I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 17 April 2019

4.00pm

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Ann Hartley, JP

 

 

Kay McIntyre, QSM

 

 

Anne-Elise Smithson

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

Lindsay Waugh

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda  Short

Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

 

10 April 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: jacinda.short@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notice of Motion - Auckland Transport                                                                      7

12        Telephone Road Reserve, Chelsea Bay - install dog gating                                  13

13        Sulphur Beach Reserve gate installation                                                                 27

14        Reallocation of the 2018/2019 Kaipātiki small building sites ambassador project budget                                                                                                                                       31

15        Options for use of the Auckland Regional Services Trust grant in the Kaipātiki Local Board area                                                                                                                    35

16        Auckland Transport Monthly Update                                                                        47

17        Kaipātiki Local Board Grants Programme 2019/2020                                             65

18        Local board decisions and input into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028                                                          73

19        Department of Conservation proposal to revoke Reserves Act 1977 delegations 95

20        Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal resolution from Governing Body                                                                             125

21        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 September 2018 - 28 February 2019                                                                                                             235

22        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report                                                         245

23        Members' Reports                                                                                                     263

24        Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update   265

25        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - March 2019                                    267

26        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     279  

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

 

                  i.        A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

 

                 ii.        A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 20 March 2019, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Notice of Motion - Auckland Transport

File No.: CP2019/05434

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Chairperson J Gillon has given notice of motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice has been signed by Chairperson J Gillon and Deputy Chairperson D Grant as seconder, along with signatures of support from Member A Tyler, Member A Smithson and Member P Gillon.

3.       Supporting information is appended in Attachment A and B.

 

Motion

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      request that Auckland Transport consider delegating the required responsibilities, duties, function, and powers to allow

i)     landowner approval,

ii)    prioritisation of proposed projects, and

iii)    approval of related budgets.

to the respective local board, where they affect roads or assets in the local street network, noting that this is allowed for under section 45 “Delegations” of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, in particular clauses (1) and (8).

b)      request that where any required responsibilities, duties, functions, or powers to give effect to resolution a) above are determined to be contrary to the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 or any other legislation, that an equivalent process is found (such as Auckland Transport formally adopting local board resolutions).

c)      note that local boards currently have the equivalent delegation as outlined in resolution a) above in regards to assets, projects and land administered by the Community Facilities department of Auckland Council, and this may be a suitable model for Auckland Transport to consider adopting.

d)      request that this Notice of Motion and subsequent resolutions are circulated to all local boards for their information and consideration.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Notice of Motion  Auckland Transport

9

b

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting -  Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 - section 54

11

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Telephone Road Reserve, Chelsea Bay - install dog gating

File No.: CP2019/00705

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the solution options for the Telephone Road, Chelsea Bay dog gate installation project.

2.       To seek approval for the recommended option (option 2) and continue with the delivery of the Telephone Road Reserve, Chelsea Bay dog gate installation project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       In the current financial year’s work programme the local board included a project to implement a recommendation given by the Dog Bylaw Hearing Panel.

4.       From the Hearing Panel report at the Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting on 10 September 2014, it recommended that under control off-leash dog access be retained for the open grassed area within Telephone Road Reserve.

5.       The Hearing Panel also recommended that a gate be erected at the entrance to the track at the south western corner of Telephone Road Reserve (resolution number KT/2014/178).

6.       The report mentioned reasons for the recommendation include to protect public safety and comfort, protect wildlife and to provide for the needs of dogs and their owners.

7.       The project team has undertaken a site investigation and presented the outcome to the local board at the workshop on 14 November 2018. 

8.       The investigation identified five options for this project:

·    Option one: Do nothing

·    Option two: Installation of signs at both entrance points to clearly identify where the off-leash dog area begins and ends, applicable dog bylaws, and responsibilities of dog owners who are accessing the area.

·    Option three: Installation of signage (as per option 2) and an additional visible barrier

·    Option four: Install gate and fencing either at one (option 4a) or both entrances (option 4b)

·    Option five: Creation of a fenced off dog exercise area within the reserve. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the proposed option 2 as identified within the agenda report for the Telephone Road Reserve, Chelsea Bay dog gate installation project, which is to install signs at both entrance points to Telephone Road Reserve to clearly identify:

i)     where the off-leash dog area begins and ends;

ii)    applicable dog bylaws; and

iii)    responsibilities of dog owners who are accessing the area.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In June 2014, the Kaipātiki Local Board appointed a hearing panel (Kay McIntyre (Chair), Ann Hartley, John Gillon and Lorene Pigg) to hear and deliberate on submissions and other relevant information and recommend changes to the proposed changes to local dog access rules (resolution number KT/2014/113). 

10.     At its 10 September 2014 business meeting the Kaipātiki local board received the hearing panel report titled “Hearing Panel Report on Dog Access Rules in the Kaipātiki Local Board Area 2014”. The report recommended that under control off-leash dog access be retained for the open grassed area within Telephone Road Reserve and that a gate be erected at the entrance to the track at the south western corner of Telephone Road Reserve (resolution number KT/2014/178)

·     Submission Topic 1 – Chelsea Bay, Fitzpatrick Bay and Manuka Road foreshore, “note that a specific project to be progressed is the erection of a gate at the entrance to the track at the south western corner of Telephone Road Reserve”.

11.     The board adopted the amendments recommended in Hearing Panel Report on Dog Access rules at its 10 September 2014 business meeting (resolution number KT/2014/178).

12.     The Hearing Panel’s reasons for the recommendation in the report on 10 September 2014, include that they considered the proposed rule was the most appropriate way to protect public safety and comfort, protect wildlife and to provide for the needs of dogs and their owners.  

13.     The erection of a gate at the entrance to the track at the south western corner of Telephone Road Reserve was approved as part of the 2018/2019 work programme (resolution number KT/2018/142) and $10,000 of LDI (Locally Driven Initiative) Capex funding was allocated to the project.

14.     A review of the official complaints records (held by Auckland Council’s Animal Management team) showed that since September 2014 (when the job tracking system was implemented), no job tickets have been raised in relation to Telephone Road Reserve. The only job tickets raised in its proximity related to a barking dog further up on Telephone Road (around No.3, last ticket in October 2017). There is no evidence for ongoing issues with roaming dogs at this reserve.

15.     A site investigation was also undertaken and provided an overview of the sites geographics and the possible options that could be utilised to implement the recommendations of the hearing panel. It also identified alternative options to enable achieving the initial concerns raised by the Hearing Panel (refer paragraph 10). The outcome of the site investigation was presented to the local board at a workshop on 14 November 2018 and the presentation is attached to this report for further reference (refer to Attachment A).

16.     The project requires a decision from the local board on the preferred option to enable the project to proceed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     Council staff support option two, which is to install signs at both entrance points to Telephone Road Reserve that will clearly identify:

·     where the off-leash dog area begins and ends;

·     applicable dog bylaws; and

·     responsibilities of dog owners who are accessing the area.

18.     The table below provides a more detailed analysis of each option:

Option description

Analysis

Advice

Option one: Do nothing

 

The project is based on a recommendation rather than a resolution from the Hearing Panel.

Since the Hearing Panel recommendation was published, local board members may have received direct feedback from residents or other concerned parties, however those were never officially recorded with Auckland Council. The related risk identified for roaming dogs at the reserve is therefore minimal.

However due to the hearing panel’s raised concern and recommendation of a solution, an action (in whatever form) is advisable to address the risk.

This option is not recommended

Option two: Installation of signs at both entrance points to clearly identify

· where off leash area starts and ends,

· applicable dog bylaws and

· dog owner’s responsibilities




 

With this option signage would be erected at both entrances to the reserve to ensure consistency for all users.

Design would most likely consist of two signs installed per each entrance (installed on single post), one for entering and one for exiting the reserve.

For entering the reserve it would outline rules for keeping dogs under control off leash and to clean up after dogs.

For exiting the reserve it would alert to the off-leash area ending and on-leash are starting.

Consequential opex cost for this solution would be minimal.

Signage is a good “value-for-money” option to account for Auckland Council’s responsibilities in relation to the Health & Safety Act and to ensure public awareness of rules for use of parks and reserves.

While this does not align with the solution recommended by the Hearing Panel, it will address the risk that was flagged in an adequate way.

This is the recommended option.

 

Option three: installation of signage (as per option 2) and an additional visible barrier (e.g. a self-closing swing gate)

 

In addition to the signage described in option two, this option would see the additional installation of a visible barrier. This would provide an additional hold-point for dog owners entering and exiting the reserve and would support the clear distinction between on-leash and off-leash areas.

Refer to sample photo below as to what this could look like:

The installation of a visual barrier would not have any effect on the dogs, just the dog owner. While in reserves with higher fluctuation of visitors this would be a good additional measure to address risk, in this case there is minimal additional value to the signage as proposed in option two.

This option is not recommended.

Option four: Install gate and fencing either at

a)   southwestern-entrance (turnoff point Inkster Road to Telephone Road Reserve track) only or

b)   south-western entrance (turnoff point Inkster Road to Telephone Road Reserve track) and eastern entrance (Telephone Road reserve to Telephone Road)

 

This option incorporates the solution that was proposed by the hearing panel and would see the erection of either one or two gates to restrict access to/from Telephone Road Reserve for dogs.

This option would see the erection of a gate at the south-western entrance at the start of the track from Inkster Road. (An installation further down the track at the actual entry point to the reserve) was considered, however due to tree consent requirements and the related extensive installation costs decided against). The gate would be accompanied by fencing that would run along the Inkster Road track (currently a handrail only) and additional fencing along the left of the track down to Telephone Road Reserve. The fencing is required to ensure dogs are not by-passing by running through the bush.

To fully restrict the ability of dogs to run off from the off-leash area a second gate would be installed at the eastern entrance which leads onto Telephone Road. As this access route is alongside a great number of non-fenced properties and dogs could easily bypass the gate by entering private properties, the gate installation will need to be accompanied by another fence to run the length of the access path from Telephone Road to the reserve.

The installation of fencing and gates will require regular maintenance checks to ensure conditions of gate and fence remain safe. The costs to renew would be similar to the initial installation costs due to the restricted access of the work site.

As previously identified, there have been no recorded issues at the reserve since September 2014 and therefore no benefits could be identified from implementing this option that would justify the outlined consequential opex cost.

This option is not recommended.

Option five: creation of a fenced off dog exercise area within the reserve, including fencing, gate, poo bag dispenser and dog rule signage

 

Option five would see a fenced off dog exercise being erected on the open grass area of the Telephone Road Reserve. This would address the risks identified by the hearing panel and would not only mitigate the risk to public safety and comfort,  but would also address the risk of dogs roaming onto private properties. As the open grass area visible is partially private and partially public land, this is the best way to clearly restrict access to private land.

The implementation of this option would see the erection of a fence, double access gate, signage (rules of use), doggy bag dispenser (optional) and rubbish bin (optional).

Depending on the extent of installation of above components, consequential opex costs to maintain would be highly out of balance as a response to an already minor risk.

The installation of a fenced dog exercise area would also change the look and feel of the reserve which seems undesirable at this stage.

This option is not recommended.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought in this report has no impact on the rest of the council group. There is a possible workload increase on the Animal Management team internal to Auckland Council as the installation of signage may improve the general public’s awareness of the dog rules at this particular reserve which could lead to an increase in job’s logged for non-compliance.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought will have a local impact only and the effects are limited to users of this particular reserve and neighbourhood.

21.     The options were presented to the Local Board and discussed at a workshop on 14 November 2018.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     No culturally significant factors have been identified in the projects identified in this report.

23.     Therefore, no further consultation with the Parks and Recreation North West Mana Whenua Engagement Forum is required.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The following table summarises the expenditure required for the project:

 

Option

Cost estimate

Option One

Do nothing

$ 2,000.00

Option Two

Installation of signage

$ 5,000.00

Option Three

Signage and visual barrier

$ 7,500.00

Option Four

Install gate and fence

a)    One entrance

b)    Both entrances

Note: option four dependent on tree consent approval refer above for details.

 

 

$ 14,025.00

$ 25,725.00

Option Five

Fenced off dog exercise area

 

Note: costs could increase depending on optional items chosen for installation as per outlined above (refer to ‘Analysis and Advice’ above).

$18,700.00

 

25.     The allocated budget for the project is $10,000 (LDI Capex). Any underspent will be returned to the local board to re-allocate should the local board choose another project that needs additional funding.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The recommendation made by the Hearing Panel flagged a possible risk to the public’s safety and comfort as well as a risk of damage to wildlife.

27.     The likelihood of such a risk was assessed as very unlikely due to the site showing little sign of use by dog owners and being an open grassed space (limiting the potential for dog aggression). If any harm to the public were to occur, the consequences could possibly be discomfort or injury from dog bites in the most severe cases and overall rates as moderate.  Overall the risk can be assessed as low.

28.     Another risk flagged was the risk to wildlife caused by roaming dogs. While no detailed analysis of the local wildlife in this reserve was investigated, there did not appear to be any endangered species or ground breeding birds present. The likelihood was therefore assessed to be very unlikely. The worst possible consequence could potentially be the death of wildlife, although the overall risk is moderate.

29.     Reputational risk is something that needs to be considered in general. However, in this particular case, none of the outlined options would adversely affect reputational risk.

30.     While all outlined options provide mitigating actions to reduce the above outlined risks, the recommended option provides a well-balanced and the most suitable mitigation for the risks identified.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     The next steps for this project will be determined by the option that will be approved by the local board.

32.     For option one, the project will be wrapped up and closed off.

33.     For options two to five the project team will work on a design for the chosen option, develop timeline for delivery and start tender process for the installation works.

34.     No further approval step is expected to be required unless the local board communicates otherwise.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Telephone Road Reserve, Chelsea Bay - installation of dog gate

19

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Barbara Heise – Project Manager Community Facilities

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Sulphur Beach Reserve gate installation

File No.: CP2019/03844

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board for the restriction of evening access to the Sulphur Beach Reserve carpark and boat ramp.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Sulphur Beach Reserve carpark and boat ramp (“the site”) is located on Sulphur Beach Road, Northcote and is currently open to the public at all times.

3.       The carpark is being routinely used for anti-social behaviour in the evenings and has led to numerous complaints for excessive noise, vandalism and theft.

4.       A request to review the access to this reserve has been received from New Zealand Police Sergeant Andrew Hawkins, as well as from Matthew Bourne – Commercial and Marina Operations Manager - Viaduct Marina, who operate and lease the dinghy lockers on site.

5.       The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the renewal project of the Sulphur Beach park roading and car park (ID 1824) as part of the 2018/2019 Kaipātiki Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme (resolution number KT/2018/142). Restricting access to the site, and the associated costs, are covered within the renewal project budget. 

6.       In order to restrict evening access to the site, a security gate needs to be installed.

7.       The site is owned and maintained by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities. The site has no suitable locations to install a gate safely.

8.       Sulphur Beach Road is owned by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) and maintained by Auckland Transport (AT). The adjacent reserve is owned by NZTA and maintained by Auckland Council Community Facilities. Requisite permission to install a gate on NZTA land has been requested and received.

9.       The solution proposed is to install a security gate along Sulphur Beach Road at a location suitable to allow vehicles to turn around when the gate is encountered. The proposed location is lit by adjacent motorway lighting and is visible to motorway traffic to avoid vandalism.

10.     The gate will be secured with a combination lock and the code may be gained by contacting the Auckland Council call centre number in urgent circumstances.

11.     The gate will be locked each evening on the following seasonal schedule:
Summer – 10:00pm until 5:30am.
Winter – 9:00pm until 5:30am.

12.     The proposal has been notified to the public and key stakeholders including mooring lease holders, dinghy locker lease holders, 100 local residential addresses, Viaduct Marina, the Harbourmaster and New Zealand Police Sergeant Andrew Hawkins. This notification was released on Monday 4 March 2019. Early feedback from a number of the above stakeholders was included in the final proposal prior to release of this notification.

13.     Stakeholders were given two weeks to provide feedback.

14.     A copy of all feedback received during the design and notification period was provided to the local board at its workshop on 27 March 2019.  

15.     A summary of this feedback would find that the majority of stakeholders support the installation of the gate and the proposed access. Three submissions were received querying the final location of the gate and requesting that this be moved further toward the Beach Road and Sulphur Beach Road intersection, citing proximity to housing and the dampness of the proposed turning area in winter. The location recommended in this report was agreed in principal on site by Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and New Zealand Police.

16.     The intention of the installation is to reduce the patronage of the area at night rather than shifting the disturbance issue to the gate’s location.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the installation of the security gate on Sulphur Beach Road at the proposed location (refer Attachment A of the agenda report).

b)      approve the proposed hours of access and operation of after-hours access (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Sulphur Beach Reserve notice of gate installation

29

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Philip Goulter – Project Manager Community Facilities  

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Reallocation of the 2018/2019 Kaipātiki small building sites ambassador project budget

File No.: CP2019/04406

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the reallocation of $10,000 from the 2018/2019 small building sites ambassador project towards an expansion of the 2018/2019 industry pollution prevention programme project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Kaipātiki June 2018 business meeting, the local board allocated $20,000 towards a new project focused on reducing the impact small building sites have on the environment (resolution number KT/2018/113).

3.       A small building site is defined as a residential or commercial site that does not require a resource consent. These sites are largely unmonitored by council. The small building sites project would engage an ambassador to work with council’s Licensing and Regulatory Compliance team to identify targeted small building site areas and reduce the amount of sedimentation and litter produced from small building sites entering waterways.

4.       After reviewing council’s building consents data, staff identified significantly fewer small building sites in the local board area than was originally estimated when the project was initially proposed. Most of the building activity happening in the local board area require resource consent, and therefore council’s compliance team are already actively monitoring these sites.

5.       As the small building sites ambassador will be required to undertake fewer site visits, this budget has been revised from $20,000 down to $10,000. Staff identified an alternative streamside awareness project for reallocation of the $10,000 underspend, and presented this option to the board at the 13 February 2019 workshop. The board indicated it would prefer to support an expansion of the board funded industry pollution prevention programme rather than the streamside awareness project.

6.       Staff recommend that the board reallocate $10,000 of budget from the small building sites ambassador project towards an expansion of the 2018/2019 industry pollution prevention programme project. An expanded industry pollution prevention programme would be delivered in the 2018/2019 financial year and would support additional site inspections of up to 40 businesses in the Wairau Creek catchment area. This would increase the board’s total investment in this project from $30,000 to $40,000 in the 2018/2019 financial year.

7.       If the board does not approve the reallocation of budget towards the proposed expanded industry pollution prevention programme at its April 2019 business meeting, there is a risk that this project cannot be delivered within the current financial year and budget will not be spent.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the reallocation of $10,000 of locally driven initiatives operational budget from the 2018/2019 small building sites ambassador project towards an expansion of the 2018/2019 industry pollution prevention programme project.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Kaipātiki Local Board Plan includes the outcome ‘a natural environment protected for future generations to enjoy’. To achieve this the board allocated $225,000 towards its local environment work programme in June 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/113), including $20,000 towards a new project focused on reducing the impact small building sites have on local waterways.

9.       A small building site is defined as a residential or commercial site that does not require a resource consent. A small building site may have a land use consent, building consent or be a permitted activity. The council’s compliance team are resourced to actively monitor regionally consented building sites, such as larger scale subdivision earthworks, and therefore small building sites are largely unmonitored.

10.     The small building sites ambassador project is primarily educational, and aims to reduce the amount of sedimentation and litter from small building sites entering local waterways by engaging an ambassador to:

·    work with council’s compliance team to identify targeted small building site areas;

·    undertake proactive monitoring of identified small building sites; and

·    provide best practice education to small sites builders.

11.     The identification of targeted small building sites is reliant on council’s building consents data, which gives an indication of building activity that is not being actively monitored by council’s compliance team.

12.     In the Kaipātiki Local Board area, preliminary investigations by the council’s compliance team have determined there are significantly fewer small building sites than was originally estimated. Most of the development happening in the area is brownfield development and infill subdivisions. These types of building activities require resource consents, and therefore council’s compliance team are already actively monitoring these sites.

13.     There will be less site visits required to be undertaken by the ambassador than was budgeted for in the original project scope. The funding required to deliver the small building sites ambassador project has been revised from $20,000 down to $10,000.

14.     An underspend of $10,000 has been identified and options for reallocation of this budget are discussed in the analysis and advice section of this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Staff investigated alternative options to reallocate the budget of $10,000 from the small sites ambassador programme. The first option, a streamside awareness pilot project, was discussed with the board at a workshop on 13 February 2019. This purpose of this project was to undertake a survey in a targeted area to engage with local residents and connect them with educational workshops and stream improvement programmes in the local board area.

16.     At this same workshop, the board received an update on the 2018/2019 industry pollution prevention programme which targeted businesses in the Wairau Creek catchment area. The project has been successfully completed, resulting in a total of 121 site visits with 60 per cent of the recommended improvements being adopted.

17.     The board indicated it would prefer to support an expansion of the industry pollution prevention programme and asked staff to investigate the option of reallocating the $10,000 towards this option instead of the streamside awareness project. Staff agreed to investigate this option and present recommendations to the board for formal resolution at a business meeting.

Recommend allocating $10,000 towards an expanded industry pollution prevention programme

18.     Expanding the 2018/2019 industry pollution prevention programme with a further $10,0000 of funding will enable up to 40 additional site inspections of businesses in the Wairau Creek catchment area, which have not yet been visited, in the 2018/2019 financial year.

19.     This programme is primarily educational, and aims to inform urban business about the impacts their activities may be having on local waterways. Site inspections involve discussion with the business owners about potential issues around pollution as well as waste minimisation techniques. If improvement opportunities are identified, a report is sent to the business detailing recommended changes.

20.     Staff recommend an expansion of the 2018/2019 industry pollution prevention programme for the following reasons: 

·        The contractor has already successfully undertaken 121 site visits in the Wairau Creek catchment area and has the capacity and resource to undertake additional site visits this financial year.

·        Wairau Creek catchment includes the Wairau Valley industrial area which has a large number of business. Increased investment in the industry pollution prevention programme will enable the project to reach more businesses in the Wairau Valley area sooner.

·        The programme will contribute towards the same local board plan objective as the original small building sites ambassador project by working to prevent pollutants from entering local waterways.

·        If the board approves the funding reallocation at its April 2019 business meeting, this programme can be delivered within the 2018/2019 financial year.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Healthy Waters staff already oversee the delivery of the industry pollution prevention programme and have confirmed sufficient resource and capacity to deliver this project in the current financial year.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     At a workshop with the board on 13 February 2019, the board gave direction that they would be supportive of an expansion of the 2018/2019 industry pollution prevention programme. This option will deliver on outcome two of the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan, ‘our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy’.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     It is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

24.     The industry pollution prevention programme works to improve the mauri of the waterways, so healthy ecosystems and biodiversity can be sustained.

25.     Specific engagement with mana whenua will not be undertaken for either of the discussed options.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The recommended option can be delivered within existing budgets, as it will involve the reallocation of $10,000 from the 2018/2019 small building sites ambassador project towards an expansion of the 2018/2019 industry pollution prevention programme project.

27.     If the board does not approve the reallocation of budget towards the proposed expanded industry pollution prevention programme at its April 2019 business meeting, an alternative water quality project cannot be delivered using these funds.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     The purpose of the industrial pollution prevention programme is educational and aims to inform industry and business on the impacts that their activities may be having on local waterways if they are not managed well. Improvements can only be encouraged and not enforced unless a spill is detected in which case the business will be offered spill training and the case will be referred to council’s compliance team.

29.     A risk of the industry pollution prevention programme is that recommendations provided to businesses are not followed. However, 60 per cent of businesses have followed the recommendations to date so this risk is considered low.

30.     If the board does not approve the reallocation of budget towards this project at its April 2019 business meeting, there is a risk that $10,000 of operational expenditure will be given up as savings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Subject to approval at the board’s April 2019 business meeting, the expanded industry pollution prevention programme will be completed by 30 June 2019. Quarterly reporting on project delivery will be provided through the Infrastructure and Environmental Services contribution to the board’s quarterly performance report.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gabi Ezeta – Healthy Waters Specialist

Authorisers

Craig Mcilroy – General Manager Healthy Waters

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Options for use of the Auckland Regional Services Trust grant in the Kaipātiki Local Board area

File No.: CP2019/05305

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the use of legacy Auckland Regional Services Trust (ARST) funding and unspent Community Arts Programme budget for a public artwork in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In December 2009, the North Shore City Council (NSCC) made a grant of $300,000 to the Shore Exhibition Trust to establish a new exhibition centre in Takapuna.

3.       Around $30,000 of this funding was spent during the initial planning and business case stage leaving a balance of $270,833.33.

4.       In October 2017, it was determined that the new exhibition centre project would not proceed, and the funds would be reallocated to local boards within the boundaries of the former NSCC (resolution number DT/2017/227).

5.       Due to the project no longer proceeding, the remaining funds have been reallocated to four local boards on the North Shore; Devonport-Takapuna, Hibiscus and Bays, Kaipātiki and Upper Harbour. The funds were reallocated based on the Local Boards Funding Policy.

6.       The Kaipātiki Local Board has received $96,913, which is allocated to 2018/2019 work programme line 1780 for arts and culture purposes.

7.       From the options outlined in this report, staff recommend allocating this budget to Kaipātiki Public Arts Trust to deliver a public artwork.

8.       There is $6,118.75 remaining from the Community Arts Programmes for 2018/2019. It is recommended that this remaining budget be combined with the allocation for the Kaipātiki Local Board from the legacy ARST fund to better enable approved projects and help groups meet the criteria of local board priorities and the Community Grants Policy.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the use of $96,913 legacy Auckland Regional Services Trust fund, in work programme line 1780, towards a public art for Kaipātiki.

b)      approve the transfer of $6,118 in unspent Community Arts Programme funding in 2018/2019 work programme line 256 to the $96,913 Auckland Regional Services Trust fund to create an available budget envelope of $103.031.

c)      approve a grant of $103,031 to the Kaipātiki Public Arts Trust to deliver a public artwork in Oruamo Domain.

d)      approve the following public art outcomes through the development of a piece of public art that:

i)     delights, welcomes, inspires and reflects the unique identity of the neighborhood, noting this outcome aligns with the Public Art Policy;

ii)    reflects one of The Mental Health Foundation’s Ways to Wellbeing; connect, take notice, keep learning, give and be active, noting this outcome aligns with Kaipātiki Local Board Plan;

iii)    supports pride of place in offering a visual focus that refreshes the experience of the space; and

iv)   is considered with affection and becomes part of the soul of the place.

e)      support the following objectives and note that both would have an impact on budget and remain cognisant of the reserve management plan objectives in approving the final artwork:

i)     a tactile and/or kinetic artwork; and

ii)    of scale and size to make a visual impact.

f)       appoint a local board member to the selection panel, and delegate this member to undertake the following responsibilities on behalf of the local board:

i)     finalise the project brief alongside the selection panel;

ii)    decide and rationalise the artist selection criteria alongside the selection panel;

iii)    advocate for the views of the local board; and

iv)   decide on the artist alongside the selection panel.

g)      approve the process map as outlined in Attachment A in the report.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In December 2009, the North Shore City Council (NSCC) made a grant of $300,000 to the Shore Exhibition Trust to establish a new exhibition centre in Takapuna.

10.     Approximately $30,000 of this funding was spent during the planning stage, leaving a balance of $270,833.33.

11.     In October 2017, it was determined that the project would not proceed, and the funds would be reallocated to local boards within the boundaries of the former NSCC (resolution number DT/2017/227).

12.     The remaining balance of funds was distributed to the following four local boards:

·        Devonport-Takapuna;

·        Hibiscus and Bays;

·        Kaipātiki; and

·        Upper Harbour.

13.     The Kaipātiki Local Board received $96,913, which is allocated to 2018/2019 work programme line 1780 for arts and culture purposes.

14.     An amount of $10,000 was allocated to Community Arts Programmes in the 2018/2019 work programme line 256, of which $3,881.25 was used to contribute to the purchase of The Night Guide Birkenhead Owl at the 23 May 2018 Community Forum meeting (resolution number KAI/2018/29).

15.     In considering the arts and culture opportunities to be delivered in 2018/2019, the local board resolved their preference for using the funding for an initiative that created an enduring positive impact in the community:

“Resolution number KT/2018/28

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson D Grant, seconded by Chairperson J Gillon:

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

c)      note that $96,913 of operational budget will be made available in the 2018/2019 year to be used for arts and culture purposes as part of the return and redistribution of the Shore Exhibition Trust grant that was provided under the Auckland Regional Service Trust grants scheme to the Shore Exhibition Centre Trust prior to the amalgamation of council.

d)      request that as part of the 2018/2019 ACE (Arts, Community and Events) work programme, staff advise how the budget referenced in resolution number KT/2018/21 c) above can used towards implementing arts and culture initiatives, programmes and events as outlined in the local board plan with a preference for those initiatives, programmes and events that create an enduring positive impact in the community.”

16.     The local board has indicated during discussions with staff that it is seeking a piece of public art to be funded from its allocated ARST funding.

17.     The local board is required to decide on how to fund the public art and the location as per its delegation.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Three options have been prepared, bearing in mind the timeframes and the relatively modest quantum of funding considering the local board’s desire for a public artwork:

Public art funding options

Option one

Allocate the full amount towards the development of a standalone public art work in the Kaipātiki Local Board area and administer the funding through a third party. Officers will work in partnership with council’s Public Art team to ensure there is alignment to the Public Art Policy, with the agreement that the artwork will be accepted in to the public art collection through the gifting policy.

Option two

Allocate the full amount towards the development of a standalone public art work in the Kaipātiki Local Board area. The local board will undertake its own contestable or non-contestable process for a community group or artist to manage the full project end-to-end. Art work may or may not be accepted into the public art collection.

Option three

Establish local board outcomes, but no specified output, run open expression of interest (EOI) for ideas from the community for arts and culture projects that would meet those outcomes. The local board could then fund one or several ideas, depending upon the nature of the EOIs received.

19.     The table below outlines the strengths and weaknesses of the options:

Option

Strengths

Weaknesses

Option one

·    Acceptance of the artwork into the public art collection means the local board do not have to provide CAPEX budget for artwork maintenance.

·    A partnership approach allows a locally-led initiative while working alongside public art subject matter experts.

·    A funding agreement can be administered immediately.

·    Additional partners and stakeholders may impact project timelines.

·    There may be a perceived lack of transparency if the fund is allocated through a non-contestable process.

Option two

 

·    This is a community-led approach to commissioning public artwork.

·    A funding agreement can be administered immediately.

 

·    The local board would need to pay for maintenance if the art work is not accepted into the public art collection.

·    There may be a perceived lack of transparency if the fund is allocated through a non-contestable process.

Option three

·    This process is transparent and accessible.

·    There is an ability to harness all potential ideas.

·    The local board will control the exact output of the project.

 

·    An EOI process can take several months to complete, whereas a non-contestable grant can be administered immediately.

·    There may be a high number of applicants from the EOI process, which can be mitigated by using assessment criteria.

·    It is unlikely that a permanent public artwork will be achieved through this option due to unique expertise required to site a permanent standalone public artwork.

 

 

20.     Staff recommend Option one – to allocate the full amount towards the development of a standalone public art work in the Kaipātiki Local Board area, and to administer funding through a third party.  Officers will work in partnership with council’s public art team to ensure there is alignment to the Public Art Policy, with the agreement that artwork will be accepted in to the public art collection through the gifting policy.

21.     The preferred option is recommended as it allows community expertise to work alongside council in delivering a public artwork that may be accessioned into the public art collection.

Process

22.     The process map (refer Attachment A) outlines the gateways where the third-party provider will seek input from Auckland Council, the Kaipātiki Local Board and the Auckland Public Art Advisory Panel.

23.     A selection panel will be formed with representation from all partners in the project so that there is insight and transparency during the artist selection process. The selection panel will be made up of:

·        Three members from the third-party provider;

·        One member of the local board; and

·        One representative from Auckland Council Public Art team.

The selection panel will be responsible for:

·        Finalising the project brief;

·        Deciding and providing rationale on the selection process;

·        Finalising the selection criteria; and

·        Ensuring that the proposed artwork is appropriate for the site.

24.     The process map also considers the procedures and gateways for the Public Art Policy. In agreeing to the partnership with the public art team, the third party and local board will adhere to the policy and include one public art policy outcome in the project brief.

Third party delivery

25.     Should the local board approve option one, it is recommended that the local board grant Kaipātiki Public Arts Trust (KPAT) the funding to deliver the artwork.

26.     KPAT is a charitable trust that was set up to develop public art projects in the Kaipātiki area that are of enduring quality, accessible to the public and stimulate public interest. The trust has experience in managing infrastructure projects in public spaces, including providing input to Zion Hill and Croftfield Lane. They are also well recognised by the community with their annual youth short film festival, ‘Short Shorts’.

27.     Other third parties that may be considered are:

·        Kaipātiki Communities Facilities Trust: as a trusted community development provider the trust has delivered murals for the local board, however this hasn’t been signalled as a desired outcome by the local board.

·        Northart: as the only art facility funded in the local board area, Northart have strong interest and expertise in the subject. However, as they are positioned in Northcote there will be unique opportunities for them to be involved in Northcote public art outcomes that have been signaled as part of the Panuku redevelopment of the town centre.

Location

28.     The local board has the allocated decision-making authority over most public land use in the local board area.

29.     Staff have discussed possible location options with the local board during a workshop on 6 March 2019. The local board supported the following criteria:

·        That the artwork be placed in a neighbourhood that doesn’t currently have a piece of public artwork;

·        That the placement of an artwork would assure visibility to a significant number of people;

·        That preference to be given to a greenspace due to the budget allowance and the complexity of working in town centres with many stakeholders; and

·        That the Northcote area not be considered as a suitable location, as a Northcote public art plan is being finalised which will inform any future investment in public art in that area.

30.     Preliminary location discussions included Totara Vale and Glenfield.

31.     Oruamo Domain was supported by the local board as a possible location for the artwork at the 6 March workshop (refer Attachment B).

32.     In investigating the suitability of an artwork in Oruamo Domain, the project team noted that the artwork would have to adhere to the following objectives from the domain’s reserve management plan (RMP):

·        5.3.1: That all modifications to the reserve be sympathetic to the site’s open green space character

·        5.3.2: That no structure such as a lookout tower or play equipment be installed that would create a dominant element within the visual catchment of the reserve

·        Objective 5.2: To develop and maintain the reserve in a way which encourages public use of the amenity

·        Policy 5.2.6: That consideration be given to the visual impact of colours and materials chosen for site furniture to produce an environmentally friendly result.

33.     On 3 April 2019, the RMP objectives were workshopped with the local board, which remained supportive of working within the nuances of the Oruamo Domain. The recommended third-party deliverer endorsed this approach.

Unspent community arts programme budget

34.     An amount of $6,118.75 remains from the $10,000 allocated to Community Arts Programmes in the 2018/2019 work programme. Given the small amount of available budget, staff recommend that this be combined with the allocation to the Kaipātiki Local Board of the legacy ARST fund for a better public art outcome.

35.     Should the local board decide against combining the remainder of the budget put towards Community Arts Programmes with the Kaipātiki Local Board’s allocation of the legacy ARST fund, the council’s Arts Advisor will work with the local board to scope suitable arts projects to be delivered in 2018/2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The Stakeholder and Land Advisory team will be impacted by this decision and have been notified of the proposed artwork location.

37.     Land Advisory and Arts and Culture units will seek land owner approval from the local board at a future business meeting.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     Workshops were attended by staff on 28 November 2018, 6 March 2019 and 3 April 2019.

39.     During the workshops the local board expressed its desire to see outcomes that included:

·        Pride in place;

·        Artwork that delights, welcomes, inspires, is enjoyable and considered with affection;

·        Potential to reflect the local board’s desire to have projects that fulfil the Mental Health Organisation, Ways to Wellbeing; and

·        Artwork that contributes to the character of a neighbourhood.

40.     The local board identified the following Public Art Policy outcome to be included in the artwork brief:

·        Artwork(s) that makes a statement and will be a key addition to the Kaipātiki Local Board area (Public Art Policy outcome).

41.     The local board also identified potential objectives for the selection criteria, noting that they may have an impact on budget. The objectives favoured by the local board were:

·        The possibility of a tactile and/or kinetic artwork (movement, shadows, interactive, climbable); and

·        Of scale and size to make a visual impact from a far and up close.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     The third-party art project deliverer will lead communication or engagement with local Māori in regard to the location chosen.

43.     This fund was not identified as specifically targeted towards a Māori arts and culture outcome by the local board.

44.     No specific outcomes have been identified that will directly impact Māori as part of this project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     The 2018/2019 work programme line 1780 has a budget of $96,913, from the legacy ARST fund, to be allocated to arts and culture groups and projects.

46.     The Kaipātiki Local Board Arts, Community Events 2018/2019 work programme line 256 had a budget of $10,000, carried over from 2017/2018, of which $6,118.75 remains.

47.     If the funding is unallocated this financial year, it cannot be carried across to the financial year 2019/2020 and would be lost.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     Using a non-contestable process, there is a risk that the approach will be perceived to be non-transparent.

49.     To mitigate this risk, staff recommend that the local board have representation on the selection panel, and that the panel’s rationale for the artist selection is provided to the local board and council’s Public Art unit.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     Immediate next steps:

·        If the local board support the option one recommendation, staff will administer a funding agreement with the chosen third party.

·        The selection panel will finalise the brief and decide on the artist selection process.

·        The third party and local board representative will keep the local board informed as per the process map (refer Attachment A).

·        Should the local board support option two or three, staff will work with local community stakeholders and the chosen third party and report to a future local board business meeting.

51.     Next formal decision:

·        Staff and third-party provider will report to a future business meeting of the local board to seek land approval with a detail design for the final artwork.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Process map for ARST funding

45

b

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Map of Oruamo Domain

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Marieke Numan – Arts and Culture Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update

File No.: CP2019/02156

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Auckland Transport Monthly Update Kaipātiki Local Board April 2019 report is attached.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Transport Monthly Update Kaipātiki Local Board April 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Auckland Transport Monthly Update April 2019

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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17 April 2019

 

 

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17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Grants Programme 2019/2020

File No.: CP2019/04215

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy was implemented on 1 July 2015. The policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Kaipātiki Grants Programme 2019/2020 for adoption (refer Attachment A).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      adopt the Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2019/2020 as included as Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy was implemented on 1 July 2015. The policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.         The local board community grants programme includes:

·    outcomes as identified in the local board plan;

·    specific local board grant priorities;

·    which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing dates;

·    any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply; and

·    other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       Once the local board grants programme for the 2019/2020 financial year has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Kaipātiki Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board on Wednesday 27 March 2019, and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2019/2020.

10.       The proposed 2019/20 grant programme includes:

·      grant round dates which exclude decision dates coinciding with the local government   elections in October 2019;

·      an additional lower priority of more than one application from an organisation in a financial year; and

·      an additional exclusion for koha (cash donations).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations, and therefore their views are not required.

12.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of their grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018 -2028 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     An implementation plan is underway, and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Grants Programme 2019/2020.

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Grant Operations Manager

Authorisers

Shane King - Head of Operations Support

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Local board decisions and input into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028

File No.: CP2019/05079

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve local financial matters for the local board agreement 2019/2020, which need to be considered by the Governing Body in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

2.       To seek feedback on regional topics in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Auckland Council’s Annual Budget contains 21 local board agreements which are the responsibility of local boards. These agreements set out local funding priorities, budgets, levels of service and performance measures. This report seeks decisions on local financial matters for the local board agreement, including:

·        any new/amended business improvement district (BID) targeted rates;

·        any new/amended local targeted rate proposals; 

·        proposed locally driven initiative (LDI) capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility;

·        release of local board specific reserve funds; and

·        any advocacy initiatives.

4.       Auckland Council consulted with the public from 17 February to 17 March 2019 to seek community views on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10‑year Budget 2018-2028, and the local board priorities included in the local board agreements. This report seeks local board views on the following:

·        regional annual budget topics: including changes to rates and fees, the draft Tūpuna Maunga o Tamaki Makaurau Authority – Operational Plan 2019/2020, and other budget information; and

·        the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers.

5.       Auckland Council also consulted on the Our Water Future discussion document. A draft strategy from the Our Water Future discussion document will be developed. Local boards will have the opportunity to provide input into this in early 2020.

6.       Local board views on these regional plans will be considered by the Governing Body (or relevant committee) before making final decisions on the plans.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive consultation feedback on the Kaipātiki Local Board priorities for 2019/2020 (refer Attachment A of the agenda report).

b)      recommend any new or amended business improvement district targeted rates to the Governing Body.

c)      recommend any new or amended local targeted rate proposals to the Governing Body.

d)      recommend that the Governing Body approves any proposed locally driven initiative capital projects, which are outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility. 

e)      recommend the release of local board specific reserve funds to the Governing Body.

f)       approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2019/2020 Local Board Agreement.

g)      receive consultation feedback on regional proposals in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers from people or organisations based in the Kaipātiki Local Board area (refer Attachment A of the agenda report).

h)      provide feedback on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.

i)        provide feedback on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board agreements form part of the Auckland Council’s annual budget and set out local funding priorities, budgets, levels of service and performance measures. This report details local board decisions and recommendations that need to be made in April/early-May 2019 to allow them to be considered by the Governing Body in the annual budget process.

8.       Local boards also advocate to the Governing Body for funding for projects that cannot be accommodated within their local budgets. These advocacy initiatives are attached as an appendix to the local board agreement.

9.       Local boards are responsible for providing local input into regional strategies, policies and plans. Local board plans reflect community priorities and preferences and are key documents that guide both the development of local board agreements and input into regional plans.

10.     Auckland Council publicly consulted on the following two plans from 17 February to 17 March 2019:

·        annual budget (which includes both regional issues and local board key priorities); and 

·        the proposed amendment to the 10-year budget.

11.     Across the region, 2278 people attended 65 engagement events. Feedback was received through written, event and social media channels.

12.     Consultation feedback on the Kaipātiki Local Board priorities for 2019/2020, and on regional proposals in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10‑year budget regarding property transfers, from people or organisations based in the Kaipātiki Local Board area are summarised in Attachment A of this report. A copy of all submissions from the Kaipātiki Local Board area are provided in Attachment B of this report. The feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the local board before they agree their local board agreement in early June 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local financial matters for the local board agreement

13.     This report allows the local board to agree its input and recommend other local financial matters to the Governing Body in early May 2019. This is to allow time for the Governing Body to consider these items in the annual budget process (decisions made in June 2019).

Local targeted rate and business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals

14.     Local boards are required to endorse any new locally targeted rate proposals or BID targeted rate proposals in their local board area (noting that any new local targeted rates and/or BIDs must have been consulted on before they can be implemented).

Funding for locally driven initiatives (LDI)

15.     Local boards are allocated funding annually to spend on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. This funding is for ‘locally driven initiatives’ or LDI. Local boards can approve LDI capital projects up to $1 million; projects over that amount need approval from the Governing Body. 

16.     Local boards can recommend to the Governing Body to convert LDI operational funding to capital expenditure for 2019/2020 if there is a specific need to do so, or Governing Body approval may be needed for the release of local board specific reserve funds, which are funds being held by the council for a specific purpose.

17.     Local boards can defer LDI projects where there was an agreed scope and cost, but the project/s have not been delivered.

Local board advocacy

18.     Local boards are requested to approve any advocacy initiatives for consideration by the Governing Body and inclusion (as an appendix) to the 2019/2020 Local Board Agreement, noting that in this triennium, a longer-term approach has been taken to progress initiatives that are unable to be funded by local board budgets. The approach used the annual budget, 10-year budget and local board plan processes to progress and advise on a narrower range of local board initiatives in a more comprehensive way.

19.     As part of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028, additional funding was provided to progress the priority advocacy initiative of each local board (the one local initiative (OLI)). All OLIs are progressing with funding either allocated or earmarked in the 10-year budget. 

Local board input on regional plans

20.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the context of the strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws of Auckland Council. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on two plans, namely, the Annual Budget 2019/2020, and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers. 

Regional issues in the Annual Budget 2019/2020

21.     The annual budget sets out Auckland Council priorities and how it is going to pay for them. The regional consultation on the proposed annual budget focused on two topics:

·        changes to rates and fees, including:

o   annual waste management changes;

o   food scraps targeted rate;

o   Waitākere rural sewerage targeted rate;

o   urban boundary rating;

o   rating of religious use properties;

o   regulatory fees; and

·        draft Tūpuna Maunga o Tamaki Makaurau Authority – Operational Plan 2019/2020.

22.     The consultation on the annual budget also included key priorities for each local board area. Decisions on local board priorities will be made when local board agreements are considered in June 2019.

23.     The feedback form contained one question relating to changes to rates and fees. Consultation feedback received from the Kaipātiki Local Board area on key regional issues in the annual budget are summarised in Attachment A, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

24.     Local boards may wish to provide feedback on these regional issues for consideration by the Governing Body. 

The proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers

25.     The regional consultation on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 focused on a proposal to transfer the legal ownership of $790 million of city centre waterfront properties from Panuku to Auckland Council. Panuku would continue to manage the properties. The resulting ownership structure would reduce governance duplication, increase consistency with other development areas and maximise future flexibility.

26.     The feedback form contained one question relating to this proposed amendment. Consultation feedback received from the Kaipātiki Local Board area on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers is summarised in Attachment A.

27.     Local boards may wish to provide feedback on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers for consideration by the Governing Body.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The Annual Budget 2019/2020 is an Auckland Council group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

29.     The key impact of the proposed amendment to the 10-year budget regarding property transfers on the group is the potential impact on Panuku. Panuku staff and board have been engaged in the development of these options. Governing Body will make their decision regarding this on 20 June 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     Local board decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. Local boards have a statutory role in providing local board feedback on regional plans.

31.     Local boards play an important role in the development of the annual budget and local board agreements form part of the annual budget. Local board nominees have also attended Finance and Performance Committee workshops on the annual budget, and a special briefing was arranged on the proposed amendment to the 10-year budget regarding property transfers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori.

33.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2017 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

34.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

35.     No feedback was received from mana whenua and mataawaka entities with interests in the rohe/local board area. No submissions were received from Māori residents in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This report is asking for local board decisions on financial matters in local board agreements that need to then be considered by the Governing Body.

37.     Local boards are also providing input to regional plans. There is information in the consultation material for each plan with the financial implications of different options.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     Local boards need to make recommendations on these local financial matters for the Annual Budget 2019/2020 by 8 May 2019, in order for the Governing Body to be able to make decisions on them when considering the annual budget in May 2019.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Local boards will approve their local board agreements and corresponding work programmes in June 2019.

40.     Recommendations and feedback from local boards will be provided to the relevant Governing Body committees for consideration during decision-making, as outlined in the table below:

Decision dates for regional plans

Plan

Decision-maker

Scheduled meeting 

Annual Budget 2019/2020

Governing Body

22 May 2019

The proposed amendment to the 10‑year Budget 2018-2028

Governing Body

22 May 2019


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting

- Annual Budget 2019/2020 and Proposed Amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers consultation feedback report for Kaipātiki Local Board

81

b

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting

- Annual Budget 2019/2020 Kaipātiki Local Board Written Feedback Vol. 1 (7-748) (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting

- Annual Budget 2019/2020 Kaipātiki Local Board Written Feedback Vol. 2 (751-2446) (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting

- Annual Budget 2019/2020 Kaipātiki Local Board Written Feedback Vol. 3 (2465-3426) (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting

- Annual Budget 2019/2020 Kaipātiki Local Board Written Feedback Vol.4 (3428 - 4082) (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Beth Corlett - Strategic Project Advisor

Daniel Han – Advisor, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Department of Conservation proposal to revoke Reserves Act 1977 delegations

File No.: CP2019/05498

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides the local board with an opportunity to formally resolve its feedback to the proposal by the Department of Conservation to revoke powers delegated to territorial authorities by the Minister of Conservation under the Reserves Act 1977.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Department of Conservation has written to all territorial authorities (refer Attachment A) advising that due to a recent Court of Appeal decision (Opua Coastal Preservation Inc v Far North District Council) that the current Minister of Conservation, Hon Eugenie Sage, is considering revoking powers delegated to territorial authorities by the former Minister, Hon Dr Nick Smith in 2013 (refer Attachment B). 

3.       The reason provided for the majority of the proposed revocation is that under the current delegation, council makes its decision as the territorial authority and then reviews that decision under ministerial delegation. This is viewed as potentially putting council in a conflict of interest situation, as it is effectively reviewing its own decision(s).

4.       This proposal has been reviewed by staff and a short assessment presentation has been prepared (refer Attachment C). A briefing was provided for local board members on Monday 8 April 2019 on the proposal. A draft submission will be prepared for feedback and circulated based on feedback and input from council departments and local boards. This draft will be circulated to members of the Environment and Community Committee and local board members for review and comment on 15 April 2019. This draft submission was not available at time of agenda production and will be tabled at the board meeting. The preparation of the draft will be followed by two drop-in sessions for elected members to provide in-person feedback.

5.       A final draft submission will be prepared for the Chairperson of the Environment and Community Committee approval prior to the due date of 26 April 2019. This draft response will need to be retrospectively adopted by the Environment and Community Committee on 14 May 2019.

6.       The local board could resolve its feedback at its meeting on 17 April 2019; however, it may be preferable to delegate this task to a smaller sub-set of local board members, circulate the draft submission to all local board members for comment, and then retrospectively adopt the submission at the local board’s May 2019 meeting.

7.       Whichever approach the local board chooses to take, its feedback must be prepared by close of business on 18 April 2019. This will allow the feedback to inform Auckland Council’s submission and to be attached to the Auckland Council submission, which will be lodged on behalf of the Environment and Community Committee.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      consider providing feedback on the Department of Conservation proposal to revoke current ministerial delegations to Auckland Council under the Reserves Act 1977, noting that feedback is required by the close of business on 18 April 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Letter and attachment from Department of Conservation to Chief Executive's territorial authorities

99

b

Reserves Act powers delegated to Auckland Council

109

c

Department of Conservation proposal to revoke Reserves Act delegations presentation to Elected Members

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Andy Roche - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal resolution from Governing Body

File No.: CP2019/04283

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a resolution from the Governing Body and provide feedback on the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 28 February 2019, the Governing Body considered the recommendation from the Regulatory Committee (refer Attachment A) and resolved as follows:

   Resolution number GB/2019/10

MOVED by Cr L Cooper, seconded by Deputy Mayor BC Cashmore: 

That the Governing Body:

a)      adopt the statement of proposal in Attachment B of the agenda report for public consultation, as amended, and confirms that the draft bylaw:

i)        is the most appropriate and proportionate way to implement aspects of the policy

ii)       is not inconsistent with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

b)      forward to local boards and advisory panels:

i)        the statement of proposal in Attachment B of the agenda report for their views

ii)       this agenda report and attachments for their information.

c)      note delegated authority to the chair of the Regulatory Committee to make replacement appointments to the panel if a member of the panel is unavailable.

d)      note delegated authority through the chief executive to staff approved by a manager responsible for bylaws to receive public feedback at ‘Have Your Say’ events.

e)      note delegated authority through the chief executive to a manager responsible for bylaws to make any amendments to the statement of proposal in Attachment B of the agenda report to correct errors, omissions or to reflect decisions made by the Regulatory Committee or the Governing Body.

f)       note the Regulatory Committee’s agreement that the statement of proposal be amended to include an option outlining the ability for local boards to determine the time and season provisions for their local board areas.

3.       The Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal is included as Attachment B.

4.       The Hearings Panel will meet on 3 May 2019 and local boards will have an opportunity to present views.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the 28 February 2019 Governing Body resolution on the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal.

b)      consider whether to provide views on the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal to the hearings panel on the 3 May 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - 28 February 2019 - Governing Body report

129

b

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Statement of Proposal Auckland Council's new policy on dogs and dog management bylaw

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarndra O'Toole - Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 September 2018 - 28 February 2019

File No.: CP2019/04570

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Kaipātiki Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area and the region for the six months from 1 September 2018 to 28 February 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Panuku is charged with balancing financial and non-financial outcomes in order to create and manage sustainable and resilient places where people want to live, work, invest, learn and visit. The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·        redevelopment of urban locations, leveraging off council owned land assets, mostly within existing suburbs;

·        review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property;

·        management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure; and

·        other property related services, such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function, strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

3.       Panuku currently manages 82 commercial and residential interests in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

4.       Panuku is continuing to work on developing masterplans and concept designs for key aspects of the Unlock Northcote programme.

5.       One property is currently under review as part of our rationalisation process.

6.       No properties were purchased or sold in the Kaipātiki Local Board area during the last six months.

7.       Panuku leads a multi-year redevelopment programme of the council’s Housing for Older People (HfOP) portfolio (Haumaru). There are seven HfOP villages in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 September 2018 to 28 February 2019

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

9.       The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world class city. Panuku will play a significant role in achieving the Homes and Places and Belonging and Participation outcomes.

10.     Panuku is leading urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Papatoetoe, Ormiston and Flat Bush, Panmure, Pukekohe, City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

11.     Panuku manages around $2 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

12.     As at 30 December 2018, Panuku’s property portfolio comprises 1636 properties across the region, containing 1062 commercial leases. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Development

13.     Unlock Northcote was approved for development by the Auckland Council Development Committee in December 2015. In March 2016, Panuku was given the mandate to progress with the planning for the development.  A Framework Plan for the Unlock Northcote area was published in November 2016, and forms the basis for current planning and design work.

14.     Panuku is continuing to work on developing masterplans and concept designs for key aspects of the Unlock Northcote programme.

15.     Engagement is ongoing with a wide range of stakeholders and partner agencies including the Kaipātiki Local Board, mana whenua, a community reference group, Auckland Council family departments, business owners, and schools.

16.     Panuku continues to work closely with Homes, Land, Community (HLC) to ensure that the two developments are well integrated. The Northcote Greenway project is a jointly-funded and developed project by HLC, Healthy Waters and Panuku.

17.     Developed design for the Northcote Greenway is complete and detailed design is underway.

18.     Greenslade construction, led by Healthy Waters is expected to begin in October 2019.

19.     Regular placemaking activities are continuing to help engage the Northcote community and activate the town centre.

Properties managed in the Kaipātiki Local Board Area

20.     Panuku currently manages 72 commercial and 10 residential interests within the local board area.

21.     A list of properties is attached to this report at Attachment A.

 

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

22.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets approved in 2015. The process involves an agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form, while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

23.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, lower maintenance and operating costs, as well as improved service delivery benefiting from co-location of other complimentary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites.

24.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

25.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes.

26.     Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

27.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

28.     Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal ‘recommendations’

$8.6 million as at 28 February  2019.

 

Process

29.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku Board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors, the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Under review

30.     Properties currently under review in the Kaipātiki Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the Governing Body.

Property

Details

R 25 Alfred Street, Northcote Point

Vacant parcel of land (also known as Rosie Bolt Reserve) formed as informal open space. It is the remainder of land acquired by the former Northcote Borough Council for the purpose of a proposed pumping station and road extension in 1923.

 

The subject site is named after a former local resident and wife of former Northcote Borough Councillor Michael Gavin Bolt.

 

It is the subject of a Panuku led rationalisation process following a review. Council’s Parks and Recreation Policy team advise the subject site is not required for open space purposes due to its limited size and proximity to Stafford Park. Council’s Parks Operations team advise there are no significant tree specimens or species present. AT advise there is no strategic requirement for the subject site to be retained for transport infrastructure purposes. Council’s Built Heritage Implementation and Cultural Heritage Policy teams advise that it is not likely to meet the criteria for assessment of historic heritage significance and warrant it being formally scheduled.

 

The board has resolved to declare as a matter of policy that it does not support the disposal of park land within the Kaipātiki Local Board area, and that it supports in principle the declaration of the land at R25 Alfred Street as a local purpose reserve. 

 

The board has also requested advice from council staff as to the costs, process, timeline and implications of classifying the land as a local purpose reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Panuku and council departments are currently formulating responses to the board’s requests.

 

Acquisitions and disposals

31.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

32.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

33.     Panuku purchased 11 properties for open space across Auckland in the 2018-19 financial year at a cost of $35.3 million, and bought one property for stormwater use at a value of $188,000.

34.     No properties were purchased in the Kaipātiki Local Board area during the reporting period.

35.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 

Disposals

36.     In the current financial year to the end of February, the Panuku disposals team has entered into thirteen sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $35.5 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

37.     Panuku 2018/19 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

38.     No properties were sold in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

Housing for Older People

39.     The council owns 1412 units located in 62 villages across Auckland, which provide rental housing to low income older people in Auckland.

40.     The Housing for Older People (HfOP) project involved the council partnering with a third-party organisation, The Selwyn Foundation, to deliver social rental housing services for older people across Auckland.

41.     The joint venture business, named Haumaru Housing, took over the tenancy, facilities and asset management of the portfolio, under a long-term lease arrangement from 1 July 2017.

42.     Haumaru Housing was granted community housing provider (CHP) status in April 2017. Having CHP registration enables Haumaru to access the government’s Income Related Rent Subsidy (IRRS) scheme.

43.     Auckland Council has delegated Panuku to lead a new multi-year residential development programme.

44.     The first new development project is a 40-unit apartment building on the former Wilsher Village site on 33 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson. Once completed in mid-2019, this development will increase the council’s portfolio to 1452 units.

45.     The following HfOP villages are located within the Kaipātiki Local Board area:

 

Village

Address

Number of units

Lancaster Court

90 Lancaster Road, Beach Haven

51

Hillcrest Court

19 Hillcrest Avenue, Hillcrest

15

Birkdale Court

2 Gatman Street, Birkdale

19

Piringa Court

140 Lake Road, Northcote

20

Greenslade Court

27-31 Greenslade Crescent, Northcote

12

Bentley Court

86 Bentley Avenue, Glenfield

21

Shepherds Park Village

2 John Bracken Way, Beach Haven

10

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

48.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries relating to a property in the local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     Panuku work collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

50.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.          

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     The next six-monthly update is scheduled for October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting

- Properties managed in the Kaipatiki Local Board area

245

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sven Mol - Corporate Affairs Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Carlos Rahman - Senior Engagement Advisor

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2019/02086

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to update members on recent activities, projects and issues since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - John Gillon Chairperson Report April 2019

249

b

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - KLB feedback to proposed development at 2  2a Tizard Road Birkenhead

261

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2019/02148

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note any verbal reports of members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update

File No.: CP2019/02080

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members to update the board on Governing Body or Independent Maori Statutory Board issues, or issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members’ verbal updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - March 2019

File No.: CP2019/05542

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 6 March, Wednesday 13 March and Wednesday 27 March 2019. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 6 March 2019, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·    Auckland Regional Services Trust funding

·    Northcote Redevelopment update – Public Excluded

·    Libraries

·    Project Streetscapes

·    Auckland Transport

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 13 March 2019, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·    Parks Sport and Recreation

-     Glenfield College update

-     Dog agility equipment 

·    Local Board Work Programme Discovery Discussion

·    Community Facilities

-     Introduction to new Community Facilities reporting

-     Operational management and maintenance verbal update

·    Local Board Work Programme

-     Arts, Community and Events

-     Service Strategy and Integration

-     Parks, Sport and Recreation

-     Plans and Places

-     Libraries

-     Infrastructure and Environmental Services

-     Community Facilities

-     Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 27 March 2019, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·    Local Board Work Programme follow up

·    Arts Community and Events

-     Introduction to Catalyst and the Kaipātiki Placemaking Pilot

-     Community grants

·    Community Facilities

-     Kauri Dieback

-     Concept design – 17 Lauderdale

-     Sulphur Beach Reserve gate installation

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the record for the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 6 March, Wednesday 13 March and Wednesday 27 March 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Wednesday 6 March 2019 Workshop Record

271

b

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Wednesday 13 March 2019 Workshop Record

273

c

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting

- Wednesday 27 March 2019 Workshop Record

277

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/02661

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2019 and an overview of workshops scheduled for the month ahead.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local board’s governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The May - June 2019 governance forward work calendar for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       The April - May 2019 workshop forward work plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B to the agenda report. Scheduled items may change at short notice depending on the urgency of matters presented to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Kaipātiki Local Board May - June 2019 governance forward work calendar and April - May 2019 workshop forward work plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Governance Forward Work Calendar May - June 2019

283

b

17 April 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Workshop Forward Work Plan April - May 2019

285

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

17 April 2019

 

 

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