I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Environment and Community Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 9 April 2019

9.30am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Komiti Taiao ā-Hapori Hoki /

Environment and Community Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Cr Penny Hulse

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Mike Lee

 

IMSB Member Renata Blair

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

IMSB Member James Brown

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Ross Clow

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Maea Petherick

Senior Governance Advisor

4 April 2019

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8136

Email: maea.petherick@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

This committee deals with all strategy and policy decision-making that is not the responsibility of another committee or the Governing Body.  Key responsibilities include:

·         Development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental, social, economic and cultural activities

·         Natural heritage

·         Parks and reserves

·         Economic development

·         Protection and restoration of Auckland’s ecological health

·         Climate change

·         The Southern Initiative

·         Waste minimisation

·         Libraries

·         Acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and within approved annual budgets

·         Performing the delegations made by the Governing Body to the former Parks, Recreation and Heritage Forum and Regional Development and Operations Committee, under resolution GB/2012/157 in relation to dogs

·         Activities of the following CCOs:

o    ATEED

o    RFA

Powers

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)        approval of a submission to an external body

(b)        establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)         The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee,    where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)        The committee does not have:

(a)        the power to establish subcommittees

(b)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)


Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

Members of the public

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

Those who are not members of the public

General principles

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation

 

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

5.1     World Animal Protection New Zealand - how the organisations work relates to Auckland Council.                                                                                                7

5.2     Boopise (Claudia) Maran - community events and working with communities  8

5.3     Cancer Society Auckland Division -  Action for Smokefree communities    8

5.4     Dr Stuart Jones - Action for Smokefree communities                                     8

5.5     Auckland Regional Public Health Service - Action for Smokefree communities                                                                                                                                9

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          9

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

8          Auahi kore hapori whānui – action for smokefree communities                           11

9          Community Facilities Network Plan; revised Action Plan (2019)                           33

10        Summary of Environment and Community Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 9 April 2019                                                                           59

11        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 12 March 2019, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       World Animal Protection New Zealand - how the organisations work relates to Auckland Council.

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Christine Rose and Elaine McNee on behalf of World Animal Protection New Zealand will speak to the committee about the organisations work and how it relates to Auckland council.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       World Animal Protection is a global organisation (previously WSPA); that works in over 50 countries worldwide and have been around for more than 50 years.

3.       The organisation has about 45,000 supporters in New Zealand focusing on animals in farming communities, the wild, in disasters, and in entertainment, as well as in our oceans.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from Christine Rose and Elaine McNee on behalf of the World Animal Protection New Zealand and thank them for their attendance.

 

 

 

5.2       Boopise (Claudia) Maran - community events and working with communities

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Boopise (Claudia) Maran has recently worked with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to create local community events and connecting with communities across the Auckland region. 

2.       A short powerpoint will be provided on issues and road blocks faced.  Boopsie will provide some suggestions and solutions that she feels can be made to benefit every ward in the pursuit of connected and engaged citizens.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)      thank Boopsie (Claudia) Maran for her presentation on working with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport in relation to creating local community events and connecting with communities across the Auckland region and thank her for her attendance.

Attachments

a          empowered-communites-approach- quick-guide......................................... 139

 

 

5.3       Cancer Society Auckland Division -  Action for Smokefree communities

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Cancer Society Auckland Division would like to present in relation to Action for Smokefree communities, in particular Māori and Pacific Smokefree communities.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from the Cancer Society Auckland Division, in relation to Action for Smokefree communities, in particular Māori and Pacific Smokefree communities and thank them for their attendance.

 


 

 

 

5.4       Dr Stuart Jones - Action for Smokefree communities

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       On behalf of Respiratory Specialists in New Zealand, Dr Stuart Jones will present in relation to the Action for Smokefree communities, in particular Maori and Pacific smokefree communities.

2.       Dr Stuart Jones has also been part of a yearlong review of e-cigarette literature and would like to present current information in relation to e-cigarettes.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from Dr Stuart Jones, on behalf of the Respiratory Specialists New Zealand in relation to the Smokefree Action for Smokefree communities, in particular the Maori and Pacific Smokefree communities and thank him for his attendance.

 

 

5.5       Auckland Regional Public Health Service - Action for Smokefree communities

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Sean Liggins on behalf of Auckland Regional Public Health Service will present in relation to Action for Smokefree communities.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)      Receive the presentation from Sean Liggins, on behalf of Auckland Regional Public Health Service in relation to Action for Smokefree communities and thank him for his attendance.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 

Auahi kore hapori whānui – action for smokefree communities

File No.: CP2019/04516

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the plan Auahi kore hapori whānui – action for smokefree communities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The council is committed to a policy and implementation plan towards a smokefree region by 2025. This includes the development of a high smoking prevalence action plan. 

3.       The plan Auahi kore hapori whānui – action for smokefree communities implements this priority. Smoking-related health conditions (such as cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases) are highest for Māori and Pacific peoples, who represent 40 per cent of those who smoke in Auckland. The action plan is:

·     evidence-based to target smoking among wāhine Māori, Pacific males (aged 22 – 45), and young people/rangatahi/talavou

·     based on an engaging, innovative approach to increase our impact on smoking prevalence

·     focused on smokefree public places, de-normalisation and community empowerment.

4.       Three activity streams are proposed:

·     by the people, for the people: community-led projects to build smokefree communities

·     activate smokefree public places: activation will involve fun, high profile activities in places that are popular with priority audiences

·     switch to quit: create supportive environments for smokers who want to quit by switching to vaping. Vaping is emerging as an innovative stop smoking tool.

5.       There is a reputational risk that the proposed harm reduction approach to support people to stop smoking through vaping may not be supported by some smokefree stakeholders. This risk can be mitigated by communicating key messages focused on the evidence and the benefits of a harm reduction for the highest smoking prevalence groups.

6.       A smokefree activator will lead implementation of the action plan in the 2019-2021 period. 

7.       Actions for 2019-2020 are identified in the next steps section of this report. They will be supported by the activities of other smokefree services and the council’s regional activities contributing to the broader smoke free implementation plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)      approve the action plan Auahi kore hapori whānui – action for smokefree communities

b)      delegate to staff through the chief executive, the ability to make minor amendments and complete the action plan design.

 

Horopaki

Context

The action plan is informed by research and feedback from smokers

8.       Smoking kills more people in Aotearoa each year than road crashes, alcohol, other drugs, suicide, murder, drowning and earthquakes combined.

9.       The council is committed to creating a smokefree region by 2025. The Smokefree Policy 2017-2025 and Implementation Plan were approved in 2017 (ENV/2017/142). This included development of a high smoking prevalence action plan as a priority. 

10.     Research commissioned from the University of Auckland and Hāpai Te Hauora in 2018 informed development of the action plan. The research provided a demographic profile of high smoking populations and activities most likely to reduce smoking rates for these groups. 

11.     The action plan was presented to smokefree sector stakeholders. There is strong support for the approach. There is also some concern about supporting harm reduction for smokers who want to quit by switching to vaping.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Strengthening council levers and complementing the smokefree sector’s work to stop smoking

12.     The Auahi kore hapori whānui – action for smokefree communities (refer Attachment A) targets high smoking prevalence communities in Tāmaki Makaurau to reach the Smokefree 2025 goal.  

13.     The action plan will complement the smokefree sector’s work, particularly efforts to support and motivate high prevalence smokers to begin or continue their stop smoking journey.

14.     The action plan initiatives have the potential to deliver long-term health and wellbeing benefits to communities in Tāmaki Makaurau.

Evidence-based to target smoking among wāhine Māori, Pacific males and young people/rangatahi/talavou

15.     The action plan focuses on those communities with the greatest need. Smoking-related health conditions (such as cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases) are highest among Māori and Pacific peoples.

16.     Smokefree initiatives have not been as effective for Māori and Pacific peoples, who represent 40 per cent of those who smoke in Auckland.  

17.     The priority audiences within these communities are wāhine Māori, Pacific males (aged 22 – 45), rangatahi/talavou and their families. These groups are critical to reducing uptake and increasing the number of successful stop smoking attempts.  

18.     Talavou (youth) are critical. Prevention will lower smoking prevalence in future generations. Māori and Pacific who smoke commonly cite setting an example for tamariki and mokopuna as their main motivation to stop smoking. 

Creating smokefree communities is not just about what we do, it is also about how we do it.

19.     Evidence indicates that the reach and impact of activities with the high priority communities can be improved by customising our approach, so it is community-led, culturally appropriate and whānau/group based. 

20.     Kōrero with Māori and Pacific smokers, ex-smokers, vapers, and stop smoking providers has informed our understanding of why people start smoking, and what would motivate and enable them to stop. This provided direction development of the action plan.  

“That’s not good for us, you know.  He awhi e te tiaki tatou o mokopuna o wenera.  Kia kete e tatou kore momi paipa, he hauora mo ratou.  That’s my cries for the mokos.  Kia ora.”

 

“Mak[e] advertisements that are more fun. When it’s funny it starts to go around like slang and people ask where did you get that? Where did you hear that from?”

,“Having a message or ad that’s cool and hits you or that it’s gripping. Not making people feel attacked.”
By us, for us.”
“People that can relate to quitting and how hard it is and have actually done it.”
 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Smokefree tuku ifi leva[1], engaging and innovative approach to increase our impact

21.     Those who smoke have told us that we can improve the reach and impact of our smokefree activities if we customise our approach so it:

·     empowers the community to design and deliver their own solutions

·     is whānau based and enables smokers to draw strength from the people around them

·     is fun, innovative, without judgment, grounded in Te Ao Māori and Pacific cultures

·     acknowledges life circumstances can make it difficult to become or remain smokefree.

Smokefree tu’u le ulaula tapa’a[2], activity streams focus on de-normalisation and empowerment

22.     In keeping with our role within the smokefree sector, the action plan has activities that promote smokefree public places, de-normalise smoking and motivate people to begin or continue their stop smoking journey. The action plan includes three activity streams.

Activity stream 1:’By the people, for the people’
Enable community-led projects that help build smokefree movements in priority communities
 

 

 


23.     This will enable community-led projects that help build smokefree movements in priority communities. Successful community empowerment requires funding flexibility and can take time. 

Activity stream 2: ‘Activate smokefree public places’
Activate smokefree public places and smokefree movements in priority communities

 

24.     Activation of smokefree public places will involve fun, high profile activities in places that are popular with priority audiences. For example:

·     celebration of local smokefree success stories

·     interactive events to share smokefree ideas (talent quests, kapa haka, flash mobs)

·     stop smoking competitions and celebrity promotions

·     instigation of smokefree conversations by local influencers

·     bespoke or interactive smokefree infrastructure in smoking hotspots.

Activity stream 3:‘Switch to quit’
Create more supportive environments for smokers who want to quit by switching to vaping
 

 

 


25.     Creating supportive environments for smokers who want to quit by switching to vaping is a harm reduction approach. Experts estimate that vaping is 95 per cent less harmful to health than smoking. Vaping is emerging as an innovative and effective stop smoking tool.

26.     A 2017 Public Health England study concluded that vaping can be an effective stop smoking method if reinforced by expert support. The Vape2Save support programme has produced strong results among Māori women. Engagement with Māori and Pacific groups indicates that lack of access to advice is a barrier to trying vaping as a stop smoking method.

27.     Complaints about vaping in smokefree public places suggest a gap in public knowledge about vaping. There is currently no robust evidence that vaping presents second-hand health risks for bystanders or that it is a gateway to smoking.

We will measure progress towards intermediate and long-term outcomes by reporting on qualitative and quantitative measures.

 

28.     It will be challenging to attribute the impact and measure the effectiveness of some activities outlined in the action plan. This is due to the focus of council on place based and de-normalising activities. Staff are conscious that:

·     a range of external factors and programs will impact on smokefree attitudes and behaviours in target communities

·     there may be a lag between the delivery of some activities (such as community-led initiatives) and realisation of outcomes.

29.     Staff propose to use a combination of data-based analysis, surveys, rōpu/focus groups and observational activities to measure progress towards outcomes.  When practicable, the community will be involved in:

·     local goal setting

·     charting progress towards local goals

·     identifying unique ways to undertake measurement activities (such as recruiting ‘citizen scientists’ at local schools to support observational activities)

·     delivering measurement activities.

30.     Visible and motivating place-based reminders of progress towards local goals will also be used to support communication of community achievements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The council group including Auckland Transport, ATEED and Regional Facilities Auckland continue to deliver activities in the Smokefree Policy and Implementation Plan 2017–2025. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Local board feedback was incorporated into the Smokefree Policy and Implementation Plan 2017–2025.  Most local boards supported the proactive promotion of smokefree public places and direct community engagement on local initiatives. 

33.     Interventions designed to de-normalise smoking will be delivered in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Henderson-Massey, and parts of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki.  

34.     In areas where targeted smokefree activities are proposed, local boards will be offered an opportunity to contribute to designing local activity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Māori currently have the highest smoking rates of any group in Auckland.  The 2013       New Zealand census reported that the overall Māori smoking rate in Auckland was 30 per cent, compared to 13 per cent for the overall Auckland population. The smoking prevalence rate is 32 per cent amongst wāhine Māori, and 28 per cent amongst Māori men.  

36.     Smoking prevalence was highest in the 25-34 year age group. Māori women in this age group had the highest overall smoking rates of any group at 38 per cent.

37.     The research commissioned from Hāpai Te Hauora and the University of Auckland included in-depth engagement with Māori smokers, ex-smokers, cessation providers, vapers and vaping product vendors, as well as demographic research and a literature review.    

38.     The Auahi kore hapori whānui – action for smokefree communities responds to these findings, and prioritises reducing smoking among targeted Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     The Long-term Plan allocated funding of $2 million over the next three years to progress ‘Smokefree Auckland by 2025’.

40.     Of the $2 million allocated, $1,100,000 is intended for delivery of Auahi kore hapori whānui –action for smokefree communities. The remaining $900,000 will action the Smokefree Policy Implementation Plan 2017.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.       There is a reputational risk that the proposed harm reduction approach to reducing smoking prevalence through vaping may not be supported by some smokefree stakeholders. They may be concerned about the potential gateway to smoking for young people or other (as yet) unknown harms. This could be reinforced if the proposed amendments to the Smoke-free Environments Act (1990) incorporate vaping within the scope of the Act. Members of the public who perceive vaping as a nuisance may also not support the approach.

42.     This risk can be mitigated by communicating key messages focused on the evidence and the benefits of a harm reduction vaping offers to the highest smoking prevalence groups. Council staff will also engage with Ministry of Health officials through the amendment process. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     The action plan will be implemented over three years. Actions are identified for the 2019-2021 period in the action plan section titled: ‘What will we do and when will we do it’.

44.     Delivery of the action plan will be led by a dedicated smokefree activator. Staff will work with internal departments, the smokefree sector and communities to maximise the reach and impact on smoking rates. The next steps for 2019-2020 are:

45.     The action plan will be supported by the regional activities being undertaking to establish smokefree public places as part of the council’s broader smoke free implementation plan. Some of the regional activities include continuing installation of smokefree signage, smoke free messages for walking trails, event guidelines and the Healthy Families, Loved Spaces’ initiative.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auahi kore hapori whānui – action plan

19

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michael Sinclair - Manager Social Policy and Bylaws

Deborah Edwards - Senior Policy Manager

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 



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09 April 2019

 

Community Facilities Network Plan; revised Action Plan (2019)

File No.: CP2019/00395

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2019) including implementation progress and status of existing actions from 2015 to 2018, and to confirm actions for the period 2019 to 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) was approved by Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in August 2015. The CFNP is a strategic document for investment and prioritisation of community facility provision.

3.       The CFNP contains criteria for identifying actions and prioritising projects to be undertaken by departments. These actions are reflected in the companion Action Plan.

4.       Annual updates on delivery of the Action Plan are recommended to be provided to committee, with a review of the Action Plan completed every three years and a review of the CFNP every five years.

5.       The Action Plan identified 121 area based actions, with 50 as a priority for delivery. Since the adoption of the CFNP:

·    82% of the 50 priority area based actions are currently underway or have been completed

·    82% of the 11 strategic improvement actions are currently underway or have been completed

·    60% of business improvement actions are currently underway.

6.       To undertake the three-yearly review of the Action Plan the criteria outlined in the CFNP have been applied to develop the revised Action Plan (2019).

7.       The revised Action Plan contains 37 existing actions and 17 new actions identified as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 (LTP) direction setting. These actions relate to the period 2019 to 2021. 

8.       The revised Action Plan includes a re-prioritisation of the action for the Tāmaki Pātaka Kōrero - Central Library. This results from an increased understanding of the limited effective life of components of the building structure, and the need for an investment strategy to ensure efficient and effective investment as library service needs change.

9.       The additional funding required to progress the priority action for the Tāmaki Pātaka Kōrero-Central Library is being requested through the Annual Plan 2019/2020 so the investigation can inform the LTP 2021-2031.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)      approve the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2019) including the prioritisation of actions for delivery during the period 2019 to 2021, as outlined in Attachment B to the agenda report).

 

b)      endorse the Central Library priority action, and note that the operational funding of $420,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year will be considered in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process and that this funding is provided for the investigation and business case.

 

Horopaki

Context

A strategic approach to investment in community facilities

10.     The CFNP was approved by Regional Strategy & Policy committee in August 2015 and is scheduled to be reviewed in 2020. Local board feedback informed the development of the CFNP and the companion action plan.

11.     The purpose of the CFNP is to guide council’s investment in the provision of community facilities for the next 20 years to support service delivery. It provides direction on the development of new facilities, major upgrades of existing facilities, optimisation and potential divestment of facilities no longer meeting community needs.

12.     The existing and proposed action plans were developed by applying the criteria outlined in the CFNP for identification and prioritisation of actions.

13.     The scope of the CFNP include five types of community facilities:

·    arts and culture facilities

·    community centres

·    libraries

·    pools and leisure facilities

·    venues for hire (community or rural halls).

14.     The CFNP includes criteria for identifying actions; triggered by one or more of the following four drivers:

i.    Existing facility has significant fit for purpose or performance issues and/or evidence of demand for additional provision

ii.    An area with a gap or duplication of provision (as determined by the provision approach in the CFNP)

iii.   An area with anticipated need arising from population growth (as determined by the approach to identifying gaps in the CFNP)

iv.  An external catalyst or opportunity

15.     An external catalyst or opportunity The CFNP also includes criteria for prioritising actions:

Category

Sub-category

Weighting

Network

40%

Network contribution

10%

Demand

10%

Catchment size

10%

Optimisation or divestment potential

10%

Community

40%

Local Board priority

15%

Impact in the community

10%

Alternative provision

5%

Catalyst/opportunity

10%

Building

20%

Size and layout

10%

Physical condition

10%

Review and update of the Action Plan

16.     The Action Plan groups actions into three themes: area based actions, strategic improvements and business improvements.

Annual updates on delivery of the Action Plan are recommended to be provided to committee, with a review of the Action Plan completed every three years and a review of the CFNP every five years.

Methodology for updating the Action Plan

17.     The methodology for updating the Action Plan is outlined in Attachment A.

18.     Direction setting from the LTP 2018-2028, local board plans and work programmes are incorporated into the methodology to identify potential actions and informs prioritisation.

19.     The revised Action Plan reflects input from across the organisation. Feedback was incorporated from relevant departments including representatives from across Community Services, Community Facilities, Commercial and Finance and Community and Social Policy.

20.     Feedback was also provided by Local Board Services reflecting direction setting provided by local boards during the LTP.

21.     The revised Action Plan will be used to guide work programmes across Community Services and Community and Social Policy and will be implemented from July 2019 according to staff resource capacity.

22.     The CFNP includes criteria for identifying actions. This table shows the varying impact of the drivers on the proposed Action Plan.

Driver

Impact on proposed Action Plan

Existing facility has significant fit for purpose or performance issues and/or evidence of demand for additional provision

This is the primary driver for the actions in the proposed plan based on our commitment to maintain our existing portfolio. Increasing requirements for compliance and remedial work relating to seismic and asbestos will continue to require assessment of investment priorities.

An area with a gap or duplication of provision (as determined by the provision approach in the CFNP)

This informed many of the actions in the existing plan that are in progress or complete.

An area with anticipated need arising from population growth (as determined by the approach to identifying gaps in the CFNP)

This informed many of the actions in the existing plan that are in progress or complete but may change when updated growth data is available for the CFNP review in 2020.

An external catalyst or opportunity

This is the secondary driver for the actions in the proposed plan based on alignment with area based activity that provide opportunities.

23.    The CFNP prioritisation criteria was applied to the identified actions to determine their relative priority.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Progress of the current actions

24.     The current status of actions is reflected in the revised Action Plan, refer Attachment B.

25.     The table below identifies the distribution of those actions and progress since the CFNP was adopted in 2015. The 2019 update column identifies additional progress made since the last CFNP progress report in March 2017. The priority area based actions that have been completed or are underway will help inform the LTP 2021-2031.

Action type

Action Plan

2017 update

% progressed

2019 update

% progressed

Priority Area Based Actions

50 actions

13 completed

17 underway

60%

19 completed

22 underway

82%

Non-priority Area Based Actions

41 actions

4 completed

5 underway

22%

6 completed

7 underway

32%

Strategic improvements

11 actions

1 completed

6 underway

64%

5 completed

4 underway

82%

Business improvements

5 actions

0 completed

3 underway

60%

0 completed

3 underway

60%

Key projects completed since previous Action Plan update (March 2017)

26.     Some examples of a strategic improvement action and four area based actions completed since the last report to committee are outlined below.

Policy to improve facility partnerships and provision

27.     The Facility Partnerships Policy was adopted in December 2018 and is currently in implementation. The policy will guide the LTP 2018-2028 investment provided by the $120 million Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund.

Integrated library and community hubs (Henderson-Massey and Whau)

28.     Te Manawa, the new multipurpose community centre and library in Westgate, Massey opened on 26 March 2019 (action #40). The service design for Te Manawa means a wider range of council and community services can be accessed from the site by customers.

29.     An indicative business case was prepared to secure funding through the LTP 2018-2028 for a multipurpose community centre and library in Avondale and a new aquatic facility (action #122). Planning is underway for the library and community centre (action #134).

Albany Stadium Pool (Upper Harbour Local Board area)

30.     A gap was identified in the pool network for the Albany area based on current population and future anticipated growth (action #98). The Albany Stadium Pool and leisure centre was opened in 2017 in response to this need.

31.     The services provided, level of utilisation and alignment to Auckland Plan outcomes are shown in the table below.

Services

Utilisation (June 2018)

Benefits

Auckland Plan Outcomes

Leisure/Play water

448,000 overall visits

Improved health, wellbeing and social connection

Improved water safety, confidence and swim to survive skills

 

Belonging and Participation

32.     Homes and Places

Learn to Swim

995 learn to swim enrolments

Spa/Sauna

Part of overall visits

Fitness

2217 fitness members

Group Fitness

 

Ellen Melville Centre (Waitematā Local Board area)

33.     This building is the only community centre within the city centre. An upgrade was required for compliance and seismic remediation. The refurbished building opened to the public as a fully managed community centre on 13 September 2017 (action #105).

34.     Some examples of the services provided and delivered from this centre include:

1.       1.      

Services

Benefits from redevelopment

Auckland Plan Outcomes

Venue for hire

A place of social connection for inner city residents, workers and visitors that enhances a sense of belonging and inclusion.

Better physical connection between the building and Freyberg Square enabling activation and a place to rest, connect and enjoy within the inner city

Cultural and historical storytelling (e.g. the tukutuku panels gifted in 1962 by Eruera and Amiria Stirling and restored by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei weavers and the Lisa Reihana commission – Justice)

Belonging and Participation

Māori Identity and Wellbeing

Homes and Places

35.     Opportunity and prosperity

Community-led and council supported programmes – (e.g. Pride Festival, Neighbours Week, literacy and language programmes, arts, culture and recreation programmes)

Revised Action Plan for delivery 2019 to 2021

36.     The revised Action Plan includes both existing and new unprogrammed actions for delivery during 2019 to 2021:

Action type

2015

2019 additions

Total

Strategic improvement

3

3

6

Area based:

-     Priority

-     Non-priority

 

16

16

 

11

1

 

27

17

Business improvement

2

2

4

Total

37

17

53

37.    The distribution of drivers associated with the area based actions are summarised in the graph below. The most significant drivers are fit for purpose (30%) and potential gaps in the network (23%).

Reprioritised regional priority, Tāmaki Pātaka Kōrero-Central City Library investigation

38.     The regional priority action for Tāmaki Pātaka Kōrero- Central City Library has increased in priority because of an investigation into:

a)   whole of life asset maintenance and renewal requirements; and

b)   assessment of potential for expansion or redevelopment to meet future service needs.

39.     The CFNP drivers for action are fit for purpose, performance and growth. This results from an increasing understanding of the limited effective life of components of the building structure, and the need for an investment strategy to ensure efficient and effective investment as the city centre grows and library and cultural service needs change.

40.     At present renewals investment applied to the library is on a component basis without an overall understanding of the effectiveness or value of that investment. The importance, age and complexity of the building requires a more planned investment approach to provide certainty for service requirements.

Summary of the proposed Action Plan 2019 to 2021

41.     Of the unprogrammed area based actions 61% are identified as priority actions for delivery during 2019 to 2021.  The shift in priority of many unprogrammed actions reflects the progress made on earlier priority actions.

42.     The 17 non-priority area based actions (39%) will be delivered once the priority actions are completed, if resource capacity is available.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     Input has been sought from Local Board Services, Community Services, Community Facilities and Community and Social Policy departments during both the review of the existing Action Plan and the development of the proposed Action Plan.

44.     Delivery of the priority actions will be undertaken by Community and Social Policy and Community Services during the period 2019 to 2021 depending on resourcing available.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     Local boards provided feedback on direction and specific content during the development of the CFNP and the companion Action Plan prior to adoption in 2015. 

46.     The CFNP prioritisation criteria applies the highest weighting of 15% to local board priority to ensure the views of local board’s influence the overall assessment. 

47.     Items identified for inclusion within the proposed Action Plan are from the current Action Plan or were identified by Senior Local Board Advisors, based on direction setting by local boards through the LTP 2018-2028 and Local Board Plan 2017-2020 development period.

48.     A presentation was made to Local Board Chairs at their forum in July 2018 outlining the Action Plan review process, the methodology and the input received from Local Board Services. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     Section 2.2 of the CFNP outlines how the plan will deliver on Māori outcomes identified in the Auckland Plan and the Māori Responsiveness Framework. These include:

·        partnering with mana whenua, mataawaka and Māori organisations to understand opportunities and community needs

·        actively engaging and consulting on planning, development and operation of facilities and the services within them

·        working closely with mana whenua, mataawaka and Māori organisations throughout projects

·        investigating Māori demographic participation and usage trends to identify opportunities to increase attendance and use of facilities

·        provide visual representation of the commitment to Māori to tell stories of their connection to the place through support for programmes such as Te Kete Rukuruku to collect and share the unique stories of Tāmaki Makaurau

50.     Consultation and engagement with mana whenua is prioritised through the planning and delivery of responses.  Examples of the way we have consulted and engaged include:

·        interviews and hui with mana whenua

·        interviews and hui with mataawaka in local settings to understand community needs

·        workshops and focus groups with local marae

·        intercept surveys with representative samples of the Māori population base

·        kanohi ki te kanohi interviews conducted in Te Reo.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     The priority action relating to the Tāmaki Pātaka Kōrero-Central City Library will require additional resourcing to deliver. An operational funding request for $420,000 to support this action will be considered through the Annual Plan 2019/2020 process.

52.     There are currently no identified financial implications for the delivery of the proposed action plan area based actions, as work will be delivered utilising existing Community and Social Policy and Community Services resources and budgets.

53.     However, the results of some of the investigations outlined in the actions, where no budget has currently been identified, may require a consideration for funding in future LTPs. Where possible this will be completed in preparation for the LTP 2021-2031.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Strategic

·   Concern that local board priorities may have been overlooked or misunderstood

 

·    Local board plans were reviewed, and any potential community facility related content was assessed for potential inclusion as an action

·    Relevant One Local Board Initiatives have been incorporated

·    Local Board Services staff involved in LTP 2018-2018 direction setting with local boards provided input to this process

·    Local board work programmes for 2019/2020 currently under development include CFNP actions. Potential actions that are not within the scope of the CFNP have not been assessed.

Financial

·   Budget allocated in the LTP 2018-2028 may be insufficient to deliver some of the action findings. In many instances, there is no capital or operational budget allocated in the LTP to deliver on any new provision requirements arising from actions 

·   Inadequate capital funding may impact on achievement of the CFNP’s objectives and may not align with expectations of local boards and local communities

·   Some investigations may require changes to current funding identified in the LTP 2018-2028.

 

·    Manage expectations by acknowledging the delegation for decision-making on investment in new facilities is held by the governing body and may require consideration during the LTP 2021-2031.

·    Ensure findings of investigations that require new investment are supported by strategic and indicative business cases (based on Better Business Case model) and are reported to governing body for consideration in time to align with the LTP process.

 

Timing

·   Delivery of some actions may exceed timeframes for consideration in the LTP 2021-2031 process

·   Progressing non-priority actions will impact resource capacity for delivery of priority actions

·   Timing for some actions (particularly non-priority actions) may not align with elected members and/or local communities’ expectations

 

·   Drive delivery to meet required timeframes 

·   Focus resources on delivering priority actions

·   Manage expectations based on the principles and direction set by the adopted CFNP

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     A copy of this report and the revised Action Plan (2019) will be provided to local boards for their information.

55.     Priority actions will be reflected in 2019/2020 work programmes and draft 2020/2021 work programmes subject to available resources.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

CFNP action plan review methodology 20190321

43

b

CFNAP- revised action plan 2019v4

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Justine Haves - Manager Service and Asset Planning

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 



Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 

Summary of Environment and Community Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 9 April 2019

File No.: CP2019/03160

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note progress on the forward work programme (Attachment A)

2.       To provide a public record of memos, workshop or briefing papers that have been distributed for the Committee’s information since 12 March 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is regular information-only report which aims to provide public visibility of information circulated to committee members via memo or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following papers/memos were circulated to members:

·    20190327_Workshop - Water Strategy Regional Stakeholder Event

·    20190326_Email – Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund – small grants round opening soon

·    20190314_Workshop – Sports Facilities Investment Plan Working Party

·    20190312_Workshop – Aucklands Climate Action Plan

·    20190308_Memo - Update on kauri dieback National Pest Management Plan

5.       Note that staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary. Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

6.       This document can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link: http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

·    at the top of the page, select meeting “Environment and Community Committee” from the drop-down tab and click ‘View’;

·    under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments”.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)      receive the summary of the Environment and Community Committee information report – 9 April 2019.

 

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Environment and Community Committee - forward work programme

61

b

20190327_Workshop - Water Strategy Regional Stakeholder Event (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

20190326_email - Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund - small grants round opening soon (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

20190312_Workshop - Aucklands Climate Action Plan

75

e

20190314_Workshop - Sports Facilities Investment Plan Working Party (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

20190308_Update on kauri dieback National Pest Management Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maea Petherick - Senior Governance Advisor

Authorisers

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 

 

Komiti Taiao a Hapori Hoki /

ENVIRONMENT AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEE FORWARD WORK PROGRAMME 2018

This committee deals with strategy and policy decision-making that relates to the environmental, social, economic and cultural activities of Auckland as well as matters that are not the responsibility of another committee or the Governing Body

 

 

 

Committee Priorities:

1.   Clearly demonstrate that Auckland is making progress with climate change adaptation and mitigation and taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

2.   Enable green growth with a focus on improved water quality, pest eradication and ecological restoration

3.   Strengthen communities and enable Aucklanders to be active and connected

4.   Make measurable progress towards the social and community aspects of housing all Aucklanders in secure, healthy homes they can afford

5.   Grow skills and a local workforce to support economic growth in Auckland

 

The work of the committee will:

 

·    Deliver on the outcomes in the Auckland Plan

·    Be focused on initiatives that have a high impact

·    Meet the Council’s statutory obligations, including funding allocation decisions

·    Increase the public’s trust and confidence in the organisation.

 

Area of work

Reason for work

Decision or direction

Expected timeframes
Quarter (month if known)

 

FY18/19

FY19/20

Jan-Mar 2019

12 Feb

12 March

Apr-Jun 2019

9 April

14 May

11 June

Jul-Sep 2019

9 July

13 Aug

10 Sept

Oct-Dec

 

Strategic approach to Climate Change

 

To demonstrate that Auckland is making progress with climate change adaptation and mitigation and taking action to reduce emissions.

Strategic direction will be provided in the coming months.

Progress to date:

A summary of activities to prepare for climate change was given in the presentation on 8/8/17 meeting.

Report was considered on 20/2/18, resolution ENV/2018/11 

Dec 18 – approval for consultation

Feb – Mar 19 - targeted public engagement

Apr 19 – feedback presented to elected members

Jun 19 – final strategy for adoption

 

Progress to date
report was considered December 2018 meeting. Res ENV/2018/170

·    Stakeholder briefing for symposium February 2019

·    Committee workshops February 2019

·    Auckland Climate Symposium March 2019

·    Develop draft plan March – May 2019

·    Draft plan to committee for input and adoption June 2019

·    Public consultation of draft plan July – August 2019

 

Q4
(June)

 

 

Low carbon living

 

To deliver on Low Carbon Auckland Plan commitments by the design and implementation of awareness raising and incentives programmes to reduce household, community, business and schools carbon emissions by approximately 50% of current levels.

Strategic direction and endorse programmes as part of the Low Carbon Auckland Plan implementation.

Progress to date:

Report was considered at 20/2/18 meeting. Res ENV/201811 report back in Dec 18 for a decision. Independent Advisory Group (IAG) was approved. Chairs Planning and Env & Community Cttees, an IMSB member and the Mayor’s office to decide on the membership of the IAG. 

Q3
(Feb)

Q4

Q1
(Sept)

 

Low Carbon Auckland / Climate Change Mitigation

 

Four-yearly review of strategic action plan due in 2018; increased engagement with and commitments via C40 Cities membership; development of proactive policy agenda to central government emerging

Climate Plan Workshop:

Risks and vulnerabilities (June)

•     Committee workshop on risks and vulnerabilities

•     Communication strategy for broader public engagement

•     Local Board workshops

•     Mana whenua engagement (integrated throughout)

•     Stakeholder workshops

Prioritisation criteria and identified actions (Jul/Aug)

•     Cost benefit and total value analysis

•     Agree prioritisation criteria

•     Review all actions

•     Draft plan

•     Draft plan to committee (Dec 2018

•     Consultation (linking to other plans, approach tbc)

•     Updates to action plan

•     Adoption of updated plan by council (Proposed December 2018)

•     Final Adoption of Climate Plan (Mar 09)

Decision and endorsement of strategic direction

Progress to date:

Report was considered at 20/2/18 meeting. Res ENV/201811 report back in Dec18 for a decision. Independent Advisory Group was approved.

Workshops scheduled: 4/7/18 and 26/09/18. An update was on 12/06/18 meeting agenda.

Report reapplication for C40 Cities membership was considered at 13/11/2018 meeting. Res ENV/2018/149 reapplication for membership was approved

Q3
(Mar)

Q4

Q1

 

Urban Forest Strategy

 

Strategic approach to delivering on the wider social, economic and environmental benefits of a growing urban forest in the context of rapid population growth and intensification.

 

Decision on strategic direction and endorsement of strategy.

Progress to date:

A workshop was held on 14/06/17. Report was considered on 12/09/17 ENV/2017/116 a full draft of the strategy was considered 20/02/18, res ENV/2018/12 with a report back on the results of the LIDAR and an implementation plan on costs and benefits in Aug 2018. An update was included in the 14 Aug agenda regarding several workstreams covered by the 18 high level implementation actions. A report on a full progress on implementing the strategy will be in August 2019

Q3

Q4

Q1
(Aug19)

 

Allocation of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund

 

Decision making over medium and large funds from the Waste Minimisation and Innovation fund in line with the fund’s adopted policy. Funds to contribute towards council’s aspirational goal of zero waste to landfill by 2040.

 

Full review of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund will be undertaken. Outcomes provided with the section 17a review report in March 2019.

Decision on the annual allocation of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund for the 2018-2019 financial year.

Decision: Approval of allocation of September 2016  funding round Resolution ENV/2016/19 Item C5. Approval of grants in Dec 17

Progress to date:
Report was considered on 4/12/18 to note allocations for the 2018/2019 small to med September funding round, res ENV/2018/176. Item C1 approval of medium to large grants September 2018 round

April 2019 -  email to committee re: small grants round opening 1 April to 30 April. A copy of the memo is attachment C of the Summary of Environment and Community Committee Information – updates, memos and briefings – 9 April 2019 report. – April agenda.

Q3
(Mar)

Q4

Q1

 

Auckland’s water strategy

The health of Auckland’s waters is a critical issue. Both freshwater and marine environments in Auckland are under pressure from historic under-investment, climate change and rapid growth. The draft Auckland Plan 2050 identifies the need to proactively adapt to a changing water future and develop long-term solutions.

Decision and strategic direction and priorities as part of the Auckland Plan.

Consider the development of an Auckland’s waters strategy to be adopted for consultation December 2018.

Progress to date:

A report was considered on 12/06/18 to approve the proposed scope, timeframe and budget for the development of the strategy. Res ENV/2018/78

Key milestones:

·    June 2018 – develop a strategic summary of water related outcomes, identify integrated water outcomes,

·    July-Oct 2018 – high level regional options are developed and assessed for the five draft themes – consultation with mana whenua

 

 

Progress to date:

A Report was considered December 2018 - discussion document ahead of public consultation Res ENV/2018/168.

Key timeframes:

·    Public consultation on discussion document 17 Feb – 17 March

·    Public engagement feedback to committee, April 2019

·    Draft options for the finalisation of Auckland’s water strategy, and associated work programmes to be present to committee in June 2019

Workshop – April water discussion document, and to foreshadow and seek the councillors’ input on the contents of the report that will be coming to them in June

 

Q4
(June 19)

 

 

Regional Pest Management Plan review

 

Statutory obligations under the Biosecurity Act to control weeds and animal pests.

To ensure that the plan is consistent with the national policy direction and up to date.

 

Decision and strategic direction on weed and plants that will be subject to statutory controls.

Consider submissions received on the draft plan in mid-2018 and adopt the final plan by December 2018.

Decision: Agreed to the inconsistencies in ACT at the 14 Feb 2017 ENV/2017/7 Item 12

Workshops held on 4/04/17, 3/05/17 and 27/09/17

Draft plan was approved for consultation in Nov 2017

Funding for implementation of the proposed RPMP through LTP.

A memo was distributed and is attached to the July agenda.

Key milestones:

·    workshops with local boards on public feedback – September - October 2018

·    workshops with local boards on public feedback – September - October 2018

·    engagement with mana whenua – September – October 2018

·    workshop with Environment and Community Committee – October – November 2018

·    formal feedback from local boards at business meetings – October – November 2018

·    approval of final plan by Environment and Community Committee – March 2019

Progress to date: 

12 March 2019 report to consider the adoption of the Regional Pest Management Plan 2019-2019. Adoption was approved and the motion was put in parts:ENV/2019/22 – ENV/2019/32

Q3
(Mar)

Q4

Q1

 

Inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan

To ensure the plan is consistent with Auckland Council’s:

-      proposed Regional Pest Management Plan

-      current and future marine biosecurity programmes

-      response to SeaChange – Tai Timu Tai Pari Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan.

Decision on the development of the discussion document for an inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan for public consultation.

A memo was distributed on 31/05/18 advising the committee on the Auckland Council’s participation in the development of a discussion document for an inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan, through the Top of the North Marine Biosecurity partnership.

 

Progress to date:

12 February 2019 report  To approve the discussion document for an inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan, ahead of informal public consultation between March and May 2019. Res ENV/2019/9

 

Q4
(July)

 

 

Allocation of the Regional Natural Heritage Grant

Decision-making over regional environment fund as per the grants funding policy and fund guidelines

Decision on the annual allocation of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund for the 2018-2019 financial year.

Progress to date

Allocation of the Regional Environmental Natural Heritage Grant for the 2017-2018 financial year was made on 6 Dec 2016_ENV/2016/11 Item 15

Q3

Q4

Q1

 

National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

The National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management is being implemented, with periodic reporting to council committee on progress, and responding to ongoing central government refinement of the framework for achieving water outcomes.

 

In December 2018 further decisions will be sought under the national policy statement, including:

·    approve final targets for swim-ability of major rivers in the Auckland region

·    approve the updated Progressive Implementation Plan for the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

 

Progress to date:

Council submission was approved on Central Govt. Clean Water Consultation 2017 process: Minutes of 4 April ENV/2017/54 Item 12. Follow up is required for resolution b) – a workshop held on 14 June. A supplementary submission on the Clean Water Consultation package was made on 25 May 2017, Item 14 13/06/17

Decision ENV/2018/14 on engagement approach for consultation on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management in Feb 2018.

A report was considered on 26/6/18 : Res ENV/2018/78

·    June 2018: develop strategy

·    July to Oct 2018 – High level regional options are developed and assessed for the five draft themes in consultation with mana whenua, local boards and key stakeholders.

·    Dec 2018- Draft Auckland's waters strategy presented to Environment and Community Committee for approval for release for public consultation

 

 

·    Feb to Apr 2019 - Targeted public engagement on the draft Auckland's waters strategy in February to March 2019.

·    Apr 2019 - Feedback analysed and presented to elected members in April 2019

·    Jun 2019 - Final strategy presented to Environment and Community Committee for adoption

Q3

Q4

Q1

 

Food Policy Alliance

To consider food policy alliance

Decision on food policy alliance

Q3
(Mar)

TBC

 

 

Auckland Growing Greener

Statutory obligations under the Resource Management Act, Biosecurity Act and Local Government Act.

Consideration of items to give effect to the adopted commitment of Auckland Council to grow greener.

Strategic direction and oversight into council’s role to improve the natural environment, and to endorse proposed incentives.

This may include endorsing:

·    a framework to ensure planning and growth decisions are underpinned by relevant environmental data

·    proposed incentives for green growth

·    recommendations arising from a current state statutory obligations review.

Q3

Q4

Q1

 

Hunua Aerial 1080 Operation

Provide information on outcomes of the Hunua 1080 aerial pest control operation

To note outcomes of the Hunua 1080 aerial pest control operation.

Q3

Q4

Q1

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Sport and Rec Strategic Partnership Grant to Aktive Auck Sports Rec

Approval of $552,000 strategic partnership grant to Aktive Auck & Sport to deliver on agreed priority initiatives.

2019 reporting schedule:

·    January 2019  -  Interim report from 1 July – 31 December 2018

·    June 2019  -  confirm 2019/20 priorities, outcomes and measures

·    July 2019 – Annual report from 1 January 2019 – 30 June 2019

·    September 2019  -  Audited Financial Statements from 1 July 2018 – 30 June 2019

To approve the $552,000 strategic partnership grant to Aktive Auckland Sport & Recreation for 2017/2018

Progress to date:

Report was considered 5/12/17 Resolution ENV/2017/186 – report back against KPI every six months. 

A report was considered on 10 July 2018 to approve the strategic partnership grant of $552,000 per annum for a three-year term (2018-2021) Res ENV/2018/90

A funding agreement will be prepared for Aktive that ensures clear accountability and KPIs for each of the four geographical areas (North, West, Central and Southern) for the investment. (TBA)

 

 

 

 

Te Motu a Hiaroa (Puketutu Island)

Status update on the Te Motu a Hiaroa Governance Trust 

To note further update on progress of the governance trust.

Q3

Q4

Q1

 

Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

Status report on implementation plan

Direction on future options for sport and recreation.

Q3

 

Q1

 

Sports Investment Plan

Council’s strategic approach to outcomes, priorities and investment in sports

Decision on issues papers

Draft Plan approval

Finalise and adopt investment plan – approval of guidelines

Progress to date:

Evaluation of current sports facilities investments and proposed changes was adopted on 14 March, resolution ENV/2017/39  Item 13 with the final draft investment plan to be adopted prior to consultation.

An outcome measurement tool to support the Sports Facilities Investment Plan was considered and agreed at the 4 April 2017 meeting. Resolution ENV/2017/50 Item 9 The findings of the pilot will be reported in mid-2019 seeking a decision on the roll-out model. 

Q3

Q4
(2019)

 

Q1

 

Golf Investment Plan

Council’s strategic approach to outcomes, priorities and investment in golf.

Decision on issues papers

Draft Plan approval

Finalise and adopt investment plan

Progress to date:

A workshop was held on 12 Sept and information is available on OurAuckland.

Q3

Q4

Q1

 

Indoor Courts

Strategic business case for indoor courts investment

Decision on investment approach

Q3

Q4

Q1

 

Western Springs Community School Partnership

Improve Community Access to school facilities

Decision on Business and Investment in indoor court facility at Western Springs  

Progress to date:

The report was considered in May. Resolution ENV/2017/71 A business case will be prepared to outline the opportunity to fully invest in the indoor court development and can consider as part of the LTP 2018-2028.

Q3

Q4
(May)

Q1

 

Growth Programme

Update on proposed growth funding allocation for 2018-2020

Decision on growth funding allocation

 

 

Q1

 

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme 2018/2020

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

Decision on sport and recreation grants programme objectives and approach

Progress to date:

Approved on 12 Sept the 2018/2019 grants programme to proceed in accordance with the Community Grants Policy suggested outcomes and assessment matrix. Applications open 30/10/17 close 8/12/17 ENV/2017/119 Workshop in April 2018. Report was considered on 8/5/18 and resolved ENV/2018/57 .

Approved applications for 2019/2020 funding round on 25/1/2019 and close on 8/3/19 for allocation from July 2019.

Q3

Q4
(June)

Q1

(Sep)

 

Review of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012: TOR

The review will assess the efficacy of the guidelines in for the council to deliver the best possible outcomes for Auckland through community leases

Decision on the terms of reference for the review of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012

Progress to date:

The TOR was approved for the review to commence and will report back in May July 2018 subject to TLP.

An update memo was circulated in August 2017 in response to feedback from the July 2017 meeting. Joint workshop with local board chairs held 20/6/18. 

Report was considered November 2018 and resolved ENV/2018/150

Q3

Q4

Q1

 

Active Recreation Investment and Visitor Experience

Council’s strategic approach to outcome, priorities and investment for active walking, cycling, waterways and visitor experience on open space, parks and regional parks

Decision on scope and phasing

Q3

Q4

Q1
(Aug)

 

Takaro – Investing in Play discussion document

Development of a play investment plan

Decision on approval for public release

Progress to date:

Approved on 16/05/17 for public release the discussion document and will report to E&C for approval in late 2017

Takaro was approved for release on 20 Feb 2018

A report back by August 2018 for approval to initiate public consultation 

Q3
 

 

Q1
(Oct)

 

Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 – variation to incorporate land at Piha into the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park

To approve variation to incorporate land purchased at Piha to be known as Taitomo Special Management Zone as part of the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park

Decision on approval to a variation

Progress to date:

Approved on 20/2/2018 Res ENV/2018/15    report

Manager, Regional Parks, will prepare an integrated vegetation management and fire–risk reduction plan in consultation with the local community and report back on the resourcing needs for its effective implementation.

 

 

Q1
(tbc)

 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The Southern Initiative (TSI)

Provide an update on the TSI approach, priorities and achievements.

Strategic direction of the TSI approach to social and community innovation in south Auckland

 

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Global Engagement Strategy

Provide an update and direction of Auckland Council’s global engagement strategy and priorities. It has been three years since a new strategic direction was introduced, progress on this strategy will presented.

Funded

Strategic direction of Auckland Council’s global engagement strategy and priorities

Progress to date:

Monthly global engagement updates are published on each agenda

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Options to expand revenue streams for sport facilities investment

Provide strategic direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan

strategic direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan

Progress to date:

A report was considered in Aug. Res ENV/2017/121

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

SOCIAL, COMMUNITY, CULTURAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Community Facilities Network Plan

Update on progress and report back on strategic business case for central west.

Decision on indicative business case for central west

Progress to date:

A progress report was considered on 14 March. Resolution ENV/2017/36 Item 11 to report back on an indicative business case for investment in the central-west area.

Q3
(Mar)

Q4

Q1
(July)

Q2

Auckland Sport Sector: Facility Priorities Plan

Develop and endorse the Sports Facilities Investment Plan to enable Auckland Council to take a more co-ordinated approach to its sports facilities investment.

Decision on the Auckland Sport Sector : Facility Priorities Plan.

Decision on sector’s investment priorities and investigate potential funding options.

Progress to date:

The plan was endorsed on 12 Sept ENV/2017/118. Staff to report back on priorities and potential funding options.

 

 

Q1
(Sept)

Q2

Homelessness

Implementing Regional Policy and Strategy resolution to progress work around Council’s strategic position on addressing homelessness

(note this work will be informed by discussions at the Community Development and Safety Committee)

Decision on scope

Decision on role and direction addressing homelessness

Progress to date:

Approved the scope policy 14 Feb Item 17 

Auckland council’s position and role was considered at the August meeting report item 12. Staff to report back with an implementation plan. Resolution  ENV/2017/118 of preferred position and role

Q3

Q4

Q1
(Aug)

Q2

Facilities Partnerships Policy

Identify the range of current council approaches to facility partnerships, issues, opportunities and agree next steps

Decision on facility partnership approach

Decision to adopt Facility Partnership Framework in December 2017

Update was given at 14 February meeting on Phase 1.  Approval was given on the proposed timelines for Phase 2 : Minutes 14 February Item 14 preferred option

A report seeking approval to engage on a draft facility partnerships policy on 12/06/18. Resolution ENV/2018/74  

Progress to date:
A report seeking approval of the Facility Partnerships Policy. Res ENV/2018/173

Implementation plan

·    January – March 2019 policy summary released

·    April – June 2019 implement initial operational guidance and systems

·    July 2019 detailed operational design and testing continues. Benefits realisation plan developed

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

Review of the Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

RSP decision in April 2016 (REG/2016/22)

Decision on review results

Progress to date:

Report was considered at 20 Feb meeting. Decision: lies on the table. A supplementary report was considered on 10 April 2018, Res ENV/2018/48 and with changes for an updated funding model to be agreed by 1 April 2019

Q3
(Feb)

Q4

Q1

Q2

Social and Community Housing Strategy and initiatives

Strategic overview of social and community housing initiatives. Wider housing portfolio and spatial outcomes of council’s role in housing is led by the Planning Committee.

 

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Affordable Housing Intervention

Understanding NZ and international interventions to address affordable housing

Decision on future Auckland Council approaches to affordable housing interventions

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Te Kauroa – Library Strategy

Libraries and Information is carrying out a change programme (Fit for the future) to accelerate the implementation of this 2013-2023 strategy (approved by the Governing Body)

Direction relating to priorities and to receive update on strategic direction and implementation progress

Approve an expanded and improved regional mobile library service

Progress to date:

workshop held on 7 March with local board chairs. Workshop notes were attached to the 10 April agenda 

Q3

Q4

Q1
(Sep)

Q2

Central library strategic review

A strategic review of the Central Library has been commissioned to understand how the current building can meet future need and demand for services, asses the Central Library’s current and potential future role in the region, and guide decision making about future investment and development opportunities

Decide direction and receive the strategic review

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Libraries

Work around the integration with customer services

Decision on matters relating to regional aspects of the proposed integration (local boards will decide on local outcomes)

 

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Intercultural Cities Network

Consideration of a proposal to join the Intercultural Cities Network to support implementation and monitoring of progress on ‘Inclusive Auckland’ actions.

Decide whether Auckland should be a member of the network

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Investing in Aucklanders (Age Friendly City)

Identify issues and opportunities for an inclusive friendly city (Regional Policy and Strategy resolution REG/2016/92)

Strategic direction on the approach to a friendly, inclusive, diverse city.

Progress to date:

Update reports were circulated on 18 April 2018 and 14 Dec 2017. Staff report findings and the proposed next phase in 2018.

A report on the Findings was considered on 12/06/18 meeting. Resolution ENV/2018/75 approval for up to five inclusion pilots.

A report back on the advantages and any obstacles to Auckland becoming an Age Friendly City as part of the World Health Organisation’s Global Network. 

Q3

Q4

Q1
(Jul)

Q2

Social Enterprise approaches for youth and long term unemployed

Improved understanding of social enterprise reach, impacts, costs and benefits

Strategic direction on council’s approach to social enterprise.

Q3

Q4

Q1
(Jul)

Q2

Youth volunteer programmes

Intervention assessment of youth volunteer programmes on long term education and employment – understanding impacts, costs and benefits

Strategic direction on interventions approach

Q3

Q4

Q1
(Jul)

Q2

Events Policy

A review of what is working well and what isn’t

 

Q3

Q4

Q1
(Sep)

Q2

Grant Policy Monitoring

Audit of the application of the Grants Policy

Decision on audit results

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Toi Whitiki Strategy

Targeted analysis of social return on investment on specific art and culture investment

 

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Public Art Policy

Review of the Public Arts Policy: what’s working what’s not.

Decisions relating to major public arts

Decision on review results

Progress to date:

The report was considered on 14/08/18.  Resolution ENV/2018/103 : report back on implementation within 18 months

Q3

Q4
(Apr)

Q1

Q2

Current Development Contribution revenue and expenditure – funding for open space purposes

Highlight the new parks and open spaces for Aucklanders’ use and enjoyment

A report was considered on 14/08/178 on Open Space acquisition in 2017/18 financial year. resolution ENV/2018/104 to report back on DC revenue and expenditure by funding area for open space purposes based on current based on the current DC policy.

 

 

 

Q2

Investigation in North-west Community Provision

Investigation to identify any current gaps in services or facilities or in the future

Decision on the investigation findings

Progress to date:

A report was considered on 13/10/18 on the findings. Res ENV/2018/131. Staff  will progress the key moves outlined in the report. 

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

LEGISLATION/CENTRAL GOVERNMENT

National Environmental Standards

Council response on the National Direction for aquaculture expected following scheduled release of consultation document in April 2017. The National Direction is likely to address matters relating to re-consenting, bay-wide management, innovation and research, and biosecurity.

Direction

Committee agreement to a council submission on the National Direction for Aquaculture

 

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

LAND ACQUISITIONS

Strategic acquisition issues and opportunities

Understanding current acquisition issues and options.

 

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Land acquisition for stormwater purposes

Delegated responsibility of the committee.

To acquire land for stormwater management and development purposes, to either support a structure plan or ad-hoc development.

Decision to acquire land. Reports will come to committee as required.

Next report will be in Feb 2018 seeking authority to carry out compulsory acquisition of land in the Henderson area for a flood prevention project.

Q3

(Feb)

Q4

Q1

Q2

OTHER

Long-term Plan

Informing the development of the 2018-2028 Auckland Council Long-term Plan

 

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

 



Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 

 

 

 

 

    

  


Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 5.2      Attachment a    empowered-communites-approach- quick-guide Page 139



Environment and Community Committee

09 April 2019

 

 



[1] ‘Tuku ifi leva’ means ‘stop smoking now’ in Tongan

[2] ‘Tu’u le ulaula tapa’a’ means ‘stop smoking’ in Samoan