I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 21 March 2019

3.00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kit Parkinson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Carmel Claridge

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Toni Millar, QSM, JP

 

 

Ros Rundle

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim  Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

14 March 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: Kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Ōrākei Open Space Network Plan                                                                                7

12        Proposed kauri dieback mitigation in local parks in the Ōrākei Local Board area 11

13        Liston Park, 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera - New Telecommunications Lease to Vodafone New Zealand Limited                                                                                 23

14        Liston Park, 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera - New Lease to Spark New Zealand Trading Limited                                                                                                            51

15        2019 Local Government New Zealand Conference and Annual General Meeting 69

16        Allocation of funding to Citizens Advice Bureaux                                                   77

17        Auckland Transport Update March 2019 (Covering report)                                    91

18        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                  93

19        Board Member Report – Carmel Claridge                                                               185

20        Board Member Report – Troy Churton                                                                    191

21        Board Member Report - Colin Davis                                                                        243

22        Board Member Report – Ros Rundle                                                                       247

23        Board Member Report – David Wong                                                                      253

24        Board Member Report – Toni Millar                                                                         259

25        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      263

26        Ōrākei Local Board Proceedings                                                                             271

27        Resolutions Pending Action                                                                                     283  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the minutes of the Ōrākei Local Board, meeting held on Thursday, 21 February 2019, be confirmed as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Ōrākei Open Space Network Plan

File No.: CP2019/02316

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the development of an Orakei open space network plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The key purpose of the open space network plan is to inform local board open space planning, resource allocation and advocacy over a 10-year period.

3.       Staff recommend that the Ōrākei Local Board approve the development of an open space network plan to improve the quality, accessibility and utilisation of parks and open space.

4.       There are limited risks in developing the open space network plan. The plan may raise community expectations that all projects are fully funded. No additional budget is provided for the implementation of the open space network plan.

5.       If approved, staff will work with the local board and mana whenua to identify and analyse the current state of the open space network, as well as key moves required for its improvement.

6.       Once the current state and key moves are completed, the project will move to identifying appropriate actions required to improve the open space network.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the following scope of work for the development of the Orakei open space network plan:

i)        identifying and analysing the current performance of the open space network incorporating, amongst other things, the work of existing local park development plans

ii)       identifying the aspirations and key moves required to improve performance of the open space network

iii)      identifying and prioritising local place-based actions to achieve the key moves.

b)      note that the Ōrākei Open Space Network Plan informs local board planning and does not require public consultation.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       An open space network plan is a key mechanism for Auckland Council to implement the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan 2013 at a local level.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The process for developing an open space network plan involves research, collaboration and planning phases.

9.       The scope of work includes:

·     identifying and analysing the current performance of the open space network incorporating, amongst other things, the work of existing local park development plans

·     identifying the aspirations and key moves required to improve performance of the open space network

·     identifying and prioritising local place-based actions to achieve the key moves.

10.     The scope of the open space network plan includes all open space that is controlled and managed by the local board, including parks, sports fields, greenways and outdoor civic areas.

11.     Parks and open spaces managed by other authorities, such as Regional Facilities Auckland and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority, will not have direct actions from the plan but will form part of the overall provision of the network.

12.     Reserve management plans, regional parks, tūpuna maunga and recreation facilities (including stadia, pools, indoor courts and cemeteries) are out of scope for this open space network plan.

13.     The completion date for the open space network plan is scheduled for September 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Staff will work with Parks, Sport and Recreation to develop the open space network plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Staff introduced the open space network plan and the components required for its completion at a workshop with the local board on 28 February 2019.

16.     Staff will continue to engage with the local board on the development of the open space network plan through further workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     Based on the 2013 Census, there are 3,600 people in the Ōrākei Local Board area who identify as Māori.

18.     There are 15 iwi groups with interests in the area:

·     Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei

·     Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whatua

·     Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·     Te Kawerau ā Maki

·     Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

·     Te Ākitai Waiohua

·     Te Ahiwaru Waiohua

·     Ngāti Te Ata-Waiohua

·     Ngāti Paoa

·     Ngāti Tama-te-rā

·     Ngāti Whanaunga

·     Ngāti Maru

·     Te Patukirikiri.

·     Waikato-Tainui

 

 

19.     Consultation with iwi will take place in two fora: the first with Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei (to be confirmed) and the second at the Central/Southern iwi forum on 24 April 2019.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     Development of the open space network plan is funded by Community and Social Policy.

21.     No funding has been allocated for public consultation, as the open space network plan informs local board decision-making. There is no statutory requirement to involve the public.

22.     No additional budget is provided for the implementation of the open space network plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are limited risks in developing the open space network plan. The plan may raise community expectations that all projects are fully funded. However, no additional budget is provided.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Staff will work with the local board and mana whenua to prepare the current state of the open space network and key moves to improve the network.

25.     Once the current state and key moves are completed, a set of actions will be workshopped with the local board. The actions will deliver the key moves required to improve the open space network.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Richard Mann - Principal Policy Analyst

Emma Golightly - Team Leader - Parks and Recreation Policy

Authorisers

Emma Golightly - Team Leader - Parks and Recreation Policy

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Proposed kauri dieback mitigation in local parks in the Ōrākei Local Board area

File No.: CP2019/02436

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse high level kauri protection actions for local parks and reserves within the Ōrākei Local Board area, ahead of the development of a detailed kauri dieback mitigation programme in mid-2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To prevent the spread of kauri dieback and protect healthy kauri, staff have analysed all local parks and reserves in the Auckland region and developed recommended high level mitigation measures for each park.

3.       This interim report provides the results of the prioritisation of local parks and reserves in the Ōrākei Local Board area. The report also seeks endorsement of the recommended high level kauri protection actions prior to the development of a detailed programme of works.

4.       A detailed kauri dieback mitigation programme will be presented to the board for approval at a mid-2019 business meeting. The report will identify specific works for each park and the associated implementation costs and timeframes.

5.       There are approximately 350 local parks throughout the Auckland region that contain kauri. Protection of healthy kauri is the primary objective of council’s kauri dieback management approach.

6.       Following the introduction of the natural environment targeted rate, additional funding is available to support the management of kauri dieback in the Auckland region. This funding is prioritised to support the protection of high value (Category A) kauri ecosystems and minimise the risk of spreading kauri dieback.

7.       In the Ōrākei Local Board area there are six local parks or reserves that contain kauri ecosystems. All of these parks have been analysed and allocated to one of four kauri dieback management categories, as summarised in this report.

8.       Two reserves in the local board area are classified as Category A, these are Dingle Dell Reserve and Waiatarua Reserve. These parks are of high recreational value and contain a high value kauri ecosystem. Investment will be required to ensure that healthy kauri are protected and any diseased kauri are contained and do not become a source of infection.

9.       Recommended mitigation measures are high level and focus on asset solutions, which could include track upgrades, re-alignment or re-routing of tracks, installation of boardwalks, and installation of hygiene stations.  Non-asset solutions such as awareness raising and education will also be undertaken.

10.     Four parks in the local board area are classified as Category C, these are Ohinerau/Mt Hobson, Ōrākei Domain B, St Johns Bush and Waiata Reserve. A list of all six local parks in the local board area that contain kauri, and recommended high level kauri dieback mitigation measures is appended to this report as Attachment A. Copies of the recreational assessments for Category A parks have been appended to this report as Attachment B.

11.     Further investigations are required to determine the exact nature of the necessary kauri protection works for each park in the local board area, as well as the costs and achievable timelines. These investigations will be completed in April 2019 and the results presented to the board as part of the detailed kauri dieback mitigation programme at a mid-2019 business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      endorse the following high level kauri protection measures for local parks and reserves:

i)        undertake detailed investigations to determine appropriate mitigation measures (such as track upgrades, track re-alignment, track re-routing, or other physical works) and consider temporary closure until mitigation works are completed, to protect symptom free high value kauri ecosystems in the Category A park Waiatarua Reserve.

ii)       undertake detailed investigations to determine appropriate mitigation measures (such as track upgrades, track re-alignment, track re-routing, or other physical works) and consider temporary closure until mitigation works are completed, to prevent potentially infected kauri ecosystems in the Category A park Dingle Dell Reserve from becoming a source of infection.

iii)      discourage direct public access through barrier planting and signage and the installation of hygiene station(s) in the Category C park St Johns Bush.

iv)      note that the remaining Category C parks are considered to be low value kauri ecosystems with low value recreational use, thus making them a lower priority for mitigation investment at this stage. These parks are:

·    Ohinerau/Mt Hobson

·    Ōrākei Domain B

·    Waiata Reserve

b)      note that a detailed kauri dieback mitigation programme with costs and timelines will be developed and submitted to a local board business meeting in mid-2019 for approval.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Natural environment targeted rate funding to support the management of kauri dieback in local parks

12.     In June 2018 the governing body adopted Auckland Council’s ten-year budget for the period 2018-2028. This included a natural environment targeted rate which will provide $311 million of additional investment towards environmental outcomes over the next decade (resolution GB/2018/91).

13.     Funding has been identified within the plant pathogen workstream of the natural environment targeted rate programme to support the management of kauri dieback. Along with existing local board renewals budgets, this funding will support the provision of physical works such as upgrades of tracks in parks with high-value kauri across the local parks and reserves network.

14.     Funding from the natural environment targeted rate will be integrated with existing renewals budgets where available. This funding will be focused on tracks, or sections of tracks where kauri are located within 30 metres of the track, and where the park has been identified as high priority (Category A) in accordance with the categorisation process detailed in the analysis and advice section of this report.

Overview of the kauri dieback mitigation programme

15.     There are approximately 350 local parks throughout the Auckland region that contain kauri. The funding available from the natural environment targeted rate will not be able to provide for the protection of all kauri in the region. 

16.     To manage investment across the region, a risk-based prioritisation approach has been applied. Local parks have been analysed in terms of kauri ecosystem value, recreational value and kauri health status, noting that the council’s primary objective is the protection of healthy kauri.

17.     This report focuses on the results of the prioritisation of local parks and reserves and the high level kauri protection measures recommended for each prioritisation category.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Establishing kauri dieback management prioritisation categories for local parks

18.     There are six local parks and reserves within the Ōrākei Local Board area that contain kauri.

19.     Each park was assessed and prioritised on the following basis:

·        the value of the kauri ecosystem, which was classified as high, medium or low. A kauri ecosystem value was assigned by council ecologists based on the work undertaken by Singers et al (2017): Indigenous terrestrial and wetland ecosystems of Auckland

·        the health status of the kauri, which was noted as infected, possibly infected or symptom free. This information was sourced from the council’s active surveillance programme, which includes soil sampling

·        the recreational value of the park, which was identified as high, medium or low. Staff analysed key recreational activities such as recreational trails, active transport, visitor destinations, volunteer activity and sports and recreation use. Reviews of reserve management plans (if applicable) and any other relevant strategic documents were undertaken.

20.     Each local park has been assigned to one of four kauri dieback management prioritisation categories, as shown in Figure 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Kauri dieback management prioritisation categories.

 

21.     Recreational assessments for Category A parks in the local board area have been appended to this report as Attachment B. These assessments have also identified mana whenua and key stakeholders with interest in the parks. For high and medium recreational value sites, the assessments also describe service outcomes. Examples of service outcomes include connections, access to existing leased areas and facilities, and any planned development. 

Identifying high level kauri dieback mitigation measures for local parks and reserves

22.     In the context of kauri dieback mitigation, kauri-safe means that a track has a dry, mud-free surface 100 metres along the track before and after the location of kauri or kauri roots. This can be achieved in a variety of ways including boardwalks, box steps, applying soil confinement membranes and providing aggregate cover.

23.     All six of the local parks that contain kauri within the local board area have been analysed and allocated to one of four kauri dieback management categories, as summarised in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Kauri dieback management categorisation of local parks in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

Category

Kauri ecosystem value

Park recreational value

Parks

Proposed mitigation measures

A

High to medium

High to medium

Dingle Dell Reserve

Waiatarua Reserve

Upgrade or re-align tracks or track sections where needed, or undertake other works to protect kauri.

Temporary closure may be required until works are completed.

B

High to medium

Low

None

Indefinite closure of tracks.

C

Low

High to medium

Ohinerau/Mt Hobson

Ōrākei Domain B

St Johns Bush

Waiata Reserve

Install hygiene stations at strategic locations if needed.

D

Low

Low

None

No mitigation measures.

 

24.     Further investigations are required to determine the exact nature of the works recommended, their costs and feasible timelines for delivery. Investigations will be undertaken by a team of asset management experts and biosecurity staff.

25.     Category A parks are those with high to medium kauri ecosystem value and high to medium recreational value. Selected tracks in these parks will be upgraded and/or provided with asset solutions that meet recreational outcomes and are kauri-safe. Category A parks in the Ōrākei Local Board area are:

·      Dingle Dell Reserve (kauri has been identified as possibly infected)

·      Waiatarua Reserve

26.     To protect healthy kauri and help prevent Dingle Dell Reserve from becoming sources of infection, recommended actions for Category A parks may include temporary closure until mitigation works are completed.

27.     Investigations began in February 2019 and will be completed by April 2019. Findings will inform the development of a detailed kauri dieback mitigation programme which will be submitted to a local board business meeting in mid-2019 for consideration and approval.

28.     Category B parks are those with high or medium kauri ecosystem value and low recreational value. There are no Category B parks in the local board area.

29.     Category C parks contain low value kauri ecosystems with high recreation values. Tracks in these parks will generally be recommended to have hygiene stations installed at strategic locations. Some track upgrades may also be required when kauri are in close proximity to the track.

30.     Category D parks contain low value kauri ecosystems with low recreation values. There are no Category D parks in the local board area.

31.     A list of all the local parks in the local board area that contain kauri and recommended high level kauri dieback mitigation measures is appended to this report as Attachment A.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     The recommendations in this report have been developed through collaboration between council’s Environmental Services department, Parks, Sports and Recreation department and Community Facilities department.

33.     Representatives from these key departments are working as part of a dedicated and ongoing project team to ensure that all aspects of the kauri dieback mitigation programme are undertaken in an integrated manner.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     In September 2018 a workshop was held with the local board on the natural environment targeted rate work programme and included discussion on kauri dieback management. The board were supportive of protecting kauri and preventing the spread of kauri dieback disease within their local board area.

35.     Closing tracks in parks or reserves will have an impact on recreational activities available to communities in the local board area. Recreational assessments were undertaken to help determine the recreational value of each local park. Along with kauri ecosystem value and health status, park recreational values form the basis of the categorisation process used to determine suitable kauri dieback mitigation measures.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Kauri is a keystone species that supports a distinct New Zealand forest ecosystem, sustaining indigenous flora and fauna. Kauri is a taonga species. Auckland Council, in partnership with mana whenua, have a responsibility for the protection of the spiritual, economic and ecological values associated with this taonga and the ecosystems it supports.

37.     Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua kaitiaki kaimahi representatives have stressed the importance of the kauri species and expressed a desire to work more closely with the council and the Department of Conservation. Staff will work with mana whenua on the approach to kauri dieback on a site by site basis, where appropriate.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     In May 2018, the Governing Body approved a natural environment targeted rate to support environmental initiatives, including addressing kauri dieback. The rate will raise $311 million over the duration of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 (resolution GB/2018/91).

39.     The costs of the mitigation measures proposed in this report will be supported by the natural environment targeted rate. Where track works are already programmed in the renewals budget, additional works required to protect kauri, such as removing muddy sections of track where kauri are at risk, will be funded by the natural environment targeted rate.

40.     Detailed design work will be undertaken as part of the kauri dieback mitigation programme development for the local board area. This work will identify the level of funding required and clarify funding sources for the recommended works.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     Closing tracks in parks and reserves, whether temporary (until upgrade works are completed) or indefinitely (where upgrade works are not recommended) will have an impact on the recreational activities available in the local board area. This may result in additional recreational pressure on other parks and reserves.

42.     To mitigate this risk, information will be provided to the public about alternative recreational activities. As part of the kauri dieback education campaign, the public will be provided with information about the reasons for the closures and the objectives of the kauri dieback mitigation programme.

43.     There is also a risk of non-compliance, where mitigation measures are disregarded by the public, particularly with respect to track closures (where tracks continue to be used despite closure notices) and hygiene stations (where hygiene stations are not used, or not used correctly).

44.     Risk mitigation includes the provision of appropriate information and effective implementation of track closures, including signage, physical barriers and other site-specific measures such as barrier planting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     Following the local board’s decision on the recommendations provided in this report, staff will develop a kauri dieback mitigation programme for each park in the local board area. The recommended mitigation measures will include an indicative cost and delivery timeframe.

46.     A report detailing the recommended kauri dieback mitigation measures for local parks in the Ōrākei Local Board area will be submitted to the board for decision at a mid-2019 business meeting.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

List of local parks and reserves in the Ōrākei Local Board area and recommended high-level kauri dieback mitigation measures

19

b

Recreational assessments of Category A parks in the Ōrākei Local Board area

21

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Phil Brown– Biosecurity Manager

Authorisers

Gael Ogilvie - General Manager Environmental Services

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Liston Park, 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera - New Telecommunications Lease to Vodafone New Zealand Limited

File No.: CP2019/02426

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a commercial lease to Vodafone New Zealand Limited (“Vodafone”) for location of telecommunications equipment and aerial space at Liston Park, 71-77 Abbots Way, Remuera.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Liston Park is a recreation reserve located at 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera.

3.       For the past 21 years Vodafone New Zealand Limited has utilised part of the site (approximately 96m²) for the location and use of telecommunications equipment. The lease commenced in December 1996 for an initial term of five years, with three renewals of five years each; a maximum term of 20 years in total valid until 16 December 2016. The lease has been in a holding-over arrangement on a month to month tenancy while the future use of the site is determined.

4.       Vodafone has now formally requested a new commercial lease with Auckland Council to remain at the site for location and use of telecommunications equipment.  Vodafone has requested a lease term of 20 years with an initial term of five years and three rights of renewal of five years each; final expiry of 26 December 2036.

5.       If the site is required in the future for redevelopment purposes the council reserves the right to provide nine months’ notice to relocate Vodafone within the park or alternatively 24 months’ notice to terminate the lease and for Vodafone to vacate the site.

6.       The management of non-roadside telecommunication leases sits with the commercial property team of Pānuku Development Auckland (“Pānuku”).

7.       This report seeks Local Board approval for a new commercial lease term of twenty years to Vodafone New Zealand Limited.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve a new lease to Vodafone New Zealand Limited for the location of telecommunications equipment and the use of the aerial space on the existing site at Liston Park, 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera for a term of twenty years subject to:

i)        the new lease term commencing from 17 December 2016

ii)       an initial term of five years

iii)      three rights of renewal of five years each

iv)      a final expiry date of 16 December 2036

v)      a redevelopment clause reflecting nine month’s relocation notice within the park or 24 months’ notice to terminate the lease and vacate the site.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Liston Park is located at 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera. It comprises several parcels of which only one is held under the Reserves Act 1977. The parcel of land on which the building is sited and referred to in this report is held in fee simple, NA8B/1133.

9.       The location of Vodafone’s equipment is shown on Attachment A, which comprises an area of approximately 96 square metres held in fee simple.

10.     Vodafone’s equipment is located on the building that was formerly used as rugby club rooms.  The site is managed by Council’s Community Facilities department and is currently vacant.

11.     On 1 July 2014 Auckland Transport, which previously managed the lease, transferred the management of non-roadside telecommunication leases to Pānuku’s commercial property portfolio team.

12.     Vodafone’s lease finally expired on 16 December 2016 and the tenant has continued to occupy the site on a month to month tenancy.

13.     In 2016 Pānuku was advised by the council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department staff that an expression of interest was being sought for the development of Liston Park.  Pānuku was requested to defer formalising new lease arrangements with Vodafone until the proposed redevelopment plans for Liston Park were finalised.

14.     Parks, Sports and Recreation staff have advised Pānuku that redevelopment plans for Liston Park have been delayed and as result support the continued use of the existing site by Vodafone. This is subject to any new lease containing a redevelopment clause to relocate Vodafone within the park or alternatively give notice to Vodafone to terminate the lease and vacate the site.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Pānuku recommends retaining the location of the telecommunications equipment at the existing location and believes this to be the most effective outcome for all parties. The location within the park reduces the impact on local residents. 

16.     The council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department supports the continued use of the existing site by Vodafone. 

17.     The inclusion of a redevelopment clause in the new lease will provide the council with future flexibility, should it be determined to redevelop the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department support the continued use of the existing site by Vodafone, subject to insertion of the redevelopment clause in any agreement. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     In August 2017, Pānuku informed the local board of Vodafone’s request to secure a lease via the Pānuku’s local board advisor’s quarterly report.

20.     Vodafone has obtained a report on other potential relocation options if they are not able to remain at the current location (please refer Attachment B).  This report concludes that vacating the current location would trigger a requirement for three new roadside installations to maintain the same level of service to its customers.  Such replacement sites would need to be located immediately adjacent to residential houses, with the equipment cabinets located on grass verges. This alternative location of the telecommunication structures could ultimately impact negatively on residents.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Pānuku has a comprehensive Iwi engagement process that engages with the nineteen key mana whenua groups in the region on four fronts: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal and development properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and engagement around design outcomes for the council driven development projects. Pānuku has also undertaken to be part of the council’s Maori Responsiveness Plan pilot program. The project’s key output will be an operational document outlining how Pānuku will contribute to the council’s strategic and operational commitments to Maori. As there is no real change to the property for use as a place of learning, there has been no Iwi engagement undertaken in respect of the lease application.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     If a new lease term of 20 years is not granted and the existing lease is terminated there will be a loss of future commercial rental.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     If a new commercial lease with a term of twenty years is not granted on Liston Park, Vodafone will vacate the existing site and may relocate the services to alternate less desirable locations for the local community.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Pānuku will inform Vodafone New Zealand Limited of the Local Board’s decision on the outcome of the application of a new commercial lease term of 20 years.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Vodafone Site Plan

27

b

Attachment B Vodafone Presentation

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nuzhat Jahan - Commercial Property Mgr

Authorisers

Lori Butterworth - Property Management, Panuku Development Auckland

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Liston Park, 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera - New Lease to Spark New Zealand Trading Limited

File No.: CP2019/02530

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a commercial lease to Spark New Zealand Limited (“Spark”) for location of telecommunications equipment and aerial space at Liston Park, 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Liston Park is a recreation reserve located at 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera.

3.       For the past 23 years Spark New Zealand Limited (formerly Telecom New Zealand Limited) has utilised part of the site (approximately 22 square metres) for the location and use of telecommunications equipment. The lease commenced on 1 March 1996 for an initial term of six years, with two renewals of six years each; with a maximum term of 18 years in total valid until 28 February 2014. The lease has been in a holding-over arrangement on a month- to-month tenancy while the future use of the site is determined.

4.       Spark has now formally requested the continued use for siting telecommunications equipment at Liston Park and seeks a new telecommunications lease with Auckland Council. Spark has requested a lease term of 30 years with an initial term of six years and four rights of renewal of six years each with final expiry 4 August 2042.

5.       If the site is required in the future for redevelopment purposes the council reserves the right to provide nine months’ notice to relocate Spark within the park or alternatively 24 months’ notice to terminate the lease and for Spark to vacate the site.

6.       The management of non-roadside telecommunication leases sits with the commercial property team of Pānuku Development Auckland (“Pānuku”).

7.       This report seeks Local Board approval for a new commercial lease term of 30 years to Spark New Zealand Limited.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the continued use by Spark New Zealand Trading Limited for the siting of telecommunications equipment and the use of the aerial space at Liston Park, 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera for a term of 30 years subject to:

·    the new lease term commencing from 4 August 2012

·    an initial term of six years

·    four rights of renewal of six years each

·    a final expiry date of 4 August 2042

·    a redevelopment clause reflecting a nine month relocation notice within the park or 24 months’ notice to terminate the lease and vacate the site.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Liston Park is located at 71-77 Abbotts Way, Remuera. It comprises several parcels of which only one is held under the Reserves Act 1977. The parcel of land on which the two Spark sites are located and referred to in this report is held in fee simple, NA8B/1133.

9.       The location of Spark’s equipment is shown on Attachment A and comprises an area of approximately 22 square metres held in fee simple.

10.     The site has two unobtrusive 15.4m floodlight poles, each housing a single cluster of three antennas, and a 3 metre outdoor equipment shelter. The equipment is located centrally between two rugby fields. The facility is serviced by power and telecommunication lines that are located underground from Michaels Avenue some 140 metres away from the site.

11.     The original lease with Auckland City Council commenced on 1 March 1996 and had a final expiry date of 28 February 2014.  At amalgamation, Auckland Transport took over the contract and issued a termination notice, resulting in a new final expiry date of 4 August 2011.

12.     On 1 July 2014, the administration of non-roadside telecommunication leases was transferred to Pānuku’s commercial property portfolio team.  It was then agreed with Spark that the termination notice would be extended from a period of 6 months to 18 months, resulting in the final expiry date of 4 August 2012.

13.     Spark’s lease has since expired on 4 August 2012 and the tenant has continued to occupy the site on a month-to-month tenancy.

14.     In 2016, Pānuku was advised by the council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department staff that an expression of interest was being sought for the development of Liston Park. Pānuku was requested to defer formalising new lease arrangements with Spark until the proposed redevelopment plans for Liston Park were finalised.

15.     Parks, Sports and Recreation staff have advised Pānuku that redevelopment plans for Liston Park have been delayed and as a result support the continued use of the existing site by Spark. This is subject to any new lease containing a redevelopment clause to relocate Spark within the park or alternatively give notice to Spark to terminate the lease and vacate the site.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Pānuku recommends retaining the location of the telecommunications equipment at the existing location and believes this to be the most effective outcome for all parties. The location within the park reduces the impact on local residents.

17.     The council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department supports the continued use of the existing site by Spark.

18.     The inclusion of a redevelopment clause in the new lease will provide the council with future flexibility, should it be determined to develop the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department support the continued use of the existing site by Spark, subject to insertion of the redevelopment clause in any agreement. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     In August 2017, Pānuku informed the local board of Spark’s request to secure a lease via the Pānuku’s local board advisor’s quarterly report.

21.     Spark has obtained a report on other potential relocation options if they are not able to remain at the current location (please refer Attachment B).  This report concludes that vacating the current location would trigger a requirement for three new roadside installations to maintain the same level of service to its customers.  Such replacement sites would need to be located immediately adjacent to residential houses, with the equipment cabinets located on grass verges. This alternative location of the telecommunication structures could ultimately impact negatively on residents.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     Pānuku has a comprehensive Iwi engagement process that engages with the 19 key mana whenua groups in the region on four fronts: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal and development properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and engagement around design outcomes for the council driven development projects. Pānuku has also undertaken to be part of the council’s Maori Responsiveness Plan pilot program. The project’s key output will be an operational document outlining how Pānuku will contribute to the council’s strategic and operational commitments to Maori. As there is no real change to the property for use as a place of learning, there has been no Iwi engagement undertaken in respect of the lease application.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     If a new lease term of 30 years is not granted and the existing lease is terminated there will be a loss of future commercial rental.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     If a new commercial lease with a term of 30 years is not granted on Liston Park, Spark will vacate the existing site and may relocate the services to alternate less desirable locations for the local community.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Pānuku will inform Spark New Zealand Limited of the Local Board’s decision on the outcome of the application of a new commercial lease term of 30 years.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Spark Site Plan

55

b

Attachment B Spark Presentation

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nuzhat Jahan - Commercial Property Mgr

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

Lori Butterworth - Property Management, Panuku Development Auckland

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

2019 Local Government New Zealand Conference and Annual General Meeting

File No.: CP2019/02629

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform local boards about the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) Conference and Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington, from Sunday 7 July to Tuesday 9 July 2019, and to invite local boards to nominate elected members to attend.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The LGNZ Conference and AGM takes place at the TSB Arena, Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington from 1.30pm Sunday 7 July to 12.30pm on Tuesday 9 July 2019.

3.       Local board members are invited to attend the conference. As the venue for 2019 is in Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington and given the cost of elected member attendance, staff recommend that one member per local board attend.

4.       The Governing Body can select up to five Governing Body members to attend the conference.

5.       In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Members wishing to attend are asked to register their intention with the Kura Kāwana programme by Friday 12 April 2019 so that this information can be provided to LGNZ.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      nominate one elected member to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2019 Conference and Annual General Meeting in Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington, from Sunday 7 July to Tuesday 9 July 2019.

b)      confirm that conference attendance, including travel and accommodation, will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

c)      note that any members who wish to attend the AGM must provide their names to the Kura Kāwana programme team by Friday 12 April 2019 to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This year, the LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the TSB Arena, Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington, from Sunday 7 July to Tuesday 9 July 2019. The AGM will commence at 1.30pm on Sunday 7 July 2018, with the conference programme commencing at 4.30pm on that day and concluding at 12.30pm on Tuesday 9 July 2019.

7.       The conference programme has the theme ‘Riding the localism wave: Putting communities in charge’. The high-level programme is attached (refer Attachment A).

8.       The AGM takes place on the first day of the conference. The LGNZ constitution permits the Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

9.       Elected members who hold LGNZ roles are:

Mayor Phil Goff

Metro Sector representative on the National Council

Councillor Penny Hulse

Chair of Zone One and Zone One representative on National Council, Member Conference Committee

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

Councillor Wayne Walker

Auckland Council representative on Zone One

Councillor Alf Filipaina

LGNZ Te Maruata Roopu Whakahaere

Councillor Richard Hills

Member Policy Advisory Group

Waitematā Local Board Chair Pippa Coom

Member Governance and Strategy Advisory Group

 

10.     Traditionally the four AGM delegates have been the Mayor, the Chief Executive and two Governing Body members who hold LGNZ roles. 

11.     The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at its meeting on 28 March 2019 which includes the recommendation that Mayor Phil Goff be the presiding delegate and the other three delegates be comprised of either:

·   two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive, or

·   one member of the Governing Body who holds a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive, and a local board member.

12.     Delegates in 2018 were:

·   Mayor Phil Goff

·   Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

·   Councillor Penny Hulse

·   Local Board Chairperson Pippa Coom.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Local board members are invited to attend the conference. As the venue for 2019 is in Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington and given the cost of elected member attendance, it is recommended that one member per local board attend.

14.     This means that a maximum of 26 Auckland Council elected members would attend the conference.

15.     Delegates who attend are encouraged to report back to their local boards.

16.     In addition, local board members can attend the AGM as observers, or as a delegate (depending on the Governing Body decision), provided their names are included on the AGM registration form, which will be signed by the Mayor.

17.     LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Members wishing to attend are asked to register their intention with the Kura Kāwana programme by Friday 12 April 2019 so that this information can be collated and provided to LGNZ.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The Governing Body will also consider an item on conference attendance at its meeting on 28 March 2019 which includes the recommendations that the Mayor is appointed presiding delegate to the AGM and that three other delegates be appointed (one of which may be a local board member).  It is recommended that these delegates also attend the LGNZ conference, along with any other Governing Body members up to a total of five attendees.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The LGNZ Conference has relevance to local board members and their specific roles and responsibilities and is in line with the purpose provided for in the elected member development budget.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes. It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups. Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. Councillor Alf Filipaina is a member of the sub-committee. Te Maruata will hold a hui on 6 July 2019.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The normal registration rate is $1410 (early bird) or $1510 (standard).

22.     Costs of attendance for one member from each local board are to be met from the elected members’ development budget, as managed by the Kura Kāwana Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making impacting costs and registration choices. 

24.     The sooner the registration for the nominated local board member can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference and flights, all done via bulk booking. 

25.     Delayed information may also impact registration into preferred conference streams or events.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Once members are confirmed to attend, the Kura Kāwana programme will co-ordinate and book all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Programme for 2019 LGNZ conference and AGM

73

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Linda Gifford, Programme Manager Kura Kāwana

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Allocation of funding to Citizens Advice Bureaux

File No.: CP2019/03398

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the proposed new model for allocating funding to Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB) and on increasing the baseline grant to Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Incorporated (ACABx) by $200,000 in 2019-2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       There are 32 CAB sites in the Auckland region, operated by 11 separate CAB organisations. Bureaux staff and volunteers offer free information, advice, referral and client advisory service to local communities.

3.       Local boards hold relationships with their local bureaux, which report on service usage and other matters of interest to the community.

4.       In 2018/2019, council granted $2.067 million to ACABx conditional on staff and ACABx jointly developing a new funding model to be agreed by 1 April 2019.

5.       The new model developed with ACABx is population-based with a deprivation factor to reflect communities with high needs and access constraints.

6.       Feedback is sought from the local board on the new funding model and the retention of the additional $200,000 to baseline funding of $1.867 million provided to ACABx in 2018/2019.

7.       Local board feedback will be included in the report to the Environment and Community Committee in May 2019 to approve a new funding model for CAB.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve feedback on the new model for allocating funding to Citizens Advice Bureaux (based on 90 per cent population and 10 per cent deprivation) and on increasing the baseline grant to Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Incorporated by $200,000 in 2019-2021 (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       ACABx was established in 2012 to provide a support structure for funding from council and other bodies and the development of a strategic direction for the service in the Auckland region.

9.       Currently there are 32 Auckland CAB sites in 18 local board areas (refer Attachment B). There are no sites in Franklin, Great Barrier and Upper Harbour.

10.     Auckland bureaux are members of ACABx and Citizens Advice Bureau New Zealand (CABNZ). The role of CABNZ is to support membership standards and influence development of social policies and services at a national level. 

11.     In 2018, a joint working group of council staff and ACABx was established to develop a new funding model for Auckland bureaux.

Auckland Council funding of CAB

12.     In 2018/2019, council granted $1.867 million to ACABx, which distributes funding to bureaux to provide services across Auckland.

13.     Through council’s 10-year Budget 2018-2028, an additional one-off grant of $200,000 was approved to maintain and develop the service in the 2018-2019 financial year (resolution number GB/2018/91). The ACABx board have distributed $90,300 of this grant to bureaux facing financial pressure (Helensville, CAB Auckland City, Māngere). The remaining funds will be used to test new ways of delivering the service and develop a regional network provision plan.

14.     Council provides accommodation for bureaux at minimal cost under community lease arrangements, which is equivalent to a $641,000 subsidy per annum. In addition to the funding through ACABx, some local boards also provide grants to bureaux for specific purposes.

15.     The Environment and Community Committee set four conditions for the 2018/2019 operational grant, as shown in Table 1 (resolution number ENV/2018/48).

Table 1: Funding conditions 2018/2019

Funding condition

Progress to date

A joint review between Auckland Council and ACABx of the funding model

·    Joint working group established

·    Considered what to include in the funding model

·    Agreed a new funding model and transitional arrangements

Updated Strategic Relationship Agreement to include the development of a regional network provision plan

·    Revised Strategic Relationship Agreement signed between Auckland Council and ACABx with scoping and timeline for regional network provision planning to be agreed by June 2019

Improved reporting and access to consistent data on the service provided at regional and site level

 

·    Council, CABNZ and ACABx jointly developed new report templates for bureaux to provide data and commentary on their activities 

·    CABNZ is currently rolling out an improved database and data collection system (CABNET) which will impact the Q3/Q4 reports for 2018/2019

Strengthened and more strategic relationships between local boards and bureaux

·    The revised Strategic Relationship Agreement sets out guidance on the relationship between local boards and bureaux

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Current funding model

16.     The current model allocates the funding received by ACABx to sub-regional clusters of bureaux based on 2013 census population data.

17.     The current funding model was implemented by ACABx with support from council as an interim approach to transition from legacy council funding to regional funding.

Council staff model

18.     In April 2016, the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee resolved to:

seek information from staff regarding a review of the service after consultation with the 21 local boards on the issues raised by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board regarding Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Incorporated funding, to achieve greater equity and fairness, taking into consideration social issues in local communities across Auckland (resolution number REG/2016/22).

19.     A review of CAB services was undertaken, and council staff developed a revised funding allocation model using 70 per cent population, 25 per cent client usage, and 5 per cent deprivation. This model responded to the review findings and focused on funding to achieve greater equity and fairness.

20.     This model was not supported by ACABx who strongly objected to the introduction of client usage as a funding factor.

New model from joint working group

21.     The joint working group have developed a new funding model for bureaux using:

·        90 per cent population, using annual Statistics New Zealand population estimates

·        10 per cent deprivation to increase the capacity of bureaux to meet the complex needs of communities with higher levels of deprivation. This will support the development of new service approaches to increase the access to CAB services within these communities.

22.     ACABx advise that this model will be difficult to implement at the current funding level as funding will be reduced to bureaux in the north, central and Ōtara. Some bureaux are experiencing financial pressure and any decline in funding would lead to a significant reduction in services.

23.     If the annual grant of $1.867 million is increased by $200,000 per annum, ACABx have indicated that the new funding model could be implemented without service reductions if bureaux continue to receive funding at the 2018-2019 level at a minimum. To further moderate the redistribution impacts of the new funding model at a bureau level, population-based increases in funding would be capped at 10 per cent for 2019-2021.

24.     The application of the new funding model is shown in Table 2.

Table 2: New funding model allocations

Bureau

2018/2019 Actual

New model
(current funding)

 

New model (plus $200,000)

Percentage difference between 2018/2019 Actual and New model plus $200,000

Helensville

$40,365

$36,872

$40,365

0

Hibiscus Coast

$51,712

$58,713

$58,920

14

Wellsford

$38,298

$36,770

$38,298

0

CAB North Shore (5 sites)

$309,030

$250,153

$309,030

0

WaiCAB (5 sites)

$298,746

$300,401

$344,999

15

CABAC (10 sites)

$499,901

$487,965

$553,597

11

Māngere (3 sites) 

$169,849

$179,162

$190,494

12

Manurewa (2 sites)

$82,775

$114,454

$118.217

43

Ōtara

$86,927

$78,215

$86,927

0

Pakuranga (2 sites)

$98,662

$109,188

$109,262

11

Papakura

$86,471

$110,844

$112,628

30

Total

$1,762,737

$1,762,737

$1,962,737

11

Note: Based on 2018-2019 funding allocated. Excludes provision for premises lease payments to Auckland Council and ACABx fee (2 per cent)

25.     The new funding model developed by the joint working group is the preferred model for implementation in 2019-2021. During this period, the regional network provision plan will be developed, and council’s level of investment can be confirmed and provided for as part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

26.     The new model supports The Auckland Plan 2050 outcome, ‘Belonging and Participation’:

·        Focus area two Accessible services and social and cultural infrastructure that are responsive in meeting people's evolving needs

·        Focus area six Focusing the council’s investment to address disparities and serve communities of greatest need.

27.     The criteria applied to assess the models were developed by the joint working group. Consideration is given to equity, responsiveness to population growth and community need. Under the Auckland Plan 2050, adopting an equitable approach means prioritising the most vulnerable groups and communities to achieve more equitable outcomes. An assessment of the funding allocation model is shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Funding model assessment

Criteria

X   does not meet

ü   partially meets

üüfully meets

Current model

Council staff model

New model from joint working group

(preferred model)

Equity

X

ü

üü

Population growth

X

üü

üü

Community need

X

üü

üü

Advantages

ACABx used the current funding model to transition to regional funding from legacy arrangements

Uses latest population estimates to reflect future growth

Deprivation factor supports equity for populations with complex issues and access constraints

Client usage as a proxy indicator of community need which takes into consideration that service users do not necessarily just access services in the area they live

 

More equitable across Auckland with population-based funding covering all the region except Great Barrier Island

Uses latest population estimates to reflect future growth

Targeted deprivation factor (NZDep2013, deciles 8-10) supports equity for populations with complex issues and access constraints

Provides platform for Auckland Council and ACABx to work together to develop a regional network provision plan

Supported by ACABx if additional funding is retained

Disadvantages

The legacy cluster funding arrangements do not provide for service development

Relies on 2013 census data

Does not target funding for populations with complex issues and access constraints

Not supported by ACABx because client usage data does not consider the range of complexity in interactions from simple information requests to lengthy interviews

Redistribution of bureaux funding within current funding envelope could lead to service reduction unless alternative funding is sourced

Redistribution of bureaux funding within current funding envelope could lead to service reduction unless alternative funding is sourced

 

28.     A comparative overview of the funding models is provided in Attachment C.

29.     ACABx support the new model conditional on the retention of the additional 2018-2019 one‑off funding of $200,000 as part of the baseline operational grant. This increased funding level would ensure that no bureaux would lose funding when the model is implemented in 2019-2020. Increased funding enables the inclusion of the Franklin population in the new funding model.

30.     ACABx has indicated that the funding for deprivation will be allocated to bureaux for initiatives to enhance access to services and to trial the development of new service models.

31.     Staff support the new model as it starts to address equitable services across Auckland through population-based funding and targeted deprivation. The model provides a platform for future service growth and the development of a regional network provision plan for CAB services.

32.     Staff support the addition of $200,000 to the ACABx baseline grant from 2019-2020 to implement the new model and extend service funding across the region. All bureaux will receive their current or increased level of funding if council increases baseline funding by $200,000.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Council staff from across the business work cooperatively on matters concerning CAB.  Council departments and units that were consulted on the new model and involved in regional network provision planning include:

·        Community Facilities and Community Places – administration of the leases for CAB premises and facility operation

·        Libraries and Information – some CABs are co-located with libraries

·        Service, Strategy and Integration – expertise in service design and integrating service offers.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Local boards provided input to the 2017 review of CAB services, which has informed the development of the new funding model. Local boards generally agreed that a higher level of funding was required to maintain services, and that any funding model needed to consider the area’s demographics and other needs in addition to overall population. 

35.     Overall, local boards reported that they had a good relationship with bureaux, that they were providing valuable, wide-ranging services to the community, and that there was room to improve reporting, service responsiveness and equity of funding.

36.     Feedback is sought from the local board on the proposed new funding model and the retention of the additional $200,000 to baseline funding of $1.867 million provided to ACABx in 2018-2019.

37.     Local board feedback will be included in the report to the Environment and Community Committee in May 2019 to approve a new funding model for CAB. The report will also reflect views on the implementation of the new model from ACABx consultation with bureaux.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     CAB services are available to all, and there is currently limited targeting of services to groups, including Māori.

39.     Staff and ACABx have worked together on development of the new model and no specific engagement with Māori was undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     It is recommended that the additional $200,000 is retained in the ACABx baseline grant, bringing the annual total to $2.067 million in 2019-2021. This excludes any consumer price index adjustment. 

41.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has provided funding from 2015-2018 to Māngere CAB to operate a CAB agency in Ōtāhuhu. Reliance on the local board funding would reduce under the new model, as the Māngere CAB would receive increased funding of 12 per cent if the $200,000 is retained in the ACABx baseline grant.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     In applying the new model without the retention of the additional $200,000, funding to the following bureaux would decline:

·        Helensville (-9 per cent)

·        Wellsford (-4 per cent)

·        CAB North Shore (-19 per cent)

·        CAB Auckland City (-2 per cent)

·        Ōtara (-10 per cent).

43.     If the grant is increased by $200,000 per annum, no bureaux would face a reduction in funding.

44.     There is a risk of reduction in CAB services in some communities if funding declines to bureaux. To mitigate this risk, it is recommended that the additional $200,000 is retained.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     Local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in May 2019 to approve a funding model.

46.     Staff will work with ACABx to scope a regional network provision plan project by June 2019. The plan development will involve bureaux and other stakeholders in setting the direction for the CAB service from 2021 onwards.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local board feedback template

85

b

Map of bureaux locations by local board

87

c

Comparative overview of funding models

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sibyl Mandow - Advisor - ACE

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Update March 2019 (Covering report)

File No.: CP2019/03538

 

  

 

This is a late covering report for the above item. The comprehensive agenda report was not available when the agenda went to print and will be provided prior to the 21 March 2019 Ōrākei Local Board meeting.

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2019/02797

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

a)      That the report be received.

Portfolio Lead: Parks and Reserves (Joint); Events, Landowner Approvals & Leases; and Communications

Other Appointments (Lead):       Friends of Madills Farm Incorporated, Friends of Tahuna Torea

Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board, Ōrākei Basin Advisory Group, Tāmaki Drive Protection Society, Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority

 

 

 

 

 

Other Appointments (Alternate): Mission Bay Business Association, Mission Bay-Kohimarama Residents Association Incorporated, East City Community Trust

Residents’ concerns/issues

2.       The Ōrākei Local Board office has fronted enquiries on tree maintenance, rates queries, rates rebates, rubbish and recycling queries, drain issues, rat problems, footpath maintenance, parks maintenance, bus changes queries, grants and funding questions, speed calming measures, berm mowing and fence issues.

Activities: 9 February 2019 to 9 March 2019

Date

Activities

9 February

Glover Park, St Heliers – Ocean’s 8

10 February

St Heliers Rally

11 February

Catherine Syme meeting
Annual Budget 2019/2020 Consultation briefing

Local Board Chairs’ Forum

Tūpuna Tāmaki Makaurau Authority Hui

Ōrākei Community Association meeting

12 February

Stonefields School Hall meeting

Auckland Transport Update

Mission Bay/Kohimarama Residents Association

Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club consultation meeting

Meadowbank St Johns Residents Association

13 February

Tāmaki Employment Precinct Strategy Advisory Group Meeting

Freedom Camping consultation community drop-in session

14 February

Chair-Deputy Chair meeting

Chair-Relationship Manager meeting

Ōrākei Local Board workshop

15 February

Glendowie Community Centre meeting

16 February

Men’s’ Shed Auckland East Open Day

Love your Maunga Event

18 February

Ōrākei Local Board agenda run through

Local Board Members Cluster Workshop

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board Hui

Ellerslie Business Association meeting

Ellerslie Residents Association meeting

19 February

Leases Portfolio

Second Quarter Finance update

Stonefields Residents Association

21 February

TEEF meeting

Ōrākei Local Board Business meeting

Ōrākei Transport Stakeholder event

23 February

Annual Budget/Water Strategy Have Your Say event

25 February

Auckland Council and Ngā Mana Whenua Annual Hui

Gowing Drive Safety Issues Open meeting

26 February

Auckland Transport update

27 February

Unveiling at Bastion Point

Local Boards Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw Hearing

Meeting with Mission Bay Business Association

Regional Facilities Auckland event

28 February

Chair-Deputy Chair meeting

Hui practise

Ōrākei Local Board workshop

1 March

Ōrākei Local Board/Thrive catch-up meeting

LGNZ Zone One meeting

3 March

Songbird BBQ

4 March

Hui to hear oral submissions on Draft Operational Plan 2019-2020

Churchill school meeting

Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority Hui

St Heliers Village Association

5 March

Planning committee meeting

Meadowbank Pony Club - NZTA meeting

Meadowbank Intermediate Girls Community pantry discussion

Mission Bay Business Association

Mission Bay / Kohimarama Residents Association

7 March

Chair-Deputy Chair meeting

Hui Practise

Ōrākei Local Board workshop

St Heliers Library Art evening

8 March

Volunteer Award planning meeting

9 March

Annual Budget/Water Strategy event: Ōrākei Environment Stakeholder Event

Outboard Boating Club fishing competition

Parks and Reserves

Selwyn Reserve, Mission Bay

3.       There is much concern from St Heliers and Kohimarama residents about the state of the beachfront. There are limited/no recycling facilities and the bins are overflowing with recyclables every morning, especially on the weekend and holidays. People are attempting to do the right thing using the bins for waste and recyclables, but they do not have the capacity for everything. A request for recycling bins has been made by a member of the public, who also questions the responsibility of the traders, using the packaging.

               

               

 


 

Karaka Bay, Glendowie

4.       The upkeep and protection of Karaka Bay is being diligently attended to by Auckland Council’s contractors, who maintain the gabion baskets and have renewed the concrete paths along the waterfront.

5.       The bay is a beautiful place to picnic or just enjoy the sea views from the wide grassed area above the sand. A boat ramp for small craft exists on this shoreline, making it the perfect recreational spot. Access to the beach is via footpath only.

A body of water

Description generated with very high confidence

Landowner Approval and Leases

6.       Leasing
a)      New Lease applications were received from:

Kohimarama Yacht Club
Tāmaki Yacht Club
Ellerslie Sports Club

b)      Streamline Lease Renewal Memos were received from:
Auckland Waterski
Ellerslie Eagles Rugby Club

Eastern Bay Gymnastics was deferred to the next financial year

c)      Land Owner Application
Ellerslie Sports Club
Crossfield Community Centre

d)      Land owner approvals
Received during December 2018
Churchill Park
Thomas Bloodworth Park

Mayor and Governing Body

Request to ban the public sale of fireworks

7.       At the Governing Body meeting held on 28 February 2019, Item 11 on the agenda regarding the ban on public sale of fireworks was debated by Councillors, who voted in favour of this request.  The request can now be sent to the New Zealand Government ‘to introduce legislation to ban the sale of fireworks to the general public and end their private use’.

Community Awareness

HMS Achilles letter

8.       HMS Achilles wrote to the Ōrākei Local Board, thanking the Local Board Members for approving a grant to refurbish their boats. The letter is attached to this report.

Wairua Playground Renewal

9.       The construction of the playground is coming along well. The bespoke natural play elements have been installed along the treeline. The playground module will be installed in the week beginning 26 February.

10.     The existing wet area near the flying fox has, after some investigation, been identified as coming from a slow leak from the drain in Wairua Road. Watercare have been on site to fix this, so the wet area should start to dry out and no longer be an issue.

Shore Road, Remuera

11.     Recently discovered and reported to Auckland Council, the car in the photo to the right, had left the road and landed upside-down in the stream just off Brighton Road. In this location, it presented a possible pollution hazard and could also have attracted vandalism. It was requested that it be moved immediately.

Ōrākei Basin walkway

12.     The first 100 metres of the path was poured during the week from 25 February 2019 and the next 200 metres be poured the following week. Bush track formation has also begun.

Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee

13.     The minutes of the meeting held on 20 November 2018 is attached to this report.

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board

14.     The agenda and minutes of the meeting held on 18 February 2019 are attached to this report.

Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority

15.     The agenda for the meeting held on 11 February 2019 is attached to this report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Letter from HMS Achilles

99

b

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board Open Agenda

101

c

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board Open Minutes

127

d

Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority Hui 43 Agenda

133

e

Michaels Ave Reserve Community Liaison Committee Minutes

179

f

Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive update

181

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


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21 March 2019

 

 

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21 March 2019

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board

 

OPEN MINUTES

 

 

 

Minutes of a meeting of the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board held in the Wharekai, Orakei Marae, 59B Kitemoana Street, Orakei, Auckland on Monday, 18 February 2019 at 5.00pm.

 

present

 

Chairperson

Marama Royal

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Members

Renata Blair

 

 

Cr Linda Cooper

 

 

Member Wyllis Maihi

 

 

Kit Parkinson

 

 

ABSENT

 

 

Cr Linda Cooper

 

 

 

ALSO PRESENT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

 

Jane Aickin

Paeurungi Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua, Auckland Counci;

 

Jamie Sinclair

Chief Executive Officer, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Trust

 

Stuart Geary

Senior Investigation Advisor

 

Gary Hale

Integrity and Investigation Manager

 

Tom Irvine

 

 

Debbie McGrath

Finance Manager

 

Munen Prakash

Lead Finanical Advisor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

 

1          Apologies

 

That the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board:

a)      accept the apology from Cr L Cooper for lateness.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 


 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board:

a)      confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 3 December 2018, as a true and correct record.

 

 


 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

There was no extraordinary business.


 

 

5

Minutes of the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board meeting, 3 December 2018

 

The minutes were confirmed at item 3.

 

 


 

 

 

6

Quarterly report and general update

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board:

a)      Approve the reforecast of $3,233,200 into the middle years of the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Financial Plan 2018-29, as shown in attachment one. 

b)      Note: the reforecast is driven by a number of capital projects being delayed due to their dependency on the endorsement of the Ōrākei Visual Framework and the review of the Whenua Rangatira and Pourewa Creek Recreation Reserve Management Plans.

c)      Delegate to the Chair and Deputy Chair the authority to approve the detailed scope of signage works on Pourewa (following the completion of a wayfinding report).

 

   

 

 

 

X.XX pm                                             The Chairperson thanked Members for their attendance and attention to business and declared the meeting closed.

 

CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD AT A MEETING OF THE Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board HELD ON

 

 

 

DATE:.........................................................................

 

 

 

CHAIRPERSON:........................................................


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


Minutes

 

What:                     Michaels Ave Reserve Community Liaison Committee

Where:                   YMCA, Michaels Avenue Reserve, Ellerslie

When:                    20 Nov 2018 (7.30 pm-8.30 pm)

Who attended:       Frederick Poelman, Mark Weipers, Cathy Summers, David Barker, Glen McCabe, Kit Parkinson, Colin Davis, Brent Hayward, Corey Parr-Thompson

·    

 

·                  Decisions and action points

·                  By whom

·                  Due

Apologies: 

 

 

Minute taker:  David Barker

DB

 

·                      Updates from last meeting:

·    Damaged bin on northern side of artificial has been fixed

·    Most of the graffiti behind the YMCA has been removed but some remains on mural

·    Confirmation that section of park between noise wall on eastern side of artificial and Michaels Ave properties will be cut twice yearly

·    One field light was blown out of place in storm – this has now been fixed

·    Construction of the Elwood Place path is underway – David to give notice of project sign off in case defects are apparent and need to be reported to council by MARS liaison committee members.

·           

 

 

 

 

Signage – Funding for directional signage to the toilet has been approved – text (with arrow) says ‘Please use toilets by changing rooms’ and will be located on the side of the cricket nets.

 

Possible need for additional signage has been noted – this need will be reviewed post installation of signage on cricket nets.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lighting – 

A quote to modify the field lights control system is being obtained so that the club can turn field lights on and off within consented hours by means of an App.

 

Club have requested that on Fridays the field lights remain on till 9.10pm as allowed for in consent.

 

Footpath lighting - a number of the footpath lights are not working.  This has been reported to the operations team. Cost of repair is high but will be carried out. David to indicate time lines.

 

 

 

DB

 

 

 

DB

 

 

DB

 

Feb 19

 

 

 

Feb 19

 

 

Feb 19

On-going maintenance issues:

·    Sweeping of car parks and footpaths

·    Rubbish on top of cricket nets

·    Cesspits

·     

Current additional issues include:

·    Some sections of footpath sit too proud of grass/lawn and pose a health and safety risk along some sections. David to report to the operations team.

·    There are a few ruts on lawn at eastern end of artificial that require filling in. This has been reported to Ops team.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feb 19

 

 

 

 

 

Requirement of consent to retest for exceedances of noise  - Noise modelling to be undertaken and an update provided in Nov 2018.

DB

Nov

2018

Michaels Ave Reserve Operational Management Plan and Strategy –   Draft edited by Mark. Feedback to draft required by 11th Dec. Traffic management plan because of changes to bus routes will also need updating.

 

 

All

 

 

 

11 Dec 2018

Consultation on club room design –  Approx 35 people attended Ellerslie Residents Association meeting earlier this evening (20 Nov). Mark presented background plans for new clubrooms. Plans generally well received.

 

Intent is to start build in Sept 2019 and complete in 2020 (subject to budget, consent etc).

 

 

MW

 

AOB:

·    Speed of traffic coming in from Elwood Place problematic and speed humps required to slow traffic. Issue will be addressed as part of stage three works.

·    Drinking of alcohol in and outside of reserve occurring – issue to be monitored.

·    The standard of field renovations has been poor this spring – David to pass on this feedback to the Ops team.

·    The Eastern Bays Songbird Project aims to restore natural ecosystems and create a bird sanctuary in the city. Rat traps are being made by the Men’s Shed and given freely to residents who wish to participate.   

·    Brent wanted to know who he should speak to at council to improve profile of YMCA by means of signage – David to confirm.

·     

·     

 

 

 

 

 

 

DB

 

 

 

 

 

DB

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nov 18

 

 

 

 

 

Nov 18

 

Next meeting:        March 13 2019 – 6.30pm


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – Carmel Claridge

File No.: CP2019/02799

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead: Transport

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Parks and Reserves

Transport

2.       Gowing Drive Safety

Since the fatal accident in Gowing Drive in January there has been a further incident with a car rolling near the Dorchester St shops and a cyclist being knocked off their bike on Tahapa Crescent. Local residents have welcomed the news that the Board is funding driver feedback signs for the area. Approximately 50 people attended the public meeting on Gowing Drive Safety Issues hosted by the Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Association and supported by the Ōrākei Local Board held on 25th February. I gave a brief presentation of the actions and requests to Auckland Transport to date so far by the Board in our efforts to improve public safety for all road users and residents of this community. The meeting was a positive one with Auckland Transport acknowledging resident concerns. Melanie Dale and Irene Tsu were in attendance to explain AT’s rationale for resource allocation for safety initiatives, and answer audience questions. The following action points were announced at the meeting which I shall be monitoring for progress and report back to the Board on completion:

·     Installation of Driver Feedback signs (funded through the Local Board Transport Capital Funding)

·     Reassessment and collation of Speed Tube data and repositioning for more accurate / current measurement. This was last completed four years previously.

·     Investigation/ Assessment of Gowing Drive for 4-8 sites for road narrowing and threshold treatment.

·     Assessment of sightlines along bends for potential broken yellow line installation to improve driver visibility.

Gowing Drive residents have been made aware that some of these actions would necessitate some removal of parking and that it is important that when proposed improvements go out for public consultation, the community must support them if they are to be installed. The public response to the Board’s funding of the driver feedback signs has been extremely positive.


 

 

3.       Safety around Schools - Lucia Glade / Temple St Intersection

On 26th February I joined 22 local children and their accompanying parents on the walking         school bus route to Meadowbank Primary and Mt Carmel School. It was hugely useful to see and experience first- hand some of the safety issues for local children, particularly where crossing roads. I had a meeting immediately afterwards with Auckland Transport and was able to promptly raise those issues directly with our Relationship Manager. She has undertaken to action the following:

·     Reinstallation of painted lines for pedestrian crossing on Meadowbank Rd. The Board sought this action by way of resolution at the end of last year.

·     Advise AT’s Community Safety team to examine the intersection and extreme traffic congestion at the entrance to Mt Carmel at Lucia Glade – in particular to provide a safer crossing facility across Temple St.

·     Work with the Safety team on roll out of educational programme including temporary signage – in conjunction with community and schools (in particular Mt Carmel and Meadowbank Primary) via the Ōrākei Local Board.

·     Request the investigative team reassess the Archdall & Parsons Rd intersections with Gowing for safety improvements in addition to speed control, given the Board’s dissatisfaction with Auckland Transport’s response to our Board resolution of August 2018.

4.       Bus Movements St Heliers

The practice of some drivers to use unsuitably narrow streets in St Heliers to reposition their buses continues unabated. It is creating unnecessary congestion and difficulties for local residents. While the problem has been raised previously, it would seem the messaging from the Ōrākei Local Board is not being heard at the high enough levels.

5.       Ellerslie Intersections

Some months ago I presented a suite of Ellerslie intersections to Auckland Transport that have long been a source of concern for local residents with a request for options for safety improvement measures particularly for pedestrians. Their response is attached.  Although some minor steps will be taken to address matters raised, the Ellerslie Residents’ Association has understandably been underwhelmed by the response and particularly disheartened by the assertion that the intersections ‘work well’ when local knowledge is quite the opposite.

6.       75 Bus Route Issues

Residents have reported, and I have personally experienced what appear to be some glitches with the 75 route on trying to get on this service when leaving the Wynyard Quarter. Buses arrive as scheduled to the stop but are not collecting passengers, with the bus then displaying “not in service” with the app then sending them to alternative stops. There have been some short staffing problems recently that appear to be the source of the problem.

7.       Remuera Rd Pedestrian Refuge

As part of their feedback at the Transport Stakeholder – Annual Plan event the Remuera Residents’ Association have requested a safer crossing point for Remuera Rd to access the library and shopping amenities. Advice from Auckland Transport at that event and through subsequent communication, is that they are more than willing to investigate this as a potential project but have cautioned that it will entail removal of up to 5 carparks. This has been explained to the Association and preliminary views also sought from the Remuera Business Association. The Remuera Residents’ Association have confirmed their wish to have this project pursued notwithstanding and it has been forwarded to the investigation team accordingly.

Parks & Reserves

8.       Duck Signs Waiatarua Reserve

A request came from Ellerslie residents for something to be done to deter people from throwing food into the water for the ducks at Waiatarua Reserve and Michaels Ave Reserve. On request Community Facilities very quickly had educational signage put up in Waiatarua. The ‘Duck Experts’ at Council have given the assurance that it is not necessarily the type of food that is problematic but rather what occurs when that food gets wet and starts rotting before being eaten – potentially then causing avian botulism when later ingested. So long as the birds are fed ‘off water’ it is their view that the public can continue to feed. This is somewhat at odds with the alternative view that in is unhealthy, for the ducks particularly, to be supplementary fed at all. 

9.       The Omega Plus Big Dog Walk – Waiatarua Reserve

Planning continues for a Board presence at this event on 6th April. It is a good opportunity to elicit some feedback on the draft Waiatarua Enhancement Plan and reinforce the principles of responsible dog ownership.  Unfortunately, I will be out of Auckland and unable to attend on the day of the walk itself, but I am in contact with Alice McKinley the event organiser and hope to join her on her site visit before the event with Council staff. Given that there is ordinarily a very high number of attendees at this event it would also be an ideal time to test the appetite for a ‘dog agility’ course.

Activities:  9/2/2019 – 8/3/2019

Date:                          Activities:

 

9th February                Movies in Parks – Welcome on behalf of OLB/Judging

12th February              Auckland Transport Meeting

                                                Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Meeting – OLB Report

13th February              Freedom Camping Public Consultation Event attendance

14th February              Chair/Deputy Chair Meeting

                                                OLB Workshop

15th February              Glendowie Community Centre site visit/morning tea to celebrate

                                                Refurbishment

                                                “The Landing” site visit – with Colin Davis and AMSTC Trustee Mark                                                                     Mark Taylor

16th February              Men’s Shed Open Day attendance

18th February              Agenda Run through

                                                Local Board Cluster Meeting

                                                Ellerslie Residents’ Association Meeting – OLB Report

19th February              Leases/Parks Meetings

                                                Finance Meeting

21st February              Tāmaki Estuary Environment Forum – Chairing

                                                OLB Business Meeting

                                                Transport Stakeholder Event presentation

22nd February              Constituent Meeting – Waiatarua Issues

25th February              Gowing Drive Safety – Public Meeting – presentation on behalf of OLB as                                                 Transport Lead

26th February              Joined the Walking School Bus – Meadowbank Primary & Mt Carmel

                                                School

27th February              Freedom Camping presentation to Committee

28th February              Chair/Deputy Chairman Meeting

                                                OLB Workshop

3rd March                                Eastern Songbird Project BBQ

4th March                                 Future of Schools Meeting – St Chads Church & Community Centre

5th March                                 Community Pantry – attendance at presentation to Board members

7th March                                 OLB Workshop

                                                Broderick Print Summer Swim Series – Prize Presentation with Ros

                                                Rundle – Kohimarama Beach

8th March                                 Volunteer Awards planning meeting

                                                Bike Tāmaki Drive meeting

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ellerslie Intersections

189

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carmel Claridge - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 10th March 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – Troy Churton

File No.: CP2019/02813

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since the last meeting.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

b)      The Ōrākei Local Board requests the Manager of Parks, Sports and Recreation to issue a notice of requirement to dismantle the fence along Tāmaki Drive bordering the grass reserve area adjacent to OBC and public boat ramps so that there is free ingress and egress for the public into the grass area from Tāmaki Drive.

 

Portfolio Lead: Resource Consenting and Regulatory

Snapshot of Planning and Regulatory Matters and general representative work

2.       Planning file enquiries and comments relating to a range of applications including other matters such as:

·    Significant liaison and comment on notification for 1 – 3 Purewa Road, Meadowbank, including considerable local resident inputs.

·    Attending Meadowbank and St Johns Resident Association and reporting on various planning items

·    Circulating weekly consent applications and liquor licence items across Residential Associations and fielding calls or enquiries from them

·    Liaising with Member Wong and Davis regarding information process on pre-lodgement information

·    Liaison regarding light spill and effects from Remuera Golf Course flood lights (copy resource consent issued in December 2013 attached)

·    Sustaining view of requirement for notification of significant earthworks proposed within Special Ecological Area at 46A Kempthorne Crescent, Meadowbank

·    Further meeting with Amanda de Jong regarding outstanding matters, matters on hold for want of more information

·    Sustaining a view that a tavern licence application for College Rifles should be notified and is a distinct prospect with very different potential effects from a club licence

·    Comment on proposed expansion of operations of a child care centre at 31 Kelvin Road, Remuera

·    Liaising with representatives from Remuera resident Association regarding planning and traffic related matters

·    Liaising with Eastern Suburbs representatives about planning clubroom and community facility improvement, stepping down from their special working party to ensure greater separation of role and interest.

·    Attending a drop-in session regarding Freedom Camping by law proposals and feeding input into discussions between Members Davis and Claridge and Senior Advisor to the Ōrākei Local Board’s (Suzanne Weld) notes.

·    Liaising with MBSJ Resident Association rep regarding Remuera Golf Course and proposed sale thereof

·    Provision: Attending Auckland Airport Noise Committee meeting

·    Attending opening of Remuera Chinese New Year ceremony

·    Attending opening of Meadowbank Road safety meeting

·    Provision: Attending Songbird BBQ, Glendowie

·    Assisting Meadowbank Primary School girls establish a trial community foodbank project with support of Officer Suzanne Weld

Fence on Tāmaki Drive outside Reserve beside Outboard Boating Club

·    In OBC’s letter dated 25th July (attached) they refer to the security fence which is a “requirement of the consents the club holds”. The consent (attached) doesn’t specify the need for a fence but only has references to security which are open to interpretation.

·    The 1959 licence (attached) makes reference to club being responsible for the maintenance of fencing.

·    While the extent of fencing in 1959 was unlikely to be as significant as it is today, Parks, Sports and Recreation advice is, it may have not even been along the Tāmaki Drive but actually across the Club’s actual exclusive area more to the rear of the site boundary anyway.

·    Parks, Sports and Recreation advice is that the current mesh fence was put up in the last ten years and replaced a smaller picket fence.

·    The reserve area is unable to be accessed by the general public. There is no basis to retain the degree of fencing regardless of unresolved separate issues regarding future licensing; future licensing in which OBC may aspire to retain areas of public reserve for its unique parking or building requirements.

·    Attached hereto are the original 1959 licence, a letter dated 27 September 1999 between ARC and OBC regarding changing conditions of resource consent, and a letter dated 25 July 2018 from Jeff Morrison to the OLB.

·    The OBC retains full time security staff and it is not reasonable to say the fence is primary security for OBC exclusive areas or assets within them.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

OBC Deed of Covenant

193

b

OBC Letter - Jeff Morrison & Associates

201

c

OBC ARC RC Decision

203

d

Remuera Golf Club RC Application Decision

235

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Troy Churton - Ōrākei Local Board Member

 Date: 10th March 2019


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

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Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Board Member Report - Colin Davis

File No.: CP2019/02817

 

  

 

Purpose

To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since last reported.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead:  Parks and Reserves (joint); Arts and Libraries; Heritage

Alternate portfolio holder: Environment; Resource Consenting and Regulatory

Other - internal appointments: Mayor’s WWI Memorial Advisory Group; Quality Advice Political Advisory Group

Other - appointments to external community organisations: Stonefields Residents Association Inc. (Lead); St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association Inc. (Alternate); Auckland Netball Centre Inc. (Lead); Friends of Churchill Park (Lead); Ōrākei Basin Advisory Group (joint parks portfolio holder); St Heliers Bay Village Association (Alternate); Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee (Alternate).

Heritage

(1)     Tamaki Drive Searchlights

Work on the restoration and preservation of the three searchlight emplacements is soon to commence, once Auckland Transport has approved a traffic management plan. Work will include floodlighting. There will be an art component on emplacement no. 2, the middle one, showing an image of a manned searchlight. Because of the project’s location on Tamaki Drive and the complexity of some of the restoration, the work is expected to take at least two months.

(2)     Heritage Projects

(i)         Work is soon to start on putting the book: Heritage Sites of Significance and Public Artwork in the Ōrākei Local Board Area onto the Board’s website. The intention is to update the electronic version of the book periodically with new material. I hope eventually a second enlarged and updated edition will be printed and available at the libraries too.

 

(ii)        Restoration by the Heritage unit of the rare 90-year old heritage ventilation pipe in the St Heliers commercial area remains almost a lost cause.

 

(iii)       It will soon be a year since I saw initial draft texts for the two small plaques at the Millennium Bridge, Mission Bay, which have yet to be approved and installed. One plaque with corrected text is to be relocated for better visibility from the side of the seawall, to the top of the seawall, and the other new interpretative plaque is also to be placed on top of the seawall; one on either side of the Tamaki Drive entrance to the bridge. The delay is most unsatisfactory.

 

Parks and Reserves and Regulatory

The Board has been involved in preparing its feedback on the Governing Body’s proposals regarding Freedom Camping. Freedom campers are starting to have an impact on our local reserves, and this use will no doubt increase with the America’s Cup challenge on Auckland’s Waitemata Harbour and the Hauraki Gulf.

 

Board members have fielded many calls and comments from concerned residents. The Board held a drop-in event on 13 February, because it considered public consultation on the proposed bylaw had not been robust, nor had reasonable time been given, which included over the Christmas/New Year period, for adequate consultation on what is a quite complex proposed bylaw, which required a large amount of reading, and research and understanding of other related bylaws, the issues, and various statutes.

 

The Board does not support the creation of the proposed bylaw and believes that the existing Bylaw No. 20 – Public Places should remain but be amended to acknowledge the Freedom Camping Act 2011. The Board at its 21 February meeting resolved not to support freedom camping in its parks and reserves and has requested that all parks and reserves in the Board’s area be deemed “prohibited from freedom camping” to enable enforcement, although it has identified a couple of reserves, not near residential areas, which could be suitable. The Board has also proposed that Auckland Transport should be requested to create a bylaw to cover freedom camping on roads and road reserves adjacent to reserves, where potential displacement of freedom camping from reserves onto streets in residential areas could result in the negative effects that have been experienced or anticipated on the adjoining reserves.

 

The Board made its presentation to the hearing panel on 27 February.

Activities (since 10 February 2019)

As well as assisting with a range of citizens’ enquiries, attending meetings, and involvement with other community activities, I have also attended the following to date:

 

11 February a meeting of the St Heliers Bay Village Association.

12 February the transport portfolio briefing.

12 February a meeting with staff re planning the 2019 St Heliers ANZAC Day Service.

12 February on-site briefing at Madills Farm by the Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club regarding the Club’s plans to redevelop its clubrooms, the changing facilities and toilets.

13 February freedom camping consultation meeting.

14 February te reo practice.

14 February the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

15 February inspection of the Glendowie Community Centre, and meeting with its management team.

15 February inspection of the new Marine Centre at The Landing, Ōrākei.

15 February meeting with staff regarding the Board’s feedback on the Governing Body’s freedom camping proposals. The legislation is most complicated when taken with other legislation.

18 February a meeting with the Chairman regarding the agenda for the Board’s business meeting.

18 February the local boards regional/sub-regional forum.

18 February the meeting of the Mayor’s WWI Memorial Advisory Group.

19 February the monthly leases portfolio briefing.

19 February the finance portfolio update.

19 February the meeting of the Stonefields Residents Association.

21 February the Ōrākei Local Board business meeting.

21 February the Ōrākei Local Board’s stakeholders’ consultation meeting regarding transport and traffic matters.

25 February the meeting hosted by the Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Association regarding traffic issues in Gowing Drive.

25 February a meeting of the St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association.

26 February the transport portfolio briefing.

27 February with the chairman and deputy chair, presenting the Board’s feedback to the Governing Body’s hearing panel regarding the Governing Body’s freedom camping proposals.

27 February inspection of Ngāti Whātua’s newly unveiled pou on the Whenua, Hapimana Street, Ōrākei. This is a striking artwork.

27 February the function for local boards hosted by Regional Facilities Auckland at the New Zealand Maritime Museum.

28 February te reo practice.

28 February the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

28 February the on-site meeting with the contractor, architect and Council staff regarding the planned restoration of the heritage Tamaki Drive searchlight emplacements.

28 February the Presentation of Museum Medals function at the Auckland War Memorial Museum.

3 March the Round the Bays fun run (as a non-active participant).

3 March the social event hosted by the Eastern Bays Songbird group.

4 March a meeting of the Quality Advice Political Advisory Group.

4 March a meeting of the St Heliers Bay Village Association.

5 March a meeting hosted by NZTA, attended by representatives of Auckland Transport, the Meadowbank Pony Club, and the Ōrākei Local Board, regarding the future of the large area of grassed land in St Johns Road presently used by the Meadowbank Pony Club for horse grazing. This will have a significant impact on the Club’s operations, including the Riding for the Disabled. I took the opportunity to speak with the AT representative regarding the Board’s resolution asking AT to give the apparent obsolete bus shelters, stored in the open at 400 St Johns Road, to the Club for temporary use as shelters near the arenas, for spectators at the Riding for the Disabled and other Club events. 

5 March a presentation at the Board’s office by students from Remuera Intermediate School regarding establishing a community pantry project.

7 March te reo practice.

7 March the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

7 March a social function hosted by the St Heliers Bay Village Association celebrating the opening of the St Heliers art exhibition and children’s art competition.

8 March a meeting regarding the Board’s “recognition of volunteers” event.

8 March a meeting hosted by Simon O’Connor MP for Tamaki at which Todd Muller MP for Bay of Plenty and Opposition Spokesman for Climate Change was the guest speaker, who spoke on issues of climate change.

9 March the Ōrākei Local Board’s environment stakeholders’ consultation meeting on the Auckland Council’s water strategy. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Colin Davis – Member, Ōrākei Local Board of the Auckland Council

10 March 2019


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – Ros Rundle

File No.: CP2019/02826

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues in February 2019

 

Recommendation

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That Council staff be requested to assess the upgrade/renewal of the Selwyn Reserve toilet and changing room block (eastern side) and report back to the Board.

c)      That Council staff be requested to assess the renewal of the children’s playground on Selwyn Reserve, Mission Bay and report back to the Board.

 

Portfolio Lead: Economic Development

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Community; Transport (Joint)

Economic Development

Remuera Business Association

New Manger Renu has been very busy organising Chinese New Year celebrations in Remuera. Number of attendees appeared to be lower this year in Remuera.

 

Still much promoting of businesses on social media being undertaken and have increased their followers on Facebook to 1,380.

 

There is a new cafe opening possibly in March in Remuera with a Michelin star chef Jake.  Opening in the ex-Kismet shop space.

Mission Bay Business Association

Mission Bay still waiting for the P120 parking limit to be implemented by AT.

 

Noted that the Belly Bins are working very well and there has not been the necessity to have as many red topped bins on Selwyn Reserve.

 

Pontoon installation has been delayed due to funding and resource consent being required.

Security Cameras are now fully functioning, and all are being monitored by the Police.

 

Tree lighting is not fully functioning.  Discussion around the lighting being taken out of the trees when the maintenance contract finishes. 

 

The funding from the OLB will need to be considered very soon and there are several suggestions for this.  These will be presented to the OLB later in March.

 

With America’s Cup in 2021 the Association advises that the Mission Bay playground and toilet block on the beach (eastern side) on Selwyn Reserve are not in the best condition considering this is a premier beach destination.  The toilet block is very old and smelly and there are many complaints especially regarding the toilet block over several summer seasons.  The toilet block was painted inside recently but the smell and design of the amenity is not of a standard which it should be, given that Mission Bay is a premium tourist/local destination.

St Heliers Business Association

Main activity being organised is the Art Exhibition which will be for the better part of March.  Art works on display in the St Heliers Library and also certain retail and hospitality outlets.

 

There is the suggestion to have various dog hooks/hitches available on certain buildings enabling dog owners to leave their pooches outside on pavement and owners would be free to shop.  This could be a point of difference for those visiting St Heliers with dogs.

 

Comment made that the rubbish bins are not fit for purpose with pizza boxes clogging up many bins in the area.  This has since been taken up with Community Facilities who are going to install larger bins shortly.

Community

Attended the Eastern Bays Network Group meeting.  This month the meeting was held at the Men’s Shed in Waiatarua.

 

Members from Ngāti Whātua blessed the building and the meeting took place after this.

 

Council staff presented to the group information about signage and the new regional policy regarding signage.

 

Activities: February 2019

As well as attending to many constituent’s queries attended the following:

Date                                       Activities

 

5                                              Attended the Mission Bay Business Association meeting

                                                Kit Parkinson and I met with Mark Taylor from AMST

6                                              Attended Waitangi Day celebrations at Okahu Bay

7                                              Hui Practice at the OLB offices

                                                OLB workshop

Presented the prizes for the Summer Swim series at Kohimarama Beach

8                                              Attended a meeting with Bike Tamaki Drive and Bike Auckland Council

9                                              Attended the OLB outdoor Movies in Park at Glover Park

11                                            Attended the St Heliers Business Association meeting

12                                            Attended the Remuera Business Association meeting

                                                Attended the Auckland Transport update meeting at the OLB offices

                                                Attended the BID’s managers catch-up with Kev Carter

Attended the Eastern Bays Football update on the proposed Club Rooms

13                                            Attended the OLB Freedom Camping Consultation with our local constituents and to gather their feedback in order to frame the OLB feedback

14                                            Hui Practice at the OLB offices

                                                Attend the OLB workshop

15                                            Glendowie Community Centre walk through to see the recent renovations and meet the management.

19                                            Attended the Community Leases update meeting at the OLB offices

21                                            OLB Business Meeting at St Chad’s Church Hall

Presented prizes for the Summer Swum Series at Kohimarama Beach

22                                            Met with Chairman Parkinson and Deputy Chairman Claridge at Orakei Basin

23                                  Attended the feedback session at the St Heliers Library for the Annual Budget

27                                  Attended the unveiling of the Pou on Bastian Point

Attended the Eastern Bay Network meeting held at the Men’s Shed Waiatarua.  The building was blessed by the local Ngāti Whātua.

Meeting regarding the Mission Bay Development

Attended the Regional Facilities Maritime Museum new exhibition “Carving Water”

28                                Hui Practice at the OLB offices

                                      Attended the OLB workshop

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Photo gallery for month of February 2019

251

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ros Rundle – Member, Ōrākei Local Board of the Auckland Council

10 March 2019


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

 

Rosalind Rundle – Board Report Attachments – 21 March 2019

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – David Wong

File No.: CP2019/02845

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report is received

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board’s feedback regarding the application for the proposed resource consent changes for 5 Aitken Avenue be formally endorsed.

 

Portfolio Lead: Community

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Economic Development; Events, Landowner Approvals and Leases; Resource Consenting and Regulatory (Joint)

Community (& Youth)

2.       Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association – 12 February & 5 March; key discussion points – funding for legal specialist and planner to front independent hearing commissioner – April/May 2019

3.       Public consultation – Eastern Suburbs Football club developments on Madills Farm club rooms; 12 February

4.       Barfoot and Thompson Stadium – Trustees meeting – 26 February; key discussion points – funding requirements for capital expenditure including the need for replacement roof

5.       Eastern Bays Networking meeting – Men’s Shed blessing conducted by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei – 27 February

6.       Volunteer awards meeting – 8 March – preparation for June awards recognition of community contributions from residents

Events

7.      Gowing Drive Safety issues – St Chads; 25 February – fronted by Member Claridge; key discussion on potentially inserting street islands and narrowing the passage way to slow vehicles

8.       Have your Say – consultation on Annual Budget 2019/20 – covering the natural environment targeted rate and water quality. Constituents vocal on ensuring Churchill Park is elevated to a focus reserve for pest management

Landowner Approvals

9.       We note applicants continue to seek permission to use Selwyn Reserve, Mission Bay – with apparent commercial intent; and utilisation of large spatial areas – usually available for local residents and visitors


 

Resource consenting and regulatory

10.     Draft feedback on 5 Aitken Avenue, Mission Bay in consultation with Member Churton; key points include increasing the accommodation units from 19 to 27; a lack of parking – with only 2 carparks whereas 30 are required – OLB advocate public notification – Refer Attachment A

11.     Liaison with Men’s Shed on proposed internal renovations including - 1. Surface drainage around the main entrance and 2. An emergency fire escape door to the north western corner and 3. Internal changes to the conference rooms area

Activities: 9 February 2019 – 9 March 2019

Date

Activities

12 Feb 2019

·    Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association meeting

·    Eastern Suburbs club room development – consultation; Madills Farm

14 Feb 2019

·    OLB workshop

21 Feb 2019

·    OLB Business meeting

25 Feb 2019

·    Gowing Drive safety public consultation – St Chads

26 Feb 2019

·    East City Community Trust Board meeting

 

27 Feb 2019

·    Eastern Bays Networking meeting – Men’s Shed

28 Feb 2019

·    OLB workshop

5 March 2019

·    Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association

7 March 2019

·    OLB workshop

8 March 2019

·    Volunteer Awards meeting

9 March 2019

·    Have your Say consultation – Auckland Sailing Club

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback on 5 Aitken Avenue - OLB

255

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Wong - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 11 March 2019

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – Toni Millar

File No.: CP2019/02846

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead: Environment

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Arts and Libraries; Transport (Joint)

St Heliers Library

2.       Festival of Art – St Heliers Library – excellent exhibition of a high standard – opening of the adult exhibition – high standard of art work to this invited exhibition.  The children’s art around the walls of a very high standard as well.  Thank you to all who have put so much work into this exhibition.

Environment

3.       Eastern Bays Songbird Project celebrates 1st birthday and farewells Dr Julie Robson, Co-ordinator. This was a gathering of committed rat and possum trappers. There have been 18 trap handouts; there are 801 people committed to the project; 873 rat traps have been handed out; 170 possum traps have been handed out; 517 rats have been trapped [there are more – that is the number recorded]; 243 possums have been eradicated.  A huge thank you to all involved.

Transport

4.       Berms – What is the point of a lot of rules if not enforced? It appears we are now in a time where we have many rules pertaining to berms in our communities.  AT do not enforce these rules any longer – what is the point of rules if they are not enforced?

5.       Parking St Heliers – great concern that AT, in the name of Safety, intend to remove 32 car parks from St Heliers.  It appears more of a system to kill the local shopping precinct than safety.

6.       Meadowbank St Johns Residents Assoc public meeting re traffic safety around Gowing Drive – excellent meeting with traffic measurement equipment on site already.  Proposed emelioration to be implemented asap.

Activities

 

12 February                AT Update – OLB office

                                    Eastern Suburbs Football. Madills Farm.  Engagement with local community about their proposed redevelopment.

                                    Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Assoc – Waiatarua Update postponed.

13 February                Freedom Camping public ‘drop-in’ OLB consultation

14 February                OLB Workshop

15 February                OLB walk through of Glendowie Community Centre

16 February                Opening of Mens Shed Event

                                    Songbirds Project – Trap handouts at Kohi Beach

21 February                OLB Business meeting

                                    OLB Transport Consultation with Stakeholders

25 February                Public Meeting at St Chads – Pushing for Safety Improvements around Gowing Drive.  Excellent meeting.

26 February                AT update

27 February                OLB present to Auckland Council Freedom Camping panel

                                    Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

28 February                OLB Workshop

                                    Sustainable Business Network Meeting on Gulf X [Marine surveillance of water life] and revitalising the cleanliness of the harbour, especially Pourewa Creek area and Okahu Bay

3 March                       Eastern Songbirds Project 1st Birthday and farewell to co-ordinator Dr Julie Robson at Glendowie Scout Hall, Kinsale Ave.

7 March                       OLB Workshop

                                    Festival of Art opening – St Heliers Library

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Photo montage March 2019

261

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Toni Millar - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 11 March 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/21111

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Ōrākei Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Ōrākei Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the draft governance forward work calendar as at March 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Governance Forward Work Calendar - March 2019

265

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Proceedings

File No.: CP2019/02851

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Orakei Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Board workshops are an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be, and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

3.       Attached are copies of the Ōrākei Local Board workshop records taken during workshops held on 7, 14 and 28 February 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board records for the workshops held on 7, 14 and 28 February 2019 be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop proceedings - 7 February 2019

273

b

Workshop proceedings - 14 February 2019

275

c

Workshop proceedings - 28 February 2019

279

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action

File No.: CP2019/03515

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from officers.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolution pending action register - March 2019

285

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

21 March 2019