I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 16 April 2019

9.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Deputy Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Brendon Crompton

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Hopkins

 

 

Murray Kay

 

 

Niko Kloeten

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise  Gunn

Democracy Advisor - Franklin

 

9 April 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 237 1310

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Women of Waiuku                                                                     5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project Plan                                                                 7

12        Classification of reserve lands and grant of licence to the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated, 73R and 87 Monument Road, Clevedon.     17

13        Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal resolution from Governing Body                                                                               25

14        Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan - allocation of funding for projects in 2018 / 2019.                                                                                                                   29

15        Local board decisions and input into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028                                                          43

16        New road name in the subdivision at 36 Jellicoe Road, Pukekohe by K M Whitton.   49

17        Auckland Transport monthly update to the Franklin Local Board - April 2019   57

18        Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar                                  65

19        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                  69  

20        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda an apology (leave of absence) had been received from Member Brendon Crompton.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 March 2019 as true and correct.

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Women of Waiuku

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the representation from Women of Waiuku and thank Serena Roper for her attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project Plan

File No.: CP2019/00303

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement from the Franklin Local Board for the Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project Plan (HLPP)

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.    The HLPP will unlock potential in Pukekohe’s town centre by initiating a programme of work facilitating the strategic management of Auckland Council’s landholding portfolio to capture redevelopment and investment opportunities within the project area. The HLPP takes a cross-council and town-centre wide view of landholding opportunities, to foster improved connectivity, vibrancy, partnership and mixed-use development. The HLPP builds on input from Franklin Local Board, the wider council whānau, mana whenua and key stakeholders in the Pukekohe community.

3.    The HLPP project area comprises of 105 hectares of land surrounding the town centre, primarily aligned with the town centre and mixed-use zonings in the Auckland Unitary Plan. The area extent spans from Franklin Pool and Leisure to the north, Bledisloe Park, Pukekohe High School and Pukekohe Intermediate to the south and south-west, and Roulston Park and Pukekohe Train Station to the east. There are 17.8 hectares of council landholdings and 24.7 hectares of crown landholdings located within the project area, of which Pukekohe Intermediate and Pukekohe High School are the largest land holdings for the crown. For council, the largest landholding is Bledisloe Park. The rest of council land is mostly in the form of the council office, service and civic buildings, carparks, smaller open spaces, some vacant and leased land and buildings.

4.    The project area provides good and improving access to services and amenities. There is market interest in enabling zoning that provides for a wide range of activities and high-quality built form. Thirty council landholdings currently exist in the wider area, with some potential for development. The Pukekohe community has expressed strong support for change and investment in the area. Together, these offer leverage for development and regeneration opportunities.

5.    Panuku is working with mana whenua and the Franklin Local Board to develop the vision for Pukekohe. The final vision could embody themes of growing a family friendly approach towards greater self-sufficiency, walkability, access to local jobs and learning and celebrating identity and history.

6.    The HLPP guides all proposed Unlock Pukekohe projects, initiatives and decision making with 13 key programme principles relating to: property development, public realm projects, partnering and placemaking.

7.    Additionally, there are four programme goals that help to focus the Unlock Pukekohe activities and efforts. These goals are aligned with the outcomes sought by the Franklin Local Board Plan and the Pukekohe Area Plan 2017: (1) the town centre benefits from the growth that is projected for Southern Auckland and Northern Waikato; (2) Improve access and bring new life to the town centre; (3) Supporting local economic prosperity; and (4) Contribute to, and celebrate, the “Pukekohe Identity”.

8.    The HLPP proposes a development strategy centred around three key urban development areas: the Edinburgh Street Superblock, the Eastern Gateway and the Station Precinct, and other sites in the wider area. The approach will involve masterplanning and options analysis.

9.         The HLPP proposes to initiate and progress a series of supporting projects or ‘Key Moves’ related to urban development, public realm projects, placemaking or partnering. They include potential public space upgrades, connectivity, streetscape and walkability enhancements, place activation and trials, conducting research and investigation and site development. These projects have the potential to revitalise Pukekohe town centre, making it more people-friendly, valuable to the community, coordinated and a centre fostering strong partnership.

10.      Mana whenua will be engaged throughout the life of the programme with the primary aim of exploring partnership opportunities. Opportunities for mana whenua may extend to joint ventures, land purchase and development.

11.      The wider council whanau, including Auckland Transport, has been engaged and will continue to collaborate with Panuku throughout the life of the programme.

12.      Funding for public realm projects and placemaking will come from the Panuku reinvestment budget.

13.      A key matter to address in the proposed programme in order to achieve the vision will be the requirement to change perceptions, behaviours and the supply of parking within the town centre.  To facilitate this change we will work with Auckland Transport and rely on expert evidence to optimise car parking within the town centre, enabling redevelopment to be achieved without a corresponding reduction in parking service. The current approach, which will be further iterated and refined in conjunction with Auckland Transport will include initiatives such as parking trials to help identify, assess and plan for more permanent future changes proposed in the property development and parking strategies.

14.      The process for approvals of the HLPP include continued progress and refinement of the vision, the mana whenua partnership, and the Pukekohe identity topics. After seeking endorsement of the HLPP from the Franklin Local Board on 16 April 2019, it is proposed to seek approval from both the Panuku Board the Planning Committee on 29 May and 4 June 2019 respectively. Finally, Panuku will seek approval from the Finance and Performance Committee for the disposal of the 30 properties listed in the HLPP on 18 June 2019. The result of these endorsements and approvals will enable Panuku to have the mandate to initiate the Unlock Pukekohe programme as outlined in the HLPP document.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)        endorse the Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project Plan

b)         endorse Panuku Development Auckland as Auckland Council’s lead urban regeneration and delivery agency for Pukekohe within the Unlock Pukekohe boundary.

c)         endorse Panuku Development Auckland recommending to the Planning and Finance and Performance Committees the disposal of the following properties, subject to the conclusion of any required statutory processes, with the objective of contributing strategically and financially to the outcomes of the Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project Plan objectives of urban renewal and housing:

 

Panuku managed properties on behalf of Auckland Council:

                       i.             Adj 603 Buckland Road, Pukekohe being Lot 1 D P 55095 held in NA7B/54;

                      ii.             27 Tobin Street, Pukekohe being Lot 1 DP 134911, held in NA79C/588;

                     iii.             42 Seddon Street, Pukekohe being Lot 3 DP 133175 held in NA76D/465;

                     iv.             Adj to 35 Tobin Street, Pukekohe being Lot 17 DP 117297 held in NA 66C/942;

                      v.             22 Edinburgh Street, Pukekohe being Lot 2 DP 154963 held in NA92C/446;

                     vi.             172 Manukau Road, Pukekohe being Section 2 SO 440667 held in RT 599298;

                    vii.             174 Manukau Road, Pukekohe being Section 8 SO 440667 held in RT 599299;

                   viii.             176 Manukau Road, Pukekohe being Section 6 and 9 SO 440667 held in RT 599300;

                     ix.             180 Manukau Road, Pukekohe being Section 4 SO 440667 held in 599301;

                      x.             182 Manukau Road, Pukekohe being Section 11 SO 440667 held in 599297;

 

Auckland Transport managed properties on behalf of Auckland Council:

                     xi.             1 Roulston Street, Pukekohe being Lot 2 DP 70196 held in NA25D/1435;

                    xii.             3 Roulston Street, Pukekohe being Lot 18 DP 7997 held in NA199/173;

                   xiii.             29 and 29a Edinburgh Street, Pukekohe being Lot 3 DP 78584 held in NA 91D/796 and Lot 12 DP 7997 held in NA380/104;

                  xiv.             4 Tobin Street, Pukekohe being lot 3,4 and 5 DP 136696 Pts Lot 12 DP 4216 held In NA80/405, NA80C/406, NA80C/407, NA191/285 and NA 188/159;

                   xv.             9 Tobin Street, Pukekohe being Lot 1-9 DP 54202, Pt Lot 1 DP 4688 and Pt Lot 24 DP 4216 held in NA8B/881, Lot 1 DP 89841 held in NA46D/1063 and Lot 3 DP 92280 held in NA48D/877;

                  xvi.             7 Massey Avenue, Pukekohe being Lot 1 DP 80851 held in NA37C/583, Pt Lot 2 DP 32793 held in NA51D/1059, Lot 1 DP 51778 held in NA48C/248 and Pt Lot 2 DP 6976 (also known as Pt Allotment 30 Suburban Section 2 Pukekohe Psh) held in NA1077/34;

                 xvii.             24 Hall Street, Pukekohe being Lot 2 DP 89699, Lot 2 DP 107822, Lot 21 DP 9934, Lot 3 DP 97270, Lot 3 DP 98490, Lot 20 DP 9934, Lot 3 DP 91272, Lot 2 DP 134717, Lot 4 DP 134717 held in NA46D/648, NA60A/686, NA351/111, NA53A/590, NA53C/1091, NA364/221, NA48B/958, NA79C/168, NA79C/170;

                xviii.             9 Hall Street, Pukekohe being Section 1 SO 489697 held in RT 717226;

                  xix.             2 Golding Road, Pukekohe being Section 2 SO 476438 held in 682560;

 

   Subject to agreement with Auckland Transport on the transport and parking outcomes for the town centre for the properties listed xi) - xix)

d)         endorse and recommend to the Finance and Performance Committee to commence the reserve revocation process and disposal of the following properties, subject to the conclusion of any required statutory processes, with the objective of contributing strategically and financially to the outcomes of the Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project Plan objectives of urban renewal and housing:

 

i)          Adj to 995 Paerata Road, Pukekohe being Lot 6 DP 16500 held in NA425/287 (cancelled);

ii)         Adj to 7 Glencairn Place, Pukekohe being Lot 15 DP 318727 held in RT 76444;

iii)        Adj to 176 Princess St West, Pukekohe being Section 1 SO 430835 held in RT 556921;

iv)        Adj to 10 Reidy Place, Pukekohe being Lot 8 DP 112574 held in NA1107/144;

v)         14 Evans Court, Pukekohe being Lot 31 DP 325010 held in RT 384047;

vi)        67 East Street, Pukekohe being Lot 2 DP 88435 held in NA592/145 (cancelled).

 

   Subject to agreement with Auckland Council on the open space and stormwater outcomes for properties listed i) - vi)

e)         note that Panuku will also dispose of the following properties previously approved for disposal, with the objective of contributing strategically and financially to the outcomes of the Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project Plan objectives of urban renewal and housing:

 

i)       82 Manukau Road, Pukekohe being Lot 1 DP 99706 held in NA54B/1241;

ii)      17 Massey Avenue, Pukekohe being Lot 3 DP 49318 held in NA1984/70;

iii)     21 Massey Avenue, Pukekohe being Pt Lot 3 DP 30052 held in NA91D/796;

iv)     33 Edinburgh Streeet, Pukekohe being Lot 2 DP 48584 held in NA34C/957;

v)      Adj to 1173 Paerata Road, Pukekohe being Parts Allotment 79 Parish of Karaka held in NA767/242 and NA 38A/69.

 

f)          recommend to the Finance and Performance Committee that Unlock Pukekohe be incorporated into the overall Panuku reinvestment policy already approved by the Committee as part of the 10 year budget (Long Term Plan 2018/28), and that authority be granted to use some proceeds for projects outside the High Level Project Plan boundary area which would promote clear benefits for the Unlock Pukekohe programme.

g)         note that the Finance and Performance Committee will need to approve the disposal of the properties in clause c) and d) above and aligned with the Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project Plan.

h)         note that as part of this project, together with the Council’s Service Strategy and Integration team and the Franklin Local Board, Panuku Development Auckland will consider other council owned properties that are currently providing a service to the community. Panuku Development Auckland will seek further approval from the Franklin Local Board if it recommends the optimisation of any of these properties.

i)           Panuku Development Auckland’s existing engagement strategy to give early       notification to Mana Whenua of intent to divest council property in this area.

 

Horopaki

Context

15.      Pukekohe is recognised as a rural satellite town centre serving a wide rural catchment. It is surrounded with low-density residential dwellings, farming related activities and provides some of New Zealand’s fertile and prime agricultural land. 

16.      Pukekohe is strategically located along an existing rail line, with a new electrified rail line anticipated between Papakura and Pukekohe. This will continue to enhance the attractiveness of Pukekohe. Pukekohe is also connected to State Highway 1 and the rest of Auckland via State Highway 22. Nearby towns in the Waikato District such as Tūākau and Pokeno are also well connected to Pukekohe and Paerata is within Pukekohe’s wider catchment. Pukekohe also has a proud local community with rich heritage, cultural diversity and is supportive of positive change. New and/or planned infrastructure upgrades and zoning changes has also sparked market attractiveness. Council has 30 landholdings in the wider area with some potential for development and disposal.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     Pukekohe’s strategic location, strong community background and opportunities for improvement make it strongly suitable as a Panuku “Unlock” location, with potential for successful urban regeneration and development.

18.      The overall potential portfolio in Unlock Pukekohe is across a range of asset classes and is distributed from Paerata in the north to Buckland in the south, Belmont in the west and along East St. The majority of the high value sites are within or near the town centre and around the ring road. The Unlock Pukekohe HLPP specifically acknowledges 82 Manukau Road, the Franklin council buildings which are part of the Corporate Property programme. However, while this site will not form part of the already committee agreed Panuku reinvestment approach, Unlock Pukekohe will guide this property’s key outcomes as if it were part of the Unlock Pukekohe programme. 

19.      The potential property portfolio of approximately 30 sites totalling 7.5 hectares comprises of a wide range of assets, land use activities and zoning. The portfolio includes two warehouses and associated retail comprising several tenants, eight car parks managed by Auckland Transport, six small open space parcels that could be surplus to requirements, a rural land block and a cluster of light industrial land, which is currently underutilised. There are also four Haumaru Housing sites totalling approximately 75 units within the Pukekohe urban area that are also being actively considered in collaboration with the Haumaru project team.

20.      Key positive themes have emerged on the preliminary basis of the identified key problems or opportunities facing the future of Pukekohe being:

21.      Land use planning: Rapid growth and some planning policies have enabled extensive urban development in greenfield areas, out of centre retail and competition from new and emerging centres and housing areas have continued to increase. This is potentially threatening the future vibrancy, liveability and investment attractiveness of Pukekohe as a successful service centre.

22.      A fragmented urban structure and form: Historically deep urban blocks, a town layout that has had its original town grid layout changed over time, with it now including a ring road and roundabouts supported by planning that has prioritised primarily vehicle movement and parking. This has impacted on connectivity by other modes such as walking, cycling, and the level of local activity and vibrancy.

23.      A lack of access to local work and learning opportunities: There is a perception that narrow employment and education options has led to over 50 per cent of residents working, training and spending outside the local area.

24.      Retaining Identity: There is a tension on how to accommodate new growth while revealing, reinforcing and celebrating Pukekohe’s service hub identity and character.

25.      In consideration of the above, Panuku has been working closely with the Franklin Local Board to shape new plans for Pukekohe town centre in response to the problems and opportunities. Open sessions with the board and its staff were held, offering opportunity to contribute ideas on the development of Pukekohe town centre vision, goals and key moves. The Programme Goals are aligned with the outcomes sought by the Franklin Local Board Plan and Pukekohe Area Plan 2017.

26.      The vision proposed for Pukekohe is still being developed further, however Pukekohe is to   embody the themes of: self-sufficiency, walkability, learning, access to local jobs, and celebrating identity and history.

27.      Panuku is progressing the engagement process with mana whenua. This is helping to reveal local stories of the area and to meaningfully shape the cultural narrative for the Unlock Pukekohe project. This engagement process has also helped to enhance and guide the principles and goals for the project.

28.      There is a total of 13 programme principles relating to Property Development, Public realm, Partnering and Placemaking, which have guided the proposed efforts.

Property Development Principles

The Local Board Plan recognises the importance of dealing with growth effectively to provide high-quality environments meeting the needs of the community. This while protecting Franklin’s productive soils. As such, the Local Board Plan seeks to focus on existing town centres like Pukekohe. Panuku will deliver initiatives that will contribute towards revitalising and transforming Pukekohe’s town centre into a vibrant, efficient hub. Council landholdings will be evaluated and leveraged in a way that facilitates this.

Public realm Principles

 

Supporting the local community, their needs, culture, talents and heritage needs to be valued.

The project will take inspiration and guidance from local people, needs and themes and seek to celebrate the aspirations and history of the community. Opportunities for partnership with local groups, creatives and Iwi will be sought, retaining the identity of the town centre.

Partnering Principles

The Local Board value the community being able to gain a sense of ownership and pride.

Panuku seeks to take a collaborative approach and negotiate to achieve better outcomes. Partnership opportunities will be embraced and a best practice approach with Mana Whenua will be piloted to support and strengthen their role.

Placemaking Principles

It is important that the community can develop a strong connection with their local area.

Panuku will seek solutions using an iterative, test and trial approach to ensure projects for the community maximise positive outcomes. Placemaking will be guided by Mana Whenua values and key stakeholders will be enabled with the right set of tools to empower them to take the lead beyond the life of Unlock Pukekohe.

 

 

29.     Project Goals have been proposed to monitor the effectiveness of the proposed initiatives and work. These project goals are:

G1

The town centre benefits from the growth that is projected for Southern Auckland and Northern Waikato

G2

Improve access and bring new life to the town centre

G3

Supporting local economic prosperity

G4

Contribute to and celebrate the “Pukekohe Identity”

 

30.     A key matter to address in the proposed programme in order to achieve the vision will be the requirement to change perceptions, behaviours and the supply of parking within the town centre.  We will work with Auckland Transport and rely on expert evidence to optimise car parking within the town centre to facilitate this change, enabling redevelopment to be achieved without a corresponding reduction in parking service. This could include following actions:

31.      Explore options to increase on-street parking that services the town centre. 

 

32.      Establish wayfinding signage to underutilised off street parking within the town centre.

33.      Increase public awareness of underutilised public carparks that are located outside of the town centre that are suitable for all-day commuter parking. 

34.      Improve pedestrian connections between the town centre and public parking areas that are located outside the ring road.

35.      Enter into commercial arrangements for private business use of public carparks.  This could include a sale of a carpark to commercial users.

36.      Increase parking restriction enforcement to ensure carparks are being used appropriately, for example to prevent all day parking in time restricted carparks.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     The project principles and goals proposed as part of the Unlock Pukekohe HLPP are aligned with the overarching themes in the Auckland Unitary Plan – Operative in Part 2016 and Auckland Plan 2050.

38.      Ongoing consultation with the council whānau has been undertaken to ensure the principles, goals, proposed initiatives and management of landholdings are consistent with the views shared across the council whānau.

39.      Auckland Transport (AT) including the Southern Growth Alliance (SGA) has been engaged throughout the formation of the current Unlock plan to understand the future of parking and transport outcomes for the wider town centre in relation to the potential redevelopment and regeneration programme. This has included exploring opportunities for potential redevelopment of eight carparks, five industrial sites as well as one rural property all held previously roading projects.

40.      Currently, Auckland Transport do not yet support the Unlock Pukekohe HLPP and during the next phase between April and May Panuku will continue to work with Auckland Transport seeking to agree a high level approach to car park optimisation within the town centre without a corresponding reduction in parking service. 

41.      Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) has been engaged on opportunities focused primarily on how the properties and public realm reinvestment programme identified can support increased access and availability of local jobs and learning.

42.      Auckland Council Plans and Places, Parks, Community Services and Healthy Waters have been engaged and contacted regarding the wider structure planning process, six open spaces, and any opportunities on community facilities for optimisation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     The project principles and goals proposed as part of the Unlock Pukekohe HLPP reflect those within the Franklin Local Board Plan 2017, Pukekohe Area Plan 2014 and Pukekohe-Paerata Paths Plan December 2018.

44.     On-going consultation with the Franklin Local Board has been undertaken between October 2018 and April 2019 to ensure the process of the formation of the Unlock Pukekohe HLPP and its principles, goals and scope of works are consistent with the views of the local board. The Franklin Local Board through this process have been positive of the process and strongly support the outcomes and content of the HLPP

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     We are seeking to authentically hear the Māori voice and support the development of outcomes defined in their own terms. To this end we will co-design a partnership framework with mana whenua in part by using a wānanga engagement methodology – a culturally appropriate and effective way of engagement that uses Māori cultural concepts and protocols to seek constructive input into solution design. Wānanga frames issues / problems in the context of participants’ own experiences. We understand that doing things properly may take more time up front, however it will provide more surety for outcome realisation. Wānanga will start in April with the intention of having the strategy developed by late May.

46.      We anticipate that mana whenua will play an integral cultural, social and economic part in the unlocking of Pukekohe. A genuine partnership with mana whenua will help define the overall approach and narrative of the project.

47.      Early engagement has highlighted the importance of mana whenua being able to practise kaitiakitanga roles and responsibilities towards sustainable management of land and water where possible across this project. Additionally, the importance of upholding the cultural values of the place and its narrative and designing for people has emerged through early korero.

48.      Opportunities for mana whenua may extend to joint ventures, land purchase and development, material involvement in decision making and master planning.

49.      The partnership strategy will also expressly look at how Unlock Pukekohe will stand to benefit mataawaka and urban Māori; the broader Māori population.

50.      Tamaki Makaurau mana whenua listed below have interests in the broader Pukekohe area. Panuku will work in partnership with mana whenua towards high quality outcomes through planning and implementation of Unlock Pukekohe, which will see the enhancement of mauri (the life essence of place and people) and opportunities to strengthen their role in the programme. The list of mana whenua that have been identified are:

·                Waiohua-Tāmaki: Ngāti Tamaoho, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Te Ahiwaru

·                Marutūahu: Ngāti Paoa, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Tamaterā

·                Waikato: Waikato-Tainui.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     Unlock Pukekohe will require funding for capital projects and adequate resourcing to progress the programme. The Transform and Unlock programme, approved by Auckland Council, is funded in the 10 year budget (Long-term Plan 2018-2028) by the reinvestment of the proceeds of property sales across the regional portfolio and programme. Panuku is required to strike a balance between strategic outcomes, such as improved town centres, more housing choices and better public amenities, while ensuring the council also optimises the commercial return from its property portfolio.

52.      A regional approach to reinvestment provides the ability to target the greatest need and enable credible progress in all locations. A programme business case for Unlock Pukekohe will be prepared and will confirm the level of funding for the capital programme. It will also estimate the net community benefits of the programme.

53.      Panuku, as the lead agency, will seek to partner with others, combining funding and resourcing with a number of other council organisations, and community groups to get the best value out of the programmes funding envelope. These funding strategies will be developed following the adoption of the HLPP.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     Given its strategic location, Pukekohe is identified as a priority satellite town in the Auckland Plan, anticipated to grow to 50,000 people by 2040. However, Pukekohe continues to attract people seeking a rural lifestyle and with its productive soils, its agricultural sector is a primary component contributing to the local economy. While these offer opportunities for positive short- and long-term outcomes, efficient management and maintaining an appropriate balance is vital to achieving overall success. 55. 

Identifying, assessing and planning for a fit for purpose parking solution for the town centre will be critical to the success of the Unlock programme. Panuku will continue to work with Auckland Transport, the Franklin Local Board and key stakeholders, such as the business association, to explore and propose a range of agreed mitigation measures that address both parking and urban development growth outcomes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     Franklin Local Board will provide their response and resolution to the proposed HLPP on 16 April 2016. If supported, Panuku will then continue to progress and refine the HLPP vision, mana whenua partnership scope, progress the town wide transport and parking strategies with Auckland Transport and further explore the “Pukekohe Identity”, with the aim of presenting the full HLPP content and scope to a Planning Committee workshop on 23 May 2019 and to the Panuku Board on 29 May 2019. After receiving comment and any additional direction setting from the Panuku Board and Planning Committee, Panuku will seek the approval of the Unlock Pukekohe HLPP from the Planning Committee on 4 June 2019.

57.      From there, Panuku will finally seek approval for the disposal of the listed properties from the Finance and Performance Committee on 18 June 2019. Once direction and decisions have been made on the HLPP, and if the outcomes are positive, Panuku will formally initiate the Unlock Pukekohe Programme. The programme is estimated to span a time period of 10 years, whereby at its end Panuku is expected to have achieved the four goals, guided by the principles and completely enabled by the development of the town centre through property development of council land, new public realm projects, placemaking and partnering initiatives.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

DRAFT Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project PLan (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard Davison - Senior Project Planning Leader, Panuku Development Auckland

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Classification of reserve lands and grant of licence to the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated, 73R and 87 Monument Road, Clevedon.

File No.: CP2019/05134

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the classification of reserve land and grant an occupation licence to the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated, (the association) for portions of the showgrounds at 73R and 87 Monument Road, Clevedon.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2018 the Franklin Local Board resolved to grant a lease and licence to the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated on land at 107 Monument Rd Clevedon.

3.       Subsequent to the deeds for the lease and licence being sent to the association advised they use additional areas of the former showgrounds at 73R and 87 Monument Road during show and event times (see Attachment A) and requested that these areas be licensed for use during the annual show and other large events.

4.       This use is occasional when events are being held. The land is also used for sporting and other community activities so there will need to be some coordination between these uses, which will be managed by council staff.

5.       The association use can be authorised by a licence. There is already a licence with approved terms and conditions for the land at 107 Monument Road that can apply to the extended area.

6.       There are procedural issues to resolve prior to the licence being granted. Some of the land is unclassified recreation reserve and needs to be classified beforehand.

7.       Public notification and consultation with iwi are also required as the licence period is longer than six months.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the classification of the following parcels of land as Recreation Reserve:

i)        Part Allotment 3-4 Parish of Wairoa in certificate of title NA7A/855 (Part-Cancelled)

ii)       Lot 1 DP 176480 in certificate of title NA108C/548

iii)      Lot 2 DP 176480 in certificate of title NA108C/549.

b)      approve public notification and iwi consultation on the proposed licence to the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated at 73R and 87 Monument Road as a requirement of the Reserves Act 1977.

c)      appoint a hearings panel to hear any submissions if required and make any recommendations to the board for further decisions if required.

d)      subject to there being no submissions adds the properties noted at a) above to the properties described in the licence approved by the Franklin Local Board resolution FR/2018/114 at clause d) iii) on the same terms and conditions.

e)      advise the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated that they are not able to unduly object to development proposals or works on the lands at 73R and 87 Monument Road progressed by Auckland Council or their contractors as the primary use of this land is recreation and other land is set aside for showgrounds use.

f)       approve inclusion of a condition that the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated advise the sports field booking team six months ahead of events that require its use of the land and the duration of that use.

g)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The report considers the classification of two parcels of land as Recreation Reserve at 73R and 87 Monument Road, Clevedon and the statutory requirements under the Reserves Act 1977.

9.       The Franklin Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including leasing matters.

10.     The board resolved at the business meeting on 24 July 2018 to grant a lease and licence to the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated (the association) for the showground’s property at 107 Monument Road.

11.     The resolution is as follows:

Resolution number FR/2018/114

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)                revokes the resolution passed by the former Manukau City Council Community Development Committee 14 December 2005 to classify 107 Monument Road as a recreation reserve pursuant to the provisions of section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 (Minute No. CD/DEC/2209/05).

b)      approves public notification and iwi consultation on the proposed lease to the

          Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated at 107 Monument        Road as it is a requirement of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)      appoints a hearings panel to hear any submissions if required and make any recommendations to the board for further decisions if required.

d)      subject to there being no submissions, grants a community lease to the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 for the area described in Attachment B to this report subject to:

i)        term - ten (10) years with one (1) right of renewal of ten (10) years

ii)       rent of $1 plus GST per annum

iii)      a concurrent licence being provided to allow the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association Incorporated to have exclusive use of the full site at 107 Monument Road including the other lease areas for 20 days per year as described in the report.

iv)     all other terms and conditions in accordance with Auckland Council                 Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

12.     Subsequently the association indicated they use the remainder of the old showgrounds area at 73R and 87 Monument Road during the show season and for other events.

13.     The omission of this area from the original licence area has been discussed with the association and the local board supports inclusion of the lands at 73R and 87 Monument Road into the licence granted for 107 Monument Rd.

14.     This report recommends approval of a licence to the Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association over the additional areas of the showgrounds subject to conditions.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     In 2018 the Franklin Local Board considered and approved a lease and licence to the association for the land it occupies and uses at 107 Monument Road.

16.     Discussions with the association and council staff prior to the report being prepared and presented to the board did not identify that the showgrounds property at 73R and 87 Monument Road should be included into the licence area. This was identified subsequent to the deed of lease and licence being presented to the association for execution.

17.     The Clevedon Agricultural and Pastoral Association had earlier sold the land at 73R and 87 Monument Road to Manukau City Council and entered into a lease for this area, which had subsequently not been renewed.

18.     The first term of the lease expired on 10 October 2011 and a renewal was not progressed as at that time the association was moving to the adjacent site at 107 Monument Road, land which has been purchased for this use to allow expansion of the sports, equestrian and showgrounds use.

19.     The land at 73R and 87 Monument Road is made up of several parcels as follows:

Legal Description

Reserve Classification

Address

Part Allotment 3-4 Parish of Wairoa - 4.2884 ha - NA7A/855 (Part-Cancelled)

Unclassified Recreation Reserve

73R Monument Rd

Lot 2 DP 67978 - 8093 m2 - NA47A/284

Classified Recreation Reserve

73R Monument Rd

Lot 2 DP 176480 - 7.3228 ha - NA108C/549

Unclassified Recreation Reserve

73R Monument Rd

Lot 1 DP 176480 - 5000 m2 - NA108C/548

Unclassified Recreation Reserve

73R Monument Rd

Lot 2 DP 170756 - 1.2388 m2 - NA104B/510

Classified Recreation Reserve

87 Monument Rd

Lot 1 DP 90733 - 22.1280 ha - NA47D/1145

Held under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002.

107 Monument Rd

 

20.     Excluded from the foregoing list is the land that is used by the tennis and bowling clubs as these are specific use areas.

Classification of Land

21.     Three of the parcels are held as unclassified Recreation Reserve and need to be classified before a licence can be issued over those areas.

22.     The process of classification involves the board resolving to classify the land as Recreation Reserve. The resolution is then published in the New Zealand Gazette and once published the land is classified.

Public notification and iwi consultation

23.     Because the additional licence will be for a period longer than six months consultation with iwi and public notification are required. These processes can be run concurrently.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The five parcels of land for showgrounds area at 73R and 87 Monument Road is land that was purchased from the association to provide sporting and recreation grounds.

25.     The use of the grounds is managed by Parks Sport and Recreation.

26.     To date the association use of the land at 73R and 87 Monument Rd has been on a booking basis; the association has booked use of the area through the sports field booking system which has worked well.

27.     If the licence is approved, the association will have rights to occupy the land, but will still need to advise the sport field booking system of their use as the land is used by other sectors of the community for active and passive recreation.

28.     During the terms of the licence there is the likelihood that works or proposals will be required for council to manage and use the land effectively, particularly as the land at 73R and 87 Monument Road was purchased for recreation use for the growing population in the area. This may also include restricted access for the association to areas of the land either on a temporary or permanent basis depending on the nature of a new development. Council wishes to be able to do this without undue objection from the association. This is pertinent as land at 107 Monument Road was purchased to expand equestrian and showground use and free up 73R and 87 Monument Road for increased sports use.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The board is supportive of the proposal to grant a licence to the association for the land at 73R and 87 Monument Road. A response from board staff on 9 January 2019 indicated board support for the licence proposal over the additional area of the showgrounds land.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and Local Board Plans.

31.     As part of the public consultation process, iwi consultation will be undertaken to assess maori views on the proposal.  This will include a presentation to a mana whenua forum and written communication with iwi groups who have a particular interest in the Clevedon area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     There are no financial implications for the board in classifying the land as recreation reserve and granting the licence. The cost of any advertising, public notification, consultation and gazetting of the resolution will be borne by the Stakeholder and Land Advisory Department.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There is a small possibility of submissions or objections to the public notification or iwi consultation. If required, the board should appoint a hearings panel to hear submissions and make any recommendations for further decisions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     If the licence to the extended area is approved and there are no submissions to the public notification and iwi consultation, staff will amend the draft deed of licence issued to the association.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Licence Area Map

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ron Johnson - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal resolution from Governing Body

File No.: CP2019/03686

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a resolution from the Governing Body and provide feedback on the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 28 February 2019, the Governing Body considered the recommendation from the Regulatory Committee - report Attachment A.  Link to Regulatory Committee, 14 February 2019 - Item 10 Statement of Proposal – page 19.  http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2019/02/REG_20190214_AGN_6987_AT.PDF and resolved as follows:

            Resolution number GB/2019/10

MOVED by Cr L Cooper, seconded by Deputy Mayor BC Cashmore: 

That the Governing Body:

a)      adopt the statement of proposal in Attachment B of the agenda report for public consultation, as amended, and confirms that the draft bylaw:

i)   is the most appropriate and proportionate way to implement aspects of the policy

ii)  is not inconsistent with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

b)      forward to local boards and advisory panels:

i)   the statement of proposal in Attachment B of the agenda report for their views

ii)  this agenda report and attachments for their information.

c)      note delegated authority to the chair of the Regulatory Committee to make replacement appointments to the panel if a member of the panel is unavailable.

d)      note delegated authority through the chief executive to staff approved by a manager responsible for bylaws to receive public feedback at ‘Have Your Say’ events.

e)      note delegated authority through the chief executive to a manager responsible for bylaws to make any amendments to the statement of proposal in Attachment B of the agenda report to correct errors, omissions or to reflect decisions made by the Regulatory Committee or the Governing Body.

f)       note the Regulatory Committee’s agreement that the statement of proposal be amended to include an option outlining the ability for local boards to determine the time and season provisions for their local board areas.

3.       The Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal is included as Attachment B.

4.       The Hearings Panel will meet on 3 May 2019 and local boards will have an opportunity to present views.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the 28 February 2019 Governing Body resolution on the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal.

b)      consider whether to provide views on the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal to the hearings panel on the 3 May 2019.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 February 2019 - Governing Body report

27

b

Statement of Proposal Auckland Council's new policy on dogs and dog management bylaw (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan - allocation of funding for projects in 2018 / 2019.

File No.: CP2019/04737

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Allocate grants to projects identified and prioritised in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (the plan) in August 2016.  The purpose of the plan is to provide local strategic guidance for investment into facility development projects and the sharing of resources across the local board area.

3.       Since the plan was adopted, the local board has provided grants to three groups leading facility development projects within the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan: Pukekohe Netball Centre Incorporated, Pukekohe Rugby Football Club Incorporated and Franklin Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated.

4.       Within line item number 884 of the 2018/2019 Franklin Local Board work programme, $215,000 has been allocated for the implementation of priority projects within the plan.  This includes $63,972.65 returned to council in 2018 by Clevedon Paddling Club as the club’s project did not progress. 

5.       During a workshop with the local board on 19 February 2019, nine projects were identified to consider for funding.  The projects have been assessed against key criteria and a summary of the assessment is included in this report. 

6.       Six projects are recommended for funding in 2018/2019, totaling $214,963 of the $215,000 available. 

7.       The remaining three projects assessed are not recommended for funding support in 2018/2019 as they do not meet as many of the key criteria as the recommended projects.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the following grants from line item 884 of the 2018/2019 local board work programme:

i)        $50,000 to Waiuku Netball Centre Incorporated towards resealing two netball courts at the centre

ii)       $32,900 to Surf Lifesaving Kariaotahi Incorporated towards planning costs associated with new clubrooms

iii)      $36,200 to Franklin Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated to complete a new toilet / changing rooms building

iv)      $25,863 to The Clevedon Sports Club Society Incorporated toward completing a deck and storage area at the Clevedon Bowling Club Incorporated clubrooms

b)      $40,000 to the Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club toward construction of new tracks in the Maraetai / Waiho block of Whitford Forest

c)      $30,000 to Counties Manukau Tennis Association towards a needs assessment, feasibility study and business case for a new tennis facility in Pukekohe.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facility Plan (the plan) in August 2016.  The plan provides a strategic approach to achieving sport and recreation outcomes through the development of sports facilities in the local board area.

9.       The plan includes projects that have been prioritised from high to low, based on the criteria in Attachment A.  The criteria reflect the outcomes the local board is seeking from investment.  Local board support for projects can be achieved via grants in non-council owned assets. 

10.     Franklin Local Board invested in the following facility development projects 2016/2017 and 2017/2018:

i)          Pukekohe Netball Centre Incorporated: $84,738.98 toward the upgrade of a toilet block.  This was due to demolition of the cricket pavilion at Bledisloe Park, adjacent to the netball courts.  The pavilion included toilets that were used by members of the netball centre and visitors.

ii)         Pukekohe Rugby Football Club Incorporated: $89,000 toward construction of new clubrooms at Colin Lawrie Fields.  The new clubrooms will be used by the rugby club and Pukekohe Softball Club Incorporated.  The project started in January 2019.

iii)        Pukekohe Netball Centre Incorporated: $99,000 toward the extension of the netball canopy at Bledisloe Park, Pukekohe.  Pukekohe Netball Centre completed the project in March 2019.

iv)        Franklin Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated: $78,750 toward a toilet / shower block at Pukekohe Showgrounds.  The society purchased a building which has been transported to the showgrounds.  Further work is required to get the building operational. 

11.     Projects i) – iii) above have now been deleted from the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facility Plan as they have been completed or are under construction.  An updated project priorities table was adopted by Franklin Local Board on 26 March 2019.

Franklin Local Board Plan (2017)

12.     Outcome 4 in the Franklin Local Board Plan is “Growth is dealt with effectively”.  For sport and recreation, the objective and associated key initiative is:

 

Objective

·      Outdoor space and community facilities that support growth.

 

Key Initiative

·      Plan the development of new facilities to support growth, where needed.

2018/2019 Franklin Local Board work programme

Work Programme item No. 884 - implementation of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

13.     Franklin Local Board has budgeted $215,000 in its 2018/2019 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operations budget for grants from the Facility Partnership Fund.  This includes $63,972.65 which was returned to council by Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated.  A grant was previously paid to the club; however the project was not completed. 

14.     The activity description is:

“Provide grants to groups providing facilities which are identified as high or medium-high priority in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

Initiative 376 of the work programme will review the criteria and priorities of the plan, which will be used to assess grants”.

15.     The purpose of the budget is to support a strategic approach to achieving sport and recreation outcomes through the development of sport facilities. 

Assessment criteria

16.     Nine projects were assessed against the following criteria:

i)    number of people who will benefit from the facility

ii)   level of alignment with sport and recreation strategic documents

iii)   impact on council’s target groups which include children and young people, especially girls aged 10 – 18 years, Maori, Asian (particularly Indian) and Pacifica (particularly Samoan)

iv)  the willingness of groups to partner and share facilities with other sports codes

v)   capability of the group leading the project and its track record of developing or improving facilities

vi)  the impact on participation in sport and recreation

vii) the impact on the use of an existing asset

viii) extent to which there will be wider community use of the facility.

Eligible projects for consideration for grant funding in 2018/2019

17.     Below is a summary of projects that are eligible and ready to proceed in 2018/2019, subject to securing funding from non-council funding sources or from council.

High Priority

i)     Counties Manukau Hockey Association Incorporated: renewal of a hockey turf (cost: $1.6m (estimate).

ii)     Waiuku Netball Centre Incorporated.  Resealing two netball courts (cost estimate: $100,000).

Medium High Priority

iii)         Karaka Sports Park Trust.  Development at Karaka Sports Park (cost: $30,000,000 estimate). 

iv)        Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated – clubrooms (cost: 3,100,000). Contribution toward planning costs to construct new clubrooms ($32,900 required for non-construction costs).

v)         Franklin Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated - toilet/shower block project.  The society requires $36,200 to complete the works required. 

Medium

vi)        The Clevedon Sports Club Society Incorporated, Clevedon Sports Park.  Completion of a deck and storage to the existing Clevedon Bowling Club Incorporated building, to create a multisport facility ($25,863 required). 

vii)       Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club Incorporated.  Construction of 10km of new mountain bike tracks in the Maraetai / Waiho block of Whitford Forest (cost: $160,000).

viii)      Counties Tennis Association Incorporated.  Needs assessment, feasibility and business case for indoor courts (cost: $60,000 is the estimated cost).

ix)        Bombay School.  Needs assessment, feasibility and business case for indoor courts (cost: $60,000 is the estimated cost).

Projects not considered in 2018/2019 (High, Medium High and Medium priority)

18.     Projects listed in the plan that are not included for consideration in 2018/2019 are:

A feasibility assessment for a central indoor court hub.  The project aims to identify options for consideration.  A scope will be prepared in Q1 2019/2020 and prices obtained. This project will be presented for consideration in 2019/2020.

Franklin Gymsports Project.  Further feasibility work is required and this is included within the scope of the next stage.  The club would like the opportunity to take part in the master planning for Belmont Sports Park and prefers to wait until the master plan has been completed by Community Facilities in 2019/2020.  The club would like the opportunity to be considered as a tenant at this park.

 

Waiuku Netball Centre.  The centre is planning to cover two netball courts with a canopy and is in the early planning stage for this project.  It is not yet ready to proceed with fund raising.

 

Pukekohe Softball Club.  The club intends to install batters’ boxes at Rosa Birch Park in Pukekohe to increase the capacity for batting practice.  This can be considered after two softball diamonds have been realigned.

 

Bombay Multisport Project.  The Bombay Multisport Project does not require investment in 2018/2019.  The group intends to update its planning documentation.  It is expected this will be completed by mid-2019.

 

Counties Baseball Club.  The club requires a backstop fence.  Where there is no lease to a club, council’s preference is that fences for diamond sports are owned and maintained by council.   Council cannot invest operational funds in an asset it will own.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options considered

19.     Options considered are presented below.  Each option has a priority level in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facility Plan.  The priority level is stated alongside the heading for each option.

 

Option 1: Counties Manukau Hockey Association Incorporated, Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe.  Renewal of a hockey turf.  High priority.

 

Overview: This project is to renew a hockey turf at Rosa Birch Park at a cost of $1.6m.  The exiting Turf No. 1 is worn out and in places it is sinking due to poor drainage. 

Analysis: Whilst it is unlikely that investment will lead to an increase in participation in hockey, asset replacement will maintain current levels of participation.  If assets are not maintained, participation may decrease for health and safety reasons. 

Council’s priorities for investment via grant funding for turf renewals are at Colin Maiden Park and Rosedale Park via a regional budget.

Recommendation: This project is not recommended for funding at this time.  With significant council and non-council capital investment going into other hockey projects across the region, it may be difficult for Counties Manukau Hockey Association to leverage the additional funding required at this time.  However, Rosa Birch Park is the highest asset renewal priority in the Regional Hockey Facility Plan and is acknowledged as a high priority project in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facility Plan.  As this project requires a large investment, this is something the board may wish to endorse to a significant level in 2019/2020

 

Option 2: Waiuku Netball CentreResealing of two netball courts with a rubber surface.  High priority (assessed January 2019).

 

Overview: The netball centre has six courts and intends to renew the surface of two courts at a cost estimated at $100,000.  The asphalt is cracking and is uneven, posing a safety issue for netball.  The centre’s preference is to resurface the two courts in one project as they are on the same level. 

Analysis:  The two courts do not meet the minimum standard for play and the management committee is seeking to address.  The courts will continue to get consistent use 11 months of the year for netball training and games, from members that come from a wide catchment area. 

Recommendation: This option is recommended for funding support for the following reasons: 

i)          the project is ranked “High” in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

ii)         player safety is a concern for the centre, due to the uneven surface

iii)        the project meets all but two of the outcomes the local board is seeking from investment.

 

Option 3:  Karaka Sports Park Trust.  Development at Karaka Sports Park, Karaka.   Medium high priority.

 

Overview:  Karaka Sports Park Trust has been planning for the development of Karaka Sports Park at an expected cost of $30,000,000.  The master plan for the park includes facilities for netball, rugby, cricket, tennis and baseball.  The trust is planning facility development due to the expected increase in population in the wider Karaka area over the next 30 years.

Analysis:  The funds are not likely to have any impact on the use of the sports park.  The project is a significant priority for the local board and is the board’s One Local Initiative for advocacy through the 2018 – 2028 long term plan.  A report to the Finance and Performance Committee in June 2019, will seek support to proceed to the detailed business case stage.

Recommendation: This project is not recommended for funding support as funds will have no impact on participation at the park.

 

Option 4: Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi IncorporatedPlanning costs associated with new clubroomsMedium high priority project.

 

Overview:  Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated has been planning new clubrooms at Kariaotahi Beach.  The club will incur additional planning costs that total $32,900.

Analysis:  Auckland Council signed a funding agreement with Surf Life Saving Northern to support the development of surf lifesaving clubrooms’ in Auckland.  Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi is one of the facilities covered by the funding agreement.  The agreement does not enable further contributions from council toward construction costs but does not prohibit investment into project planning.  The additional $32,900 the club requires will enable the club to complete the planning required for the new clubrooms.

Recommendation: This option is recommended for funding support for the following reasons: 

i)    the project is ranked “Medium High” in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

ii)   the project meets all but two of the outcomes the local board is seeking from investment.

 

Option 5: Franklin Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated (A and P Society), Pukekohe Showgrounds.  Completion of a new toilet / changing block which includes plumbing, drainage, deck and roof overhang, an access ramp to provide wheel chair access to the disabled toilet/shower, and installation of a coin system for operating the showers and laundry.  Medium high priority project.

 

Overview:  Franklin A and P Society purchased a standalone building in 2018 and $36,200 is required to complete the project.  The building is located at the southern end of the showgrounds and has building consent. 

Council leases three hectares for football fields from 1 March - 30 September annually.  The lease expires in 2020.

Analysis:  There are not enough toilet/ shower/ changing facilities for the increasing numbers of visitors who attend a wide variety of events and programmes at the showgrounds.  The facilities will get a high level of use from the sport and recreational groups that use the facilities on a regular basis.

Recommendation: This option is recommended for funding support for the following reasons: 

i)    the project is ranked as “Medium High” in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

ii)   the project can be completed, and the facilities will be available to the wider community

iii)   the project meets all but two of the outcomes the local board is seeking.

 

Option 6: The Clevedon Sports Club Society Incorporated, Clevedon Sports Park.  Completion of a deck and storage at the existing Clevedon Bowling Club building including engineering costs, drainage, plumbing, concreting, lighting and paintingMedium priority project.

 

Overview:  The society has started a project to upgrade the existing bowling club building so it can be used as clubrooms by the bowls, football, rugby and cricket clubs.  Works completed to date include the foundations and part of the decking.  The society requires $25,863 to complete the project. 

Analysis: The impact on participation in sport and recreation will come from the clubs’ networking and joint administration of the facility.  All four clubs will benefit from having easy access to their sport equipment stored at the park.

Recommendation: This option is recommended for funding support for the following reasons: 

i)    the project is ranked as “Medium” in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

ii)   the project can be completed and four sports groups will benefit from the alterations to the building

iii)   the project meets all but three of the outcomes the local board is seeking.

 


 

Option 7: Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club IncorporatedConstruction of tracks in the Maraetai / Waiho block of Whitford Forest.  The current project is to construct 10km of track.  Medium priority project.

 

Overview:  The Maraetai/ Waiho block of Whitford Forest has been logged and replanted.  Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club is proposing to construct approximately 10 km of new tracks at a cost of $160,000.  The tracks will be used mainly for mountain biking, in accordance with the license agreement which has been in place for five years.  Tracks will also be used for walking, running and horse riding.

Analysis:  The forest is within the network of opportunities for mountain biking in the Auckland Bike Facilities Plan and is identified as a sub-regional facility.  Any member of the public has the opportunity to use the forest for mountain biking, walking, running or horse riding.  The forest owner has a process to register recreationists who are not bike club members. 

Kauri dieback has restricted access to mountain bike tracks in other parts of Auckland including two tracks in Hunua Regional Park.  The implication is that riders are seeking tracks in other areas of south and south/east Auckland. 

Recommendation: This option is recommended for funding support for the following reasons:

i)    the project is ranked as “Medium” in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan. 

ii)   the tracks will be used for the next 25-30 years, until the trees are harvested.

iii)   the project meets all but one of the outcomes the local board is seeking.

 

Option 8: Counties Manukau Tennis Association, Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe – Needs assessment, feasibility and business case for a new tennis facility.  Medium priority (assessed in January 2019).

 

Overview: Counties Manukau Tennis Association would like to complete a needs assessment, feasibility study and business case at an estimated cost of $60,000.  The association wishes to ensure that tennis facilities meet the needs identified and that any future tennis facility will be financially sustainable.

Analysis: Counties Tennis Association has funds to invest in tennis facilities from the sale of land on Edinburgh Street, Pukekohe.  The association advised its preference is to invest the funds at Rosa Birch Park, where it is based.  Auckland Tennis will be involved in the steering group for the project as will the Sport and Recreation Lead. 

Recommendation: This option is recommended for funding support for the following reasons:

i)    the project is ranked as a ‘Medium’ priority.

ii)   Counties tennis centre is one of five regional facilities in Auckland.

iii)   the project meets all but one of the outcomes council is seeking.

iv)  the association has the funds to pay the balance based on the estimated cost of $60,000.  It also has funds for facility investment.

v)   learnings from similar projects suggest that if delivered in partnership with council, rather than funded and delivered solely by tennis, the scope of this planning work is more likely to consider the wider community needs.  It is also more likely to follow best practice, rather than jump to the architectural design stage.

 


 

Option 9: Bombay School - Needs assessment, feasibility study and business case to replace the existing pool at Bombay School.  Medium priority (assessed in January 2019).

 

Overview: Bombay School is leading a project to construct a new swimming pool to replace the existing pool.  This is due to the increase in the number of students at the school.  The school requires an estimated $60,000 to compete a needs assessment, feasibility study and business case.

Analysis:  Provision of aquatic facilities in the Bombay area is a low priority in council’s Community Facilities Network Plan.  Currently, the local board provides grant funding toward school swimming pool operational costs rather than capital development costs.  

Recommendation: This project is not recommended for funding at this time.  The school would need to agree to follow a development process that aligns with best practice for facility planning and development, before investment in planning documents would be recommended.

20.     Should the local board support the projects above which total $214,963, there will be $37.00 remaining from the total of $215,000 available in work programme item No 884 in 2018/2019. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

Surf Life Saving – Surf 1020 Project

21.     Council has signed a funding agreement with Surf Lifesaving Northern Region Incorporated for the allocation of $5.6m toward the Surf1020 Project.

22.     Council will enter into a separate funding agreement with Surf Life Saving Northern Region Incorporated and Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated for a financial contribution toward the Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi building.  The draft funding agreement specifies that no additional council funding can be secured for construction costs. 

23.     Funds can however be granted by the local board to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi for non-construction costs.

Clevedon Multisport Project

24.     Clevedon Bowling Club Incorporated has a signed lease of additional premises for the extension to its building at Clevedon Sports Park. The Clevedon Sports Club Society Incorporated has a signed sublease with the bowling club to use the clubrooms.

25.     The Clevedon Sports Park Society Incorporated received landowner approval to extend the bowling club building in October 2017.

Te Puru Community Charitable Trust

26.     Te Puru Community Charitable Trust is a council controlled organisation (CCO), based at Te Puru Park near Maraetai.  The trust sees the opportunity for more bike tracks in Waiho / Maraetai block of Whitford Forest as beneficial for the local community and advised the forest is well used by local recreationists and the Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club.  The club is not affiliated with the trust.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The input and views of the local board were received at a workshop held on 19 February 2019.  Options presented to the local board focused on the high, medium high and medium priorities. 

28.     The board was supportive of the Franklin Agricultural and Pastoral Society project at Franklin A and P Showgrounds.  The board requested confirmation that the building is on-site and confirmation of the timeline for the project.  The building is located at the southern end of the showgrounds and the project can start in May 2019.

29.     The local board commented that Maraetai / Waiho block of Whitford Forest is owned by Canadian company Whitford Forest Holdings Company.  Members acknowledged that the forest is an important area for outdoor recreation and requested confirmation that there is an access agreement in place between the club and the forest owner.  The forest manager confirmed a licence agreement has been in place for five years.

The local board also requested confirmation of the level / grade of tracks planned.  A map illustrating the planned tracks is in Attachment B.  There are two beginners’ tracks, four intermediate tracks (grade 3), an intermediate/advanced track (grade 4) track and an advanced track (grade 5).

30.     The local board supported the Clevedon Sports Club Society project and acknowledged the volunteer effort to date on this project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan guides decision making to increase community participation in sport and recreation, including an increase in participation for Māori. 

32.     Within the Franklin Local Board area, 13.2 per cent of the population is Maori. 

33.     The impact on Māori is likely to be greater than that of general participants from investment into netball courts.  Maori are 70 per cent more likely to participate in netball than other Franklin residents.  For surf lifesaving, mountain biking and tennis, less than 1 per cent of Maori residing in Franklin participate in these activities therefore the impact on Maori participation will be minimal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     Franklin Local Board has budgeted $215,000 in line item 884 within its 2018/2019 work programme.  The total includes $63,972.65 returned from Clevedon Paddling Club. This line item is within the Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget. 

35.     Recommendations for grant funding total $214,963.

36.     The recommendations do not give rise to any major financial risks.

37.     The economic return on investment from resealing two netball courts at Waiuku Netball Centre include healthier community members as there will be fewer injuries.  The courts will be safer to use.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     Potential risks from investment will be mitigated by having a signed funding agreement with each of the organisations recommended for grant funding.  The funding agreement will state how the funding is to be used.  Where a grantee requires additional funds to complete a project, such as Waiuku Netball Centre, the grant will be released once the grantee provides confirmation that the balance to complete a project has been secured.

39.     The sport and recreation team has prepared and managed many similar funding agreements.  The risk of not achieving the expected outcomes from the recommended grant funding is expected to be low.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Should the local board resolve to allocate funding to the recommended projects, then:

i)    a funding agreement will be developed for the organisations, outlining the terms and conditions for the funding. 

ii)   staff from the sport and recreation team will keep the local board informed on progress through local board reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Criteria used to assess sport and recreation facility development projects.

39

B

Proposed tracks in Waiho / Maraetai block of Whitford Forest.

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rose Ward - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

Dave Stewart - Manager Sport & Recreation

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Attachment A - Criteria used to assess sport and recreation facility development projects.

Criteria

Key Guiding Considerations

Score out of 100

Weighting (%)

Sharing Facilities

·      Level of willingness to operate under a shared facility/multisport arrangement.

·      Is the club is seeking genuine partnership with other codes and clubs for the development of this facility. 

Note: Some clubs may not be able to operate under this model for reasons such as Health and Safety (i.e. Gymsports) such codes will not be unduly disadvantaged by this criterion.

·     

·      10

Current Participation / Membership

·      Total active membership - For maximum score total playing membership greater than 750

·      Total junior membership (relative to the demographic profile of the code) - For maximum score greater than 500 juniors. If less than 500 juniors calculate score as ratio of the total membership.

·      Growth in membership in the past 3 years  (in actual numbers).

·     

·      15

 

Projected Participation / Membership

·      Does the facility have a catchment which will extend into a known Council growth area?

·      Level to which population / demographic projections support the facilities / clubs membership increasing.

·      Degree to which external factors are likely to erode membership in the future.

·     

·      15

Level of Strategic Alignment

·      Level of alignment to local, regional and national facility strategies, code development strategies and Council plans and strategies.

·      How well does the facility contribute to an integrated local facility network?

·     

·      10

Appropriate scale of facility 

·      The spaces and size of the facility is core to the delivery of the sport and appropriately scaled.

·     

·      10

Sustainability of the facility

·      How sustainable is the facility likely to be (considering partnerships, trends, financial issues etc)?

·      Is the club a strong club overall with a strong future?

·      Will the facility enhance the future delivery and operation of the sport(s)?

·     

·      20

Capital funding

·     What ability do proponents have to assist with capital funding themselves (i.e. not including public funding).

·     Are the required funding splits realistic within the projects development timeframes.

·     

·      20

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Attachment B – proposed tracks in Waiho Maraetai block of Whitford Forest

 

Waiho Maraetai block of Whitford Forest – Proposed tracks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Key

          Area within the Maraetai / Waiho block of Whitford Forest for proposed tracks (see detail on next page)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment B Cont’dProposed tracks

Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 1.44.22 PM.png
1)	A bi-directional multipurpose (walkers and runners both ways and riders uphill only).  Links the lower forest at Waiho Road to the upper Trig Road via a valley. 
2)	A track that initially is parallel to a forest road before looping down a ridgeline (grade 3).
3)	A bidirectional multi purpose track).
4)	 Down hill track (grade 3) from the trig station area to Waiho Rd.  
5)	Downhill track (grade 4) from the trig station to Waiho Rd.
6)	Down hill track (grade 3) that extends from Forestry Road down hill.
7)	Downhill track (grade 5/ advanced) that will be steep.
8)	A bi-directional track that will extend along the southern boundary of the Maraetai / Waiho  block to the upper ridge forest at Trig Road 
9)	A relatively flat area where a beginners track will be built.  Eucalyptus rather than pine forest.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Local board decisions and input into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028

File No.: CP2019/04718

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve local financial matters for the local board agreement 2019/2020, which need to be considered by the Governing Body in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

2.       To seek feedback on regional topics in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Auckland Council’s Annual Budget contains 21 local board agreements which are the responsibility of local boards. These agreements set out local funding priorities, budgets, levels of service and performance measures. This report seeks decisions on local financial matters for the local board agreement, including:

·        any new/amended business improvement district (BID) targeted rates

·        any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·        proposed locally driven initiative (LDI) capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·        release of local board specific reserve funds

·        any advocacy initiatives (to be included in the appendix).

4.       Auckland Council consulted with the public from 17 February to 17 March 2019 to seek community views on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10‑year Budget 2018-2028, and local board priorities to be included in the local board agreements. This report seeks local board views on both of these plans:

·        regional annual budget topics: including changes to rates and fees, the draft Tūpuna Maunga o Tamaki Makaurau Authority – Operational Plan 2019/2020, and other budget information

·        the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers.

5.       Auckland Council also consulted on the Our Water Future discussion document. A draft strategy from the Our Water Future discussion document will be developed. Local boards will have the opportunity to provide input into this in early 2020.

6.       Local board views on these regional plans will be considered by the Governing Body (or relevant committee) before making final decisions on the plans.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive consultation feedback on the Franklin Local Board priorities for 2019/2020.

b)      recommend any new or amended business improvement district targeted rates to the Governing Body.

c)      recommend any new or amended local targeted rate proposals to the Governing Body.

d)      recommend that the Governing Body approves any proposed locally driven initiative capital projects, which are outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility. 

e)      recommend the release of local board specific reserve funds to the Governing Body.

f)       approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2019/2020 Local Board Agreement.

g)      receive consultation feedback on regional proposals in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers from people or organisations based in the Franklin Local Board area.

h)      provide feedback on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.

i)        provide feedback on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board agreements form part of the Auckland Council’s annual budget and set out local funding priorities, budgets, levels of service and performance measures. This report details local board decisions and recommendations that need to be made in April/early-May to allow them to be considered by the Governing Body in the annual budget process.

8.       Local boards also advocate to the Governing Body for funding for projects that cannot be accommodated within their local budgets. These advocacy initiatives are attached as an appendix to the local board agreement.

9.       Local boards are responsible for providing local input into regional strategies, policies and plans. Local board plans reflect community priorities and preferences and are key documents that guide both the development of local board agreements and input into regional plans.

10.     Auckland Council publicly consulted on the following two plans from 17 February to 17 March 2019:

·        annual budget (which includes both regional issues and local board key priorities) 

·        the proposed amendment to the 10-year budget.

11.     Across the region, 2278 people attended 65 engagement events, including one in the Franklin Local Board area. Feedback was received through written, event and social media channels.

12.     Consultation feedback on the Franklin Local Board priorities for 2019/2020 and on regional proposals in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10‑year budget regarding property transfers from people or organisations based in the Franklin Local Board area are set out in Attachment A. The feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the local board before they agree their local board agreement in early June 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local financial matters for the local board agreement

13.     This report allows the local board to agree its input and recommend other local financial matters to the Governing Body in early May 2019. This is to allow time for the Governing Body to consider these items in the annual budget process (decisions made in June 2019).

Local targeted rate and business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals

14.     Local boards are required to endorse any new locally targeted rate proposals or BID targeted rate proposals in their local board area (noting that any new local targeted rates and/or BIDs must have been consulted on before they can be implemented).

Funding for locally driven initiatives (LDI)

15.     Local boards are allocated funding annually to spend on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. This funding is for ‘locally driven initiatives’ or LDI. Local boards can approve LDI capital projects up to $1 million; projects over that amount need approval from the Governing Body. 

16.     Local boards can recommend to the Governing Body to convert LDI operational funding to capital expenditure for 2019/2020 if there is a specific need to do so, or Governing Body approval may be needed for the release of local board specific reserve funds, which are funds being held by the council for a specific purpose.

17.     Local boards can defer LDI projects where there was an agreed scope and cost, but the project/s have not been delivered.

Local board advocacy

18.     Local boards are requested to approve any advocacy initiatives for consideration by the Governing Body and inclusion (as an appendix) to the 2019/2020 Local Board Agreement, noting that in this triennium, a longer-term approach has been taken to progress initiatives that are unable to be funded by local board budgets. The approach used the annual budget, 10-year budget and local board plan processes to progress and advise on a narrower range of local board initiatives in a more comprehensive way.

19.     As part of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028, additional funding was provided to progress the priority advocacy initiative of each local board (the one local initiative (OLI)). All OLIs are progressing with funding either allocated or earmarked in the 10-year budget. 

Local board input on regional plans

20.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the context of the strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws of Auckland Council. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on two plans, the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers.  

Regional issues in the Annual Budget 2019/2020

21.     The annual budget sets out Auckland Council priorities and how it is going to pay for them. The regional consultation on the proposed annual budget focused on two topics:

a.    changes to rates and fees

                               i.        annual waste management changes

i)      food scraps targeted rate

ii)     Waitākere rural sewerage targeted rate

iii)    urban boundary rating

iv)   rating of religious use properties

v)    regulatory fees

b)         draft Tūpuna Maunga o Tamaki Makaurau Authority – Operational Plan 2019/2020.

22.     The consultation on the annual budget also included key priorities for each local board area. Decisions on local board priorities will be made when local board agreements are considered in June 2019.

23.     The feedback form contained one question relating to changes to rates and fees. Consultation feedback received from the Franklin Local Board area on key regional issues in the annual budget are summarised in Attachment A, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

24.     Local boards may wish to provide feedback on these regional issues for consideration by the Governing Body. 

The proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers

25.     The regional consultation on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 focused on a proposal to transfer the legal ownership of $790 million of city centre waterfront properties from Panuku to Auckland Council. Panuku would continue to manage the properties. The resulting ownership structure would reduce governance duplication, increase consistency with other development areas and maximise future flexibility.

26.     The feedback form contained one question relating to this proposed amendment. Consultation feedback received from the Franklin Local Board area on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers is summarised in Attachment A.

27.     Local boards may wish to provide feedback on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers for consideration by the Governing Body.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The Annual Budget 2019/2020 is an Auckland Council group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

29.     The key impact of the proposed amendment to the 10-year budget regarding property transfers on the group is the potential impact on Panuku. Panuku staff and board have been engaged in the development of these options. The Governing Body will make their decision regarding this on 20 June 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     Local board decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. Local boards have a statutory role in providing local board feedback on regional plans.

31.     Local boards play an important role in the development of the annual budget and local board agreements form part of the annual budget. Local board nominees have also attended Finance and Performance Committee workshops on the annual budget, and a special briefing was arranged on the proposed amendment to the 10-year budget regarding property transfers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Many local board decisions are of importance to, and impact on, Māori. Local board agreements and the annual budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori.

33.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2017 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

34.     Attachment A includes analysis of submissions made by mana whenua and mataawaka entities who have interests in the rohe/local board area.

35.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This report is asking for local board decisions on financial matters in local board agreements that need to then be considered by the Governing Body.

37.     Local boards are also providing input to regional plans. There is information in the consultation material for each plan with the financial implications of different options.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     Local boards need to make recommendations on these local financial matters for the Annual Budget 2019/2020 by 8 May 2019, in order for the Governing Body to be able to make decisions on them when considering the annual budget in May 2019.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Local boards will approve their local board agreements and corresponding work programmes in June.

40.     Recommendations and feedback from local boards will be provided to the relevant Governing Body committees for consideration during decision-making, as outlined in the table below:

Decision dates for regional plans

Plan

Decision-maker

Scheduled meeting 

Annual Budget 2019/2020

Governing Body

22 May 2019

The proposed amendment to the 10‑year Budget 2018-2028

Governing Body

22 May 2019

 


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Annual Budget 2019/2020 and Proposed Amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers consultation feedback report for the Franklin Local Board (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Beth Corlett – Advisor Plans and Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

New road name in the subdivision at 36 Jellicoe Road, Pukekohe by K M Whitton.

File No.: CP2019/05096

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board for a name for a new private way to be created in a subdivision at 36 Jellicoe Road, Pukekohe by K M Whitton. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The Applicant, K M Whitton, has submitted the following names for consideration for a new private way at 36 Jellicoe Road, Pukekohe:

·    Whitton Way            (preferred name)

·    Griselinia Grove      (first alternative)

·    Vista Lane                (second alternative)

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the new road name ‘Whitton Way’ for the new private way, in the subdivision at 36 Jellicoe Road, Pukekohe, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Horopaki

Context

4.       The private way to be named already exists and serves 5 lots, comprised of 1 front lot and 4 rear lots.  The rearmost lot (Lot 5 DP 420242) is currently being subdivided into 3 lots under subdivision reference SUB60322445.

5.       The subdivision of Lot 5 DP 420242 will result in the existing private way serving a total of 7 lots. 

6.       The road is required to be named in accordance with the national addressing standard as it serves more than 5 lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

-    A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

-    A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-    An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

8.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the local board’s approval.

 

9.       The applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new private way created as part of the subdivision at 36 Jellicoe Road, Pukekohe.

 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Whitton Way

Named after Tom Whitton, the landowner and a local builder in the area for 30 years.  Tom has built all of the houses in the existing subdivision at 36A-D Jellicoe Road, including fencing and landscaping for all the properties.  Tom is community minded and has supported many charities and events in the area.

First Alternative

Vista Lane

Named for the vista to the north.

Second Alternative

Griselinia Grove

A species of evergreen shrub native to New Zealand. Named for the shrubs planted alongside the existing private way formation. 

 

10.     Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that with the exception of Vista Lane, the above names are acceptable to use. There are too many instances of ‘Vista’ already being used within the Auckland region.  

11.     The proposed suffix of ‘Way’, ‘Lane’ or ‘Grove’ is deemed acceptable as it accurately describes the characteristics of the road.

12.     The name proposed by the applicant is deemed to meet the road naming guidelines.

13.     The Aaplicant has obtained written approval from all of the existing users of the private way to the proposed names.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     The applicant has consulted with local iwi and no objections to these names, or any further suggested names were received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database, which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Locality Map

53

b

Scheme plan of subdivision

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lesley Wood – Subdivision Advisor - South

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly update to the Franklin Local Board - April 2019

File No.: CP2019/04526

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board (FLB) about transport related matters in its area including Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month but the report contains information about the following matters:

i.    Information on the Safer Speeds Bylaw consultation.

ii.    Responses to local board resolutions.

iii.   Information on the ‘Love Your Local’ Campaign for Beachlands.

3.       This report also provides an update on Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport update to the Franklin Local Board – April 2019’.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area and includes information on the progress of the LBTCF projects.

5.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting supports the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities on transport matters.

6.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

 

Thousands have their say on speed bylaw

7.       Public consultation closed on the speed bylaw on the 31 March 2019. 

8.       AT received 11,007 submissions on its proposal to reduce speeds on some 700km of high-risk roads around the region.

9.       Auckland is facing a road safety crisis with a 78 per cent increase in deaths and a 68 per cent rise in serious injuries since 2014. Lowering speeds and working with police to enforce those limits is one of the easiest and most effective interventions available.

10.     Submissions were made by organisations representing large sections of the community, such as District Health Boards, universities and school Boards of Trustees, the AA, Victim Support and Local Boards. AT also received many submissions from people wanting their local street or neighbourhood to have speeds lowered.

11.     Submissions are currently being analysed and those who have requested will present to a Hearings Panel of AT board members and senior executives in mid-April 2019.

12.     As a significant number of roads targeted for speed reduction are located within the Franklin area, the local board’s feedback is important in informing the outcome of the speeds adopted for Franklin.

13.     If adopted, the speed limit changes will come into effect in August this year.

Services and passenger trips on Auckland’s new transport network

14.     A complete re-working of Auckland’s public transport network has delivered more services and strong growth in passenger numbers.

15.     AT’s New Network saw an 11 per cent increase in trips during February, with close to 98 million trips for the year, the highest number of passenger trips since the 1950s.

16.     Auckland’s Mayor Phil Goff welcomes the surge in public transport services and patronage, concluding that the number of people now using public transport has reached record levels, not seen since the days when trams ruled Auckland’s streets. While the distance travelled by Auckland buses has increased 32 per cent each year, running costs have been held to just seven per cent. Aucklanders are getting both better services and value for money.

17.     In 2012 AT decided something had to be done to drive an increase in the numbers using public transport; although there were about 70 million trips a year, the rate of growth was barely matching the population rise. Something radical was required so AT discarded the existing route map in favour of the New Network.

18.     Simplicity is the key to the New Network. On 30 main bus and rail routes, AT introduced a minimum 15 minute frequency, 7am to 7pm, seven days a week. The new services arrived at the same time as electric trains, newer buses, double decker buses, new stations and integrated ticketing which means passengers now pay for their entire journey rather than each part of it.

19.     Auckland now has a public transport system which is working for more people. There has been an increase of 163 per cent in the number of people that live within 500 metres of a rapid or frequent service and patronage is up in all parts of the city.

20.     The last region to be implemented will be Waiheke in October 2019 where AT is also working to complete additional infrastructure, improve capacity on some services and provide even more frequent routes.

21.     It is acknowledged that there are still issues to work through, including the national shortage of bus drivers. AT is also investigating first-and-final leg solutions to access the New Network without needing to use the private car. An On-Demand Rideshare roadmap to expand AT local services to complement or replace local scheduled feeder bus services is being developed and other options to allow people to access public transport are bike, e-bike, e-scooter and ride-share, services that are likely to be delivered by the private sector.

22.     A few fast facts include:

·    Service levels increased 32 per cent, creating more than 300 jobs.

·    Fleet size increased 15 per cent, capacity was up 20 per cent at peak times.

·    Buses now travel 59.1 million kilometres every year.

·    New Network South implemented 30 Oct 2016 – trips up 24 per cent (Sep 17) up 8 per cent (Sep 18).

·    New Network West implemented 11 June 2017 – trips up 16 per cent (May 18).

·    New Network East implemented 10 Dec 2017 – trips up 22 per cent (Oct 18).

·    New Network Central implemented 8 July 2018 – trips up 10 per cent (Oct 18).

·    New Network North implemented 30 Sept 2018 – trips up 22 per cent (Oct 18).

 

 

Airport Botany Rapid Transit – Puhinui Station

23.     The Airport to Botany Rapid Transit project will deliver a new public transport link between the airport, Manukau and Botany, improving accessibility in the south-west, southern and eastern areas of Auckland. Puhinui station has been identified as an important public transport link to the rail network and as such, will be significantly upgraded.

24.     This project is important for those areas in the south and east as it will provide a direct public transport link to the airport.

25.     Public consultation on proposed early improvements are scheduled for later this year in May/June 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

26.     Through Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan 2018-2028, LBTCF funding has been increased to a total of $20.8 million per annum across all 21 local boards.

27.     The allocation for the FLB has also increased, with the updated figures for the remainder of this electoral term reflected in Table 1 below:

            Table 1: FLB Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,856,450

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,855,965

Remaining Budget left

$485.00

 

Table 2 below shows the status of projects to which LBTCF has already been committed.

Table 2: Status update on current Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

Project

Description

Current status

Status change

Funds allocated

Upgrade of Beachlands town centre gardens

 

 

 

Completed

No

$263,063

First View Avenue, Beachlands

Installation of new kerb and channel between Sunkist Bay and Wakelin Roads (both sides)

 

Completed

No

$315,339

Second View Avenue, Beachlands

 

Installation of new kerb and channel between Puriri and Cherrie Roads (north side)

 

Completed

No

$331,265

Station Road parking and pedestrian improvements

A project to formalise and improve parking on Station and Birch Roads, and improve pedestrian safety by providing new footpath on Station Road, Pukekohe.

On 25 September 2018, the FLB approved $181,104

Work to develop a firm order of costs has been completed.

 

A workshop is to be organised with the local board to review the firm estimate of cost in early April.

No

$181,104

Beachlands Kerb and Channel

 

Improvements

Project to install kerb and channel in Beachlands on following roads:

· Shelley Bay Road

· Karaka Road

· First View Ave

· Second View Ave

The local board approved project ROC estimate up to $1.18m to progress to detailed design and report back with Firm Estimate of Cost.

Project manager appointed, currently working on documentation for procurement of services.

No

$1.18m

Tourist Road-Monument Road intersection electronic warning signage

 

Installation of electronic warning signage on each and smart studs on the Tourist Road.

The local board approved project ROC estimate up to $80,000 to progress to detailed design and report back with Firm Estimate of Cost.

Further investigation required before this proposal can progress to design.

No

$80,000

 Responses to resolutions

28.     At the business meeting in March 2019, the local board passed the following resolutions:

Resolution number FR/2019/25

That the Franklin Local Board:

          b)           request that AT provide the Franklin Local Board with a summary of Safer Speeds               Bylaw consultation feedback from submitters in the Franklin Local Board                                       boundaries so that the board can consider communities’ views in developing formal                   feedback on the Safer Speeds Bylaw.

29.     The consultation team from AT have been liaising with local board services staff to provide the feedback to the local board members as soon as the information is available. A workshop will be held with the Franklin Local Board on the 7 May to provide a summary of the feedback from the consultation.

c)           request AT provide the board with an opportunity to nominate projects for delivery              through the broader road safety programme at a workshop and to formalise those                         views via resolution at the appropriate time.

30.     A series of workshops are organised from April to June with the Franklin Local Board to consider nominating projects for the Community Safety Fund. The series of workshops can be used to identify safety priorities for nomination for the Community Safety Fund, future LBTCF allocations or for advocacy.

d)                       request that AT assess and report the effectiveness of the rural road safety                         initiatives implemented to date across the Franklin Local Board area.

31.     The standard period before AT reviews road safety initiatives is usually set at 5 years after a project has been implemented. In regards to the recent rural road safety initiatives in the Franklin Local Board area, AT have taken a different approach and have increased the level of monitoring of the current initiatives to more quickly determine their effectiveness.

32.     A workshop will be held with the local board at the earliest opportunity to present the recent data collected.

Local projects and activities

Love Your Local Campaign for Beachlands

33.     In February 2019, planning for the ‘Love Your Local’ campaign for Beachlands started with stakeholder engagement meetings held in March.

34.     The programme uses local organisations, clubs and individuals who have joined Auckland Transport's "Love Being a Local" campaign to promote safer speeds on Auckland's roads.

35.     Speeding was a contributing factor in 25 per cent of serious accidents on Auckland's roads between 2011 and 2015.

Pukekohe Travel Demand proposal 

36.     The FLB requested AT to support a project within the Pukekohe area to promote a change in travel behaviour and encourage more people to use the public transport options available, particularly local bus services but also the train.

The Travel Demand Team are developing a draft Plan of Action, which was to be shared with the local board in March 2019. This has been delayed but will provided to the local board at the earliest opportunity. The plan is intended to be implemented by the end of June 2019.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to AT and does not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local Board consultations

38.     Auckland Transport provides the Franklin Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

39.     The local board’s views on any proposed schemes are taken into account during consultation on those proposals.

40.     In the reporting period ending March 2019, two proposals were put forward for comment by the FLB, The details of proposals and their feedback are listed in Table 3 below.

Table 3: Local Board Consultation proposals and feedback

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

48 to 68 Seddon Street, Pukekohe

Proposed implementation of P120 parking restrictions on west side of Seddon Street between 48 & 68 Seddon Street.

Documentation was circulated to the transport reps on the 4 March 2019.

 

The parking restriction would apply between Monday and Saturday between 8am and 6pm. It would not apply on Sundays or public holidays.

 

The local board feedback has been recorded as “The rationale / policy that AT will be following whereby it seems businesses can apply to have parking restrictions put in place to safeguard their customers. This seems out of step with parking in the nearby vicinity and I for one don’t support it without greater understanding as to what AT’s policy is in respect of these types of requests.  If we had been given more notice we could have received that information.  So in the absence of any justification and reasoning I oppose it”.

 

The local board was opposed to this application.

 

Various streets in Paerata Rise Stage 2a Subdivision

New Traffic Controls for Streets in Paerata Rise Stage 2a Subdivision - Resolution 15710

Documentation was circulated to the transport reps on the 5 March 2019.

 

This proposal is for a number of traffic controls to be resolved as part of Stage 2a of the Paerata Rise subdivision. The proposal involved the formation and vesting of several new streets. The streets within Stage 2a require a number of traffic controls to be resolved.

 

The local board feedback was recorded as “Other than continued concern at narrow nature of the roads, these controls appear standard and offer no concern.”

 

A question was asked about lack of controls shown on the plan the western end of Symonds House Lane and southern end of Fetter Lane.” The consultant responded confirming that this was included in the resolution for Stage 1 (Resolution ID 15527)

 

There was no objection to this proposal.

 

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

41.     Traffic Control Committee decisions within the FLB area are reported on a monthly basis. The decisions within the local board area in the period of March 2019 are reflected in Table 4 below:

Table 4: Traffic Control Committee Decisions

Street

Area

Work

Decision

Bell Road, Fern Place

Beachlands

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Carried

Road, Ranfurly Road, Alfriston Road, Phillip Road, Popes Road, Hamlin Road, Walters Road, Wedding Place, Airfield Road, Polo Prince Road, Cosgrave Road Mill Road, Walters Road, Redoubt

Alfriston

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

 

                 

Carried

Waiuku Road, Stuart Road, Foy Road

Pukekohe

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Carried

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     The proposed decision of receiving the report or requesting cost estimates has no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     AT will provide another update report to the board at the next monthly meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai – Elected Member Relationship Manager, AT

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, AT

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2019/04525

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the monthly update of the Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report provides an update on the Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar. A schedule of key decisions that will come before the board at business meetings over the next year is attached (Attachment A).

3.       The calendar aims to support the local board’s governance role by:

i)          Ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)         Clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)         Clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be regularly updated to ensure that formal reporting milestones for new projects are added to the schedule. Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar is a less formal but more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.

5.       At its business meeting on 6 June 2017, Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar would be reported monthly to enable greater public transparency on forthcoming local board key decision timescales (Resolution number FR/2017/82).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the April 2019 update of the Franklin governance forward work calendar (Attachment A to the report entitled ‘Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar).

Horopaki / Context

6.       The governance forward work calendar brings together reporting on all of Franklin Local Board’s projects and activities previously approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes governing body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response. Inclusion on a formal business meeting agenda will allow greater transparency for the public.

7.       Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar is a more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.

8.       The forward work calendar is arranged in three columns: ‘Topic’, ‘Purpose’ and ‘Governance Role’:

i.)         Topic describes the items and may indicate how they fit in with broader processes such as the annual plan.

ii.)        Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates.

iii.)        Governance role is a high-level categorisation of the work of local boards.

9.       At its business meeting on 6 June 2017, Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar would be reported monthly to enable greater public transparency on forthcoming local board key decision timescales (Resolution number FR/2017/82).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     This report is an information report providing the governance forward work programme for the next six months.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     All local boards have been receiving governance forward work calendars on their business meeting agendas. This will support more effective management of the local board’s governance work.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The projects and processes referred to in the governance forward work calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     There are no financial implications relating to this report.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     This report is a point in time of the governance forward work calendar. It is a living document and updated month to month.  It minimises the risk of the board being unaware of planned topics for their consideration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     Staff will review the calendar each month and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

67

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

 

File No.: CP2019/04524

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 19 and 26 March and 2 April 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for19 and 26 March and 2 April  2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

3.       a)  receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 19 and 26 March and 2      April 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board workshop record 19 March 2019

71

b

Franklin Local Board workshop record 26 March 2019

73

c

Franklin Local Board workshop record 2 April 2019

75

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

16 April 2019