I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Albert-Eden Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 22 May 2019

4.00pm

Albert Eden Local Board Office
135 Dominion Road
Mt Eden

 

Albert-Eden Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Peter Haynes

 

Deputy Chairperson

Glenda Fryer

 

Members

Lee Corrick

 

 

Graeme Easte

 

 

Rachel Langton

 

 

Ben Lee

 

 

Jessica Rose

 

 

Margi Watson

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Mark Macfarlane

Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

 

13 May 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 623 6090

Email: mark.macfarlane@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

6.1     Taylah-ane Lasini and William Koloamatangi - Owairaka District School    5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Approval of Contract for Service for Epsom Community Centre                            7

12        Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019 and Accommodation Support Fund 2018/2019 grant allocations                                                                              15

13        Business Improvement District Programme Compliance Report to Albert-Eden Local Board for FY 2017/2018                                                                                  281

14        Delegation for formal local board views on notified plan changes and notices of requirement                                                                                                                297

15        Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw                                                                                 303

16        Remuneration Authority - policy on child care allowances                                  305

17        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for quarter three 2018/2019                                                                                            319

18        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                          365

19        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                367

20        Board Member's Reports                                                                                          369

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      381

22        Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Notes                                                            387  

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting, held on Wednesday, 1 May 2019, as  true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

6.1       Taylah-ane Lasini and William Koloamatangi - Owairaka District School

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Owairaka District School representatives Taylah-ane Lasini and William Koloamatangi represented the school children of Auckland by receiving the NZ ensign from the Prime Minsiter at the Anzac Day Civic Service.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      acknowledge Taylah-ane Lasini and William Koloamatangi from Owairaka District School who represented the school children of Auckland, by receiving the NZ ensign from the Prime Minsiter, the Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern, at the Anzac Day Civic Service and the kawa being a tradition that dates back to the first Anzac Day service in Auckland in 1916.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Albert-Eden Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Approval of Contract for Service for Epsom Community Centre

File No.: CP2019/07484

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a new provider and the contract for service terms for the community centre management at Epsom Community Centre.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The current agreement between Epsom Community Centre Incorporated (ECCI) and Auckland Council for management of the Epsom Community Centre will conclude on 30 June 2019.

3.       An expression of interest process was used to invite applications to operate and manage the community centre for a new contract term of three years.

4.       The following two groups submitted expression of interest applications for the contract for service:

·    Community Leisure Management Limited (CLM)

·    Parnell Community Trust (PCT).

5.       Applications were assessed by a panel comprising of staff from across council with support from procurement specialists to ensure each application was assessed objectively.

6.       Parnell Community Trust was rated highest overall and is the recommended new service provider for the Epsom Community Centre.

7.       Feedback from the panel process highlighted that both applications were very strong, however the Parnell Community Trust’s scale and extensive experience managing an existing community centre, closely matched the local board’s aspirations and priorities for Epsom Community Centre.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve Parnell Community Trust as the preferred community centre management service provider for Epsom Community Centre from 1 July 2019 for a term of three years.

b)      approve the Community Centre Management Contract for Service for the Epsom Community Centre, for a term of three years, commencing in 1 July 2019 and with an allocated asset based services budget of $22,632 per annum from the Activation of Community Places 2019/2020 work programme line, annually adjusted for inflation.

 

 


 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Council’s community centres, houses and hubs provide opportunities for social interaction, arts and recreation, events, programmes and interest-based groups or activities. These facilities generally have meeting spaces which can be booked and can host coordinated activities/programming, and are often staffed by an on-site manager.

9.       The Epsom Community Centre is a former public works depot situated at 202 Gillies Avenue, Epsom. The centre has four bookable activity rooms, ranging in capacity from 10 to 90 people and provides hireable office space for community organisations. The centre also contains kitchen facilities, onsite parking and an administrations office.

10.     The current agreement for service between ECCI and council for the management of the Epsom Community Centre will end on 30 June 2019.

11.     The end of the agreement term provided an opportunity to invite expressions of interest, including ECCI to make a case that their skills, experience and capabilities are best suited to operate and manage the community centre for the next contract term.

12.     On 24 October 2018, the local board approved a report recommending staff undertake an expression of interest process for the Epsom Community Centre (AE/2018/302).

13.     A workshop was held with the local board on 14 November 2018 to further discuss the priorities and measurements for the Epsom Community Centre and the new contract for service term.

14.     Notifications seeking expressions of interest were placed in the Central Leader newspaper and on council’s website, as well as distributed through community email networks and placed on the local board’s Facebook page.

15.     The local board priorities for the Expression of Interest were included in the application guide, to provide a clear understanding of what the local board was seeking for the successful management and operation of the Epsom Community Centre (Attachment A).

16.     A panel of council staff assessed and individually scored all the applications received. The panel reviewed the scorings as a group and agreed on Parnell Community Trust as their recommended provider.

17.     A workshop was held with the local board on 3 April 2019 and staff presented the panel’s assessment of each application and the panel’s final recommendation of Parnell Community Trust as the preferred provider.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The following two groups submitted expression of interest applications for the service contract:

Group

Entity purpose or mission

Community Leisure Management Limited

Vision - To be leaders in the leisure and recreation industry - Hei rangatira mo te ahumahi ngā mahi a te rēhia.

Mission - We put Leisure in your Life and Life in your Leisure - Ka Āwhina Mai, Ka Āwhina Atu, Nga Māhi A Te Rēhia.

 Aims -

·         Pillar #1 - Deliver expectation quality by attracting and retaining great people

 

·         Pillar #2 - Our Leisure and Recreation business to be financially and environmentally sustainable

·         Pillar #3 - Look out for opportunities that will enhance CLM.

Values -

·         Quality - Kounga

·         Continuous Improvement - Whakawhanake tonu

·         Innovation - Auaha

·         Respect – Whakaute

·         Fun – Parēkareka

Parnell Community Trust

Vision – Our vision is for a sustainable, vibrant, inclusive and connected community.

Mission – We can achieve our vision by continuously improving community well-being through providing opportunities for all people to participate, learn and grow.

Parnell Trust will:

·      Deliver educational opportunities that stimulate and engage

·      Create places for people to meet, learn and exchange ideas

·      Introduce and encourage sustainability initiatives in our community

·      Play a key role in facilitating community empowerment and engagement.

 Values

·      To work with our community to understand changing needs

·      To ensure that all of our services and programmes meet community needs

·      To collaborate with community to bring about positive change

To create inter-generational activities that build a sense of belonging in the community

19.     The table below provides an analysis and comparison from the panel members, based on the responses from the applicants against the criteria in the application.

Applicant criteria comparison analysis

 

Community Leisure Management

Parnell Community Trust

Prioritisation

Ability to deliver service levels

Alignment with Local Board Plan

Alignment with Local Board focus areas

·         Less strongly aligned to local board priorities. Risk of limited diversity of activation, due to specific recreation and leisure focus of organisation.

 

 

 

·         Understand access clearly, however, activation had a strong focus towards recreation activities which could limit diversity of activities.

·         Understand local board outcomes and can align it’s services to four of them.

·         The organisations focus on community centres and local community strongly align with the local board priorities.

·         Access and activation clearly understood and addressed separately, with a focus on meeting the needs of the community through diverse activities.

·         Understand local board outcomes and can align it’s services to four of them.

Suitability

Alignment with Māori outcomes

Collaboration with other groups

Organisation history and examples of activities

·         Established organisation with evidence of successfully operating community facilities.

·         Organisation purpose is strongly focused on leisure and recreation, could limit the diversity of activation.

·         Examples provided were all sport and leisure related and focused for facility management rather than collaboration with groups.

·         Did not strongly demonstrate meeting the preferences indicated by the local board for a successful applicant.

·         Established organisation with evidence of successfully operating community facilities.

·         Organisation purpose is aligned directly with the operation of a community facility offering activities to meet the needs of a local community

·         Examples provided showed a good range of diverse focus, and showed collaboration at a strategic level through to local level.

·         Strongly demonstrated meeting the preferences indicated by the local board for a successful applicant.

Due Diligence

Financial records

References

·         Financially and organisationally capable of operating a community centre.

·         Financially and organisationally capable of operating a community centre.

Eligibility

Organisation status

Insurance

Capacity and capability to operate

·         All documents provided support the eligibility of the organisation.

·         All documents provided support the eligibility of the organisation.

 

20.     Applications were assessed by a panel consisting of council staff from Community Places, Community Empowerment Unit and Local Board Services, with support from procurement specialists.  Parnell Community Trust was rated highest overall and is subsequently recommended to be the new service provider.

21.     Parnell Community Trust currently operate and manage the Parnell Community Centre on council’s behalf.  PCT’s successful operation of Parnell Community Centre shows evidence of the scale and extensive experience in managing a community centre.  PCT was also successful in demonstrating that it has the skills and expertise to ensure that activities are matched to the local board’s aspirations and priorities for the Epsom Community Centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Community Leisure Management Limited is a valued partner in the provision of active recreation services. The sustainability of those services is not impacted by this decision.

23.     A panel consisting of staff from across the council organisation including Community Places, Community Empowerment Unit, Local Board Services, and procurement specialists objectively assessed both applications based on the criteria outlined in the application document.

24.     There are no other known wider council implications as a result of the panel’s recommendation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     A workshop was held with the local board on 14 November 2018 for staff to further discuss the service levels and focus areas to be used in the expression of interest process.

26.     On 24 October 2018, the local board approved a report recommending staff undertake an expression of interest process for the Epsom Community Centre and the priorities for the Epsom Community Centre (AE/2018/302).

27.     Local board priorities for Epsom Community Centre were included in the application documentation under prioritisation criteria and used to assist the panel assessment.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     An ability to provide opportunities for Māori to pursue social, cultural and well-being outcomes formed part of the expression of interest criteria.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The report’s recommendation allocates the existing annual asset-based services budget of $22,632 for delivery of access at the Epsom Community Centre to Parnell Community Trust through a contract for service for a period of three years, commencing 1 July 2019 from the Activation of Community Places 2019/2020 work programme line, annually adjusted for inflation.

30.     In year two of the contract for service, the local board will have the option to provide Locally Driven Initiative funding to increase the service level at the centre.

31.     The operational funding amount will be adjusted annually in accordance with council’s agreed inflationary mechanism once confirmed.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The following identified risk was discussed by staff and the local board during the workshop on 3 April 2019:

·     The Epsom Community Centre’s local identity may diminish and may be perceived by the local community as an extension of the Parnell Community Centre’s operation.

33.     This risk and any impact will be mitigated through clear key performance indicators in the contract for service that will be monitored by council staff.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Council staff have commenced transition support and operational delivery planning for Epsom Community Centre which will continue for up to 24 weeks from 1 July 2019. This time allows council to work together closely with PCT to plan and deliver a well-managed, timely transition and handover with ECCI. It also allows time to negotiate an acceptable handover date and details of the contract for service.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Priorities for Epsom Community Centre

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Susan Ropatki – Place Manager

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019 and Accommodation Support Fund 2018/2019 grant allocations

File No.: CP2019/06279

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019.

2.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report presents applications received for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019 (refer Attachment B) and the Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2018/2019 (Attachment C).

4.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 23 May 2018. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

5.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,725 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $125,826.18 has been allocated in previous grant rounds, leaving a total of $14,898.82 to be allocated to one local grant round and one quick response grant round.

6.       Forty-seven applications were received for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019, requesting a total of $121,368.

7.       The Albert-Eden Local Board has set a total accommodation budget of $160,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year, with one grant round.

8.       Thirty applications were received for the Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2018/2019, requesting a total of $346,644.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1901-302

Marvellous Theatre Group Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the artistic director fees for weekly workshop sessions.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-304

Mount Albert Primary School Parent Teacher Association

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of five panels of completed artwork prepared by a local artist.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-306

Losalia Aleva

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of hall hire, tutor fees and administration to provide free Tongan dance classes to young people in the Albert-Eden area between June 2019 to August 2019.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-314

Handweavers and Spinners Guild Auckland Incorporated.

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of rigid heddle looms to be used at the "Handweavers and Spinners Guild Taster Classes".

$1,266.00

Eligible

QR1901-319

The Opera Factory Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the venue hire cost of the Raye Freedman Arts Centre.

$3,500.00

Eligible

QR1901-323

Creative Desk Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of running six free storytelling sessions for children at the Mt Albert Library from April 2019 to October 2019, specifically the costs of materials including colour pencils, colouring books, toys, signage, online promotion, decorations, theatrical property and food.

$2,400.00

Eligible

QR1901-332

Lyn-maire Harris

Arts and culture

Towards workshop facilitation costs, materials for fairy doors, creation and installation of educational panels and design and printing of promotional materials for "The enchanted walk".

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-339

Proudly Asian Theatre Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the costs to deliver the Filipino production "Pinay", including personnel, rehearsal venue hire, design, costume, set and theatrical property.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-341

Auckland Youth Choir Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the Youth Choir concert "Bernstein, Britten and Brahms" on 12 October 2019 at St Mathew in the City.

$500.00

Eligible

QR1901-344

Dance Club Collective

Arts and culture

Towards a creative event in “Water week” from 10 to 15 June 2019.

$975.00

Eligible

QR1901-346

Sierra Diprose

Arts and culture

Towards the development of "The Creative Human Project" workshops from 2 June to 12 December 2019.

$3,941.00

Eligible

QR1901-348

Mount Roskill Floral Art Club

Arts and culture

Towards a floral art demonstration "A touch of India" including demonstration fees, hall hire (Western Springs Community Hall) and stage hire on 5 June 2019.

$975.00

Eligible

QR1901-350

He Waka Eke Noa Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards production costs for the "KickArts" radio show on the Planet radio station from 7 July 2019 to 5 July 2020.

$3,312.00

Eligible

QR1901-353

Euphoria Entertainment Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards costs for the theatre production "Bella’s Cottage" at “The Auckland Performing Arts Centre (TAPAC)” including venue hire from 15 June to 4 August 2019.

 

 

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-355

Panacea Arts Charitable Trust trading as Mapura Studios

Arts and culture

Towards costs for the annual open day at the studio including display screens, art materials, staff time and advertising on 31 August 2019.

$1,938.00

Eligible

QR1901-310

Basava Samithi of Australasia (New Zealand Chapter) Inc.

Community

Towards the costs of delivering the "Language enhancement through cultural activities" programme from July 2019 to March 2020.

$3,920.00

Eligible

QR1901-312

Auckland Library of Tools

Grey Lynn 2030 Transition Community Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of power tools, storage for the tools, a lawn mower and computer.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-313

Bellyful New Zealand Trust (Bellyful Central Auckland)

Community

Towards the purchase of plastic and foil containers, delivery bags and a freezer.

$670.00

Eligible

QR1901-315

Mt Albert Community Playgroup Incorporated.

Community

Towards the purchase of special items for specific cultural celebrations and play resources to reflect diverse cultures.

$3,327.00

Eligible

QR1901-317

Presbyterian Support (Northern)

Community

Towards the purchase of four tallboy dressers for the “Shine” Mount Albert Refuge.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-318

Renew Rehabilitation Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the costs to run mindfulness and parenting courses, specifically, the facilitator fees, intellectual property, advertisement, administration and rental costs.

$3,900.00

Eligible

QR1901-321

Mind Over Manner Limited

Community

Towards the venue hire, facilitators fees and promotional materials for neurodiversity workshops.

$3,006.00

Eligible

QR1901-329

Knox Home Trust

Community

Towards the costs of video production and running 15 interactive workshops "Knowing our residents through listening to their stories" for the staff, residents and volunteers of the "Elizabeth Knox Home and Hospital".

$2,590.00

Eligible

QR1901-331

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of new toys and resources for the Mt Eden, Owairaka, and Sandringham playgroup centres.

$3,500.00

Eligible

QR1901-335

The Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust

Community

Towards the therapist fees including mileage and musical instruments to deliver a music therapy programme at the Owairaka District School between 23 July 2019 to 5 November 2019.

$2,824.00

Eligible

QR1901-338

Renu Sikka

Community

Towards the venue hire, facilitator fees, and editing cost.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-345

Parenting Place Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the "Attitude Mental Health and Wellbeing Programmes" in Albert-Eden schools, specifically for presenter fees between 28 June 2019 to 1 June 2020.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-349

Grow New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the operating costs for the support hub in Sandringham for Grow Incorporated from 1 June to 31 October 2019.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-351

Tuileapa Youth Mentoring Trust Board

Community

Towards the youth mentoring programme, specifically mentors wages and supervision costs from 1 June 2019 to 31 May 2020.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-356

Mt Albert Presbyterian Church

Community

Towards the installation of a noticeboard at the Mt Albert church

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-305

Point Chevalier School

Environment

Towards the bee and butterfly garden project costs.

$1,955.00

Eligible

QR1901-334

Again Again Limited

Environment

Towards "Again Again Auckland" pilot project launch costs.

$3,300.00

Eligible

QR1901-358

Sophie Todd

Environment

Towards printing costs for educational material.

$900.00

Eligible

QR1901-307

Vivre La France Limited

Events

Towards a portion of the cost of running the "Renault French Festival" between 11 to 14 July 2019.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-340

Auckland Kindergarten Association

Events

Towards the 75th birthday celebration for the Epsom south kindergarten, including decorations, resources and catering on 8 June 2019.

$1,122.00

Eligible

QR1901-301

Caroline Taku

Historic Heritage

Towards the upgrade of a heritage villa roof.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-337

Dr Fiona Pardington

Heritage New Zealand Limited

Historic Heritage

Towards "Taku toi kahurangi" exhibition costs at Alberton.

$2,920.00

Eligible

QR1901-347

Kathleen Sharyn van Bokhoven

Historic Heritage

Towards maintenance of a heritage Pohutukawa Tree.

 

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-303

Te Roopu O Wai Ora Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards health and fitness classes, purchase of a kayak and rudder kit, boxing training and fitness classes and weekly community club programmes for at-risk youth within the community.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-311

Point Chevalier Croquet Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the annual cost of green compost collection from June 2019 to May 2020.

$607.00

Eligible

QR1901-316

Auckland Badminton Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of shuttlecocks.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-324

Pop Up Sports Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards the sports gear, signage, venue hire, uniform and staff cost for the "Pop Up sports" programme.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-326

YMCA North Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a fitness wheel for the gymnastics and other childrens recreational programmes at the YMCA, Mt Albert Community and Leisure Centre.

$2,820.00

Eligible

QR1901-327

Gurkha Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards a football kit and costs for the Sunday league.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-330

Mt Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a new projector.

$1,200.00

Eligible

QR1901-352

Just Move Charitable Health Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards the "World's Biggest Bootcamp 2020" at Eden Park on 25 January 2019.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1901-328

Home and Family Counselling Incorporated

Community

Towards costs to run the after hours counseling sessions for the Albert-Eden community.

$4,000.00

Ineligible

Total

 

 

 

$121,368.00

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2019, listed in Table Two below:

Application ID

Applicant

Accommodation Location

Amount requested

Eligibility

ASF1901-02

Autism New Zealand Incorporated

642 New North Road, Mt Albert, Auckland

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-04

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated.

581 Mt Eden Rd, Mt Eden

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-05

The Documentary New Zealand Trust

Suite 2-3, 72 Dominion Road

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-06

No.3 Squadron (Auckland City) Air Training Corps

Ventura Block, Unitec Campus, Farm Road, Point Chevalier

$3,500.00

Eligible

ASF1901-07

Central United Football Club Incorporated

Auckland Grammar School and St Peter's College

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-08

New Zealand Nejashi Trust Incorporated

Top floor 166 Stoddard Road, Mt Roskill, Auckland

$14,400.00

Eligible

ASF1901-09

Eden Epsom Tennis and Squash Club Incorporated

Eden Epsom Tennis & Squash Club, 1 Penrhyn Rd, Mt Eden 1024

$4,462.00

Eligible

ASF1901-11

Shanti Niwas Charitable Trust Incorporated

258 Balmoral Road, Mt Albert

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-12

Beth-Shean Trust

46 Seaview Terrace, Mt Albert2a Brewster Avenue, Mt Albert

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-13

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

Scout Hall, 93b Moa Rd, Pt Chevalier.

Balmoral Baptist Church, 1 Queens Ave, Balmoral

$5,010.00

Eligible

ASF1901-14

No 19 Squadron Air Training Corps

Gate Three, Unitec Campus Carrington Road Mt Albert

$5,880.00

Eligible

ASF1901-15

Somerville Hockey Club Incorporated

3 Normanby Rd, Mt Eden

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-16

Mt Albert Ramblers Softball Club

Warren Freer Park, Cornwallis St, St Lukes

$2,000.00

Ineligible

ASF1901-17

The Asthma Education Charitable Trust

581 Mt Eden Rd, Mt Eden

$16,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-18

Conservation Volunteers New Zealand

Level Two, Villa Dalmacija, 10 New North Rd, Eden Terrace, Auckland 1021

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-19

Script to Screen Te Tari Tuhi Kupu a Whakaahua

21 Taylors Road, Morningside

$10,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-20

Friends of Oakley Creek Te Auaunga Incorporated

4/65 Woodward Road, Mount Albert

$6,750.00

Eligible

ASF1901-22

The Auckland Swords Club

Auckland Grammar School

$5,500.00

Eligible

ASF1901-25

Auckland Youth Orchestra Incorporated

Kohia Terrace School Hall and Storage King, Wagener Place, Mt Albert

$6,800.00

Eligible

ASF1901-27

Dress for Success Incorporated

4 Boston Road

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-29

Point Chevalier Hallyburton Johnstone Tennis Club

335 Point Chevalier Road, Point Chevalier

$3,500.00

Eligible

ASF1901-31

Auckland Choral Society Incorporated

Diocesan School for Girls, Epsom

$17,500.00

Eligible

ASF1901-32

Point Chevalier Bowling Club

25 Dignan St, Point Chevalier

$5,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-33

The Music Association of Auckland Incorporated.

Cornwall Park Primary School, Cornwall Park

$3,500.00

Eligible

ASF1901-34

Auckland Electric Tramways Trust

3 Porters Ave Mt Eden 1024

$3,802.00

Eligible

ASF1901-37

Hindu Elders Foundation

Community Hall, 258 Balmoral Rd

Sandringham Auckland 1025

 

$5,520.00

Eligible

ASF1901-38

The New Zealand Ethnic Employment Education and Youth Development Charitable Trust

Lyndfield College, Lynfield

$14,400.00

Ineligible

ASF1901-39

Shine - a service of Presbyterian Support Northern

Shine -  Kingsland Service Centre, 409 New North Road, Kingland

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF1901-41

Panacea Arts Charitable Trust

Fowlds Park, Rocky Nook Ave, Morningside, Auckland

$6,120.00

Eligible

ASF1901-42

Central Auckland Chinese Association

489 Dominion Road, Mt Eden

$7,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$346,644.00

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 23 May 2018. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,725 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $125,826.18 has been allocated in previous grant rounds, leaving a total of $14,898.82 to be allocated to one local grant round and one quick response grant round.

12.     The Albert-Eden Local Board has set a total accommodation budget of $160,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year, with one grant round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage. Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department, will provide input and advice.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Albert-Eden Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

18.     A summary of each application received through Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019 and Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2019 applications is provided in Attachment B and Attachment C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

20.     Fifteen applicants applying to local grant round two, has indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,725 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $125,826.18 has been allocated in previous grant rounds, leaving a total of $14,898.82 to be allocated to one local grant round and one quick response grant round.

23.     Forty-seven applications were received for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019, requesting a total of $121,368.

24.     The Albert-Eden Local Board has set a total accommodation budget of $160,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year, with one grant round.

25.     Thirty applications were received for the Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2018/2019, requesting a total of $346,644.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Following the Albert-Eden Local Board allocating funding for round three of the quick response and accommodation support fund, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019

27

b

Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019 applications

33

c

Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2018/2019 applications

191

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Community Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grant Operations Manager

Shane King - Head of Operations Support

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Business Improvement District Programme Compliance Report to Albert-Eden Local Board for FY 2017/2018

File No.: CP2019/06114

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the Albert-Eden Local Board’s recommendation to the Governing Body to strike the BID (Business Improvement District) targeted rates for the Dominion Road Business Association, Kingsland Business Society, Mt Eden Village Business Association and Uptown Business Association for the 2019/2020 financial year.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) programme supports business associations by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area.  The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a grant to the relevant BID.

3.       The BIDs are incorporated societies that are independent of council.  For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BIDs are being used appropriately, council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Hōtaka ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

4.       The BID Policy was developed to encourage improved governance of BID committees and staff to improve financial management, programme delivery and transparency to their members. 

5.       This report indicates that the Dominion Road, Kingsland (branded as the Fringe District), Mt Eden Village and Uptown business associations are in substantial compliance with the BID Policy. Information presented in this report is based on documents submitted by these business associations to council’s BID programme team to date. 

6.       Staff recommend that as the BIDs have met the requirements of the BID Policy, the Albert-Eden Local Board should, therefore, recommend to the Governing Body to strike the targeted rates sought by the BIDs.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body to strike the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2019/2020 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

·        $180,000 for Dominion Road Business Association;

·        $210,000 for Kingsland Business Society;

·        $89,035 for Mt Eden Village Business Association; and

·        $270,000 for Uptown Business Association.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The council adopted the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (Hōtaka ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) in 2016.  This Policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, and disestablishing BIDs; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.  Attachment A provides an overview of key elements of the BID programme.

8.       BID targeted rates are applied to all commercially-rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct. Those funds are transferred to the business association operating the BID programme.

9.       There are currently 48 BID programmes throughout Auckland which represent more than 25,000 businesses and a combined $17.7 million in targeted rates investment.  Refer to Attachment B for current and proposed targeted rates budgets for all BIDs.

10.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BIDs. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body.  The local board should recommend the striking of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is substantially complying with the BID Policy.

11.     Recommendations arising from this report are put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and striking of the targeted rate.

12.     This report is a requirement of the BID Policy (2016). The local board must decide whether to endorse the BID targeted rates.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The council’s BID programme team monitors compliance with the BID Policy on an ongoing basis and provides governance advice to BID-operating business associations as needed or requested.

14.     As BID programmes are operated by private independent societies, their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities.  In recognition of their independent corporate status, the policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness.  Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Compliance with the BID Policy

15.     The BID Policy is the means for council to ensure accountability for BID targeted rate funding and to encourage good governance. This is achieved by requiring regular reporting by BID-operating business associations specifically by providing to council the following documents, and staying in touch with their local board(s) at least once a year:

16.     Current Strategic Plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

17.     Audited Accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

18.     Annual Report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers.

19.     Business Plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the Strategic Plan, to be achieved and resourced.

20.     Indicative Budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Budget process which sets all rates.

21.     Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

22.     Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

23.     Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

24.     The BID Policy (2016) requires each business association to ratify the BID grant amount/targeted rate and budget for the following financial year. The Dominion Road, Kingsland, Mt Eden Village and Uptown business associations presented for members’ approval, their 2019/2020 BID grant amount/targeted rate and budget at their 2018 AGMs. Their 2018 AGM minutes show resolutions supporting this action and requesting the Albert-Eden Local Board to recommend to the Governing Body the striking of the BID targeted rates for 2019/2020.

25.     The Dominion Road, Kingsland, Mt Eden Village and Uptown business associations substantially comply with the BID Policy and, therefore, it is recommended that the Albert-Eden Local Board recommends to the Governing Body the striking of the targeted rate relevant to these business associations. 

26.     The recommendation of this report is supported by evidence of compliance with the BID Policy by the Dominion Road, Kingsland, Mt Eden Village and Uptown business associations Refer to Attachments C, D, E and F for details.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.    The proposed decision does not impact other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     Recommending that the Governing Body strikes the targeted rates for the Dominion Road, Kingsland, Mt Eden Village and Uptown business associations means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their districts; and provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

29.     By continuing these services and programmes, the Dominion Road, Kingsland, Mt Eden Village and Uptown business associations should better serve their town centres/precincts and members, and support business growth.

30.     We do not comment on the effectiveness of individual BID programmes as that is a matter for the members to assess.

31.     The Albert-Eden Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the BID programmes last year (resolution number AE/2018/205), as did the other 17 local boards that have BID programmes operating in their area.

32.     Several local boards provide additional funding to local business associations, however, accountability for that funding is set by funding agreements between the local board and the business association.  Those requirements are apart from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     BIDs work for the benefits of all members, including Māori businesses.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that district.  The council’s financial role is only to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the business association on a quarterly basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     There are reputational risks to the council if ratepayer funds are misused, but this is rare.  Otherwise, there are no direct financial risks to the local board or council that could result from this recommendation to approve the BID targeted rates.

36.     The requirements of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for BIDs to misuse funds, by requiring each BID to plan for the intended use of funds, report on its activities to its members, and to have its accounts audited. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     If the board endorses this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be struck as part of its approval of the Annual Budget 2019/2020.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID programme key elements

285

b

BID programme budgets

287

c

Dominion Rd

289

d

Kingsland (branded as the Fringe District)

291

e

Mt Eden Village

293

f

Uptown

295

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paul  Thompson - BID Programme Specialist

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Delegation for formal local board views on notified plan changes and notices of requirement

File No.: CP2019/06898

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek that the Albert-Eden Local Board delegates the responsibility of providing formal views (feedback) on plan changes and notices of requirement to a local board member.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board feedback can be provided on plan changes and notice of requirements. Written feedback needs to be provided prior to the submission closing date (usually 20 working days after public notification). This feedback is included in the planner’s report verbatim and local boards are also able to speak to their written feedback at the public hearing. Views should be received by the processing planner or reporting consultant by the submission closing date to ensure the content can be considered in planning reports.

3.       This report explores options to enable local boards to provide their views in a timely way. Local boards normally provide their formal views at business meetings. Because local board reporting timeframes don’t usually align with statutory timeframes, in most instances formal reporting at a business meeting will not allow local feedback to be provided by submission closing dates.

4.       Providing formal local board views by way of a delegation to a local board member is considered the most efficient way of providing formal local board views. This is because the delegate can provide views within the regulatory timeframes and because no additional reporting is required when new applications of interest are notified.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      delegate the authority to a local board member (the Resource Consent Lead) and another local board member, as an alternate, to prepare and provide local board views and speak those local board views at any hearings on:

i)        Notified plan changes

ii)       Notices of requirement.

b)      agree to note and ratify any views provided, or expressed on the local board’s behalf, by its duly authorised delegate at its next business meeting.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       In 2011, the Governing Body confirmed a process whereby local boards could make their interests and preferences of the people within the local board area known by providing comments which could be taken into consideration for notification decisions for resource consents.

 

6.       In May 2016, a political working party was set up to review the statutory context of that practice. As a result of that work, it was confirmed that local boards could provide feedback on notified applications and could also make an oral presentation as part of any hearing on notified applications. The opportunity to present at a hearing is in alignment with section 15(2) of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 (LGACA).

7.       In relation to resource consents, a standard practice was signalled and endorsed by the Hearings Committee (20 September 2016, CP2016/20479) to enable local boards to speak to their local views and preferences when a hearing occurs in relation to any of the relevant resource management applications.

8.       In the current political term, and since the completion of the Auckland Unitary Plan, there is now an increased number of plan change applications (both council-initiated and privately-initiated) and notices of requirement. This has a highlighted an issue with timeframes and the wider process of obtaining local board views and preferences. Relying on local board workshops to present these types of applications or monthly business meetings to obtain local board views and preferences is not ideal. On some occasions local boards have not received notification of plan change applications in their area until timeframes are well underway and this has resulted in urgent decisions and limited opportunities for local boards to consider their views and preferences and provide them to the reporting planner.

9.       Providing local board views and preferences (feedback) is different from making a submission. Local board feedback is the formal view of the local board providing local context. In comparison, submissions (which cannot be made by local boards) are made by submitters on notified applications for resource consents, plan changes and notice of requirements. Those who have submitted have formal rights to speak at a subsequent hearing and have appeal rights to the Environment Court.

10.     This report seeks a delegation from the Albert-Eden Local Board to provide feedback (local views and preferences) to address the times when applications are not able to meet local board timeframes. This will also acknowledge those local board members who have knowledge and understanding of planning and to ensure local boards do not miss the opportunity to express views and preferences as provided for by LGACA.

Notified Plan Changes and Notices of Requirement

11.     The Auckland Unitary Plan was made “Operative in Part” in November 2016. As plan changes and notices of requirement can now be received and processed by council, there are opportunities for local boards to provide their views and give feedback on notified applications.

12.     For council-initiated plan changes and notices of requirement, staff will seek local board views prior to notification for proposals where there are issues of local significance. For private plan changes and notices of requirement submitted by non-council requiring authorities, local boards may not have any prior knowledge of the application until notification.

13.     Local boards can provide written feedback on notified applications. Written feedback needs to be provided prior to the submission closing date (usually 20 working days after public notification). Local boards can subsequently present their feedback to support their views council hearings.

14.     It is important that options are explored to enable local boards to provide their views in a timely way and a delegation to ensure timely feedback is desirable. At present the local board views must be confirmed formally and statutory timeframes are short and do not always align with local board reporting timeframes.

15.     Local boards may want to add the responsibility for plan changes and notices of requirement feedback to the Resource Consent Lead role. This will broaden the responsibilities of the role to enable feedback on notified plan changes and notices of requirement to be provided. Alternatively, local boards may want to develop a separate planning lead role and each local board has the flexibility to make appointments that best suit their needs.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options considered

16.     Options available for local boards to provide their views into the hearings process have been summarised in Table 1.

17.     Local boards normally provide their formal views at business meetings (option 2). Because local board reporting timeframes do not usually align with statutory timeframes, in most instances formal reporting at a business meeting will not allow local feedback to be provided by submission closing date. Views must be received by the processing planner or reporting consultant by the submission closing date to ensure the content can be considered in planning reports.

18.     Providing formal local board views by way of a delegation to one local board member (option 5) is considered the most efficient way of providing formal views. This is because no additional reporting is required when new applications of interest are notified.

Table 1: Options for local boards to provide their formal views on notified applications (resource consents, plan changes, notices of requirement)

Options

Pros

Cons

1.   No formal local board views are provided

 

·    Local board views will not be considered by the hearings commissioners

2.   Formal local board views are provided at a business meeting

·    All local board members contribute to the local board view

·    Provides transparent decision making

·    Local board meeting schedules and agenda deadlines are unlikely to align with statutory deadlines imposed by the planning process

3.   Formal local board views are provided as urgent decisions

·    Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that meets statutory deadlines

·    Decisions are not made by the full local board

·    Urgent decisions may not be accompanied by full information and the discussion may be rushed

·    Not transparent decision-making because the decisions do not become public until after they have been made

4.   Formal local board views are provided by separate and specific delegation for each application on which the local board wishes to provide their views

 

·    Delegations can be chosen to align with area of interest and/or local board member capacity

·    Local board meeting schedules and agenda deadlines required to make each separate delegation are unlikely to align with statutory deadlines imposed by the planning process

·    Decisions are not made by the full local board

5.   Formal local board views are provided by way of delegation to one local board member (preferred option) for all applications

·    Delegate will become subject matter expert for local board on topic they are delegated to

·    Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that meets statutory deadlines

·    Any feedback can be regularly reported back to the local board

·    Decisions are not made by the full local board

·    Not transparent decision-making because the decisions do not become public until after they have been made

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     These delegations will allow the local board to provide input into statutory planning processes in a timely manner.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     In April 2018 (AE/2018/182), the Albert-Eden Local Board delegated authority to Board Member Greame Easte to prepare, submit and speak to the views at any hearings on notified resource consents. However, the local board did not take the opportunity to delegate authority to provide feedback on plan changes and notice of requirements.

21.     This report seeks a delegation to a local board member for plan changes and notices of requirement, to allow the local board to provide feedback in accordance with agreed timeframes on notified plan changes and notices of requirement.

22.     Any local board member who is delegated responsibilities should ensure that they represent the wider local board views and preferences on each matter before them.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have a positive or negative impact for Māori.

24.     The Resource Management Act 1991 requires that council consult with mana whenua of the area who may be affected, through iwi authorities, on draft plan changes prior to their notification. Council must also consider iwi authority advice in evaluations of plan changes.

25.     For private plan changes, council seeks that the applicant undertakes suitable engagement with relevant iwi authorities, and where necessary will undertake consultation before deciding whether to accept, reject or adopt a private plan change.

26.     For notices of requirement, council serves notice on mana whenua of the area who may be affected, through iwi authorities. Requiring authorities must also consult with the relevant iwi as part of the designating process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have financial implications on Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     If the local board chooses not to delegate to provide views on notified applications, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to the submission closing date and may miss the opportunity to have their feedback presented and heard at a hearing.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     For notified applications of interest to the local board, local board members delegated under these resolutions will provide feedback and speak at hearings on behalf of the local board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol Stewart - Senior Policy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw

File No.: CP2019/07635

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a resolution from the Governing Body and provide feedback on the Auckland Council Policy on Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 11 April 2019, the Governing Body considered the recommendation from the Regulatory Committee.  Link to Regulatory Committee, 11 April 2019 - Item 10 Waste Bylaw Statement of Proposal – page 135. http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2019/04/REG_20190411_AGN_6989_AT.PDF  and resolved as follows:

          Resolution number REG/2019/21

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson BC Cashmore, seconded by IMSB Chair D Taipari:  

That the Regulatory Committee:

a)       note that this committee completed the review of the Solid Waste Bylaw 2012 in March 2019 and:

i)          determined a bylaw is still the most appropriate way to address some waste issues, but not others

ii)        gave directions to prepare a new bylaw about waste.

b)      recommend the Governing Body adopt the statement of proposal in Attachment A of the agenda report for public consultation, and confirm that the proposed new Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2019 and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015:

i)          are the most appropriate form of bylaw

ii)         do not give rise to any implications and are not inconsistent with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

iii)        are not inconsistent with the Waste Plan.

c)      appoint Cr L Cooper, Cr P Hulse Cr W Walker and Independent Māori Statutory Board Member Glenn Wilcox to attend ‘Have Your Say’ events, to deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body on public feedback to the statement of proposal in Attachment A of the agenda report.

d)      delegate authority to the Regulatory Committee chairperson to make replacement appointments to the panel if a member of the panel is unavailable.

e)      delegate authority through the Chief Executive to a manager responsible for bylaws to appoint staff to receive public feedback at ‘Have Your Say’ events.

f)       delegate authority through the Chief Executive to a manager responsible for bylaws to make any amendments to the statement of proposal in Attachment A to correct errors, omissions or to reflect decisions made by the Regulatory Committee or the Governing Body.

g)      request through the Chief Executive that the manager responsible for local board services include this report and attachments on the waste bylaw statement of proposal on the agenda of all local boards for their information.

The proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw can be found at the following link http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2019/04/REG_20190411_AGN_6989_AT.PDF.

3.       The Hearings Panel will meet on 26 July 2019 and local boards will have an opportunity to present views.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the 11 April 2019 Governing Body resolution on the Waste Bylaw Statement of Proposal.

b)      consider whether to provide formal views on the Waste Bylaw Statement of Proposal by 16 June 2019 and present those views to the hearings panel on the Friday 26 July 2019.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Remuneration Authority - policy on child care allowances

File No.: CP2019/07359

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback on the Remuneration Authority’s proposed policy on child care allowances.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Remuneration Authority has previously received submissions from members in other councils stating that if childcare were a claimable expense, then serving in local government might be a more realistic option for parents who are currently deterred from considering the role because of the costs of childcare. Some jurisdictions in other countries provide such allowances.

3.       The authority has distributed its proposed policy in order to get feedback from councils and individual elected members.  The proposed policy is in Attachment A. The authority has asked for feedback by 31 May 2019 and intends to include the provision in its determination that comes into force on 1 July 2019.

4.       At present, the authority determines allowances for vehicle mileage, travel time and communications. Each individual council considers its approach to the expenses and allowances and writes its own policies within the upper limits set by the authority.  If the authority determines that childcare allowances are permissible the council could include, within the framework established by the authority, specific rules in the council’s expenses policy.

5.       A draft submission on the proposed policy has been prepared and is attached as Attachment B. Elected members can provide individual comments to the Remuneration Authority if they wish, by 31 May 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      endorse the draft submission on the Remuneration Authority’s proposed policy on childcare allowances.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       LGNZ has formed a Young Elected Members (YEM) committee with members representing LGNZ Zones. These are elected members who are under the age of 40 years.  The YEM network has raised the matter of childcare costs with the Remuneration Authority.  They cite examples such as a member of a smaller council who is 24 years of age and on a salary of $18,707.  Another, struggling to pay for childcare on her councillor’s salary of $20,634 opted instead to bring her child to meetings[1]

7.       The group makes the point that other costs of attending to council duties can be claimed, such as mileage and communications, but not the cost of childcare.  The group is broadly interested in developing the ability of younger elected members. 

8.       The Remuneration Authority has researched childcare allowances and is now inviting feedback on its draft policy, which includes the eligibility and payment conditions which will be included in the authority’s formal determination.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Remuneration Authority has recognised the need to address childcare costs if those with families are not to be deterred from standing for local government office.

10.     Salaries paid to Auckland local board members and governing body members are generally higher than in smaller council districts in New Zealand, where it is likely elected members particularly struggle to meet childcare costs from their salaries.  Nevertheless, the provision of the allowance may encourage greater diversity in those standing for election in Auckland.

11.     The cost to the council and the ratepayer is reasonable in terms of the total budget for elected members’ remuneration but is a significant help for the member who has to arrange childcare.  The policy places a cap of $6,000 per annum for any member.  LGNZ statistics show that approximately 6 per cent of elected members are 40 years of age or below[2].  On that basis, the cost to Auckland Council, if 6 per cent of members (10 members) claimed the allowance, would be $60,000.

12.     The Remuneration Authority indicates it is in discussion with the Inland Revenue Department about how the allowance will be treated for tax purposes (as income or as an expense reimbursement).  It is possible it will be taxed at source (that is by the council) prior to payment.

13.     Payment of the allowance under the proposed conditions requires evidence of the expense incurred.  This is supported.

14.     The allowance cannot be paid to family members. This is supported.

15.     The proposed conditions state that a local authority may pay the childcare allowance as a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.  This wording may be too wide.  Consider a member who has regularly arranged childcare, irrespective of undertaking council duties, deciding to spend two hours preparing for the next council meeting while the children happen to be in childcare. The member would be “engaged on local authority business” and could claim the childcare cost of those two hours.

16.     Staff researched conditions around payment by other councils in other jurisdictions.  One council simply paid the full cost of child care.  Another specified the meetings and events that could be claimed. Staff believe the intent of the provision is to make a contribution toward the cost of child care where that is necessary in order for the member to undertake council duties, such as attend meetings.  The wording should indicate more clearly that the payment is for childcare costs that are necessary in order for the member to undertake council duties and are not simply childcare costs that are incurred at the same time the member is undertaking council duties and would have been incurred anyway, if the member was not attending to council duties.

 

 

 

 

 

17.     Other conditions are:

i)     the child is under 14 years

ii)    payment cannot be greater than $15 per hour and cannot be greater than the actual expense

iii)    childcare cannot be for more than 8 hours in any 24 hour period.

These are supported.

18.     Staff recommend that the council supports the proposed policy with the comment, outlined above, that the purpose should more clearly reflect that the expense is a necessary expense in order for the member to attend to duties.

19.     Staff also note that the council itself will decide its own provisions to include in its expenses policy, within the framework set by the authority.

20.     Members can provide individual comments to the Remuneration Authority if they wish, by 31 May 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Remuneration Authority’s policy applies only to elected members and does not impact the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The policy affects all elected members, including local board members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The Remuneration Authority’s policy may assist those in the Māori community who are potential candidates for election but are deterred by the costs of childcare.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There will be financial implications.  As noted in the body of the report, the additional cost is likely to be less than $60,000 and will impact the cost centre for elected members’ remuneration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a small risk of the provision being abused (false claims submitted).  The requirement for evidence of the amount paid will mitigate this risk.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     This report is being presented to local boards for their feedback.  It is also being circulated to Governing Body members for their feedback.  The draft submission will be amended if there is a clear majority position in favour of an amendment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Childcare Allowance Proposed Draft Policy Paper

309

b

Remuneration Authority draft policy - child care allowances - submission

317

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for quarter three 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/05704

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Albert-Eden Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2018/2019 work programme. This is a retrospective report intended to provide a transparent overview and reflect the progress of how the Albert-Eden Local Board work programme is tracking at the end of quarter three 2018/2019.

3.       The work programme is produced annually, and aligns with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·          Potters Park Learn to Ride event was held on 2 February 2019 and over 300 people attended.

·          Kūkūwai Karnival was held on 23 February 2019 and over 500 people attended the event throughout the day.

·          23 Neighbours Day grants were approved. 

·          5 Alexis Street refurbish ventilation and insulation refurbishment, 869 New North Road floor replacement and exterior painting, Epsom Library CCTV system renewal, Kerr-Taylor Park asset renewal, Griffin Reserve drainage installation, Albert-Eden utilities renewal , Coyle Park path and development, Gribblehirst Park Action Plan and Mt Albert Recreation Centre minor asset renewal are complete.

·          78 preschool programmes were delivered across the three libraries, with 1,754 children attending.

·          Albert-Eden Business Sustainability Development project is complete. Four businesses presented their achievements to the local board in February 2019 and all are implementing recommendations from their individual action plan. 

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Most activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risks or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status this quarter.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2018/2019 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·          Overall operating result is two per cent below the budget due to higher operating revenue and lower expenditure. 

·          Operating revenue is above budget by 11 per cent, mostly from venue hire and miscellaneous income from the libraries.

·          Operating expenditure is slightly below budget by one per cent.  Expenditure in asset-based services is higher due to scheduled and response repairs in full facility parks contract, and property costs also for repairs and maintenance. Expenditure on Locally Driven Initiatives is below budget as projects are still in progress. Capital expenditure is 22 per cent below budget.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter ending 31 March 2019.

b)      allocate $6,800 locally driven initiative operating expenditure from the cancelled 2018/2019 project Waitītiko, Waiateao (Meola and Motions Creek catchments) and the Three Kings to Western Springs Aquifer Initiative (717) towards the 2018/2019 community education and moth plant disposal project (1531).

c)      allocate $5,500 locally driven initiative operating expenditure from the underspent 2018/2019 Epsom business engagement project (345) to the 2018/2019 Marketview Retail Spend Monitor project (2332).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Albert-Eden Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·          Arts, Community and Events;

·          Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·          Libraries and Information;

·          Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration;

·          Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·          Community Leases;

·          Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·          Local Economic Development.

8.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Albert-Eden Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Albert-Eden Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·          Albert-Eden has a strong sense of community

·          Our parks are enjoyed by all

·          Our community spaces are well used by everyone

·          Albert-Eden has thriving town centres and a growing local economy

·          Travelling around Albert-Eden is safe and easy

·          Our natural and cultural heritage is valued

·          We respect and protect our environment.

 

The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board or projects funded by the Transport Capital Fund, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

9.       The work programme activities have two statuses; RAG status which measures the performance of the activity (amber and red show issues and risks); and activity status which shows the stage the activity. These two statuses create a snapshot of the progress of the work programmes.

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey). It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Albert-Eden Work Programme by RAG status

11.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities in each department’s work programme. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

Arts, Community and Events

12.     Local civic events (45). Potters Park Learn to Ride event was held on 2 February 2019. Over 300 people attended and activities included bike stunt riders, bike decorating and learn to ride instruction.

13.     Neighbours Day grants (958). 23 Neighbours Day applications were approved. Neighbourhood Support are coordinating distribution of vouchers for the events and Auckland Emergency Management staff are working with Neighbourhood Support to assist them to build neighbourhood connections. A summary of the events will be reported to the board next quarter.

14.     Kūkūwai Karnival (981). The event was held on 23 February 2019. Approximately 500 people attended, which included carnival type performers and children’s entertainers. Auckland Transport activated the car park to promote biking around the city.

15.     Community Arts and Events Programmes – Arts and Events Brokering Service (988). The Eric Armishaw Reserve toilet block mural by Kākano Collective was completed. In January 2019, an expression of interest process invited applications for events and this was finalised in March 2019. A capacity-building programme for community-led events will commence next quarter, with the aim that further events will be delivered by community.

16.     Thriving Town Centre Programmes – local placemaking (990). The Pt Chevalier placemaking group funded a children’s focused event in March co-organised between ‘Learning at the Point’ kindergarten and Point Chevalier Community Centre. A funding agreement for the new Balmoral place coordinator has been finalised. The coordinator will continue to work closely with the Balmoral Chinese Business Association (BCBA) Chairperson, the Dominion Road Business Improvement District Manager and Council events staff to strengthen relationships and identify resources. The grant allocation for the expressions of interest process for local economic development grants was completed.

17.     Enabling shared use of space (1004). At a workshop in March the local board identified five sites to pilot the shared space approach. The focus for next quarter will be on developing tools to help groups wanting to share their spaces and ways to promote space availability.

 

Community Facilities: Build, Maintain, Renew

18.     The following projects have been completed:

·    Coyle Park – renew playground (2354). This playground did not need renewing.

·    5 Alexis Street - refurbish ventilation and insulation (2358).

·    869 New North Road - replace floor covering and paint exterior (2359).

·    Epsom Library – renew CCTV system (2361).

·    Kerr-Taylor Park – renew park assets (2366).

·    Griffin Reserve – install drainage (2733).

·    Albert-Eden – renew utilities FY17 (2911).

·    Coyle Park path and development (2967).

·    Gribblehirst Park Action Plan (3016).

·    Mt Albert Recreation Centre – renew minor assets (3013).

Parks, Sport and Recreation

19.     Mt Albert Aquatic Centre (2260). There was a six per cent increase in centre visits and a 24 per cent increase in under-16 swimming lesson participants, when measured against the same period last year (December–February). Customer experience scores were up 4.7 per cent (using a 12-month rolling average), with feedback noting an improvement in cleanliness.

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

20.     Waitītiko, Waiateao (Meola and Motions Creek catchments) and the Three Kings to Western Springs Aquifer Initiative (717) and Community education and moth plant disposal project (1531). Previous data collected at the sites for groundwater analysis show high concentrations of nitrogen. This is most likely due to ageing wastewater infrastructure in the area. Solutions to these issues are being addressed through large-scale regional projects such as the central interceptor and infrastructure renewals projects. Improvements in groundwater nutrient loads take many years to achieve so funding water quality is not recommended. Therefore this project is cancelled. The remaining $6,800 of this budget is recommended to be reallocated to expand the community education and moth plant disposal project. An online game will be developed where participants will sign up to the Find-A-Pest app and locate and record sightings of moth plant.

Libraries and Information

21.     Preschool programming (1079). 78 preschool programmes were delivered with 1,754 children in attendance for this quarter. All libraries have continued outreach to local kindergartens and childcare centres promoting literacy and library membership. Point Chevalier Library continue to visit the Waterview Kindergarten and have recently started visits to Point Chevalier Kindergarten.

22.     Support customer and community connection and celebrate cultural diversity and local places, people and heritage (1081). Following the terrorist shootings in Christchurch, all libraries erected displays to allow the public to convey their condolences to the Muslim and wider Christchurch community. These were collected and sent to the Ponsonby Mosque. Point Chevalier Library held an acupuncture talk in February to tie in with the Lunar New Year, and a heritage talk in March about Italian history. Epsom Library a Lunar New Year celebration, collaborating with the Epsom Chinese Association and the Community Project Co-ordinator. Mount Albert Library celebrated the Lunar New Year with a variety of different events, including an acupuncture demonstration, Japanese tea ceremony, calligraphy and musical performances.

ATEED: Local Economic Development

23.     Albert-Eden Business Sustainability Development (346). This project is complete. Four businesses presented their achievements to the local board in February 2019 and all are implementing recommendations from their individual action plan.

24.     Epsom business engagement (345). The proposed three networking events will not be going ahead due to lack of interest from local businesses. Instead the service provider will start drafting a business plan for Greenwoods Corner, an action plan on coordinating with other departments, and a process to give feedback to participating businesses. The remainder of the project budget is recommended to go towards funding further coaching to Mt Albert, Pt Chevalier and Sandringham business associations/groups. These session will focus on how to best utilise the information provided in the Marketview data reports (2332), previously funded by the local board.

Activities with significant issues

25.     There are no activities which have a red RAG status.

Activities on hold

26.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·    Sandringham Heritage Toilet - renew facility (2371). The proposed works will be included into the town centre upgrades.

·    Village Centres Transformation Programme (2391). Plans and Places department are still leading the planning on this project. Upon approval of the priorities the project will progress into delivery with Community Facilities department.

·    Motu Manawa Marine Reserve - develop coastal boardwalk (2957). The 2018-2028 Long-term Plan growth funding is not resolved so funding for this project is uncertain.

·    990 Great North Road, Western Springs - refurbish interior and exterior (3066) and Western Springs Gardens - renew car park and paths (3129). These projects occur on the same site as the planned Waste Solutions Central Recycling Centre project, the shifting of the current community lease tenants from 990 Great North Road into the Western Springs Garden Hall building and both buildings maintenance and renovations.

·    Nicholson Park bowling green development - stage 3 multi courts (3216). A workshop will be held with the local board in April 2019 to progress with investigating a multipurpose court at this site.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

27.     These activities are cancelled:

·    Waitītiko, Waiateao (Meola and Motions Creek catchments) and the Three Kings to Western Springs Aquifer Initiative (717). This is discussed in paragraph 20.

·    Gribblehirst Park Bowling Green - investigate reuse (3040). The upgrades identified by the local board to complete will be covered by the local board's renewal programme. This capex funding will be returned to the board to be re-allocated as part of the work programme planning for 2019/2020.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

29.     The changes and re-allocation of project budgets recommended in this report can be implemented by Auckland Council departments and Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic development and associated contractors.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report informs the Albert-Eden Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 31 March 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The local board’s work programme contains a number of projects which provide direct outcomes for Māori, such as:

·    Local Māori Responsiveness Action Plan (1243). The strategic broker has continued to work with Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Maungarongo on support options for the Kai Festival. 

·    Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori – Whakatipu I te reo Māori (1082). All Albert-Eden libraries continue to celebrate and support Te Ao Māori through inclusion of songs and stories in all children's programmes such as Wriggle and Rhyme, Story Time and Rhyme Time. Staff continue to gain confidence using Te Reo Māori in their everyday work.

·    Local Civic Events (45). Coyle Park sod replacement was held on 20 March 2019. The event included a blessing, replacing the sod and was attended by 15 guests. Owairaka Bridge blessing was held on 28 March 2019. A karakia (prayer) was performed by iwi representatives, followed by a ribbon cutting ceremony and speeches. This was a joint event with the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa local boards.

32.     The local board, through its work programme responds and delivers upon council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework through the following actions:

·    fostering and building strong relationships with mana whenua and matawaaka by ensuring their views are considered prior to making decisions on local projects.

·    embedding mana whenua customary practices within the development of local projects (e.g. blessings at sod-turnings).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     This report recommends reallocating underspent budget to expand existing local board work programme projects.

Financial Performance

34.     Revenue at $460,000 is $47,000 above the budget, from venue hire and miscellaneous income such as printing in the libraries.

35.     Expenditure of $10,411,000 is below the budget by $112,000 mainly in asset-based services for scheduled and response repairs in parks services, in facility contracts and for community centres.  In Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) expenditure is below budget by $436,000. Most of the board’s projects are still in progress, for example, a decision on local accommodation support grant will be made in May and further funding agreements for the thriving town centre programmes have just been concluded.

36.     Capital spend is $5,044,000 and is below budget by $1,462,000. Several capital projects were completed this quarter and project delivery is still in progress.

37.     The Albert-Eden Local Board Financial Performance report is in Attachment C.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

39.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The local board will receive the next performance update for quarter four following the end of the financial year (June 2019).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme update

327

b

Financial performance report

359

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor Albert-Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 


 


 



 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2019/01088

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity to provide for the local ward area Governing Body Members to update the board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body Members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Governing Body Members Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey’s verbal updates

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2019/01108

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Chairperson will update the board on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the Chairperson will update the board members by way of a verbal or written report at a meeting of the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2019/01098

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for board members to give updates on projects, events-attended since the previous meeting and discuss other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an information item.  A written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda, if the board wishes to pass a resolution requesting an action taken under this item.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Board Member verbal reports for May 2019.

b)      receive Member Watson’s written report for May 2019.

c)      permit in parks only those signs that are for free events or activities, held in either that specific park where the sign is erected, or the next closet park within the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

d)      resolve that all other community, event or meeting signs not complying with the above criteria or on a Community Noticeboard are to be removed as they are not permitted by the Board as landowner.

e)      request staff advise the Bylaw Compliance Team of the resolution.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member Watson - Board Report May 2019

371

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/01115

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Albert-Eden Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar which is a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Albert-Eden Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is required and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the Albert-Eden Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

383

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2019/03254

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous month’s business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance to Standing Order 12.1.4 the board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of its local board workshops held over the past month following the previous business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Notes for the workshops held on 17 April 2019 and 08 May 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20190417 Workshop Record

389

b

20190508 Workshop Record

393

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

22 May 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

    

    



[1] https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/109002369/underrepresentation-of-young-elected-members-woeful

[2] http://www.lgnz.co.nz/assets/e41e5fb07f/Elected-Members-Profile-Report-FINAL.pdf