I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 16 April 2019

5.00pm

Manukau Chambers
Level 1, Manukau Civic Building
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lotu Fuli

 

Deputy Chairperson

Ross Robertson, QSO, JP

 

Members

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

 

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

 

Mary Gush

 

 

Donna Lee

 

 

Dawn Trenberth

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

 

8 April 2019

 

Contact Telephone:  +64 27 591 5024

Email: carol.mcgarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Keys Down Real Talk, Anti-Drink Driving Campaign.                5

8.2     Deputation - Pursuit of Excellence Award - PACIFICA Manukau                   6

8.3     Deputation - Kolmar Charitable Trust                                                                6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Board Members' Report                                                                                              11

13        Chairperson's Announcements                                                                                 13

14        Auckland Transport April 2019 report to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board      15

15        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 September 2018 - 28 February 2019                                                                                                         27

16        Local board decisions and input into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028                                        35

17        Māori naming of parks and places in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area 181

18        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Engagement Strategy                                          199

19        Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal resolution from Governing Body                                                            217

20        Local board resolution responses and information report                                  221

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      237

22        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                                   245  

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 19 March 2019, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Keys Down Real Talk, Anti-Drink Driving Campaign.

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Noma Sio-Faiumu will be in attendance to provide the board with an update on the Keys Down Real Talk: Anti Drink-Driving Campaign that was presented to the board in October 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Noma Sio-Faiumu for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Pursuit of Excellence Award - PACIFICA Manukau

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Natia Tucker and Rosetta Fuimaono from PACIFICA Manukau, Pursuit of Excellence Award recipients will be in attendance to present to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Natia Tucker and Rosetta Fuimaono and for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Kolmar Charitable Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Barry George, General Manager of the Kolmar Charitable Trust will be in attendance to present to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Barry George from Kolmar Charitable Trust for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

 

File No.: CP2019/00528

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

a)      That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Board Members' Report

 

File No.: CP2019/00518

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board;

a)      receive the board members’ written and oral reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

 

File No.: CP2019/00521

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the chairperson’s verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport April 2019 report to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

File No.: CP2019/05184

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board (OPLB) about transport related matters in its area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This month’s report includes information on:

·    Update of the Safer Speeds Bylaw consultation.

·    Improvements to the Station/Shirley roads and Gray Ave intersection.

·    LBTCF Project update: Completion of Rongomai Walkway to Te Irirangi Drive budget reallocation.

3.       This report also provides an update on Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport April 2019 report to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’.

b)      allocate $80,000 from its LBTCF, set aside for the Rongomai Footpath Completion project, to construct the footpath link from the eastern end of the Rongomai footpath to the car park at the Te Irirangi Drive shown as Section C in Map 1 as noted in this report.

c)      allocate the remaining $100,000 of its LBTCF, set aside for the Rongomai Footpath Completion project, to the Upgrade of Hunters Corner Streetscape project.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area and includes information on the progress of the LBTCF projects.

5.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting supports the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities on transport matters.

6.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council (AC) and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

LBTCF Project update: Completion of Rongomai Walkway to Te Irirangi Drive

7.       AC Community Facilities (CF) is delivering this project on behalf of the local board and AT. AC CF held a workshop with the OPLB in January 2019, to consider alternate options to the original route, due to issues with Transpower. 

8.       At the January workshop the OPLB gave clear direction that the alternate route from the existing eastern end of the pathway should be progressed linking to the carpark on Te Irirangi Drive, noted as Section C on the map shown as Map 1 below.

9.       Section B is to be progressed once issues with Transpower are resolved.

10.     Subsequently, the allocated LBTCF allocation for Section B is $180,000. Approx $80,000 is required to construct section C and address drainage issues.

11.     The remaining $100,000 is to be reallocated to the Hunter’s Corner streetscape project. 

12.     This report makes recommendation to give effect to the local board’s guidance.

Map 1 – Rongomai Park footpath options

image002

 

Thousands have their say on speed bylaw

13.     Public consultation closed on the speed bylaw on the 31 March 2019. 

14.     AT received 11,007 submissions on its proposal to reduce speeds on some 700km of high-risk roads around the region.

15.     Auckland is facing a road safety crisis with a 78 per cent increase in deaths and a 68 per cent rise in serious injuries since 2014. Lowering speeds and working with Police to enforce those limits is one of the easiest and most effective interventions available.

16.     A number of submissions were made by organisations representing large sections of the community, such as District Health Boards, universities and school Boards of Trustees, the AA, Victim Support and Local Boards. AT also received many submissions from people wanting their local street or neighbourhood to have speeds lowered.

17.     Submissions are currently being analysed and those who have requested will present to a Hearings Panel of AT Board members and senior executives in mid-April 2019.

18.     If adopted, the speed limit changes will come into effect in August this year.

 

Services and passenger trips on Auckland’s new transport network

19.     A complete re-working of Auckland’s public transport network has delivered more services and strong growth in passenger numbers.

20.     AT’s New Network saw an 11 per cent increase in trips during February, with close to 98 million trips for the year, the highest number of passenger trips since the 1950s.

21.     Auckland’s Mayor Phil Goff welcomes the surge in public transport services and patronage, concluding that the number of people now using public transport has reached record levels, not seen since the days when trams ruled Auckland’s streets. While the distance travelled by Auckland buses has increased 32 per cent each year, running costs have been held to just seven per cent. Aucklanders are getting both better services and value for money.

22.     In 2012 AT decided something had to be done to drive an increase in the numbers using public transport; although there were about 70 million trips a year, the rate of growth was barely matching the population rise. Something radical was required so AT discarded the existing route map in favour of the New Network.

23.     Simplicity is the key to the New Network. On 30 main bus and rail routes, AT introduced a minimum 15 minute frequency, 7am to 7pm, seven days a week. The new services arrived at the same time as electric trains, newer buses, double decker buses, new stations and integrated ticketing which means passengers now pay for their entire journey rather than each part of it.

24.     Auckland now has a public transport system which is working for more people. There has been an increase of 163 per cent in the number of people that live within 500 metres of a rapid or frequent service and patronage is up in all parts of the city.

25.     The last region to be implemented will be Waiheke in October 2019 where AT is also working to complete additional infrastructure, improve capacity on some services and provide even more frequent routes.

26.     It is acknowledged that there are still issues to work through, including the national shortage of bus drivers. AT is also investigating first-and-final leg solutions to access the New Network without needing to use the private car. An On-Demand Rideshare roadmap to expand AT Local services to complement or replace local scheduled feeder bus services is being developed and other options to allow people to access public transport are bike, e-bike, e-scooter and ride-share, services that are likely to be delivered by the private sector.

27.     A few fast facts include:

·    Service levels increased 32 per cent, creating more than 300 jobs.

·    Fleet size increased 15 per cent, capacity was up 20 per cent at peak times.

·    Buses now travel 59.1 million kilometres every year.

·    New Network South implemented 30 Oct 2016 – trips up 24 per cent (Sep 17) up 8 per cent (Sep 18).

·    New Network West implemented 11 June 2017 – trips up 16 per cent (May 18).

·    New Network East implemented 10 Dec 2017 – trips up 22 per cent (Oct 18).

·    New Network Central implemented 8 July 2018 – trips up 10 per cent (Oct 18).

·    New Network North implemented 30 Sept 2018 – trips up 22 per cent (Oct 18).

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is/are confined to AT and do/does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

28.     Through Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan 2018-2028, LBTCF funding has been increased to a total of $20.8 million per annum across all 21 local boards.

29.     The allocation for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has also increased, with the updated figures for the remainder of this electoral term reflected in table 1 below:

 

Table 1: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,815,162

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,528,127

Remaining Budget left

$287,035

 


 

30.     Table 2 below shows the status of projects to which LBTCF has already been committed.

Table 2: Status update on current Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

Project

Description

Current status

Status change

Funds allocated

Footpath link from Belinda Ave to Rongomai Park footpath

Construct a new footpath link from Belinda Ave to existing footpath on Rongomai Park behind Tangaroa College

Project set up complete, currently in design phase with construction expected to be completed in the 2019 summer construction period.

Yes

$176,000

Pedestrian Safety upgrades on East Tamaki Road

Upgrades to pedestrian crossing facilities to improve disability access crossing East Tamaki Road

Project is in the initial start-up phase.

 

No

$100,000

Upgrade of Hunters Corner Streetscape

Improving the amenity of Great South Road at Hunters Corner through street furniture upgrades

Board approved option and allocated funds.

Plans are currently being redrawn in response to local board feedback.

Yes

$925,000

Completion of Rongomai Walkway

Complete footpath link from East Tamaki Road to Te Irirangi Road

Delivery by Community Facilities. Design complete. Transpower refused to permit path under lines due to proposed works. CF directed by LB to progress alternate route for footpath to car park at a cost of $80,000. Balance of allocation, $100,000, to be reallocated to LBTCF.

Yes

$180,000

Canopy for Ōtara Town Centre

Canopy to provide all-weather access from eastern car park to the library

Project delivered by Community Facilities.

New option for canopy being prepared to work in with adjacent building roof works.

No

$262,000

Welcome to Ōtara signage

Place-making signage

Sign under construction at workshop. An application for an exemption to sign bylaw has been lodged and is awaiting approval by AC.

Yes

$55,000

Footpath upgrade at Ōtara Town Centre

Upgrade of the footpath at the Ōtara Town Centre (along the southern side of town centre including 15-17 Fair Mall)

Design plan prepared.

Undergoing consultation with shop owners.

Consultation day has been held for business owners that will be affected at the Otara Town Centre.

Yes

$203,000

A path through Milton Park to Papatoetoe North School

Provide an alternate all-weather access for students from Papatoetoe North School

Local board approved this project in July 2018 which has been allocated to AC CF. They have commenced design and identified a $25,000 shortfall. The local board allocated an additional $25,000 at its March 2019 meeting to address the shortfall.

Yes

$112,000

All-weather footpath upgrade from East Tamaki Road to Lovegrove Crescent

Upgrade of the two paths connecting to the renewed Ōtara Creek Bridge - Greenway

This project is being delivered by Community Facilities. Funding agreement signed by AC. Public consultation to take place prior to design starting.

No

$480,000

Projects from Previous term 

N/A

N/A

No

$35,127

 

Local projects and activities

Airport Botany Rapid Transit – Puhinui Station

31.     The Airport to Botany Rapid Transit project will deliver a new public transport link between the airport, Manukau and Botany, improving accessibility in the south-west, southern and eastern areas of Auckland. Puhinui station has been identified as an important public transport link to the rail network and as such, will be significantly upgraded.

32.     Workshop briefings are scheduled with the OPLB for early April 2019.           

33.     Public consultation on proposed early improvements are scheduled for later this year in May/June 2019.

 

Improvements to the Station/ Shirley roads and Gray Ave intersection

34.     The Station/Shirley/Gray Ave roundabout upgrade is a safety project to improve safety at this intersection.

35.     Historically, there have been a number of accidents at this intersection due to the roading layout, as well as congestion due to the right hand turn onto Gray Ave.

36.     Improved pedestrian and cycling facilities are included in the package of works for the upgrade. The roundabout will make it safer for vehicles entering and exiting Gray Ave and reduce congestion.

37.     Currently, the contract has been awarded and construction is expected to start in the second quarter of 2019.

 

Middlemore and Papatoetoe Station gating

38.     AT has been delivering a region-wide programme to install electronic ticket gates at selected stations on the rail network that includes Papatoetoe and Middlemore stations.

39.     Papatoetoe has now been largely completed, with some minor parking changes to create a pick up and drop on the Shirley Road side of the street.

40.     Gating at the Middlemore Station was expected to be operational by February 2019 but has been delayed and is now expected to be completed in September 2019.

41.     Due to funding constraints, the construction of an additional staircase access on the Shirley Road side of the Papatoetoe Station is under review, with further discussions of options to be considered with the local board.

42.     A workshop was to be held with the local board in early March but was cancelled. Another workshop is to be organised.

Pedestrian Safety outside Papatoetoe North School

43.     In relation to the requests from the representatives of Papatoetoe North School, AT and Auckland Council Stormwater are working to resolve the flooding issues at the main Graeme Ave entrance to Papatoetoe North School.

44.     In September 2018, Auckland Council’s Healthy Waters department upgraded the stormwater catch-pit in front of the school to improve the existing stormwater system.

45.     AT and AC are continuing to monitor the stormwater situation with the onset of winter.

46.     Initial consultation and design review was undertaken in mid to late 2018 to upgrade the existing pedestrian crossing and traffic markings and signage outside of the Graeme Ave entrance to the school. The initial designs are being update by AT with delivery expected in the 2019-20 financial year. 

47.     As part of the redesign, AT will review the requests from the school for footpath widening and fencing at the Graeme Ave entrance to the school.

Local Board Advocacy

48.     This section provides a regular report about how AT is supporting the OPLB advocacy initiatives in the Local Board Plan, as outlined in the table below.

Table 3: Advocacy Initiative Status

Advocacy Initiative

Key Initiative

Status

Transform Manukau’s Metropolitan area through good planning and sustainable development.

Improve connectivity through providing public Wi-Fi and improving walking routes between Manukau Square and transport centre, Hayman Park, and public carparks.

AT is currently in the process of planning for the Airport to Botany project which will better connect Southern and Eastern suburbs of Auckland to the Airport through improved public transport links. Manukau is key link in that public transport networks, particularly from the east. 

 

As part of wider public transport improvements, AT has currently adopted peak-time bus lane along Manukau Wiri Station Road, to improve scheduling.

 

AT completed the $50m Manukau Bus Station in early April 2018. The bus station has been successfully operating for nearly a year.  The Intercity buses are now operating from the bus station, also improving the station’s ability to serve commuters.

 

Putney Way streetscape upgrades have been completed and are now operating successfully. This links Manukau Mall, Manukau Square, Hayman Park, and the bus and train stations.

 

Promote economic development and public safety in the town centres and strengthen their roles as community hubs.

Investigate opportunities for funding public facility improvements in town centres, e.g. toilets, footpaths, parking and public.

 

AT is currently delivering, through the LBTCF, footpath upgrades in Ōtara Town Centre and streetscape upgrades in Hunters Corner, Papatoetoe, which will improve both town centres amenity.

 

AT is in the process of delivering a series of road safety upgrades along Bairds road, including Ōtara Town Centre, significantly impact on pedestrian road safety, through speed reduction and increased pedestrian facilities.

 

 

Redesigning the entrances to Ōtara Library and Ōtara

Music and Arts Centre, including the courtyard between the Council buildings in Ōtara Mall.

A new canopy linking the western car park to the courtyard between the Council buildings in Ōtara Mall is currently being programmed for delivery and funded through the LBTCF.

 

Advocate to AT to realign Station Road / Portage Road / Gray Avenue intersection.

AT is in the process of upgrading the Portage Road and Station Road intersection by installing a roundabout to improve vehicle and pedestrian safety at this junction.

Note timing of this project.

 

Work with AT to allocate funding and develop priority routes through parks and other public spaces for cyclists and walkers, as identified in the Ōtara‑Papatoetoe Greenways Plan.

The local board is currently funding an upgraded section of the OPLB Greenways Plan from East Tamaki Road to Lovegrove Crescent in Ōtara via its LBTCF.

 

Footpath links in Rongomai Park are also under development, which links Te Irirangi Drive to Preston Road.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

49.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is/are confined to AT and do/does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

Local Board consultations

50.     AT provides local boards with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

51.     In the reporting period for March 2019, no projects were put forward for comment by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. 

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

52.     Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board area are reported on a monthly basis. Decisions within the local board area for the period of March 2019 are reflected in the table below.

 

Table 3: Traffic Control Committee Decisions

Street

Area

Work

Decision

Manukau Station Road, Leyton Way, Osterley Way, Barrowcliffe Place, Putney Way, Davies Avenue, Wiri Station Road

Manukau

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Carried

St George Street, Wilmay Avenue, Kingswood Road

Papatoetoe

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Carried

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     AT will provide another update report to the board at the next monthly meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Realtionship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Rina Tagore - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu & Otara-Papatoetoe

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 September 2018 - 28 February 2019

File No.: CP2019/04048

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area and the region for the six months from 1 September 2018 to 28 February 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Panuku is charged with balancing financial and non-financial outcomes in order to create and manage sustainable and resilient places where people want to live, work, invest, learn and visit. The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·        redevelopment of urban locations, leveraging off council owned land assets, mostly within existing suburbs

·        review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property

·        management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure

·        other property related services such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function, strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

3.       Panuku currently manages 67 commercial and residential interests in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

4.       Development in Manukau and Papatoetoe is underway as part of our Transform and Unlock programmes.

5.       Two properties are currently under review as part of our rationalisation process.

6.       No properties were purchased and one property was sold in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area during the last six months.

7.       Panuku leads a multi-year redevelopment programme of the council’s Housing for Older People (HfOP) portfolio (Haumaru). There are four HfOP villages in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 September 2018 to 28 February 2019

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

9.       The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world class city, Panuku will play a significant role in achieving the Homes and Places and Belonging and Participation outcomes.

10.     Panuku is leading urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Papatoetoe, Ormiston and Flat Bush, Panmure, Pukekohe, City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

11.     Panuku manages around $2 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

12.     As at 30 December 2018, the property portfolio comprises 1636 properties, containing 1062 leases. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Ngā Mahi ā-Hapori / Local Activities

Development

13.       Transform Manukau – Panuku's property marketing testing ‘expression of interest’ process was completed in November 2018. This campaign presented five site opportunities in central Manukau. It also sought interested parties to assist council with its corporate accommodation requirements. The responses to this process have been evaluated. However, we have halted further negotiations as a result of the Panuku Board's desire to see a refreshed precinct development plan for Manukau central.

14.       The agreement with Hayden & Rollett to develop 52-54 Manukau Station Road for an extension of Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) facilities has been executed. A formal site blessing by MIT will take place in early April. MIT is leading the organisation of this process.

15.       A Development Agreement for the development of a Quest Hotel on Lot 3 should be executed in late March. The developer was selected after a tender process.

16.       Scentre Group (Manukau Westfied) has confirmed its intent to bring forward commencement of construction works to extend and remodel the mall.

17.     Panuku is working closely with Healthy Waters to plan the regeneration of the Puhinui Stream in conjunction with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe and Manurewa Local Boards. A Steering Group has been established to provide direction and harness community stakeholder interest and involvement - it consists of Local Board members and mana whenua.

18.     Negotiations with Counties Manukau District Health Board (DHB) are underway in regard to extending a walkway along the Puhinui through the existing Super Clinic land (the northern paddocks) from Rata Vine to Kerr’s Road.

19.     Panuku, Healthy Waters and Community Facilities are working together to develop a plan for the improvement of Hayman Park. Assessment of stormwater treatment options is underway to present to the Local Board in May 2019.

20.     Unlock Old Papatoetoe - Implementation of the Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme is progressing well. The new supermarket, civic space and town centre car park will have opened on 26 March.

21.     An additional site, 7 St George Street (the old police station), has been acquired to improve access, visibility and design quality for the Tavern Lane development site and neighbouring facilities. Negotiations are progressing well with a potential purchaser.

22.     Panuku will progress a piece of work with the council family to investigate options for the potential upgrade of Stadium Reserve and improved management of civic and community spaces.

23.     The 98 St George Street and 15 Kolmar Road properties have been transferred to Panuku following Auckland Transport’s (AT) decision that the intersection project will not proceed.  

24.     91 Cambridge Terrace is being considered as a potential residential site. Panuku are considering locations for the existing tenants, and awaiting the outcome of the Tavern Lane site, before commencing the project.

 

Properties managed in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Area

25.     Panuku currently manages 61 commercial and 6 residential interests within the local board area.

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

26.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets approved in 2015. The process involves an agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

27.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, lower maintenance and operating costs, as well as improved service delivery benefiting from co-location of other complimentary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites.

28.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

29.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes.

30.     Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

31.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

32.     Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal ‘recommendations’

$8.6 million as at 28 February  2019.

 

Process

33.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors, the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Under review

34.     Properties currently under review in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the Governing Body.

Property

Details

30R Birmingham Road, Otara

Open space identified as potentially surplus to council requirements. It is a recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

The rationalisation process commenced in December 2017. No alternate service uses for the subject site were identified during the internal consultation.

The board endorsed the reserve revocation and proposed disposal at its May 2018 meeting.

The Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal of the site at its September 2018 meeting.

Panuku is undertaking a reserve revocation and plan change process prior to a disposal.

5Z Butler Avenue, Papatoetoe

5Z Butler Avenue is a Local Purpose (Service lane) Reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

AT advised that the site serves no purpose as a service lane as it does not provide access to any other title.  

The board endorsed the reserve revocation and proposed disposal at its November 2018 meeting.

The Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal of the site at its December 2018 meeting.

Panuku is undertaking a reserve revocation and plan change process prior to a disposal.

 

Acquisitions and disposals

35.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

36.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

37.     Panuku purchased 11 properties for open space across Auckland in the 2018-19 financial year at a cost of $35.3 million and bought one property for stormwater use at a value of $188,000.

38.     No properties were purchased in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area during the reporting period

39.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 

Disposals

40.     In the current financial year to the end of February, the Panuku disposals team has entered into thirteen sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $35.5 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

41.     As part of the Northern Corridor Improvements, Auckland Council has agreed to transfer various parcels of land to NZTA to facilitate the works. The compensation amount totals $6.5 million, of which $1.554 million is advance compensation for required land at Rook Reserve with the final compensation amount still to be agreed.

42.     Panuku 2018/19 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

43.     The one property sold in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area in this period is 2R Carolyn Street, Papatoetoe.

Housing for Older People

44.     The council owns 1412 units located in 62 villages across Auckland, which provide rental housing to low income older people in Auckland.

45.     The Housing for Older People (HfOP) project involved the council partnering with a third-party organisation, The Selwyn Foundation, to deliver social rental housing services for older people across Auckland.

46.     The joint venture business, named Haumaru Housing, took over the tenancy, facilities and asset management of the portfolio, under a long-term lease arrangement from 1 July 2017.

47.     Haumaru Housing was granted community housing provider (CHP) status in April 2017. Having CHP registration enables Haumaru to access the government’s Income Related Rent Subsidy (IRRS) scheme.

48.     Auckland Council has delegated Panuku to lead a new multi-year residential development programme.

49.     The first new development project is a 40-unit apartment building on the former Wilsher Village site on 33 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson. Once completed in mid-2019, this development will increase the council’s portfolio to 1452 units.

50.     The following HfOP villages are located within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area:

Village

Address

Number of units

Acacia Court

25 Kolmar Road, Papatoetoe

37

Hills Court

14 Hills Road, Ōtara

45

Otara Court

163 East Tamaki Road, Ōtara

61

Whitehaven Court

146 Kolmar Road, Papatoetoe

24

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.     The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

53.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries relating to a property in the local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     Panuku work collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

55.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.         

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

57.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     The next six-monthly update is scheduled for October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sven Mol - Corporate Affairs Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Helga  Sonier - Senior Engagement Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Rina Tagore - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu & Otara-Papatoetoe

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Local board decisions and input into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028

File No.: CP2019/04765

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve local financial matters for the local board agreement 2019/2020, which need to be considered by the Governing Body in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

2.       To seek feedback on regional topics in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Auckland Council’s Annual Budget contains 21 local board agreements which are the responsibility of local boards. These agreements set out local funding priorities, budgets, levels of service and performance measures. This report seeks decisions on local financial matters for the local board agreement, including:

·        any new/amended business improvement district (BID) targeted rates

·        any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·        proposed locally driven initiative (LDI) capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·        release of local board specific reserve funds

·        any advocacy initiatives (to be included in the appendix).

4.       Auckland Council consulted with the public from 17 February to 17 March 2019 to seek community views on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10‑year Budget 2018-2028, and local board priorities to be included in the local board agreements. This report seeks local board views on both of these plans:

·        regional annual budget topics: including changes to rates and fees, the draft Tūpuna Maunga o Tamaki Makaurau Authority – Operational Plan 2019/2020, and other budget information

·        the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers.

5.       Auckland Council also consulted on the Our Water Future discussion document. A draft strategy from the Our Water Future discussion document will be developed. Local boards will have the opportunity to provide input into this in early 2020.

6.       Local board views on these regional plans will be considered by the Governing Body (or relevant committee) before making final decisions on the plans.

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive consultation feedback on the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board priorities for 2019/2020 (Appendix A)

b)      recommend the continuation of our local business improvement district targeted rates to the Governing Body.

c)      recommend the continuation of our local targeted rate (to enable free adult entry to swimming pools) to the Governing Body and note that the rate is currently $30.80 inclusive of GST based on current cost estimates and the number of separately used or inhabited parts of a residential property in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

d)      approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (to be tabled at the meeting) to its 2019/2020 Local Board Agreement.

e)      receive consultation feedback on regional proposals in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers from people or organisations based in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area (Appendix A)

f)       provide feedback on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.

g)      provide feedback on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board agreements form part of the Auckland Council’s annual budget and set out local funding priorities, budgets, levels of service and performance measures. This report details local board decisions and recommendations that need to be made in April/early-May to allow them to be considered by the Governing Body in the annual budget process.

8.       Local boards also advocate to the Governing Body for funding for projects that cannot be accommodated within their local budgets. These advocacy initiatives are attached as an appendix to the local board agreement.

9.       Local boards are responsible for providing local input into regional strategies, policies and plans. Local board plans reflect community priorities and preferences and are key documents that guide both the development of local board agreements and input into regional plans.

10.     Auckland Council publicly consulted on the following two plans from 17 February to 17 March 2019:

·        annual budget (which includes both regional issues and local board key priorities) 

·        the proposed amendment to the 10-year budget.

11.     Across the region, 2278 people attended 65 engagement events, including 119 in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. Feedback was received through written, event and social media channels.

12.     Consultation feedback on the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board priorities for 2019/2020 and on regional proposals in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10‑year budget regarding property transfers from people or organisations based in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area are set out in Attachment A. The feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the local board before they agree their local board agreement in early June 2019.

13.       All feedback collected during the public consultation from people in the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board area, including feedback from local events, are included in this report in Attachments B (written submissions), C (events feedback) and D (region wide social media feedback).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local financial matters for the local board agreement

14.     This report allows the local board to agree its input and recommend other local financial matters to the Governing Body in early May 2019. This is to allow time for the Governing Body to consider these items in the annual budget process (decisions made in June 2019).

Local targeted rate and business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals

15.     Local boards are required to endorse any new locally targeted rate proposals or BID targeted rate proposals in their local board area (noting that any new local targeted rates and/or BIDs must have been consulted on before they can be implemented).

16.     There are no new locally targeted rate proposals or BID targeted rate proposals in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

17.     The existing targeted rates which the local board recommends continuation of to the Governing Body:

·    targeted rate (to enable free adult entry to swimming pools) to the Governing Body

·    targeted rates for the four local BIDs.

Funding for locally driven initiatives (LDI)

18.     Local boards are allocated funding annually to spend on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. This funding is for ‘locally driven initiatives’ or LDI. Local boards can approve LDI capital projects up to $1 million; projects over that amount need approval from the Governing Body. 

19.     Local boards can recommend to the Governing Body to convert LDI operational funding to capital expenditure for 2019/2020 if there is a specific need to do so, or Governing Body approval may be needed for the release of local board specific reserve funds, which are funds being held by the council for a specific purpose.

20.     Local boards can defer LDI projects where there was an agreed scope and cost, but the project/s have not been delivered.

Local board advocacy

21.     Local boards are requested to approve any advocacy initiatives for consideration by the Governing Body and inclusion (as an appendix) to the 2019/2020 Local Board Agreement, noting that in this triennium, a longer-term approach has been taken to progress initiatives that are unable to be funded by local board budgets. The approach used the annual budget, 10-year budget and local board plan processes to progress and advise on a narrower range of local board initiatives in a more comprehensive way.

22.     As part of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028, additional funding was provided to progress the priority advocacy initiative of each local board (the one local initiative (OLI)). All OLIs are progressing with funding either allocated or earmarked in the 10-year budget. Ōtara-Papatoetoe are currently advocating to the Governing Body to fund the shortfall for Ngati Ōtara multisport facility from the OLI programme.

Local board input on regional plans

23.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the context of the strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws of Auckland Council. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on two plans, the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers. 

Regional issues in the Annual Budget 2019/2020

24.     The annual budget sets out Auckland Council priorities and how it is going to pay for them. The regional consultation on the proposed annual budget focused on two topics:

·        changes to rates and fees

o   annual waste management changes

o   food scraps targeted rate

o   Waitākere rural sewerage targeted rate

o   urban boundary rating

o   rating of religious use properties

o   regulatory fees

·        draft Tūpuna Maunga o Tamaki Makaurau Authority – Operational Plan 2019/2020.

25.     The consultation on the annual budget also included key priorities for each local board area. Decisions on local board priorities will be made when local board agreements are considered in June 2019.

26.     The feedback form contained one question relating to changes to rates and fees. Consultation feedback received from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area on key regional issues in the annual budget are summarised in Attachment A, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

27.     Local boards may wish to provide feedback on these regional issues for consideration by the Governing Body. 

The proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers

28.     The regional consultation on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 focused on a proposal to transfer the legal ownership of $790 million of city centre waterfront properties from Panuku to Auckland Council. Panuku would continue to manage the properties. The resulting ownership structure would reduce governance duplication, increase consistency with other development areas and maximise future flexibility.

29.     The feedback form contained one question relating to this proposed amendment. Consultation feedback received from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers is summarised in Attachment A.

30.     Local boards may wish to provide feedback on the proposed amendment to the 10-year Budget 2018-2028 regarding property transfers for consideration by the Governing Body.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The Annual Budget 2019/2020 is an Auckland Council group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

32.     The key impact of the proposed amendment to the 10-year budget regarding property transfers on the group is the potential impact on Panuku. Panuku staff and board have been engaged in the development of these options. Governing Body will make their decision regarding this on 20 June 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     Local board decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. Local boards have a statutory role in providing local board feedback on regional plans.

34.     Local boards play an important role in the development of the annual budget and local board agreements form part of the annual budget. Local board nominees have also attended Finance and Performance Committee workshops on the annual budget, and a special briefing was arranged on the proposed amendment to the 10-year budget regarding property transfers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori.

36.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2017 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

37.     Attachment A includes analysis of submissions made by mana whenua and mataawaka entities who have interests in the rohe/local board area.

38.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     This report is asking for local board decisions on financial matters in local board agreements that need to then be considered by the Governing Body.

40.     Local boards are also providing input to regional plans. There is information in the consultation material for each plan with the financial implications of different options.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     Local boards need to make recommendations on these local financial matters for the Annual Budget 2019/2020 by 8 May 2019, in order for the Governing Body to be able to make decisions on them when considering the annual budget in May 2019.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Local boards will approve their local board agreements and corresponding work programmes in June.

43.     Recommendations and feedback from local boards will be provided to the relevant Governing Body committees for consideration during decision-making, as outlined in the table below:

Decision dates for regional plans

Plan

Decision-maker

Scheduled meeting 

Annual Budget 2019/2020

Governing Body

22 May 2019

The proposed amendment to the 10‑year Budget 2018-2028

Governing Body

22 May 2019

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Annual Budget 2019/2020 feedback

41

b

Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board area written feedback

51

c

Have Your Say event feedback

151

d

Region-wide social media feedback

179

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Beth Corlett - Advisor Plans and Programmes

Shirley  Coutts - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Rina Tagore - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu & Otara-Papatoetoe

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

 

 


 

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Māori naming of parks and places in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area

 

File No.: CP2019/04496

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To agree the initial scope, priorities and work programme for Te Kete Rukuruku, a Māori naming and storytelling programme for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Te Kete Rukuruku is a programme involving the collection and telling of the unique stories of Tāmaki Makaurau. A subset of this programme is the Māori naming of parks and places which involves the reclamation or identification of new Māori names and narratives across Tāmaki Makaurau. 

3.       Te Kete Rukuruku is a programme that responds to strong feedback from mana whenua about the current naming practices across Council which are somewhat unpredictable and appear to place low priority and visibility on Māori naming and narratives. 

4.       The programme also responds to the Auckland Council Māori Language Policy adopted in 2016 (refer Attachment A).

5.       Te Kete Rukuruku is a partnership between the Auckland Council and the 19 mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau. Mana whenua have been actively working on the programme Since 2017 and have agreed on a new Māori naming process. 

6.       All local boards were invited to join this programme in 2017. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board chose to join the programme in 2017/18.

7.       The first phase of the programme is focussed on libraries and local parks. This report is specifically seeking direction on the number of local parks to be included within this first phase.

8.       Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board have held two workshops where the scope of the programme has been discussed and the research showing known history of existing park names has been considered.  Attachment B shows the list of parks that the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board have identified through this workshop process.

9.       It is expected that a follow up report, to confirm the gifted names and narratives will be delivered to the local board, in partnership with mana whenua, in 2019. Prior to adoption of any of the gifted names, a focussed communications approach will be developed to inform the local community of the project and raise awareness and understanding of the rich Māori history and values in the local board area.

10.     Where the local board consider more community engagement is required for specific parks, then this engagement will be developed with the local board and undertaken prior to the proposed Māori names being adopted for specific parks. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Council Māori Language Policy 2016 (Attachment A).

b)      endorse the Te Kete Rukuruku programme, including the Māori naming of parks and places, noting that it supports the visibility of te reo Māori and seeks to capture and tell the unique Māori stories of Ōtara-Papatoetoe  and Tāmaki Makaurau.

c)      invite mana whenua to provide a Māori name and narrative for the list of parks detailed in Attachment B of this report.

d)      note it is expected that the gifted names and narratives will be adopted by the local board for use as dual names to enrich the stories of parks and support the Māori language to be visible, heard, spoken and learnt.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

Strategic context

11.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within an Auckland local government context.

12.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents – the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan, local board plans and the Unitary Plan.

13.     Included in outcome five of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2017 is this statement: “Under Whiria Te Muka Tangata / Māori Responsiveness Framework, the council has committed to strengthening Māori communities and their wellbeing. The board will contribute to this through its programmes for engagement and capacity building, especially by active involvement in rangatahi mentoring programmes. Visible Māori names in the community will provide a platform for engaging, capacity building and activating rangatahi involvement.

14.     Whiria Te Muka Tangata – The Māori Responsiveness Framework has been developed in response to Council's commitments and obligations to Māori in a way that will improve outcomes for all. Its purpose is to enhance and guide Auckland Council’s responsiveness to Māori. The framework articulates that council will work to ensure its policies and its actions consider:

·    the recognition and protection of Māori rights and interests within Tāmaki Makaurau

·    how to address and contribute to the needs and aspirations of Māori.

15.     Auckland Council’s Māori Language Policy was adopted by the Governing Body in 2016 (resolution number REG/2016/89).  The policy recognises council’s commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. This policy recognises that the Māori language is a cultural treasure and an official language of Aotearoa. It notes that the Māori language and culture forms a critical part of a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. Reclaiming or identifying new Māori names for local parks within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area provides a significant opportunity to fulfil the policy intent.

16.     Key outcome areas of the Māori language policy are:

·    Te reo tē kitea - Māori language that is visible

·    Te reo tē rongohia - Māori language that is heard

·    Te reo tē kōrerohia - Māori language that is spoken

·    Te reo tē ākona - Māori language that is learnt.

17.     The Māori language policy acknowledges that te reo Māori is an official language of Aotearoa and should receive equal status to English and NZ Sign Language.

18.     All local boards were consulted on the Māori Language Policy. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards’ leadership in choosing to participate in Te Kete Rukuruku, in particular the Māori naming of parks and places programme provides the opportunity for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to give effect to the Māori naming policy in a meaningful way within the local board area. 

19.     Te Kete Rukuruku is a programme involving the collection and telling of the unique stories of Tāmaki Makaurau. A subset of this programme is the Māori naming of parks and places which involves the reclamation or identification of new Māori names for parks and facilities across Tāmaki Makaurau.

20.     The programme represents a partnership between Auckland Council and the 19 mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau.

21.     The programme directly responds to the Auckland Council Māori Language Policy adopted in 2016

22.     Local boards are delegated decision-making authority for naming most local parks and facilities.

Project scope

23.     The scope of Te Kete Rukuruku programme, and particularly the Māori naming of parks and places, is defined as the naming, renaming or dual naming of parks and places throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

24.     The programme recognises there was a rich layer of Māori names that existed across Tāmaki Makaurau. The programme provides an opportunity for Aucklander’s to learn te reo, Māori history and Māori values relevant to places throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

25.     In line with the Māori Language Policy, reclaiming or identifying new Māori names for parks and places will have the following benefits:

·    accelerate the public visibility of the Māori language as a cultural treasure which is at the heart of Māori identity

·    contribute to the Māori language being visible, heard, spoken and learnt

·    celebrate and create connections with the rich Māori heritage of Tāmaki Makaurau

·    enable or support storytelling and interpretation of place and communities

·    provide a practical means for Council to fulfil its commitments and obligations to Māori.

26.     It is expected that, in most cases, Māori naming will be dual naming. Dual naming means that a Māori name is added to the existing name thereby enriching the stories about that place or facility and not taking away from an existing name. For the public this means signs will present both names and in line with the Māori language policy and signage guidelines the te reo Māori name will be presented first.  

27.     Dual naming also means that a Māori name, which is appropriate to the place, sits alongside another name that is not related in its meaning. In other words, the two names are not translations of each other but independent and unique.

Year one of the programme

28.     The first phase of the project is focussed on local parks and libraries. This report focuses on the proposed approach for local parks. A separate report will follow regarding library names for libraries. 

29.     Options for creating new or dual Māori names for leisure centres and other community facilities will be delivered as part of this programme in later years.

30.     The Māori naming project demonstrates a best practice approach for naming in partnership with mana whenua. This practice enables a commitment to a consistent process and a strong relationship between mana whenua and the local boards as decision makers of local parks and facilities.

31.     The following aspects are not included in the scope of the Te Kete Rukuruku programme although some of these may be progressed as separate projects parallel or following on from the programme:

·    the naming of features or assets within a park or facility e.g. bridges and walkways

·    English translations of messages within parks and facilities

·    capital development

·    gazetting of the name via the Geographic Board

·    any change to Council brand. 

32.     The scale of the programme is significant. It is estimated there are 4130 parks and facilities across Tāmaki Makaurau and there are 22 council governance entities and 19 mana whenua governance entities. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

33.     Within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area there are a total of 134 parks, of which 10 have an existing Māori name (7%) that is unique to the place. Note: a larger number are named after common Māori words or localities that have a Māori name e.g. Wiri Station Road Corner. This compares with a regional average of 9% of parks and places with a Māori name.  45% of names in Ōtara-Papatoetoe are either not named or named after the street.

34.     The current approach to Māori naming (in most cases) is to look for opportunities to identify a Māori name as part of capital development works or when acquiring new parks or facilities.  This approach (the status quo) is likely to result in no change in percentage or only a few percentage points change in any given year noting that across the region there is a lot of growth and new parks many of which are not being given a Māori name.

35.     The current approach to Māori naming is seen as ad hoc and presents the following challenges:

·    it is often too late i.e. the naming occurs at the end of a project thereby losing the opportunity to settle the name in hearts and minds of all those involved in the project.  The opportunity is also lost for the name to inform the design and development of a place.

·    the process is often not clear and mana whenua may select a name only for it to compete with another name suggested from elsewhere in the community. It is difficult and disrespectful to create a process whereby names that are gifted by mana whenua, being the Māori people with mana or authority in an area, to have their names considered as part of a naming competition. 

36.     This programme is about moving away from the status quo and supporting local boards to make a transformational shift in the number of Māori names and the associated visibility of te reo Māori and the unique Māori narratives. The options within the programme relate to pacing and the options for using various supporting processes.

37.     As this process shows the number of parks and facilities where mana whenua are invited to gift a name and narrative is at the discretion of the local board.

38.     It is not yet clear how far the funding that the local board has already committed to the project is likely to go as this will vary based on the significance to mana whenua of the sites chosen and their history. 

39.     The funding the local board has already committed to the project is likely to support between 20-50 names and narratives being identified for each of the nine local boards. However, the level of resourcing required for each site will vary based on the significance of the site and its history. 

40.     As a general rule it is recommended that the first list of parks or places (tranche one) are local parks where the parks are named after a street, not named or are new parks. It is also likely that in adopting new Māori names these will be applied as dual names rather than replacing an existing name although this needs to be assessed on a case by case basis.

41.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has had the opportunity to review the research that is available for all local parks in their rohe (area). Based on this review, the local parks in Ōtara-Papatoetoe that are considered appropriate for inviting mana whenua to identify Māori names for are provided in Attachment B. 

42.     This would represent a transformational shift in the first phase of the project. A lesser number of parks is also appropriate however a minimum number of 20 parks are recommended to be considered in the first phase in order to achieve a transformational shift.  For the reasons outlined in the section on the scope of this project this is anticipated to bring a number of benefits to the community and is recommended over the status quo.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

43.     Two workshops have been held with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to date.

44.     Workshop one, on 21 August 2018, focussed on introducing the project and seeking feedback on the approach.

45.     Workshop two, on 26 March 2019, direction was sought from the board on a potential list of parks for dual naming.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

46.     As discussed in tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu (the analysis and advice section of the report) the Māori naming of parks and places programme is a response to feedback from mana whenua.

47.     The proposed programme seeks to develop a good practice approach to Māori naming, through an agreed process in partnership between mana whenua and local boards.   Through this partnership it is envisaged that relationships between mana whenua and their local boards will be strengthened.

48.     The role of providing Māori names in Tāmaki Makaurau rests with mana whenua. This is Māori who have mana and for which Tāmaki Makaurau is their tūrangawaewae (standing place) and they have whakapapa (a genealogical link) to the place.

49.     This programme is expected to provide significant benefits to mātāwaka Māori and mātāwaka Māori organisations will be engaged and potentially become partners in the communication plan for the programme. The increase in Māori language and stories will enable matawaka Māori to see and hear their culture and language being used in their community. This is expected to increase their sense of belonging and connection. It is also recognised that many Māori are yet to learn or in the process of learning their language is in a phase of revitalisation and many Māori are not yet able to speak their language.  This is programme will play a role in supporting this.

50.     Mana whenua have been meeting monthly since 2017 where the issues, opportunities and the scope of the programme have been discussed. Through this regular engagement up to 17 of the 19 mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau have been engaged.

51.     The project team also provide regular programme updates to the Independent Māori Statutory Board secretariat on progress.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

52.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board participated in this programme in the first year and contributed $10,000. This funded a programme manager, mana whenua engagement, research and database development as well as supporting resources to progress the programme.

53.     In the 2018/19 the budget is $23,000.  The exact cost to be spent this year can only be confirmed once the names are confirmed and the level of significance of the sites and the number of mana whenua with an interest in the site is known. However it is estimated that there will be a carry forward of $18,655 will be needed as there are only 2.5 months left in the financial year for mana whenua to work on this.

54.     The programme involves the gifting of names and narratives for nominated parks. It does not include any capital expenditure. Any new signage or capital works would occur over a number of years as signage renewals occur or if the local board sets aside budget to fast track upgrades to signage.

55.     The project team are working closely with the signage renewals team to align the signage renewals work programme with the adoption of Māori names to enable the names to be seen, heard, learnt and spoken as soon as practicable.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

56.     A number of risks have been discussed during the scoping of this programme and most of these have been mitigated through project design.

a.    The volume of names and narratives and the capacity to deliver on these. The process to mitigate this is discussed at paragraph 39 and 40.

b.    Māori translation of functional names for parks or facilities for example domain or esplanade adds a lot of complexity and could make Māori names quite long. As noted above a principle of the project is that the Māori name will not be a translation of the existing name. There is therefore no need to apply the functional name and in general it is not expected that this will occur for park names. However, this has occurred with libraries and may be considered for other facilities. This will be discussed in future reports as part of the next phase of the programme.

c.    Where there are multiple iwi interests there may be no agreement. There are overlapping iwi interests throughout much of Tāmaki Makaurau. In recognition of this, a principle of the project, as agreed by mana whenua, is that mana whenua will work together to provide a single name except where there is more than one traditional name for a site. However, it is noted that many of the Tūpuna Maunga (volcanic cones) have several traditional names (for example Puketāpapa and Pukewiwi are both gazetted names that sit alongside the English name Mt Roskill, so Auckland Council and the community now has a history of supporting multiple Māori names.

d.    Digital naming only won’t gain traction and names will be lost. It may take some time for the names to be ‘seen’ through signage renewals. As an interim measure a Geographic Information System (GIS) database and web page is in development that can be easily searched that will provide information on the origin of the existing name and the Māori name and narrative. The communications strategy will promote the website and database so that the community can have access to it. It will also look to celebrate new names through publications, events and other means. It is noted that many of the Tūpuna Maunga have Māori names that are not yet all on signs, yet through the work of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority, media and events the Māori names have been widely used. 

e.    Navigation confusion / way finding – this is a potential or perceived risk but given the significant growth in Auckland and the number of new names popping up on a regular basis the placement of names in GIS and other digital forums as well as an effective communication plan is expected to mitigate any actual or perceived risk.

f.     Some local boards have had negative experiences with changing the names of parks within their local area. In response to this concern the programme includes a research phase to ensure the origins of the existing names are well understood. Where current names have a significant history, they are not included in the first phase. In addition, the predominant outcome is going to be the addition of names and associated rich narratives and will not involve the removal of names. Where it is considered appropriate to replace a name the board will also need to carefully consider who the affected parties are and determine if community engagement is appropriate. In all other cases we are proposing that a strong public communications approach to enable the community to understand the process and enjoy the benefits of the additional name and narrative.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

57.     The list of parks that is endorsed by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be provided to mana whenua inviting them to gift names and narratives.

58.     Those mana whenua with an interest in these parks will undertake research and, where necessary, will work together to agree a single name and narrative to be gifted to the local board.

59.     In parallel with the mana whenua naming process, the project team will work closely with local board communications team to develop a tailored communications plan for the local board area.

60.     The project team will also continue to work closely with the signage renewals delivery team to seek opportunities for new Māori names to be part of signage renewals.

61.     The decision as to dual naming or replacing names with a Māori name does not need to occur until the names and narratives are gifted by mana whenua and first considered by the local board. It is proposed that this occur at a non-decision making meeting. At this time the local board can finalise the option of dual naming or not and also consider if the proposed naming is likely to trigger the need for community engagement.

62.     Dual naming is expected to make up the largest number of new Māori names and, in general, it is expected that an effective communications programme to inform the community of the new names and narratives will be the appropriate approach.

63.     A report to confirm the gifted names and narratives is anticipated during 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māori Language Policy

189

b

List of parks the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board have idenified.

197

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Jane Aickin - Kaiwhakahaere Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Rina Tagore - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu & Otara-Papatoetoe

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Engagement Strategy

File No.: CP2019/05045

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board three-year Engagement Strategy.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have a series of statutory responsibilities under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009. This includes decision-making responsibility for community engagement, consultation and advocacy.

3.       The purpose of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Engagement Strategy is to set objectives to guide the local engagement and consultation programme. The engagement strategy will also enable delivery of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan by guiding improvements to the engagement work undertaken by Council staff on behalf of the board. This will guide the plans we develop for engaging and consulting the local community on special consultative procedures including for the annual plan, 10-year budget and the three-year Local Board Plan.

4.       The engagement strategy (Attachment A) seeks to demonstrate that Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board values diversity and inclusion through creating meaningful opportunities for engagement and participation with local communities, identifying and removing barriers to access to council processes, and being well-informed about who makes up our community. The local board is committed to improving Māori engagement through our Māori Responsiveness Framework.

5.       Engagement will be evaluated to ensure effectiveness and to identify ongoing improvements.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board engagement strategy.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires local boards to:

·        communicate with community organisations

·        communicate the interests and preferences of people in relation to strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws (to the governing body)

·        use the local board plan process to provide an opportunity for people to participate in decision-making processes on the nature and level of local activities to be provided by council within the local board area.

7.       The Local Government Act 2002 also establishes engagement principles:

·        a local authority should conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner and give effect to its identified priorities and desired outcomes in an efficient and effective manner.

·        a local authority should make itself aware of, and should have regard to, the views or all its communities

·        when making a decision, a local authority should take account of the diversity of the community, and the community’s interests, within its district or region; and the interest of future as well as current communities; and the likely impact of any decision on them

·        a local authority should provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes.

8.       The Auckland Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy 2014:

·        identifies how and when communities can expect to be engaged in, or specifically consulted on, decisions about issues, proposals, assets, decisions and activities

·        enables the council and our communities to understand the significance that council places on certain issues, proposals, assets, decisions, and activities.

9.       Evaluation of engagement across the wider council is needed to ensure reflective practice and ongoing improvement and this should occur at the local board level also.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Analysis – Formal Engagement

10.     In 2013 the population of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe board area was 75,663. It is anticipated that data from the Census 2018 will show population growth overall. Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board area is ethnically diverse and is one of the few local board areas that is home to a large Pacific community (46%). 

Low engagement – a key challenge

11.     Demographic data from submissions on the 10year Budget 2018/2028 (which includes local board priorities for 2018/19) and the Auckland Plan 2050 demonstrates the local community has a low level of engagement with council and the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board. The local board only received 350 submissions this - included written submissions, in-person/face-to-face submissions at community engagement events and social media engagements.

12.     These low statistical trends have been similar throughout all types of engagement in the past year.

Other challenges

13.     Numerous departments within Council undertake engagement with the community separately on various projects making it difficult to take a wholistic community-centric approach to engagement. Efforts to engage must be coordinated across departments to minimise costs and avoid saturation which can ‘turn off’ communities from remaining engaged.

14.     The diverse capacities and capabilities in communities present challenges to outreach and effective engagement. This includes the linguistic diversity in the community and grasp of English, which is the main language through which council conducts business. Ongoing targeted capacity building can assist in enhancing the ability of communities to make the most of engagement opportunities and enabling them to be heard.

15.     There will likely be many other challenges that we are not aware of so it will be important to continue to work with the community to identify barriers and identify shared understanding and solutions.

16.     There is a need to educate the wider community about the Auckland Governance model, the role of local boards as well as decisions that are the responsibility of the regional governing body and central government agencies. Civic education can help residents engage with the right parts of council to address the different concerns and issues. Tools and methods such as static display and videos are being used to assist with public engagement.

Advice

17.     This strategy will guide delivery of engagement, consultation and communication initiatives in the local board area. The engagement strategy sets the following objectives for all consultation, engagement and communication:

·    Community is better informed and aware of local board services and activities and can participate in its engagement initiatives

·    Community members feel inclusive, involved, empowered and a valued part of key decision making in their local area

·    Local board is seen as a key driver in advocating for local communities’ interests, focusing on collaborating and forming relationships

·    Local board will provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to our decision-making processes through it’s Māori Responsiveness Framework

·    Local board will use a coordinated and consistent approach to communications and community engagement

·    Staff will showcase continuous improvement and innovation are evident in how we work

18.     Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy is embedded in this engagement strategy via multiple avenues including:

·    Reporting on measures of success,

·    Calendarising upcoming engagement and communications opportunities

·    Regular Engagement Opportunities led by The Board

·    High quality and effective communications

·    Efforts to engage those communities often less-engaged

·    Special efforts to engage with Maori, and

·    Engagement with communities to enable effective advocacy

19.     The amount and timing of engagement activities each year will be dictated by the work programme of each electoral cycle and will include statutory processes (eg annual plan, local board plan), work programme project needs etc. It will also be influenced by the availability of resources including staff capacity.

20.     A coordinated approach to engagement will hopefully help us achieve other objectives eg greater youth representation, growing the database of people who receive notifications about Council activities and increase connections on social media platforms.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

21.     The local board is committed to meaningful engagement and improving engagement in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board area. The local board recognises that new and innovative approaches will be needed including the use of digital strategies.

22.     This engagement strategy has been developed by staff for the local board through the following activities facilitated by the engagement advisor:

·        attending an initial engagement workshop in November 2018 where the board gave feedback and direction

·        attending a subsequent engagement workshop in April 2019 at which the board indicated support for the proposed engagement activities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

23.     Local government has obligations to Māori through legislation and the local board is committed to honoring te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi. 

24.     Māori are a diverse group and the local board provides opportunities to Māori to contribute to its decision-making in its dialogue with:

·        mana whenua – currently represented by 19 tribal authorities in Auckland, and

·        matāwaka - which includes individuals, whanau and organisations.

25.     The local board is desirous of improved engagement with Māori so that the views and preferences of Māori are considered and factored into its decision making.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

26.     The board’s engagement activities are supported by the Engagement Advisor, Local Board Services. The position of the advisor is shared with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

27.     At modest costs, the board’s governance budget supports, on an annual basis, two community hui, purchase innovative engagement resources, static display materials and production of a short video.

28.     Additional funding will be required depending on the number of engagement and consultation activities and associated events and activities. Most programmes or projects that require consultation have a small budget but there will be instances where additional funding is required. These will be sought from the local board as and when they arise.

29.     Promotion and communication costs associated with promotion of the board’s engagement activities in the community will be met through the Local Communications budget.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

30.     Poor engagement can sometimes lead to decision making that doesn’t adequately respond to the needs of people. This strategy is aimed at increasing the quality of engagement so that the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board can better understand the range of needs and aspirations of its community. However, establishing a good understanding of all relevant issues for every decision will not always be possible as it is also dependent on the community’s desire, willingness and ability to engage and input.

31.     The board could suffer a loss of reputation if the engagement strategy does not deliver improved meaningful engagement. Low engagement can risk the perception that the board is out of touch with the community.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

32.     The Engagement Advisor will develop an annual engagement calendar to be delivered alongside the Local Board Plan.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019

205

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shoma Prasad – Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Rina Tagore - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu & Otara-Papatoetoe

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal resolution from Governing Body

File No.: CP2019/03670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a resolution from the Governing Body and provide feedback on the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 28 February 2019, the Governing Body considered the recommendation from the Regulatory Committee - report Attachment A.  Link to Regulatory Committee, 14 February 2019 - Item 10 Statement of Proposal – page 19.  http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2019/02/REG_20190214_AGN_6987_AT.PDF and resolved as follows:

            Resolution number GB/2019/10

MOVED by Cr L Cooper, seconded by Deputy Mayor BC Cashmore: 

That the Governing Body:

a)      adopt the statement of proposal in Attachment B of the agenda report for public consultation, as amended, and confirms that the draft bylaw:

i)   is the most appropriate and proportionate way to implement aspects of the policy

ii)  is not inconsistent with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

b)      forward to local boards and advisory panels:

i)   the statement of proposal in Attachment B of the agenda report for their views

ii)  this agenda report and attachments for their information.

c)      note delegated authority to the chair of the Regulatory Committee to make replacement appointments to the panel if a member of the panel is unavailable.

d)      note delegated authority through the chief executive to staff approved by a manager responsible for bylaws to receive public feedback at ‘Have Your Say’ events.

e)      note delegated authority through the chief executive to a manager responsible for bylaws to make any amendments to the statement of proposal in Attachment B of the agenda report to correct errors, omissions or to reflect decisions made by the Regulatory Committee or the Governing Body.

f)       note the Regulatory Committee’s agreement that the statement of proposal be amended to include an option outlining the ability for local boards to determine the time and season provisions for their local board areas.

3.       The Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal is included as Attachment B.

4.       The Hearings Panel will meet on 3 May 2019 and local boards will have an opportunity to present views.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the 28 February 2019 Governing Body resolution on the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal.

b)      consider whether to provide views on the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and Dog Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal to the hearings panel on the 3 May 2019.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 February 2019 - Governing Body report

219

b

Statement of Proposal Auckland Council's new policy on dogs and dog management bylaw (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Rina Tagore - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu & Otara-Papatoetoe

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

 

File No.: CP2019/02910

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

 

Information reports for the local board:

 

2.       Feedback on the draft Increasing Aucklanders’ participation in sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039, was delegated to Chairperson L Fuli to approve.  A copy of the feedback submitted is Attachment A to this report.

3.       The Regional Facilities Auckland Second Quarter Report 2018/19 is attached to this report.  (Attachment B).

4.       Feedback to Auckland Transport on the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 is Attachment C to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the feedback on the draft Increasing Aucklanders’ participation in sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 – Attachment A.

b)      note the Regional Facilities Auckland Second Quarter Report 2018/19.

c)      note the feedback to Auckland Transport on the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Increasing Aucklanders’ participation in sport:Investment Plan 2019-2039 feedback

223

b

Regional Facilities Auckland Second Quarter Report 2018/19

225

c

Feedback to Auckland Transport on the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019

233

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authoriser

Rina Tagore - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu & Otara-Papatoetoe

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2019/00524

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Work Calendar

239

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authoriser

Rina Tagore - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu & Otara-Papatoetoe

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2019/00536

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the notes for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshops held on Tuesday,
12 and 26 March and 2 April 2019.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the workshop notes from the workshops held on Tuesday 12 and 26 March and 2 April 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Notes - 12 March 2019

247

b

Workshop Notes - 26 March 2019

249

c

Workshop Notes - 2 April 2019

251

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authoriser

Rina Tagore - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu & Otara-Papatoetoe

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

16 April 2019