders: more active, more often.’

15.     The multiple benefits delivered to local communities through increased sport participation will also contribute directly to the health, social and economic outcomes for Aucklanders as set out in the local board plans.

Achieving the desired outcomes requires putting people at the heart our investment

16.     The plan sets out a targeted, people-centric approach to increase sport participation in Auckland. Future sport investment will focus on meeting the needs of three distinct groups of people:

1.   

People who already play sport:

 

There will be more fit-for-purpose facilities and programmes to keep them actively involved in sport.

 

2.

People who play a new sport (like futsal)

 

 

Currently there are limited opportunities to play, but in the future, there will be more fit-for-purpose facilities and programmes that cater to new and emerging sports.

 

 

3.

People who currently do not participate in sport

 

Auckland Council will create more opportunities and make it easier for them to take up sport.

 

 

17.     A key step towards increasing sport participation rates in these targeted groups is through addressing disparities.

18.     Decision-makers will use a set of principles to prioritise multiple investment projects. ‘Equity’ has the highest weighing to ensure all Aucklanders enjoy the same outcomes. The full list of principles includes:

·   Equity (40 per cent of assessment) – Sport investment should ensure equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status or where people live.

·   Outcome-focused (30 per cent) – There needs to be a clear line of sight between each investment and the outcomes it delivers.

·   Financial sustainability (30 per cent) – Investment decisions need to be financially sustainable for council and sports organisations.

·   Accountability (10 per cent) – Auckland Council has responsibility to act in the best interests of Auckland.

     

There will be changes to the way we currently invest in sport

19.     The draft plan sets out four key shifts in our approach as illustrated in Figure 1 below.

 

 

 

Figure 1: Key shifts

 

20.     Figure 2 below explains the reasons for these key shifts, the problems they will tackle and the benefits for Aucklanders. 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2: Intervention logic map

       

21.     The plan will ensure robust, evidence-based decision-making and ongoing monitoring of benefits delivered to our communities.

22.     Performance data will be collected to measure the return on investment. This will be shared with investors and ratepayers.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Once adopted, the plan will have a direct impact on council’s internal investment processes, particularly regarding how future projects will be assessed and monitored.

24.     Parks, Sport and Recreation staff have been engaged throughout the development of the draft plan. Their feedback, particularly regarding how the proposed changes can be adopted in practice, has helped shape the investment framework and the scenarios in the draft plan.

25.     Parks, Sport and Recreation staff have also facilitated the council’s engagement with the sport sector through Aktive, the council’s strategic partner for sport. The general feedback is supportive of the new investment approach to improve participation and deliver better outcomes for Aucklanders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The local boards have an important role to play in the council’s sport investment. They:

·   set outcomes and priorities for local sport investment through local board plans

·   identify local sports facility and programmes needs and advocate for investment through the Long-term Plan and Annual Budget processes

·   have allocated decision-making responsibility for local sport facilities and initiatives including:

-    the specific location, design, build and fit-out of new local sports facilities within budget parameters agreed with the Governing Body

-    the use of local sport facilities and initiatives including leasing and changes of use

-    local recreation and sports programmes

·    manage local and sub-regional facility partnership relationships, funding or lease agreements and performance reporting

·    work together to support facilities that benefit several local board areas.

27.     Staff have engaged with local boards informally at various stages throughout the development of the draft plan. Local boards members’ views and concerns have helped shape the key components of the plan.

Previous engagement with local boards showed general support for an investment plan

28.     Staff met with local boards between February and April 2018 and sought informal feedback on the key components of the plan.

29.     Feedback from local boards was generally supportive of a new investment plan for sports facilities to ensure consistency, efficiency, transparency and outcome delivery.

30.     Challenges relating to population growth, land supply and budgetary constraints were highlighted. Local boards also noted challenges specific to their areas and populace.

31.     Feedback showed a strong preference to have a flexible approach to accommodate diverse local needs.

Formal local board feedback is sought between February and March 2019

32.     Staff are seeking to understand local boards’ views on the draft plan and request a formal decision at local boards’ business meetings during February and March 2019.

33.     Staff would particularly value local board feedback on the following parts of the draft plan (refer Attachment A), which are likely to have the most bearing on local board decision-making:

·   the key shifts in the council’s future investment approach in sport (page 4)

·   the benefits of sports to Auckland communities, particularly Te Ao Māori (page 9)

·   the difference between equity and equality in the context of sport investment (pages 22-23)

·   the proposed investment framework (pages 24-36).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Sport participation contributes directly to the following ‘Māori Identity and Wellbeing’ outcome in Auckland Plan 2050:

 

Māori Identity and Wellbeing

·      Direction 1 – ‘Advance Māori wellbeing’

·      Focus area 1 – ‘Meet the needs and support the aspirations of tamariki and their whanau’

35.     According to Sport New Zealand data weekly sport participation of Māori in Auckland (76.8 per cent) is similar to European (76.3 per cent), but higher than Asian (70.7 per cent) and Pasifika (69.1 per cent).

36.     Research also show pockets of sedentary Māori who do not have adequate opportunities to participate in sport. They will be a target group for investment.

37.     Feedback from the Mana Whenua Forum and Aktive Māori Advisory Group during public consultation on the discussion document informed the development of the plan.

38.     A key area of focus was the delivery of outcomes through increased Māori participation. Means of achieving this goal include partnerships with iwi and Māori organisations, to manage demand efficiently and to use sports programmes and facilities as a social hub to strengthen cultural and community connections.

39.     Partnerships will draw on Māori-centric models and collective models of learning so that key Māori concepts become embedded in sport service design and delivery.

40.     Staff will seek further feedback from the Mana Whenua Forum and Aktive Māori Advisory Group as part of the consultation on the draft plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Once adopted, the plan will guide all council investment in sport.

42.     An immediate focus will be to establish a clear and contestable process for the allocation of the $120 million Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund established in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     Staff have identified reputational and operational risks associated with the adoption of the draft plan. These risks will be mitigated through regular communication and engagement with key stakeholders.

Type

Risk

Mitigation

Reputational

Some people might worry the plan will change arrangements already in place, or ongoing council investment.

Clear communication with key stakeholders and funding recipients that the plan will guide decisions on future investment only, unless a current project is already scheduled for review.

 

Operational

The transition to the new investment approach will be operationally complex. It impacts multiple teams across the council, and new business processes, guidance and forms will need to be designed to support it.

 

Detailed implementation planning will be required to ensure the transition is as smooth as possible. Changes will be phased in over the next three to five years.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Staff will undertake public consultation from February to March 2019.

45.     The consultation will be conducted in various forms:

·    local boards will be asked to formally indicate their support for the draft plan during business meetings and provide any additional feedback

·    the public will be invited to submit their feedback via ShapeAuckland

·    targeted interviews will be conducted with community groups including Māori, Pasific and Asian people

·    the sport sector will be invited to provide their formal views through Aktive.

46.     A summary of consultation feedback and a final plan will be prepared for consideration and adoption by the Environment and Community Committee around May 2019.

47.     Implementation of the plan will occur in stages over the next three to five years, depending on council budgetary and planning processes. An indicative timeline of the potential changes is presented in section three of the draft plan.

48.     Figure 3 below shows the next steps in a flow chart.

Figure 3: Next steps

 

This plan will inform the development of other investment plans

49.     The draft plan sets out an overarching investment framework to help decision-makers prioritise investment between different sports.

50.     Separate, but related plans are being developed to guide council’s investment in golf and play facilities. These plans will be consistent with the overarching framework set out in Increasing Aucklanders’ participation in sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Increasing Aucklanders' Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nancy Chu – Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager, Parks and Recreation Policy

Lesley Jenkins – Relationship Manager

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Proposal to grant new community leases to Pakuranga Croquet Club, Harlequin Musical Theatre and The Scout Association of New Zealand (Cockle Bay)

File No.: CP2019/00602

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant community leases to the Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated, Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated and The Scout Association of New Zealand (Cockle Bay).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated seeks a new community lease for the land sited at 2R Bells Road, Lloyd Elsmore Park, Pakuranga. The current lease commenced 1 April 2009 and will finally expire on 31 March 2019.

3.       The Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated seeks a new community lease for the land sited at 563R Pakuranga Road, Pakuranga. The current lease commenced 1 July 2009 and will finally expire 30 June 2019.

4.       The Scout Association of New Zealand seeks a new community lease for the land sited at 47R Shelly Beach Parade, Cockle Bay. The current lease commenced 1 August 1997 and expired 31 July 2012. The lease has continued to roll over on a month by month basis.

5.       This report recommends the Howick Local Board grant new community leases to Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated, Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated and The Scout Association of New Zealand.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated for the land comprising 6,400 square metres (more or less) at 2R Bells Road, Lloyd Elsmore Park, Pakuranga legally described as Parts of Part Allotments 6 and 7 Section 3 Small Farms near Howick both comprising 1.6187 ha each contained in titles NA52/174 (part-Cancelled) and NA542/163 (Part-Cancelled-Limited) (Attachment A) subject to the following terms and conditions;

i)    term – 10 years commencing 1 March 2019 with one 10-year right of renewal and a final expiry date of 28 February 2039

ii)   rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if requested

iii)   delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve the Community Outcomes Plan to be attached to the lease as a schedule

iv)  all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

b)      grant a new community lease to Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated for the land comprising 716 square metres (more or less) at 563R Pakuranga Road, Pakuranga described as Section 1 SO 62911 comprising 2.1370 ha and contained in title NA77D/96 (Attachment B) subject to the following terms and conditions;

i)    term – 10 years commencing 1 March 2019 with one 10-year right of renewal and a final expiry date of 28 February 2039

ii)   rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if requested

iii)   delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve the Community Outcomes Plan to be attached to the lease as a schedule

iv)  all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

c)      grant a new community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand for the land comprising 477 square metres (more or less) at 47R Shelly Beach Parade, Cockle Bay described as Lot 6 Deposited Plan 16751 comprising 1,437 square metres (Attachment C) subject to the following terms and conditions;

i)    term – 10 years commencing 1 March 2019 with one 10-year right of renewal and a final expiry date of 28 February 2039

ii)   rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if requested

iii)   delegate to the Chair and Deputy Chair authority to approve the community outcomes plan to be attached to the lease as a schedule

iv)  all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report considers new community leases to Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated, Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated and The Scout Association of New Zealand

7.       The Howick Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated

8.       The Pakuranga Croquet Club was established in 1982 and registered as an incorporated society on 19 July 1985.

9.       The primary objective of the club is to provide the facilities to promote and encourage the playing of the game of croquet.

10.     The lease for Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated commenced 1 April 2009 for a term of 10 years and finally expires on 31 March 2019.

11.     The land occupied by the club is held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002 and legally described as Parts of Part Allotments 6 and 7 Section 3 Small Farms near Howick both comprising 1.6187 ha each and contained in titles NA52/174 (part-Cancelled) and NA542/163 (Part-Cancelled-Limited).

12.     The building is owned by the club and comprises a large open floor space, a newly renovated kitchen, toilet and storage areas. The building is in excellent condition, fit for purpose.

13.     The club room is also used by two Mahjong groups and a Rummikub group in the afternoons as well as three Alcoholic Anonymous groups who use the building in the evenings each week. On occasion, the building is hired out to business social clubs, a travel club and for family functions which assist with fundraising efforts.

14.     The croquet club utilises four croquet greens that are well maintained and used by the club for interclub and national tournaments held throughout the year.

15.     The club is managed by 15 part-time volunteers and 15 full-time volunteers with a paid membership of 55 members.

16.     The club is affiliated to the Auckland Croquet Association (ACA). The ACA is one of 19 affiliated regions throughout New Zealand with 110 registered clubs and approximately 4,000 members.

17.     The activity of the club, together with the building and croquet lawns, supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s need by providing quality recreation and leisure facilities to people of all ages and abilities to use and responding to the needs of the growing community. 

18.     The recommended term for a tenant owned building is ten years with one ten year right of renewal in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

19.     Council staff are negotiating a Community Outcomes Plan with the club which the report recommends will be submitted to the Chair and Deputy Chair for approval to be attached as a schedule to the lease deed.

20.     The financial accounts provided indicate that the club’s funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

21.     The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

22.     Public notification has been carried out as required by the Local Government Act 2002 when granting new leases. No submissions opposing the proposal were received.

Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated

23.     The Howick Operatic Society Incorporated was incorporated on the 17 May 1966 and changed its name to Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated on the 5 December 2002.

24.     The primary objective of the group is to promote, encourage and educate members of the community in performing arts, including all skills related to production of events and performance through training and public display of the performing arts.

25.     The lease for Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated commenced 1 July 2009 for a term of 10 years and finally expires 30 June 2019.

26.     The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified local purpose (community building) reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and legally described as Section 1 SO 62911 comprising 2.1370 ha and contained in title NA77D/96.

27.     The building is owned by the group and comprises multiple storage and dress rooms, a green room which acts as a quiet space, stage area, lounge room, toilet facilities, a side area for guest to mingle, a ramp for people in wheelchairs and tiered seating. The building is in good condition fit for purpose.

28.     The building is purpose-built for theatre and is perfectly suitable for the group. It is the only theatre in the wider Howick and Pakuranga area that has tiered stands for its audience.

29.     The building is well managed and can seat approximately 140 people.

30.     The group is a fully volunteer run organisation led by a committee of 10 members and aims to produce two – three shows per year.

31.     The group celebrates its 60-year anniversary this year and have produced over 90 shows including Witches of Eastwick, Westside Story, Joseph and his Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat, Grease, Guys and Dolls, Jesus Christ Superstar and New Zealand premieres of A Christmas Carol and Rent.

32.     The group is supported by 20 part-time volunteers and has a paying membership of 45 members. The membership numbers fluctuate annually as it is generally based on what productions are held during the year as it attracts members from all over Auckland.

33.     The committee, as well as the members and patrons, are predominately from the greater Howick and Pakuranga area. However, as a result of the quality of performances that are produced, the group draws creative teams, performers and audiences from the greater Auckland area as well.

34.     The group provides opportunities for people to be involved in all facets of theatrical production including props, front of house, set building, stage crew and production management, and provides a successful training and experience base for the community.

35.     At the 2017/2018 Northern Area Performance Theatre Awards (NAPTA), the group received nominations for best makeup and hair as well as best leading actress in a musical.

36.     The group have also won NAPTA awards in various categories including best prop design, best sound design, best supporting male in a musical and a cameo award.

37.     The theatre is casually hired out to other performing arts organisations including a children’s theatre group.

38.     The activity of the group together with the building supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s need for access to quality facilities that grow and promote cultural diversity through music, dance, theatre and visual arts.

39.     The recommended term for a tenant owned building is ten years with one ten year right of renewal in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

40.     Council staff are negotiating a Community Outcomes Plan with the club which the report recommends will be submitted to the Chair and Deputy Chair for approval to be attached as a schedule to the lease deed.

41.     The financial accounts provided indicate that the group’s funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

42.     The group has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

The Scout Association of New Zealand

43.     The Scout Association of New Zealand was established by the Scout Association of New Zealand Act 1956 on 19 October 1956.

44.     The primary objective of the group is to empower youth through adventurous experiences to lead lives that make a positive difference.

45.     The lease for The Scout Association of New Zealand commenced 1 August 1997 for a term of 15 years finally expired 31 July 2012. The lease has held over on a month by month basis.

46.     The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified local purpose (site for scout hall) reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and legally described as Lot 6 DP 16751 comprising 1,437 square metres.

47.     The building is owned by the group and comprises a large open floor space, a kitchen, storage and toilet facilities. The building is in adequate condition fit for purpose.

48.     The building is used to host annual events such as Founders Day; a worldwide event which celebrates Lord Robert Baden-Powell’s birthday, a Lieutenant General in the British Army who founded the scout movement in 1907 with the first experimental camp at Brownsea Island, England.

49.     The group is managed by 12 part-time volunteers and has a paying membership of 76 consisting of 64 youth and 12 leaders.

50.     The group has four youth training sections; a Kea group which caters for school years one to three, a Cub pack that caters for school years four to six, a Scout Troop for school years seven to 10 and a Venturer Unit for school years 11 to 13.

51.     The groups are challenged through a system of badges and awards that can be earned by mastering a diverse range of skills. These skills aim to develop its members through practical sessions in a safe and controlled environment that include areas such as first aid training, camping skills, food hygiene, cooking classes, arts and crafts, water safety, sailing, kayaking, construction projects, map reading, compass and global positioning system use, community service, emergency survival to produce well rounded and prepared citizens.

52.     The building is hired to a Pentanque Club which utilises the facility on Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday afternoons. The building is also used on an ad hoc basis by other community users on a casual basis.

53.     The activity of the group together with the building supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s needs for access to quality recreational and leisure facilities and people are supported to actively contribute to their community.

54.     The recommended term for a tenant owned building is ten years with one ten year right of renewal in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

55.     Council staff are negotiating a Community Outcomes Plan with the club which the report recommends will be submitted to the Chair and Deputy Chair for approval, to be attached as a schedule to the lease deed.

56.     The financial accounts provided indicate that the group’s funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

57.     The group has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

58.     The proposal to grant new community leases to Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated, Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated and The Scout Association of New Zealand has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     At its workshop on 13 December 2018, the local board expressed support for all three community groups and the proposed new leases.

60.     The activity of Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated, together with the building and croquet lawns, supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s need by providing quality recreation and leisure facilities to people of all ages and abilities to use and responding to the needs of the growing community. 

61.     The activity of Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated, together with the building supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s need for access to quality facilities that grow and value cultural diversity through music, dance, theatre and visual arts.

62.     The activity of The Scout Association of New Zealand, together with the building supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s needs for access to quality recreational and leisure facilities and people are supported to actively contribute to their community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and individual local board plans.

64.     Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. An aim of community leasing is to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects. Additionally, it seeks to improve access to facilities and participation for Māori living in the Howick Local Board area.

65.     Iwi engagement was undertaken between 17 December 2018 to 10 February 2019 with the iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Howick Local Board area.

66.     Engagement included:

i)    a mana whenua forum presentation on 28 November 2018

ii)   written notification of the proposals to grant new community leases to Pakuranga Croquet Club Incorporated, Harlequin Musical Theatre Incorporated and The Scout Association of New Zealand to iwi groups representative of mana whenua with a specific interest in the Howick Local Board area.

67.     No objection to the proposal to grant new community leases to the three groups were received.

68.     One submission was received from iwi to reduce the lease term of all three community groups to five years plus one-five year right of renewal, as opposed to the recommended terms in line with tenant owned buildings in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

69.     Direct costs to community facilities have amounted to $315.98 for the public notification.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

70.     Should the Howick Local Board resolve not to grant all three community groups with a new community lease, this decision will materially affect their ability to provide services to the Howick community.

71.     No concerns were raised as the result of the public notification process or mana whenua engagement to grant new leases to all three community groups apart from the iwi suggestion that the lease terms be shorter. Staff advise that the benefits to the community of granting the new leases as recommended outweigh any risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

72.     Subject to the local board approval to grant new community leases to all three community groups, council staff will work with the groups to formalise the lease documents.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachments - A, B & C Site Plans

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Setefano - Community Facilities Graduate

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


 


 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2019/00606

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report attaches the workshop records taken for the period stated below.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1 workshop records shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed or decisions reached, but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.  This report attaches the workshop records for the period stated below.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for workshops held on 27 and 29 November, and 4, 6, and 13 December 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 27 November 2018

117

b

Workshop record 29 November 2018

119

c

Workshop record 4 December 2018

121

d

Workshop record 6 December 2018

123

e

Workshop record 13 December 2018

125

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2019/00321

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Howick Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       The governance forward work calendar for the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

2.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Howick Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

129

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

18 February 2019