I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Henderson-Massey Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 21 May 2019

4.00pm

Te Atatū South Community Centre

247 Edmonton Rd,

Te Atatū South

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Shane Henderson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Peter Chan, JP

 

Members

Paula Bold-Wilson

 

 

Brenda Brady, JP

 

 

Warren Flaunty, QSM

 

 

Will Flavell

 

 

Matt Grey

 

 

Vanessa Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Busola Martins

Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)

 

15 May 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 892 4455

Email: busola.martins@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Glenn Boyd

(Relationship Manager)

Local Board Serices West

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                        5

2          Apologies                                                                                      5

3          Declaration of Interest                                               5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                              6

5          Leave of Absence                                                                         6

6          Acknowledgements                                                   6

7          Petitions                                                                      6

8          Deputations                                                                6

8.1     Deputation: Heart of Te Atatῡ South              6

8.2     Deputation: TAP lab progress report            7

8.3     Deputation: Sport Waitakere                           7

8.4     Deputation: Healthy Families Waitākere       7

8.5     Deputation: Auckland Marklin Club               8

9          Public Forum                                                                                 8

10        Extraordinary Business                                            8

11        Chairperson's Report                                              11

12        Te Atatū South Plan adoption                                13

13        Options to explore service use for the ex-Massey Library space, 545 Don Buck Rd                           19

14        Approval for New Lease at 3 Ratanui Street, Henderson                                                                27

15        New community lease to Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited, Te Rangi Hiroa/Birdwood Winery, 99 Glen Toad, Ranui      31

16        Renewal of community lease to Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated, Cranwell Park, 20 Alderman Drive, Henderson                                   35

17        Renewal and variation of community lease to Waitakere City Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated, Fred Taylor Park, 184 Fred Taylor Drive, Whenuapai.                                        39

18        Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 grant allocations                                    43

19        Business Improvement District Programme Compliance Report to Henderson-Massey Local Board for FY 2017-2018                                           55

20        Remuneration Authority – Policy on Child Care Allowances                                                               59

21        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Henderson-Massey Local Board for quarter three 2018/2019                                          63

22        Auckland Transport Update Report for the Henderson-Massey Local Board – May 2019       69

23        Proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and Amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Place                                            73

24        Confirmation of workshop records                       75

25        Governance forward work calendar - May 2019   77

26        Ward Councilors' Update                                        79  

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The following are declared interests of elected members of the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

 

BOARD MEMBER

ORGANISATION

POSITION

Updated

Shane Henderson (Chairman)

Waitakere Licensing Trust

Waitakere Badminton

Colwill School

Elected Member

Patron

Trustee

21 August 2018

4 Dec 2018

Peter Chan, JP

(Deputy Chairman)

Cantonese Opera Society of NZ
Asian Leaders Forum
NZ-Hong Kong Business Association
NZ-China Business Association
Auckland Chinese Environment Protection Association (ACEPA)

Whau Coastal Walkway Trust

Member
Member
Member
Member
Advisor 

 

Trustee

21 Feb 2017

5 June 2018

Brenda Brady, JP

Safer West Community Trust

Trustee

17 April 2018

Matt Grey

West Auckland Youth Development Trust

Billy Graham Youth Foundation

Director and Board Member

Affiliate

17 July 2018

 

16 October 2018

Paula Bold-Wilson

Community Waitakere

Unitec Institute of Technology

Board member

Employee

17 April 2018

Vanessa Neeson, JP

Village Green Quilters

Ranui Advisory Group

Member

Chairperson

17 April 2018

Warren Flaunty, QSM

NorSGA Properties
The Trusts Community Foundation Ltd

Life North West Pharmacy

Waitemata District Health Board
Waitakere Licensing Trust
Massey Birdwood Settlers Ass.
Taupaki Residents & Ratepayers Association

Henderson Rotary

Director
Director
Director

Elected Member
Elected Member
Member
Member

Member

17 April 2018

5 June 2018

18 Sep 2018

 

 

 

 

 

Will Flavell

Te Atatū Tennis Club

Asia New Zealand Leadership Network

Rutherford College

Waitākere Literacy Board

Board Member

Member

Employee

Board Member

15 Nov 2016

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 April 2019 as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Henderson-Massey Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Heart of Te Atatῡ South

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Henderson-Massey Local Board on the activities and achievements of Heart of Te Atatῡ South.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Heart of Te Atatῡ South.

 


 

 

8.2       Deputation: TAP lab progress report

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update board on the progress made by the community led digital makerspace in Te Atatῡ Peninsula.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Andrew Dixon from TAP:lab.

 

 

8.3       Deputation: Sport Waitakere

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview to the Henderson-Massey Local Board on the work that we do in the Henderson-Massey area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Sport Waitakere (SW) has a vision that everyone is connected, healthy and active. We aim to make a positive difference to the lives of people in our West Auckland community where they live, learn, work and play. Sport Waitakere has several contracts for service with Auckland Council.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive presentation from Lynette Adams from Sport Waitakere on their activities in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

 

 

8.4       Deputation: Healthy Families Waitākere

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview to the local board of Healthy Families Waitākere, a Ministry of Health funded initiative and key projects that impact the communities in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Healthy Families Waitākere is a Ministry of Health funded initiative. We aim to improve people’s health where they live, learn, work and play by taking a systems approach to reducing risk factors of chronic disease and increasing health equity.

3.       Healthy Families is a prevention approach with a focus on enabling the health and wellbeing of our communities. We work alongside communities and stakeholders to encourage thinking differently about the underlying causes of poor health, to engage and empower communities to make changes that reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive deputation from Kerry Allan from Healthy Families Waitākere.

 

 

8.5       Deputation: Auckland Marklin Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the activities of the Auckland Marklin Club to the Henderson-Massey Local Board and to request for the local board’s support in finding a permanent space for our activities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Our goal is to build a strong club to allow members the opportunity to enjoy the design construction and computer running of the railway.

3.       Auckland Marklin Club has been in existence for over 40 years with approximately 22 club members and still growing.

4.       We are looking for a space to carry out our activities.

5.       We have 2 public displays each year but having a permanent room would enable us build better layouts for the community.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Auckland Marklin Club Incorporated.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2019/07469

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update from the Chairperson of the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       More wonderful community spirit has been on display in the various events and neighborhoods of Henderson-Massey this month.  This Board has been furiously busy both getting out amongst our residents and in the board room hammering away at work that we hope will make a big difference.

Henderson-Massey Local Board comes to Te Atatū

3.       First off, I need to say a huge thank you to our local board staff for working extra hard getting our meetings together.  Our business meetings are a key component in the public deciding its future, and a strong access point to the local board they elect to represent them.

4.       This Board has indicated a strong desire to be amongst the community, and a way of making that happen has been to hold meetings in various parts of Henderson-Massey.  Last year we held meetings in Massey and in Ranui, and this time we visit the Te Atatū South Community Centre.

5.       Without our staff none of this would happen.  They have taken that directive by the Board and made it a reality, and this Board and the whole community owe you a huge debt of gratitude.  Thank you immensely.

Kids Art Festival lights up Corban Estate

6.       It was a great honour to fund, along with our community partners, the Kids Art Festival in Henderson this year. 

7.       A bumper turnout rocked up, kids obviously in tow, to enjoy the best children’s entertainment in the West.  The stage performances were a particular highlight, where Westies as young as four years old put on a show and had a great time.  There were all kinds of workshops and demonstrations on the production of art, and this fires the creative imaginations of young people. 

8.       Thanks to Corban Estate Arts Centre for this wonderful event.

Pop-Up Business School

9.       Some 60-odd percentage of West Aucklanders work outside the West, and our local boards take it as a strong challenge to grow local business and entrepreneurship to ensure more local jobs are available.

10.     This month I had the pleasure of opening the new chapter of the Pop-Up Business School over in the New Lynn with my colleagues in the Whau Local Board.  It was a roaring success in Henderson recently, and contributed to our economic wellbeing.  For another West based programme to start is a real boon for us, and we are sure more great Westie ideas will take root and thrive from this work.

11.     Thanks to Tony and the team from the Pop-Up Business School, if it is in my power as local board Chair, I would love to bestow the title of honorary Westie on you all!

Pool and Te Whau Pathway top of the local board advocacy agenda

12.     As part of the annual budget discussions, local boards are invited by the Governing Body of the Council to present on their biggest one or two advocacy items for their communities.

13.     Of course, there is so much to discuss, much need and much opportunity.  This year, as in years past, your Board has focused on the dire situation of West Wave.  We only have one pool in the West, and we are taking the community’s view that there be another planned pool to serve the Northwest area.  It will not be cheap, nor will it be quick, but we feel it should be in long term planning.

14.     Similarly, another project that will be neither quick, nor cheap, is the Te Whau Pathway.  A pathway along the coast would be a game changer, for coastal suburbs like Glendene, Te Atatū South and Te Atatū Peninsula, and with linkages out to Henderson and even Ranui.  The proposal has been slowly advanced for several years, but the bulk of funding and work is still to come.  On behalf of the community, we presented on this for Council’s consideration as well.

15.     We thank our Governing Body members.  It sure is a hard job, and with 21 local boards arguing for need, this opportunity is certainly fully appreciated.  A special note to thank our local Ward Councillors Penny Hulse and Linda Cooper for their support on these issues as well.

ANZAC Services

16.     As the reader is no doubt aware, ANZAC services had to be scaled back this year on security advice.  This was a somewhat controversial topic in our communities, and I don’t blame residents for their depth of feeling on what is an important day for the West and NZ.  Our Police deserve our support and we want to thank them for keeping us safe, acknowledging their reasons for caution, and in the hope that we can continue to commemorate ANZAC in future years as we have done. 

17.     The Waikumete services were solemn, respectful and moving.  I want to thank our community partners and staff as always for their work in putting them on, not an easy task but a meaningful one for sure.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Shane Henderson – Chairperson, Henderson-Massey Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Te Atatū South Plan adoption

File No.: CP2019/06355

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Henderson-Massey Local Board to adopt the Te Atatū South Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Te Atatū South Plan (the plan) contains a vision, four themes, three key moves and a range of projects to guide the future improvement of Te Atatū South for the next 30 years.

3.       The plan is sponsored by the Henderson-Massey Local Board who allocated $45,000 of Locally Driven Initiatives opex funding in 2018/19 for community engagement and the development of the plan. The plan was developed by the urban design group Isthmus, in collaboration with council planning staff.

4.       The plan reflects and responds to the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes, and a range of current programmes, plans and strategies including the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan 2017 and the Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan.

5.       Projects and actions identified in the plan will guide future funding decisions and advocacy by the local board, the council and the wider council family for the area. The plan also identifies various delivery partners across a range of projects including community groups, mana whenua and land owners.

6.       The local community in Te Atatū South has contributed extensively to the development of the plan, through the use of a co-design workshop process and public engagement. Members of the Heart of Te Atatū South (HoTAS) community association advised the project team throughout the project and facilitated a number of community engagement activities.

7.       Community-wide engagement on a set of themes and project ideas was undertaken between 16 November and 3 December 2018. A substantial amount of feedback was received, which informed the development of a draft and final plan with input from the co-design group, the local board, internal council and council-controlled organisation stakeholders. Mana whenua were engaged on the plan, providing advice and support.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      adopt the Te Atatū South Plan as set out in Attachment A of the report

b)      delegate the approval of any final minor corrections to the Te Atatū South Plan to Chairperson of the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has sponsored a project to develop a 30-year spatial plan for Te Atatū South. At its meeting on 21 August 2018 the local board approved the allocation of $30,000 Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) opex funding for the preparation of the plan in the 2018/2019 financial year as part of the Henderson-Massey Local Board Work Programme. The local board also approved the plan coordination role of the Plans and Places Department to manage the plan process.

9.       At its meeting on 18 September 2018 the local board approved the scope and approach to the preparation of a centre plan. The local board also requested that the Community Facilities and Community Services Departments participate in the plan, to integrate the Open Space Network Plan and the developing Connections Plan.

10.     The proposed plan focussed on physical works and related improvements to the public areas of the Te Atatū South centre and surrounds. The plan built on the survey work completed in 2017 by HoTAS and the consultancy Isthmus. This was reflected in the HoTAS 2018 submission to the Long-term Plan 2018-2028. This submission helped to inform the plan that links local aspirations with the council’s strategic outcomes for Te Atatū South.

11.     Plans and Places commissioned Isthmus in October 2018 to provide urban design, planning and engagement services for the plan. Isthmus proposed using a ‘co-design’ approach to develop the plan, involving the range of community stakeholders together with council and Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) representatives and the local board to put together the material for public engagement.

12.     The first co-design workshop was held at the Te Atatū South community centre on 1 November 2018. Facilitated by Isthmus, close to 50 participants including council staff explored key topics - environment, community, transport and history. Ideas, thoughts and existing opportunities were captured and themed. These themes gave rise to possible projects that were used as examples during the consultation phase.

13.     The outputs from the co-design workshop were discussed at a local board workshop on 6 November 2018. The local board supported the material for public engagement.

14.     Nine iwi with interests in the area were invited to engage in the plan process. Most iwi groups deferred to Te Kawerau ā Maki as mana whenua of the area, with representatives having been involved in the development of the plan. A representative of Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara attended the co-design workshops.

Community engagement on the themes and project ideas

15.     The public engagement for the plan occurred over the period 14 November to 3 December 2018. The engagement events and activities sought feedback from as wide a range of organisations, iwi, businesses, groups and individuals as possible.

16.     The engagement material (including a feedback form) was placed on the Auckland Council “Have Your Say” website, with links to it via Facebook. A video had over 10,000 hits and posters were displayed throughout the area promoting the engagement. A flyer was sent to 4000 households in the area and display boards placed in the former ASB building on Edmonton Road and at the community centre.

17.     Engagement events included a staffed display at the Te Atatū South Community Centre fiftieth jubilee event on 16 November 2018, a pop-up event outside the Te Atatū South Countdown on 26 November 2018, and presentations to Edmonton Primary School, the Disability Group, HoTAS annual general meeting and Te Atatū Network.

18.     A total of 142 feedback form submissions were received through email and hard copy, including from a number of local groups and other organisations. Three non-feedback form submissions were received, including from HoTAS. A further 306 transcribed verbal pieces of feedback were received.

19.     Most of the feedback respondents (77%) thought that the key themes for the Te Atatū South area had been correctly identified. When asked to rank the themes that were most important, three of the four themes received similar levels of support.  These were ‘creating a consolidated heart for Te Atatū South’; ‘enhance and increase activity within community spaces and places’; and ‘improve connectivity to the centre, to the water and around Te Atatū South’.


 

20.     Submitters were also asked to prioritise up to five possible projects or actions in the engagement material. The top five overall were:

1.            Make the centre more attractive and inviting (46%)

2.            Connect Te Atatū South, east and west walk/cycle loops (43%)

3.            Attract local people and support more community services (40%)

4.      Enhance existing spaces and create opportunities to meet and connect (39%)

5.      Establish clear and safe connections to other key areas, and provide recreation opportunities within Te Atatū South Park (both 35%).

21.     An engagement summary report was distributed to the local board and stakeholders in December 2018. This informed the participants of the feedback that would be considered for preparing the draft plan in January 2019.

Drafting the plan and further engagement

22.     To reflect the outcomes for the first co-design workshop and the engagement feedback, the scope of the plan was extended to encompass the whole of the Te Atatū South area. This required more time for the project team to consider projects and actions across a wider area and enable more input from council and CCO stakeholders. To support this work and to complete the plan in 2018/19, the local board approved an additional $15,000 LDI opex in March 2019.

23.     Isthmus developed the draft plan proposals and presented them to the second co-design workshop on 31 January 2019. The stakeholders present provided useful feedback on what was required for the centre, local reserves and additional connections through the area. There was also the opportunity to comment on more detailed concepts for the Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park and the Te Atatū South Park.

24.     A revised draft plan was produced and reviewed by the council project team and internal stakeholders. Detailed feedback from Auckland Transport and the council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation Department informed a revised final draft plan, with greater explanation and description provided for the proposed projects.

25.     Mana whenua Te Kawerau ā Maki provided feedback on the draft plan and the final draft plan. Initial feedback on the draft plan included the recognition of Te Whau pathway Te Wai o Pareira as being important. The need to incorporate more cultural and historical narratives and interpretation in the area was emphasised.

26.     In terms of the final draft plan, Te Kawerau ā Maki supported the inclusion of a section on Te Ao Māori and Te Aranga principles, and that these principles apply across the plan projects through their design phases. They noted that the name for Henderson Creek had changed to Te Wai o Pareira and that an opportunity be included under issues and opportunities as follows:

“Uplift and support Mana Whenua/Māori identity and cultural values throughout the area.”

27.     Te Kawerau ā Maki asked for environmental health to be addressed as a goal of the plan, in terms of a healthy environment leading to a healthy community. These matters have been addressed in the final version of the plan, with an addition to key move 3 addressing environmental quality and reference to water and natural environment improvements in projects and actions section 3.2.

28.     Discussions were held with the local schools - Edmonton Primary, Freyberg Primary, and Rangeview Intermediate - about the plan proposals and the prospect of public access. These highlighted some ongoing security concerns for pupils and staff. Walkway connections through the schools have been identified as aspirational and informal. It is up to the individual schools to assess what form of access if any is made possible in future.


 

29.     A final meeting of co-design group stakeholders was held on 10 April 2019 to present the key content of the final draft plan. Feedback received included an expectation of some more immediate works (quick wins) happening in the next year, particularly in Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, and the need for greater clarity about the council funding process. Possible funding derived from a New Zealand Transport Agency lease payment for potential projects in the streets and parks was raised, as was the need for champions for the plan to ensure it is successfully implemented over time.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

30.     The proposed final Te Atatū South Plan has evolved out of the feedback received from the stakeholders and general public to be more of an “umbrella” plan for the whole Te Atatū South area rather than just focused on the centre.

31.     The final plan is set out in the general format of a local spatial plan prepared by the council. Introductory and background sections give the context to the area and the plan. A vision that emerged through the process for the overall outcome for the plan is:

“Te Atatū South – a place to go to, not just drive through”.

32.     The four themes that have endured and been supported through the process from the first co-design workshop are as follows:

• Create a Heart for Te Atatū South.

• Improve connectivity to the centre, to the water and around the area.

• Enhance and increase activity in spaces and places.

• Encourage community involvement by establishing a strong local identity.

33.     Three key moves are identified that define the transformational changes sought by the plan. These are a heart for the community, access and connections, and people and activity. The key moves highlight the need for a strong centre at the heart of a better-connected area, with improved activities and facilities for local people and visitors.

34.     Two groups of projects then follow, setting out the actions that will help deliver the key moves over the next 20-30 years.

35.     The first group involves improvements to the environment and functioning of the centre including pedestrian and cycleway improvements, gateways and streetscape improvements. A development framework for the future of the centre is also proposed to help guide and manage the growth and change signalled by the new and enlarged Local Centre Zone for the centre in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

36.     The second group involves improved local park facilities and connections through the Te Atatū South area. This will provide a better integrated and more appealing area for local people and visitors. This will have benefits for the health and vitality of the centre and it’s wider community by enabling easier access to the centre, an improved community hub at Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park as part of the centre, and better provision of recreational activities.

37.     The implementation schedule of the plan defines which of the three key moves of the plan each project helps to deliver. Indicative timeframes are given, being short term (1-2 years), medium term (3-5 years) and long term (6+ years). The timing of some projects has been brought forward, in response to feedback and also to reflect committed and emerging work programmes. Funding status of the projects is listed along with who the delivery stakeholders are and who is the lead agency. Many of the actions are aspirational and therefore not currently funded.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     An internal stakeholder group of representatives from a number of council departments and CCOs including Auckland Transport has operated throughout the plan process. They attended the co-design workshops, contributed plan and project ideas and programmes, and reviewed engagement feedback and subsequent drafts of the plan.

39.     The Parks, Sport and Recreation Department have been closely involved in the plan. Development plans for Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park and Te Atatū South Park have been progressing in tandem with this plan, utilising the eco-design approach and public engagement to test ideas for park improvements. The local board’s Open Space Network Plan and evolving Connections Plan have been reflected in this plan and will take forward parks and connections actions in the plan in future programmes.

40.     Auckland Transport project representatives are satisfied that the plan reflects their requirements for further investigations and evaluation to be done prior to programmes or specific projects being approved for delivery. Auckland Transport do not consider that they are the lead agency for many of the projects and resulting works that are identified for public space, pathways and roads but will be involved in projects as they progress.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     The plan has been sponsored and supported by the Henderson-Massey Local Board. The local board have been updated about progress and plan content through workshops at key points from its inception in August 2018. The local board has contributed funding towards engagement and specialist consultants Isthmus.

42.     The Chair and other local board members have attended co-design stakeholder workshops and meetings. The co-design process has involved many representatives of local community groups and organisations, who have contributed knowledge and time to ensure that local views and feedback have been adequately gathered and considered in the preparation of engagement material and the final plan.

43.     The successful delivery of the projects and actions proposed in the Te Atatū South Plan will result in a range of positive physical, social, cultural and environmental improvements for the local community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     The Te Atatū South area contains places of cultural and historical importance to mana whenua, including Te Whau estuary and Te Wai o Pareira. As set out earlier in this report, nine iwi groups with an interest in the area were contacted at the start of the project and kept informed through its development.

45.     Three iwi groups including Te Kawerau ā Maki as mana whenua had an involvement in the process to develop the plan. A Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara representative attended the co-design workshops. Initial feedback was received from Ngāti Tamaoho that was considered in the drafting of the plan concerning water quality improvements.

46.     Meetings and correspondence with a representative of Te Kawerau ā Maki enabled feedback and direction to be received on the emerging draft plan. The content of the matters of interest are noted in clauses 23 to 25 of this report. The matters raised by Te Kawerau ā Maki have been incorporated or addressed in the final plan. The final plan establishes the prospect of more recognition and protection of matters of importance to mana whenua in the area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     The plan identifies a range of projects that contribute to achieving the vision and key moves. The funding status and timeframes indicated for delivering these actions reflects current approved programmes, including the 10-year Budget (Long-term Plan), and advice provided from relevant council departments and CCOs. Some projects in parks and reserves are being considered in the 2019/20 local board work programme.

48.     Many of the projects and actions in the plan are aspirational and are not yet funded. However, some of these actions are already included in other approved plans or strategies of council, local board or CCOs. Future funding proposals will be progressively required through the budget setting and programming processes of these bodies to secure funding to deliver them, depending on priorities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     For 30-year local spatial plans such as the plan, there is a strategic and reputational risk to not initiating and maintaining momentum for the implementation of identified projects. To manage this risk, a more detailed monitoring programme will be developed so that the relevant delivery agents remain accountable for, and committed to, following through on these actions in accordance with the implementation plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     Once adopted by the local board, the project team will work with the council’s Design Studio on the final design and layout of the plan for publication. It is proposed that any minor amendments or corrections required in this process be referred to the Chair of the local board for approval.

51.     An implementation and monitoring programme will be prepared as a guidance tool for the local board, council stakeholders and other delivery agencies for delivering the actions. Along with other adopted local spatial plans in the local board area, there will also be annual monitoring reports to the local board to provide progress updates on implementation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The Te Atatū South Plan

Under separate cover

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ross Moffatt - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Options to explore service use for the ex-Massey Library space, 545 Don Buck Rd

File No.: CP2019/07449

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm the ex-Massey Library space remain an in service asset and approve the proposed Option 1, of a tailored Expressions of Interest (EOI) process to identify the optimal service use and tenancy.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Massey Library and Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) previously occupied a portion of space at 545 Don Buck Road to provide learning, literacy and information services. These services were co-located with YMCA who provide recreation and early childhood services.

3.       With the library and CAB services moving to Te Manawa on March 2019, the future service or non-service use of the ex-Massey Library and CAB space (the “ex-Massey Library space”) was considered as well and mechanisms to confirm future tenancy.

4.       The local board considered future use of the ex-Massey Library space at a workshop on 9 April 2019. The local board confirmed their preference that the space remain in service. This aligns with the findings of NorthWest Community Needs Assessment, 2018.

5.       In providing this feedback, the local board took into account advice on the availability of commercial space currently provided by the local market, building constraints and requirements to upgrade the interior, all of which reduced the viability of commercial options.

6.       A number of service based organisations have signalled interest in the space including council teams, council contract partners (YMCA) and community groups. This was outlined at a further workshop that considered service uses and approaches to confirming tenancy. Transparency of process and ensuring services complement those provided by Te Manawa were identified as priorities for the local board.

7.       Staff developed three options to identify a future tenant and service provision:

·        Option 1: community lease process with a tailored EOI process

·        Option 2: council occupancy to deliver council/community social innovation services via West Worx (previously known as The Western Initiative)

·        Option 3: a combination of Option 1 and 2 with West Worx occupying part of the space and a tailored EOI process for occupancy of the reminder of the space

8.       Community leasing EOI processes are tailored to support the identification of organisations whose service offer will align to and deliver outcomes that support local board plan outcomes and meet the requirements of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. Given the local board preference to hear from all interested parties, and the recent opening of Te Manawa, staff also recommend that the EOI process is tailored to invite applications from a wide range of community organisations that complement services at Te Manawa. 

9.       Option 1 is recommended by staff as it provides:

·    an open and transparent process

·    a tailored EOI ensuring services provided complement those of Te Manawa

·    an ability for interested parties to either collaborate or individually apply

·    an opportunity to bring third party investment to adapt or upgrade the space.

10.     Future local board decision-making points include publicly notifying the opportunity to apply for the community lease and allocating the lease agreement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      approve the ex-Massey Library space located at 545 Don Buck Road, Massey remain in service.

b)      approve Option 1 and request that the Community Leasing team prepare a tailored Expressions of Interest for the ex-Massey Library space located at 545 Don Buck Road, and invite applications for service uses that complement services at Te Manawa.

Horopaki

Context

About the space available, building and site

11.     The ex-Massey Library space is in the building called Massey Leisure Centre and Library, located at 545 Don Buck Road, Massey. The YMCA occupy part of the building and provide recreation and early childhood services. The library and CAB have relocated their services to Te Manawa which opened March 2019.

12.     The ex-Massey Library space was purpose built as a library and is 939m2. The space has structural pillars throughout, split flooring and exposed ceiling trusses. There is currently no available budget to make changes to the fit out of the ex-Massey Library space.

13.     The building is on 1.94ha of open space land, with a carpark and outdoor futsal court. The site is freehold local government land and is not classified under the Reserves Act. In the Unitary Plan this site is zoned as Open Space Community.

14.     Renewal works are planned over a five-year period (FY2020 - FY2024) to address weather tightness issues with the overall building. These renewal works will ensure the building is fit for purpose for the next 15 years. The ex-Massey Library space has been assessed as Condition 3 (average) and therefore considered habitable in terms of occupancy.

Parties interested in occupying the space

15.     Staff were made aware that the YMCA and The West Worx were potentially interested in occupying the space. Local board members have also informed staff that they have fielded queries from other interested parties. There are currently eight organisations on a community leasing interest register held for the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

16.     The West Worx is an Auckland Council place-based service focused on supporting youth employment, community and social innovation in the west. They are in the early stages of establishment and actively looking for space to share with community partners and social enterprise initiatives and to create an outreach space.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

What we know about community need and existing responses to this

17.     Notwithstanding building and financial constraints, the ex-Massey Library space provides a new opportunity to deliver local services and improve local outcomes. To understand the opportunity for service provision, it is helpful to draw on previous research and to identify the services Te Manawa is providing.

18.     Investigations were completed to inform the development of Te Manawa and to identify future facility provision needs in the North-West. Community aspirations for the Westgate, Massey West and West Harbour area, outlined in the 2018 Social Research Report, include:

·    a wide range of community and recreation facilities and services in the Massey-Westgate area

·    facilities and services for youth

·    flexible spaces, performing art spaces and active recreation and sport facilities

·    Te Manawa to have a creative space and provide opportunities for arts, craft, dance and performances

·    Te Manawa to act as a community hub, a welcoming place to visit and be flexible for diverse community use

·    ex-Massey Library space retrofitted into an active recreation centre that would tie in with the Massey Leisure Centre.

19.     The North-West community facility provision investigation concluded that removing Massey Leisure Centre from the network would create a leisure provision gap. For this reason, staff have not considered any options that involve rationalising 545 Don Buck Road (and therefore the ex-Massey Library space). The investigation also identified a future gap in aquatic facility provision, which Community and Social Policy staff are currently developing a strategic business case to address. 

20.     Te Manawa opened in March 2019 and is an integrated facility with a modern library, creative suites, co-working spaces, commercial kitchen, bookable meeting and function rooms, as well as a Citizens Advice Bureau. Many of the spaces and services provided respond to the community aspirations mentioned above, such as a community hub with flexible and creative spaces. Te Manawa is popular within the community with positive feedback around the spacious community space and friendly, helpful staff.

Criteria used for identifying and assessing service use options

21.     To identify options that take into account financial and building constraints, and maximises the opportunity provided by the ex-Massey library space, staff have focussed on developing options using the following criteria:

·    can be carried out within existing budgets

·    is relatively easy and quick to implement

·    responds to what we already know about community need

·    complement services provided by Te Manawa

·    aligns with local board outcomes

·    minimises reputational risk to council

·    enables community leadership.

22.     At a local board workshop held on 12 March 2019, staff discussed the option of directly negotiating with the YMCA to extend their services. The local board were not supportive of direct negotiation because of their preference for an open and transparent process. This would allow for all interested parties to be able to state a case for using the ex-Massey library space, including the YMCA. For this reason direct negotiation with the YMCA has been discarded as an option. 

23.     Staff also assessed the viability of non-service uses including a commercial lease. This has been discarded based on advice from Commercial and Finance and Community Facilities that investment will be required to meet commercial market needs and that investment is not justifiable based on expected commercial revenue. Additonally there is good commercial lease provision provided by the local market.

Options identified and recommendations

24.     Considering the criteria, parties who have expressed an interest, and local board feedback, the following options have been identified to secure an occupant for the site: 

·     Option 1: Tailored community lease EOI (recommended).

Lease process is initiated providing an opportunity for all interested parties to respond.

·     Option 2: The West Worx tenancy.

The West Worx use the space as part of council’s Corporate Property portfolio. The West Worx would provide a collaborative space supporting youth employment.

·     Option 3: Combination of The West Worx and tailored EOI for a community lease.

The West Worx move into the ex-Massey library in the area previously leased to the CAB offices. A tailored EOI for a community lease for the remainder of the space.

25.     In Options 1 and 3, the process is managed by the Community Leasing team. Applicant’s proposals will be weighted on the basis of community need, financial stability and alignment with local board outcomes. Option 2 would be managed by Corporate Property.

26.     All three options strongly align with the service use criteria, with key differences highlighted in the table below. Option 1 provides the greatest transparency and, because EOI processes are able to be tailored, includes the ability to invite applications for service uses that complement services being delivered by Te Manawa.

Option 1: Tailored community lease EOI (recommended)

Option 2: The West Worx  tenancy 

Option 3: Combination of Option 1 and 2 - The West Worx and tailored EOI for a community lease

Advantages

Transparent EOI process enabling a wide range of organisations to state their case for maximising the use of the space.

Includes the ability to tailor the EOI process to ensure services complement services being provided by Te Manawa.

Enables all parties to participate including community, YMCA and The West Worx and partners.

 

Advantages

The West Worx can occupy the space immediately. This minimises the amount of time the ex-Massey library space is left vacant.

The West Worx by design, work collaboratively with community and social entrepreneur partners ensuring the space is seen as both council and community occupancy and delivering services to improve employment outcomes for west Auckland youth.

Advantages

The West Worx can occupy the space immediately (using the ex CAB offices).

The balance of the ex-Massey library space is made available for a community lease, which will provide transparency and the abilty to tailor the EOI process as per Option 1.

 

Disadvantages

From beginning to end, an EOI process can take 6-12 months. However, as outlined in paragraph 27 of this report, by leveraging off work already done and removing step A it is possible to shorten the EOI process for the ex-Massey library space.

Disadvantages

Other community organisations with an interest is using the space, could consider it unfair that The West Worx are able to move in without going through an EOI process themselves.

May be a less attractive option for community organisations who do not yet have a relationship with The West Worx. 

May be a less attractive option for community organisations due to there being less space and having to share it.

Disadvantages

There is a risk this option won’t satisfy The West Worx  space requirements for community collaboration and outreach activities, and therefore not be attractive to them in the long term. Less access to collaborative space for The West Worx may compromise the outcomes able to be achieved.

May be a less attractive option for community organisations due to there being less space and having to share it.

27.    The key disadvantage of Option 1 is the time it can take to initiate and complete an EOI process, which can be up to 12 months. A standard EOI process involves the following steps:

·    Step A: Local board workshop to define the type of group or service being sought, for the purposes of providing direction to the community leasing team on how to tailor the EOI process

·    Step B: Formal report to the local board at a business meeting, requesting approval to commence public notification of opportunity to apply and the content of the public notice

·    Step C: Public notice placed in community newspaper

·    Step D: Staff review applications, check for eligibility, assess against criteria, and identify preferred applicant

·    Step E: Local board workshop to discuss applications including preferred applicant

·    Step F: Formal report to business meeting for local board decision on tenant and terms and conditions of lease

·    Step G: Community outcomes plan and lease agreement prepared for successful applicant

·    Step H: Lease is publicly notified.

28.     Given the work already carried out to understand service use options for the ex-Massey library space, staff do not consider it necessary to carry out step A in this instance.

29.     Staff recommend instead that the local board approve tailoring the EOI process to invite applications from organisations that provide services aligned to local board outcomes and complement services at Te Manawa. This would enable staff  to start drafting the public notice (outlined as step B in paragraph 27) as their next step, and reduce the time taken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Staff have worked across Community Services and Community Facilities in order to formulate the advice contained in this report. Internal advice and information has also been received from Legal Services, Corporate Property, Commercial and Finance, Panuku, Community and Social Innovation TSI, and Community and Social Policy, and has been incorporated into this report.

31.     Option 1 as the recommended option would directly impact the Community Leasing team within Community Facilities who are responsible for completing the EOI process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Making the ex-Massey Library space available as a community lease has the potential to positively impact the local community, particularly if the services provided complement those being provided by Te Manawa. It is a means to achieve local board outcomes.

33.     Staff have discussed the criteria, approach and service use options with the local board over the course of three workshops. At these workshops the local board expressed their preference for a community lease. Securing the occupancy through an open EOI process, allows for all interested parties to participate and outline the services they would provide to achieve improved local outcomes. Local board feedback has been included in formulating the options and recommendation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     No negative impacts for Māori have been identified while determining options for future use of the ex-Massey Library space.

35.     As part of the EOI process Community Facilities will engage with mana whenua and mataawaka organisations to raise awareness of the opportunity.

36.     Responsiveness to Māori responsiveness is included as part of the standard EOI criteria.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     There is no existing budget allocated to refit the ex-Massey Library space. For Options 1 and 3 prospective community lessees will need to fund any refit themselves or budget will need to be re-prioritised to allow for these costs. For Option 2, council Corporate Property would need to reprioritise existing budgets to renew or improve the workspace for The West Worx or alternatively The West Worx could seek investment from a third party.

38.     Community Facilities existing resources and budgets can resource the EOI process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Identified risks and mitigations associated with Option 1, an EOI for Community Lease include:


 

Risks

Mitigations

Services provided compete with Te Manawa

The EOI can be tailored to ensure duplication of services provided by Te Manawa can be managed.

Space remains vacant for prolonged period due to the timeframes required to carry out an EOI process

As outlined in this report, it is possible to shorten this process for the ex-Massey library space by using the knowledge we have already gained relating to types of organisations and services sought.

Large number of applications resulting in frustrated and disappointed  community organisations

Other opportunities for community leases in the Henderson-Massey local board area are about to be made available and this can be communicated to applicants. Examples of these spaces are

·    399 Don Buck Road, Massey

·    Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, 247 Edmonton Road, Henderson

·    Kaumatua Reserve, 572C and 580 Te Atatū Road, Te Atatū Peninsula

The community may expect council to invest in the fit out of the space

Clear communication throughout the EOI process to potential lessee’s that fit out costs will be at their cost.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Subject to approval of Option 1, the next step is for staff to report to the local board 63

41.     requesting the EOI be publicly notified. Following the public notification period, applications are assessed and discussed with the local board in a workshop. A formal report is then presented at a local board business meeting for resolution on lessee, and the terms and conditions of lease.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Bex Ah Fook | Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - Head of Service and Asset Planning

Lisa Tocker - General Manager Service Planning & Integration

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Approval for New Lease at 3 Ratanui Street, Henderson

File No.: CP2019/05765

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a new lease to Desmond Cook & Susan Cook at 3 Ratanui Street, Henderson (Waitākere Library).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The current tenant, Abreo Enterprises Limited, entered in to a commercial lease with Auckland Council by way of an assignment of lease dated 01 June 2016.

3.       The current lease expired 23 March 2018, a new lease was proposed to the existing tenant at the same rental level which was accepted but then declined by the tenant stating the rent was too high and the business was not trading well.

4.       A new tenant has proposed to buy the business, contingent on securing a longer lease term.

5.       This report seeks local board approval for a new commercial lease term of four (4) years with two further renewals of three (3) years each.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      approve a new commercial lease to Desmond Cook and Susan Cook at 3 Ratanui Street, Henderson as outlined in attachment A of this report, subject to the following terms:

i)       Term of four (4) years commencing 01 June 2019

ii)       Final expiry is 31 May 2029

iii)      Market rent reviews on each renewal date

iv)      Outgoings – Rent to be inclusive of outgoings

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       3 Ratanui Street, Henderson sits on a reserve known as the Waitākere Central Library. The reserve contains a Council owned building occupied by the library and a carpark which is accessed via Trading place. Panuku manages a commercial tenancy situated in the western side of the building. The leased area is outlined in attachment ‘A’. The area ‘A’ marked in red is the retail space, area ‘B’ marked in green is the seating area for the café

7.       The lease that was assigned to the sitting tenant, Abreo Enterprises Limited, expired 23 March 2018 and is currently on a ‘holding over’ month to month tenancy on the same terms and conditions.

8.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board previously approved a new lease to the tenant for five years at the present rental. The tenant originally accepted the terms but has since rejected the offer requesting a substantial reduction in rent.

9.       The premises have been used as a café for the past thirteen years. The café largely serves customers from the Auckland Council Library as well as the neighbouring Unitec Waitākere campus.

10.     The proposed tenant has owned and operated three lunch bars including the Muffin Break at Auckland Hospital, at the time the largest in Australasia. Susan Cook has worked in Retail/Hospitality for the past twelve years.

11.     The proposed tenant will rebrand the premises and will no longer be operating under the Gloria Jeans brand.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The use of the space located within the Waitākere Library will not change from its present use as a café, however, the proposed tenant will rebrand the premises and will no longer be operating under the Gloria Jeans brand.

13.     It has been proposed that a newly branded and independent café will assist in creating a refreshed new look and increase productivity.

14.     The commercial space within the library complex comprises of approximately 104.3m2 of retail space with some storage space to the rear. The space itself is reasonably modern, well presented and maintained. Being set back from Ratanui Street, there is less foot traffic and patrons largely come from the Library and Unitec facilities rather than off Ratanui Street.

15.     The building is of a superior quality building compared to some surrounding premises resulting in a higher market rental.

16.     The granting of a total term of 10 years (assuming all rights of renewal are exercised) provides the tenant with a longer term to invest in to the business and the premises.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The Head of Community Libraries for North and West, has supported Panuku’s role in leasing this space commercially but has stipulated a preference regarding opening hours, healthy food policy and whether they will be selling alcohol on site. These preferences will be discussed with the tenant directly; any application for a liquor licence will require full approval from Council.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board is aware of the present lease on the site and no concerns have been raised.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Panuku has a comprehensive iwi engagement process that engages with the 19 key Mana Whenua groups in Tamaki Makaurau on four fronts:

·    identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal and development of properties

·    flagging commercial interests

·    development partnering discussion

·    engagement around design outcomes for Council driven development projects.

20.     As there is no change to the property use or other major factors, there has been no iwi engagement undertaken in respect of the new lease on the reserve.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     If a new lease term of four years with further rights of renewals is not granted and the existing lease is terminated, there will be a loss of commercial rental and provision of a café to the local area.

22.     There will be no financial incentive associated with this new lease.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     We see the proposed tenant as a low risk for this type of tenancy. They have demonstrated through financial records that they have a strong financial standing and credit checks have come back positive.

24.     If a new lease is not granted the sale of the business will likely falter leaving the tenant in a vulnerable position on a month to month tenancy. If the current tenant, then chooses to give notice there would be a substantial risk that the building will be vacant for an extended period and could become susceptible to vandalism.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Panuku will inform the proposed tenant of the Henderson-Massey Local Boards decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Commercial Tenancy Premises Plan

Under separate cover

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Matthew Jones - Commercial Property Manager

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

Lori Butterworth - Property Management, Panuku Development Auckland

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

New community lease to Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited, Te Rangi Hiroa/Birdwood Winery, 99 Glen Toad, Ranui

File No.: CP2019/06537

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new licence to occupy to Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited located on part of Te Rangi Hiroa/Birdwood Winery, 99 Glen Road, Ranui.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited has applied for a licence to occupy part of Te Rangi Hiroa/Birdwood Winery to develop a Pā Harakeke site.

3.       Te Ukaipo is part of a national organisation working under the Sisters of Mercy Ministries of New Zealand Trust.  Te Ukaipo is a limited liability company and charity who are registered under the Charities Act 2005 (CC31609).

4.       The property sited at 99 Glen Road, Ranui is described as Section 2 SO 477190 comprising 7.7750 hectares and contained in NA2B/867.  Section 2 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

5.       Prior to any licence being granted, iwi engagement will be required in terms of section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987, together with the proposed licence to occupy being publicly notified in terms of section 73 (4) of the Reserves Act.

6.       Council granted land owner approval to Te Ukaipo on 31 July 2018 subject to a licence to occupy being granted to the group prior to the commencement of works.

7.       This report recommends that Henderson-Massey Local Board grant a licence to occupy to Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited for a term of five years commencing 21 May 2019 with one five year right of renewal as specified in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. 

8.       The extended term of the licence proposed reflects the long-standing relationship Te Ukaipo has with Auckland Council through the delivery of Project Twin Streams.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      grant a licence pursuant to Section 73 of the Reserves Act 1977 to occupy to Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited for 670 m² (more or less) on part of Te Rangi Hiroa/Birdwood Winery, 99 Glen Road, Ranui, described as Section 2 SO 477190 (Attachment A), subject to one months’ public notification, and with no objections, on the following terms and conditions: -

i)       term:  five years commencing 1 July 2019 with one five year right of renewal;

ii)       rent:   $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

 

iii)      the Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the community lease document (Attachment B);

iv)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

Horopaki

Context

9.       This report considers the licence to occupy to Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited on Te Rangi Hiroa, 99 Glen Road, Ranui.

10.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Te Rangi Hiroa

11.     The property sited at 99 Glen Road, Ranui is described as Section 2 SO 477190 comprising 7.7750 hectares and contained in NA2B/867.  Section 2 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

12.     Prior to any licence being granted, iwi engagement will be required in terms of section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987, together with the proposed licence to occupy having to be publicly notified in terms of section 73 (4) of the Reserves Act.

Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited

13.     Te Ukaipo is part of a national organisation working under the Sisters of Mercy Ministries of New Zealand Trust.  Te Ukaipo is a limited liability company and charity who are registered under the Charities Act 2005 (CC31609).  Its objectives are to work with tangata whenua and others in the community to offer a healthy whanau environment through quality programmes, services and advocacy initiatives that benefit youth in at risk situations, their whanau and all communities. 

14.     Te Ukaipo has submitted a comprehensive application in support of a new licence to occupy and currently has 128 volunteers.

15.     Te Ukaipo manages the Project Twin Streams contract which is a large scale environmental restoration project working since 2003 to improve West Auckland streams by re-vegetating streambanks with native trees and shrubs. 

16.     Te Ukaipo hold streamside community events involving the community in planting, weeding, mulching and clearing rubbish.  Te Ukaipo also work with groups within the community to adopt an area of stream to care for on a long-term basis.  Volunteer workers are also assigned via the Department of Corrections.

The recommended licence term for newly established community groups under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 is one year with a one year right of renewal.  The extended term of licence proposed reflects the long-standing relationship Te Ukaipo has with Auckland Council through the delivery of Project Twin Streams.


 

Pā Harakeke site

17.     Pā Harakeke involves planting selected varieties of harakeke chosen for their muka (fibre) or raranga (weaving/plaiting) qualities.  The cultivation of harakeke ensures vigorous, healthy bushes that provide high quality leaf material for weaving.  Pā Harakeke will provide community access to a natural resource taonga with the benefit of providing environmental learning and development programmes and opportunities for local community groups, schools and iwi.

18.     The proposed Pā Harakeke site is an estimated 22m x 12m and has a back drop of bush with adequate space to walk and mow around the site.  At the front is a paved area that links a path to enable weavers to enter the area to pick flax and undertake weaving at the site.  Various types of harakeke and whariki will be planted at the site.

19.     The preferred design for the Pā Harakeke site is based on tāniko.  Tāniko is a traditional method of decorative māori weaving used specifically to decorate the boarders of fine garments based on geometric triangle and diamond shapes.

20.     The design around the weaving area and the path will have border painted tiles that will be created by local schools reflecting images of wildlife and weaving from the area.  The different colours will bring out the tāniko design.

21.     Various types of harakeke and whariki will be planted at the site and coloured mulch will be used.

22.     Te Ukaipo has sought guidance and support from weavers at Hoani Waititi Marae for the Pā Harakeke site

23.     Maintenance of the proposed licence to occupy site is the responsibility of Te Ukaipo and water will be brought on-site to water the harakeke.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Staff have obtained input from colleagues in Parks, Sports and Recreation, Community Development and Operational Management and Maintenance.  No concerns were raised regarding the licence to occupy to Te Ukaipo.

25.     The proposed licence to occupy has no identified impact on other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board is the allocated authority to approve the granting of a licence to occupy.

27.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board expressed their support for a licence to occupy at a workshop held on 13 November 2018.

28.     The recommendations within this report support the Henderson-Massey Local Board 2017 plan outcome of:

-     communities know each other and work together on common interests (Outcome 3);

-     natural spaces are valued and restored (Outcome 6).

29.     Authority to grant the lease is provided by Section 73 of the Reserves Act 1977.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Engagement was undertaken on 7 November 2018 with mana whenua who have a key interest in the site located on part of Te Rangi Hiroa. 

31.     Engagement involved:

-     a presentation at the North West Mana Whenua Forum held at Orewa on 7 November 2018;

-     written engagement containing detailed information on the proposed Pā Harakeke site.

32.     No objections were raised by the iwi representatives who responded.

33.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.  The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treating obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.  These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term, Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and Local Board Plans.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     Provided there are no objections, the cost implications for Auckland Council for the public notification of the lease will be an initial cost estimated at $750.00

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     If a new licence to occupy is not granted this will inhibit Te Ukaipo’s ability to provide environmental learnings, develop programmes and opportunities for local community groups, schools and iwi through the cultivation of Pā Harakeke.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Subject to the local board grant of a licence to occupy and there being no objections received following the public notification, council staff will work with key representatives of Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited to finalise the licence to occupy agreement.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan for Te Rangi Hiroa, 99 Glen Road, Ranui

Under separate cover

b

Community Outcomes Plan for Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited

Under separate cover

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Knudsen - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Renewal of community lease to Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated, Cranwell Park, 20 Alderman Drive, Henderson

File No.: CP2019/06534

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a renewal of community lease to Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated for part of Cranwell Park, 20 Alderman Drive, Henderson.   

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated has a community lease with the former Henderson Borough Council for part of Cranwell Park, 20 Alderman Drive, Henderson.  The lease commenced 1 August 1984 for a term of 21 years to 31 July 2005.  There are two further renewal terms of 21 years each.

3.       Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated gave written notice to council in 2005 and on 10 March 2019 of its intent to exercise its first renewal term for the period beginning 1 August 2005.

4.       In 2005 when the Henderson Croquet Club gave notice of its intention to renew its lease, a proposal was being considered on the land which would have affected the leaseholders.  Because of this, the terms of the renewal were not agreed between the club and the former Waitākere City Council and the matter was placed on hold.  Discussions were recently revived and the club and Auckland Council have agreed to the renewal on the same terms and conditions as outlined in the deed of lease dated 20 October 1986.  

5.       This report recommends granting a renewal of community lease to Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated for a term of 21 years commencing 1 August 2005 to 31 July 2026.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      grant a renewal of community lease to Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated, located on part of Cranwell Park, 20 Alderman Drive, Henderson, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)       term – 21 years commencing 1 August 2005 to 31 July 2026;

ii)       rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum.

b)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Deed of Lease signed and dated 20 October 1986.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report considers the renewal of community lease to Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated located on part of Cranwell Park, 20 Alderman Drive, Henderson.   

7.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Cranwell Park

8.       Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated occupies part of the land on Cranwell Park described as Part DP 1467 and Part DP 2251, 7.4690 ha contained in NA14C/1115 (Part- Cancelled).  The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated

9.       The club gave written notice to the former Waitākere City Council in 2005 and again on 10 March 2019 to Auckland Council of its intention to renew its lease.  In 2005 the matter was placed on hold as the former Waitākere City Council and the club could not agree on the terms of the renewal. The application for renewal was resubmitted in 2019 and the club and Auckland Council have agreed to the renewal on the same terms and conditions as outlined in the deed of lease dated 20 October 1986.  The building and improvements are owned by the council. 

10.     The club is affiliated to Croquet New Zealand and is one of 11 clubs in the Auckland Croquet Association.  The club has been an incorporated society since 17 December 1992 and its objectives are to:

-     provide lawns and all the necessary equipment and amenities for the game of croquet;

-     promote good fellowship and recreation among its members.

11.     The club meets the criteria required for a renewal of lease as follows:

-     it is a registered incorporated society

-     it has complied with the terms of the current lease

-     it has a history of delivering its services to the local community

-     is financially viable and is managed appropriately

12.     Croquet is a sport that is accessible to all ages and abilities.  It taxes the mind as well as the game skills of the participants and is able to be played by members who find other sports too physically challenging.  The sport provides opportunities to engage with people and offers companionship and social interaction.

13.     Club days are Wednesday and Saturday from 9.30am – 12pm and golf croquet is Thursday and Saturday from 1.00pm – 3.00pm.  Free croquet lessons and competition events are offered.

14.     Current membership is 25.  Older residents want to be active in their community and lead healthy lives for as long as possible and it is hoped that new residents to the area will join the club and take advantage of the facilities on offer, and the opportunities to become part of the community.

15.     Audited accounts show proper accounting records have been kept.

16.     A recent site visit ascertained the leased area is in a neat and tidy condition.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     Staff have obtained input from colleagues in Parks, Sports and Recreation, Community Development and Operational Management and Maintenance.  No concerns were raised regarding the renewal of lease to the club. 

18.     The proposed renewal of community lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group.

19.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board is the allocated authority to approve the granting of a renewal of community lease. 

21.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board expressed their support for a renewal of community lease at a workshop held on 2 April 2019. 

22.     The recommendations within this report support the Henderson-Massey Local Board 2017 plan outcome of:

-     communities know each other and work together on common interests (Outcome 3);

-     community facilities are vibrant and welcoming places at the heart of our communities (Outcome 4).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.  The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treating obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.  These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and Local Board Plans.

24.     There are no changes in use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

25.     Additionally, the objective of community leases is to ensure community facilities are well maintained and accessible to all members of the community, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There is no direct cost to Auckland Council in granting this renewal of community lease.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The provision for a renewal of community lease is provided for in the Deed of Lease granted to the club.  As such, where a group meets the criteria stipulated in the lease agreement, council has a contractual obligation to effect the renewal.   

28.     If the renewal of lease is not granted this will compromise the club’s ability to provide its services to the community and impact the Henderson-Massey Local Board outcomes.   

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Subject to the local board granting a renewal of community lease, council staff will work with key representatives of the club to finalise the deed of renewal of community lease.  


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan - Cranwell Park, 17 Alderman Drive, Henderson

Under separate cover

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Knudsen - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Renewal and variation of community lease to Waitakere City Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated, Fred Taylor Park, 184 Fred Taylor Drive, Whenuapai.

File No.: CP2019/06746

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a renewal and variation of community lease to Waitakere City Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated formerly known as Massey Association Football Club Incorporated for part of Fred Taylor Park, 184 Fred Taylor Drive, Whenuapai. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waitakere City Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated formerly known as Massey Association Football Club Incorporated has a community lease with the former Waitemata City Council for part of Fred Taylor Park, 184 Fred Taylor Drive, Whenuapai.   The lease commenced 1 April 1985 for a term of 33 years to 31 March 2018.  The lease contains one 33 year right of renewal.   

3.       The club gave written notice to council on 5 March 2019 of its intent to exercise its renewal term for the period 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2051.

4.       A variation to the lease is required to record the name change and include a Smoke free Policy clause.  The club has agreed to the variations.

5.       This report recommends granting a renewal and variation of community lease to Waitakere City Association Football & Sports Club Incorporated for a term of 33 years commencing 1 April 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      grant a renewal of community lease to Waitakere City Association Football & Sports Club Incorporated formerly known as Massey Association Football Club Incorporated, located on part of Fred Taylor Park, 184 Fred Taylor Drive, Whenuapai (Attachment A), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)       term – 33 years commencing 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2051;

ii)       rent - $5.00 plus GST per annum

b)      grant a variation to the renewal of community lease to:

i)       record the name change from Massey Association Football Club Incorporated to Waitakere City Association Football & Sports Club Incorporated;

ii)       include a Smoke free Policy clause.

c)       all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Deed of Lease signed and dated 19 December 1985. 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report considers the renewal of community lease to Waitakere City Association Football & Sports Club Incorporated located on part of Fred Taylor Park, 184 Fred Taylor Drive, Whenuapai. 

7.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Fred Taylor Park

8.       Waitakere City Association Football & Sports Club Incorporated occupies part of the land on Fred Taylor Park described as Lot 1 DP and Parts Lot 2 and 3 DP 65077 – 8.0922 ha – NA51D/741.  The land is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

Waitakere City Association Football & Sports Club Incorporated

9.       Waitakere City Association Football & Sports Club Incorporated was formerly known as Massey Association Football Club Incorporated formed under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 on 5 December 1978.

10.     The club gave written notice to council on 5 March 2019 of its intent to exercise its renewal term and submitted an application in support of renewing the community lease.  The club owns the building and improvements. 

11.     The club is affiliated to New Zealand Football through the Northern Football Federation and has been an incorporated society since 5 December 1978.  The objectives of the club are:

-     to develop and protect the interest of Association Football generally and especially in the area of Waitakere City;

-     to teach players of all ages the rudiments of Association Football and sport in general to develop their sense of sportsmanship and fair play.

12.     The club meets the criteria required for a renewal of lease as follows:

-     it is a registered incorporated society

-     it has complied with the terms of the current lease

-     it has a history of delivering its services to the local community

-     it is financially viable and well managed.

13.     The club continues to grow and plans are underway to accommodate growing team numbers and the expanding population growth in the area.  The club is currently engaged, with the support of council and Sport Waitakere to investigate the collaboration of surrounding clubs in providing an optimum football environment to develop junior players.

14.     Membership has grown over the years with current membership reflected below: -  

-     members aged 25 years and under                  525

-     members aged 25 years and over                    125

Total membership                                           650

15.     Audited accounts show proper accounting records have been kept.

16.     A recent site visit ascertained the leased area is in a neat and tidy condition.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     Staff have obtained input from colleagues in Parks, Sports and Recreation, Community Development and Operational Management and Maintenance.  No concerns were raised regarding the renewal and variation of lease to the club. 

18.     The proposed renewal and variation of community lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group.

19.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board is the allocated authority to approve the granting of a renewal and variation of community lease. 

21.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board expressed their support for a renewal and variation of community lease at a workshop held on 2 April 2019. 

22.     The recommendations within this report support the Henderson-Massey Local Board 2017 plan outcome of:

-     Communities know each other and work together on common interests (Outcome 3);

-     Community facilities are vibrant and welcoming places at the heart of our communities (Outcome 4).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.  The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treating obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.  These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and Local Board Plans.

24.     There are no changes in use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

25.     Additionally, the objective of community leases is to ensure community facilities are well maintained and accessible to all members of the community, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There is no direct cost to Auckland Council in granting this renewal and variation of community lease.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The provision for a renewal of community lease granted to the club.  As such, where a group meets the criteria stipulated in the lease agreement, council has a contractual obligation to affect the renewal.   

28.     If the renewal of lease is not granted this will compromise the club’s ability to provide its services to the community and impact the Henderson-Massey Local Board outcomes.   

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Subject to the local board granting a renewal and variation of community lease, council staff will work with key representatives of the club to finalise the deed of renewal and variation of community lease.  

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site map of Fred Taylor Park, 184 Fred Taylor Drive, Whenuapai

Under separate cover

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ron Johnson - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 grant allocations

File No.: CP2019/05834

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 including multiboard applications.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 (refer Attachment B) including multiboard applications (Attachment C).

3.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board adopted the Henderson-Massey Local Board Community Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 20 April 2017. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $124,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $63,456.22 has been allocated in previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $60,543.78 to be allocated to one local grant round and one quick response grant round.

5.       In addition, an underspend of funding from “Waves Trust” (MB1819-119) totalling $384.07 was returned to the 2018/2019 grants budget. This would provide a total budget of $60,927.85 for one local grant round and one quick response grant round.

6.       Thirty-four applications were received for Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019, requesting a total of $182,081 and seventeen multiboard applications were received, requesting a total of $75,377.81.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1905-227

Act One Productions Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the "Kauri Kid" play including costs of set design, songwriting and sound equipment hire

 

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-242

Panacea Arts Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the art materials and tutor wages to run a weekly therapeutic 'Creative Living' art class from 25/7/2019 to 19/12/2019.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-249

Red Leap Theatre Charitable Trust Board

Arts and culture

Towards  tutors' fees for "workshops with Rutherford College and Henderson High School" from 28/6/2019 to 5/8/2019.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-251

Fresh Movement Arts Trust

Arts and culture

Towards production costs and venue hire for "Battlezone Dance Competition" from 27/09/2019 to 29/09/2019.

$9,408.00

Eligible

LG1905-232

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture, Community

Towards the facilitator fees to deliver 15 "Spoken Word Poetry" workshops at schools in Henderson-Massey area between 1/6/2019 to 1/6/2020

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-201

Waitakere City BMX Club

Community

Towards the costs of murals on the container buildings.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-203

Combined Youth Services Trust

Community

Towards the costs of two Lifeskills Camp programmes for youth groups in Henderson-Massey area from 22/7/2019 to 29/11/2019.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-205

KidsCan Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of food for the Food for Kids programme

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-206

New Zealand Continence Association Incorporated

Community

Towards costs of venue hire, information packs, awareness coordinator and a contribution to educator salary.

$5,500.00

Eligible

LG1905-215

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

Community

Towards the venue costs, purchase of toys and resources to maintain operation of Pacifika Beatz Playgroup in Ranui

$3,600.00

Eligible

LG1905-216

Ranui Community Centre

Community

Towards the Rongoā Māori workshops including gardening materials, resources, and the facilitator's fees between July 2019 and December 2019.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-221

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards venue hire, marketing, facilitation (therapist and assistant fees), equipment, coordination and associated administrative costs for Dance Therapy NZ programme for the period July 2019 to December 2019.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-222

New Zealand African Welfare Service Trust

Community

Towards the African youth life-skill mentoring programme including venue hire and facilitators, mentors, volunteers' costs.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-223

Ranui community Centre

Community

Towards the purchase of a freezer and a label printer to pilot a project of take-home-meals for the elderly groups in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-225

Communicare Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the weekly venue hire for Te Tuhi.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-226

Bhartiya Samaj Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the "International Day for Older Persons" including costs of  transportation, catering, marketing, venue hire, sound system, decorations, gift voucher and volunteer costs

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-231

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the wages of two asthma nurse educators for "Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Education and Awareness"

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-234

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Community

Towards costs for project materials, travel, venue hire, printing and stationary, management fees and insurance for the "WISE" project.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-235

West Auckland Youth Development Trust t/a West Auckland Boxing Academy

Community

Towards "West Auckland Boxing Academy" including boxing equipment, tutor costs, and a contribution to youth membership

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-238

Sport Waitakere Trust

Community

Towards project and coordination costs for "Collaborative Marketplace" from 3/6/2019 to 31/7/2020.

$12,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-239

The Crescendo Trust of Aotearoa

Community

Towards "Jam Cellar" at Corban Estate Arts Centre including venue hire, marketing, Quickpay subscription, and marketing material from June 2019 to June 2020.

$4,393.00

Eligible

LG1905-240

Hospice West Auckland

Community

Towards Hospice West Auckland's brochures including costs of three versions of translations and the printing costs

$3,689.00

Eligible

LG1905-243

Peter Ruka

Community

Towards tutor wage and travel costs for "together, stronger." From 15/04/2019 to 31/05/2019.

$2,000.00

Ineligible

LG1905-244

Shakti Community Council Incorporated

Community

Towards coordinator and facilitator costs, materials, marketing, and resources for "4R Project - Upcycling Training Programme" from 1/6/2019 to 1/6/ 2020.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-246

Community

Towards advertising, coordinator and referee costs for "Ranui Touched." from 15/8/2019 to 30/6/2020.

$16,960.00

Eligible

LG1905-247

Sally Prebble

Community

Towards facilitator's costs for "non-violent communication training" from 1/6/2019 to 20/12/19.

$2,080.00

Eligible

LG1905-248

Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust

Community

Towards the cost of therapist fees, administration, rent and maintenance of instruments.

$3,387.00

Eligible

LG1905-252

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards helpline direct costs for "youthline youth helpline" from1/7/2019 to 30/3/2020.

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-253

Auckland Action Against Poverty

Community

Towards volunteer, resources and office expenses required to support advocacy services from 1/6/2019 to 29/5/2020.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-213

Ranui 135 Leadership Team

Sport and recreation

Towards fees and costs of sport camps and sport and music initiatives for young people.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-220

YMCA of Auckland

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of “Picklebal”l equipment at YMCA Massey

$2,710.00

Eligible

LG1905-229

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust t/a Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Sport and recreation

Towards a contribution to wages of the programme coordinators for the "Project K Wilderness Adventure"

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-245

Waitakere Badminton Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards purchasing four mats for the 12 court facility at Waitakere Badminton Association Hall.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG1905-250

Te Kura O Hoani Waititi Marae

Sport and recreation

Towards a subsidy for students to participate in the "Hillary Outdoor Adventure Programme"

$2,354.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$182,081.00

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Henderson-Massey Multiboard Round Two 2018/2019, listed in Table Two below:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB1819-211

New Zealand Kiribati National Council

Arts and culture

Event costs for the Kiribati Stick dance event.

$4,500.00

Eligible

MB1819-254

Proudly Asian Theatre Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the costs to deliver the Filipino production, Pinay, including personnel, production and marketing.

$1,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-273

Sisters United Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, facilitator costs, resources and catering for Sisters United Girls Conference on 2 August 2019 in Auckland.

$2,104.10

Eligible




MB1819-214

Tuileapa Youth Mentoring Service

Community

Towards a contribution for salaries of mentors operating services for Pacific and Maori youth

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB1819-226

Fix Up, Look Sharp

Community

Towards operational costs for the "supporting men to access jobs" programme from 8 June 2019 to 6 June 2020.

$2,000.00

Eligible





MB1819-245

Zeal Education Trust

Community

Towards the "West Auckland Street Youth Work and Community Activations" including project manager wages, activity costs, van hire and resources from 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.

$9,576.67

Eligible








MB1819-255

Waitakere Adult Literacy Incorporated

Community

Towards the "Whanau Links" programme inlcuding tutor fees and venue hire from  22 July to 29 November 2019.

$4,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-260

Children's Autism Foundation

Community

Towards extending the outreach service delivery for children with autism and their families, in south and west Auckland.

$2,880.00

Eligible







MB1819-265

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards project coordination and activity costs including, external facilitators, support staff and administration costs for the "Diversity for all" project from 3 June to 20 December 2019.

$2,700.00

Eligible








MB1819-269

Victim Support (New Zealand Council of Victim Support Groups Inc)

Community

Towards recruitment, training expenses and supervision of the volunteer support workers from 1 June to 31 December 2019.

$4,500.00

Eligible








MB1819-271

Hearts & Minds NZ Incorporated

Community

Towards updating and printing the Support Services Directory 2019 to 2021 for the North Shore, Waitakere and Rodney areas.

$3,000.00

Eligible






MB1819-220

Project Litefoot Trust

Environment

Towards a contribution for the overall costs of the project, including salaries, materials installed at the club, administration costs, travel costs, and promotion for Project Litefoot.

$1,623.98

Eligible








MB1819-246

The Auckland King Tides Initiative
The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Inc

Environment

Towards the "King Tides" project including costs for signage, gauges, website, data system and public launch.

$5,736.25

Eligible






MB1819-225

The Kids for Kids Charitable Trust

Events

Towards venue hire and production costs of the "Kids for Kids" event in Takapuna.

$770.48

Eligible




MB1819-237

Interacting Theatre Trust

Events

Towards the "InterACT Festival 2019" for people with disabilities, including St Johns, portaloos, entertainment and venue hire from 23 October to 25 October 2019.

$2,888.00

Eligible








MB1819-223

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards the West Auckland Junior Development Programme including venue hire (Trusts Arena), administrator fees from 4 June to 17 December 2019.

$8,000.00

Eligible








MB1819-275

Te Kura O Hoani Waititi Marae

Sport and recreation

Towards costs of Te Wikihakinakina 2019

$10,098.33

Eligible






Total

 

 

 

$75,377.81

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board adopted the Henderson-Massey Local Board Community Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 17 April 2018 and will operate three quick response, two multiboard and two local grant rounds for this financial year.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11. Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage. Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department, will provide input and advice.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Henderson-Massey Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

17.     A summary of each application received through Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019 and multi-board applications is provided in Attachment B and Attachment C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

19.     Twenty six applicants applying to local grant round two, has indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

21.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $124,000. A total of $42,000 was allocated in round one of the Local Grants 2018/2019, leaving a total of $82,000 to be allocated. A total of $11,120 was allocated in round one of the Quick Response Grants 2018/2019, leaving a total of $70,880 to be allocated. A total of $10,336.22 was allocated in round two of the Quick Response Grants 2018/2019, leaving a total of $60,543.78 to one local grant round and one quick response grant round.

22.     Furthermore, an underspend of funding from “Waves Trust” (MB1819-119) totalling $384.07 was returned to the 2018/2019 grants budget. This leaves a total of $60,927.85 to be allocated between one local grant round and one quick response round.

23.     In round two of the Henderson-Massey Local Grants 2018/2019, thirty-four applications were received requesting a total of $182,081 and seventeen multiboard applications requesting a total of $75,377.81.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Henderson-Massey Local Board allocating funding for round two of the local grants and multiboard, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019

Under separate cover

b

Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019 applications

Under separate cover

c

Henderson-Massey Multiboard Grants Round Two 2018/2019 applications

Under separate cover

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Erin Shin - Community Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grant Operations Manager

Shane King - Head of Operations Support

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Business Improvement District Programme Compliance Report to Henderson-Massey Local Board for FY 2017-2018

File No.: CP2019/06613

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the Henderson-Massey Local Board’s recommendation to the Governing Body to strike the BID (Business Improvement District) targeted rates for the Te Atatū Peninsula Business Association for the 2019-2020 financial year.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) programme supports business associations by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area.  The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a grant to the relevant BID.

3.       The BIDs are incorporated societies that are independent of council.  For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BIDs are being used appropriately, council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Hōtaka ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

4.       The BID Policy was developed to encourage improved governance of BID committees and staff to improve financial management, programme delivery and transparency to their members. 

5.       This report indicates that the Te Atatū Peninsula Business Association is in compliance with the BID Policy. Information presented in this report is based on documents submitted by the business association to council’s BID programme team. 

6.       Staff recommend that as the BID has met the requirements of the BID Policy, the Henderson-Massey Local Board should, therefore, recommend to the Governing Body to strike the targeted rates sought by the BID.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body to strike the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2019-2020 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programme:

i)       $92,000 for Te Atatū Peninsula Business Association

Horopaki

Context

7.       The council adopted the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (Hōtaka ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) in 2016.  This Policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, and disestablishing BIDs; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.  Attachment A provides an overview of key elements of the BID programme.

8.       BID targeted rates are applied to all commercially-rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct. Those funds are transferred to the business association operating the BID programme.

9.       There are currently 48 BID programmes throughout Auckland which represent more than 25,000 businesses and a combined $17.7 million in targeted rates investment.  Refer to Attachment B for current and proposed targeted rates budgets for all BIDs.

10.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BIDs. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body.  The local board should recommend the striking of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is substantially complying with the BID Policy.

11.     Recommendations arising from this report are put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2019-2020 and striking of the targeted rate.

12.     This report is a requirement of the BID Policy (2016). The local board must decide whether to endorse the BID targeted rates.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The council’s BID programme team monitors compliance with the BID Policy on an ongoing basis and provides governance advice to BID-operating business associations as needed or requested.

14.     As BID programmes are operated by private independent societies, their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities.  In recognition of their independent corporate status, the policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness.  Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Compliance with the BID Policy

15.     The BID policy is the means for council to ensure accountability for BID targeted rate funding and to encourage good governance. This is achieved by requiring regular reporting by BID-operating business associations specifically by providing to council the following documents, and staying in touch with their local board(s) at least once a year:

·   Current Strategic Plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

·   Audited Accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

·   Annual Report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers.

·   Business Plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the Strategic Plan, to be achieved and resourced.

·   Indicative Budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Budget process which sets all rates.

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

16.     The BID Policy (2016) requires each business association to ratify the BID grant amount/targeted rate and budget for the following financial year. The Te Atatū Peninsula Business Association presented for members’ approval, their 2019-2020 BID grant amount/targeted rate and budget at their 2018 AGM.  The approval at the AGM by way of a resolution accepting the 2019-2020 BID grant amount/targeted rate enables the Henderson-Massey Local Board to recommend to the Governing Body the striking of targeted rates for 2019-2020.

17.     Te Atatū Peninsula Business Association complies with the BID Policy and, therefore, it is recommended that the Henderson-Massey Local Board recommends to the Governing Body the striking of the targeted rate relevant to this business association. 

18.     The recommendation of this report is supported by evidence of compliance with the BID Policy by the Te Atatū Peninsula Business Association. Refer to Attachment C for details.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The proposed decision does not impact other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Recommending that the Governing Body strikes the targeted rates for the Te Atatū Business Improvement District means that this BID programme will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their district and provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plan, and support business growth.

21.     We do not comment on the effectiveness of individual BID programmes as that is a matter for the members to assess.

22.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the BID programme last year (resolution number HM/2018/67) as did the 17 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their areas.

23.     Several local boards provide additional funding to local business associations, however, accountability for that funding is set by funding agreements between the local board and the business association.  Those requirements are apart from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     BIDs work for the benefits of all members, including Māori businesses.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that district.  The council’s financial role is only to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the business association on a quarterly basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are reputational risks to the council if ratepayer funds are misused, but this is rare.  Otherwise, there are no direct financial risks to the local board or council that could result from this recommendation to approve the BID targeted rates.

27.     The requirements of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for BIDs to misuse funds, by requiring each BID to plan for the intended use of funds, report on its activities to its members, and to have its accounts audited. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     If the board endorses this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be struck as part of its approval of the Annual Budget 2019-2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID programme key elements

Under separate cover

b

BID programme funding

Under separate cover

c

Te Atatū BID Compliance Summary 2017-2018

Under separate cover

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Steven Branca - BID Partnership Advisor  

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Remuneration Authority – Policy on Child Care Allowances

File No.: CP2019/07890

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback on the Remuneration Authority’s proposed policy on child care allowances.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Remuneration Authority has previously received submissions from members in other councils stating that if childcare were a claimable expense, then serving in local government might be a more realistic option for parents who are currently deterred from considering the role because of the costs of childcare. Some jurisdictions in other countries provide such allowances.

3.       The authority has distributed its proposed policy in order to get feedback from councils and individual elected members.  The proposed policy is in Attachment A. The authority has asked for feedback by 31 May 2019 and intends to include the provision in its determination that comes into force on 1 July 2019.

4.       At present, the authority determines allowances for vehicle mileage, travel time and communications. Each individual council considers its approach to the expenses and allowances and writes its own policies within the upper limits set by the authority.  If the authority determines that childcare allowances are permissible the council could include, within the framework established by the authority, specific rules in the council’s expenses policy.

5.       A draft submission on the proposed policy has been prepared and is attached as Attachment B. Elected members can provide individual comments to the Remuneration Authority if they wish, by 31 May 2019.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      endorse the draft submission on the Remuneration Authority’s proposed policy on childcare allowances.

Horopaki

Context

6.       LGNZ has formed a Young Elected Members (YEM) committee with members representing LGNZ Zones. These are elected members who are under the age of 40 years.  The YEM network has raised the matter of childcare costs with the Remuneration Authority.  They cite examples such as a member of a smaller council who is 24 years of age and on a salary of $18,707.  Another, struggling to pay for childcare on her councillor’s salary of $20,634 opted instead to bring her child to meetings[1]

7.       The group makes the point that other costs of attending to council duties can be claimed, such as mileage and communications, but not the cost of childcare.  The group is broadly interested in developing the ability of younger elected members. 

8.       The Remuneration Authority has researched childcare allowances and is now inviting feedback on its draft policy, which includes the eligibility and payment conditions which will be included in the authority’s formal determination.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Remuneration Authority has recognised the need to address childcare costs if those with families are not to be deterred from standing for local government office.

10.     Salaries paid to Auckland local board members and governing body members are generally higher than in smaller council districts in New Zealand, where it is likely elected members particularly struggle to meet childcare costs from their salaries.  Nevertheless, the provision of the allowance may encourage greater diversity in those standing for election in Auckland.

11.     The cost to the council and the ratepayer is reasonable in terms of the total budget for elected members’ remuneration but is a significant help for the member who has to arrange childcare.  The policy places a cap of $6,000 per annum for any member.  LGNZ statistics show that approximately 6 per cent of elected members are 40 years of age or below[2].  On that basis, the cost to Auckland Council, if 6 per cent of members (10 members) claimed the allowance, would be $60,000.

12.     The Remuneration Authority indicates it is in discussion with the Inland Revenue Department about how the allowance will be treated for tax purposes (as income or as an expense reimbursement).  It is possible it will be taxed at source (that is by the council) prior to payment.

13.     Payment of the allowance under the proposed conditions requires evidence of the expense incurred.  This is supported.

14.     The allowance cannot be paid to family members. This is supported.

15.     The proposed conditions state that a local authority may pay the childcare allowance as a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.  This wording may be too wide.  Consider a member who has regularly arranged childcare, irrespective of undertaking council duties, deciding to spend two hours preparing for the next council meeting while the children happen to be in childcare. The member would be “engaged on local authority business” and could claim the childcare cost of those two hours.

16.     Staff researched conditions around payment by other councils in other jurisdictions.  One council simply paid the full cost of child care.  Another specified the meetings and events that could be claimed. Staff believe the intent of the provision is to make a contribution toward the cost of child care where that is necessary in order for the member to undertake council duties, such as attend meetings.  The wording should indicate more clearly that the payment is for childcare costs that are necessary in order for the member to undertake council duties and are not simply childcare costs that are incurred at the same time the member is undertaking council duties and would have been incurred anyway, if the member was not attending to council duties.

17.     Other conditions are:

(i)      the child is under 14 years

(ii)     payment cannot be greater than $15 per hour and cannot be greater than the actual expense

(iii)     childcare cannot be for more than 8 hours in any 24 hour period.

These are supported.

18.     Staff recommend that the council supports the proposed policy with the comment, outlined above, that the purpose should more clearly reflect that the expense is a necessary expense in order for the member to attend to duties.

19.     Staff also note that the council itself will decide its own provisions to include in its expenses policy, within the framework set by the authority.

20.     Members can provide individual comments to the Remuneration Authority if they wish, by 31 May 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Remuneration Authority’s policy applies only to elected members and does not impact the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The policy affects all elected members, including local board members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The Remuneration Authority’s policy may assist those in the Māori community who are potential candidates for election but are deterred by the costs of childcare.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There will be financial implications.  As noted in the body of the report, the additional cost is likely to be less than $60,000 and will impact the cost centre for elected members’ remuneration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a small risk of the provision being abused (false claims submitted).  The requirement for evidence of the amount paid will mitigate this risk.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     This report is being presented to local boards for their feedback.  It is also being circulated to Governing Body members for their feedback.  The draft submission will be amended if there is a clear majority position in favour of an amendment.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Childcare Allowance Proposed Draft Policy Paper

Under separate cover

b

Remuneration Authority draft policy - child care allowances - submission

Under separate cover

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Henderson-Massey Local Board for quarter three 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/05951

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Henderson-Massey Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2018/2019 work programme. This is a retrospective report intended to provide a transparent overview and reflect the progress of how the Henderson-Massey Local Board work programme is tracking at the end of quarter three 2018/2019.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·      The draft Henderson-Massey Connections Plan went out for consultation In March 2019.

·      The local board approved additional Local Development Initiative (LDI) funding for Isthmus (contractor) to complete the feasibility and concept plan development for the Te Atatū South Centre Plan.

·      The scope and scale options for improving the existing play space in Moire Park has been workshopped with the board.

·      Major renewals and physical works at Te Pai netball courts have been completed.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Most activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status this quarter.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2018/2019 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note.

7.       Henderson Massey Local Board capital investment for the period was $15.9 million and net operational cost of service was $14.9 million. Operating expenditure is 1.4 per cent below budget. The main drivers being that several Locally driven initiatives (LDI) are at various stages of progression due to either scoping, deferment or timing delays.

8.       Operating revenue was below budget by 4 per cent mainly due to reduced attendance numbers at the West Wave aquatic centre due to closures for maintenance. Capital expenditure was 15.2 per cent below budget. The main reasons for this are the general park restoration projects, where allocation of expenditure was recently approved, and local asset renewals programmes that are at various stages of progress.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter ending 31 March 2019.

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·      Arts, Community and Events;

·      Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·      Libraries and Information;

·      Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration;

·      Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·      Community Leases;

·      Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·      Local Economic Development;

·      Plans and Places.

10.     Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Henderson-Massey Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·      A network of vibrant and loved urban neighbourhoods.

·      A thriving local economy that supports quality of life.

·      Communities know each other and work together on common interests.

·      Community facilities are vibrant and welcoming places at the heart of our communities.

·      It is easy to get around without a car.

·      Natural spaces are valued and restored.

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet local board plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The work programme activities have two statuses; RAG status which measures the performance of the activity (amber and red show issues and risks); and activity status which shows the stage of the activity. These two statuses create a snapshot of the progress of the work programmes.

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey). It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Henderson-Massey Work Programme by RAG status

14.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities in each departments work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes.

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department


 

Key activity updates from quarter three

15.     The draft Henderson-Massey Connections Plan consultation got underway, seeking feedback on the draft plan that will connect local neighbourhoods to key destinations including public transport hubs, schools, local shops, libraries and parks in a bid to help more people ditch the car and embrace walking and cycling where possible. The long-term vision for the Connections Plan is to build an interconnected wider Auckland through the development of a comprehensive walking and cycle network.

16.     The local board approved additional Local Development Initiative (LDI) funding for Isthmus (contractor) to complete the feasibility and concept plan development for the draft Te Atatū South Centre Plan. This was due to feedback from the community at a number of design workshops. This plan has a forward vision to create a vibrant community where people feel connected to their neighbourhood.

17.     The scope and scale options for improving the existing play space in Moire Park in Massey has been workshopped with the board. Board feedback was given to scale back on the proposed spend of approximately $1.2 million and to develop a scaled down concept plan for a playspace at a cost of around $700,000.

18.     Te Pai Park netball courts and goal posts renewal is complete with the front seven courts complete and all 21 courts having been renewed. The physical works to increase light capacity at the courts is also complete.

Activities with significant issues

19. There are no activities with red RAG status for the local board this quarter.

Activities on hold

20.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·      All capital works for incorporating Dive Auckland at Westwave Recreation Centre are on hold pending a condition assessment being undertaken by Community Facilities. In this quarter, staff have worked closely with Dive Auckland to accommodate their needs for more space and have worked with other users to be able to offer extra space for diving on a Tuesday night. This has been well received by Dive Auckland.

·      Renewal of the car park at The Concourse Strand is still on hold as Watercare are currently using the carpark for work site storage and site inspection is not currently possible.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

21.     These activities are deferred from the 2018/2019 work programme:

·      The ‘Making the most of what we've got’ project (work programme item 1446) has been deferred to the 2019/2020 financial year following a workshop discussion with the local board. This project will have a focus on increasing diverse participation across the network of local facilities.

Cancelled activities

22.     There are no activities that have been cancelled for this quarter.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

23.     These activities have been merged with other activities for efficient delivery:

·      Improvements to the Massey North Youth Facility have been merged with the project to renew the Massey Leisure Centre as both projects are connected, and they will be constructed at the same time under the one design scope.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     This report informs the Henderson-Massey Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 31 March 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board formally adopted the Waitākere Ki Tua document on Maori responsiveness which was fully supported by the three west local boards. Next steps include the recruitment of the Maori broker to take forward the actions identified in this document.

27.     Staff continue to collaborate with iwi groups to identify areas of support, access to resources and to maintain the working relationship with iwi, which includes Te Kete Rukuruku monthly hui with all Mana Whenua. Mana whenua will progress their process to identify Māori names for the approved local parks and facilities.

28.     The Monolingual Māori name of Te Pae o Kura has been gifted from Te Kawerau a Maki as the new proposed name for the Kelston Community Centre.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

30.     Operating expenditure is $0.3 million (1.4 per cent) below budget. The underspend mainly relates to several locally driven initiatives (LDI) which have been delayed due to scoping, deferment or timing delays.

31.     Operating revenue was below budget by $0.2 million (4 per cent) due to reduced attendance numbers at West Wave Pool and Leisure centre due to closures for maintenance.

32.     Capital spend is below budget by $2.9 million. This is mainly due to the general park restoration projects where allocation of expenditure plan is now approved, local asset renewals at various stages of delivery and completion of Te Manawa multi- purpose community facility at Westgate.

33.     The Henderson Massey Local Board Financial performance report is in Appendix B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

35.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     The local board will receive the next performance update for quarter four following the end of the financial year (June 2019).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

HMLB Work Programme Update Q3 2018-19

Under separate cover

b

HMLB Financial Performance Report Q3 2018-19

Under separate cover

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey  Wisnewski - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Update Report for the Henderson-Massey Local Board – May 2019

File No.: CP2019/07480

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to respond to requests on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), provide a summary of consultation material sent to the board and, provide transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Henderson-Massey Local Board and its community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In particular, this report:

·    Provides updates on the Local Board Transport Fund projects in the Henderson/Massey Local Board Area.

·    Notes consultation information sent to the Board for feedback and, details decisions of the Traffic Control Committee as they affect the Board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Update to the Henderson-Massey Local Board – May 2019 report.

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report updates the board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the local board area, it updates the board on their advocacy and consultations, and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    be safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

6.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF was $4,623,969 for the current political term. In addition, there is a sum of $1,253,083 which has been approved by Council and is available from 1 July 2018. 

Henderson Massey Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$5,877,052

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$5,021,640

Remaining Budget left

$855,412

Henderson North Zone Proposed Residential Speed Management Project Update

7.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board resolved at its December meeting approving the allocation of up to 1.1 million to the Henderson North Zone proposed Residential Speed Management project. Auckland Transport has awarded the contract to a consultant to carry out the investigation component of this project. 

8.       At this stage Auckland Transport is aiming to have a draft plan and costing by the end of May or early June.  All preliminary data has been completed and the 12-traffic count/speed count on 12 sites and one pedestrian count on Edwards Avenue have also been completed.  All this information will be presented to the Local Board upon completion of our internal consultation process, in mid to late June 2019.

Local Board Issues Being Investigated

9.       Auckland Transport has high volumes of requests for service at this time. This has made our standard timeframe to process requests longer than usual. The Local board have requested the following issues be investigated and they have been recorded, entered and are in the initial investigation stage:

Request for Yellow Lines on Serwayne and Manui Place

·    Request Auckland Transport to investigate installing yellow lines on Serwayne and Manui Place.

Te Manawa, Kohuhu Lane

·    Request Auckland Transport to re-look at the disability Park outside the north side of Te Manawa At Kohuhu Lane.

Roading Issues at 35 Sunnyside Road, Sunnyvale

·    Request Auckland Transport to look at the roading infrastructure at 35 Sunnyside Road, Sunnyvale

251 Lincoln Road – entry/exit Issues

·    Request Auckland Transport to look at the entry and exit outside Yogijis Food Mart due to safety concerns

Widmore/Moire Road Keep Clear Request

·    Request Auckland Transport to look at a Keep Clear section be put in place for the intersection between Widmore and Moire Road, Massey.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

10.      The impact of information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Consultation documents on proposed improvements

 

11.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Henderson-Massey Local Board for its feedback and are summarised below for information purposes only.

12.     After consultation, Auckland Transport considers the feedback received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on or proceed with an amended proposal if changes are considered necessary.

·    Proposed broken yellow lines Rowan Terrace, Te Atatū South-

·    Proposed parking restrictions Stevies Lane

·    Proposed parking restrictions Jezero Road and Tiriwa Drive, Massey

Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee (TCC) report

13.     Decisions of the TCC during the month of March and April 2019 affecting the Henderson-Massey Local Board area are listed below.

Date

Street (Suburb)

Type of Report

Nature of Restriction

Decision

 

1-March-19

 

Royal Road, McCormick Road, Te Atatū Peninsula

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Road Hump

 

CARRIED

 

 

1-March-19

 

Vera Road, Porter Avenue, Rowan Terrace, Grainger Road, Te Atatū Peninsula

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Road Hump, Traffic Island

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

1-March-19

 

Vodanovich Road, Te Atatū Peninsula

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Removal Of No Stopping At All Times, Removal Of Traffic Island, Road Hump, No Passing

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

1-April-19

 

Fred Taylor Drive, Kerepi Street, Tarapuka Road, Matakohe Road, Waekahu Road, Houhora Street, Herekino Street, Tahetoka Street, Massey

 

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Lane Arrow Markings, Cycle Lane, Cycle Path, No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Traffic Island, Road Hump, Pedestrian Crossing, Give-Way Control, Flush Median, Lanes 

 

 

 

CARRIED

 

Safe School Streets – Rutherford School

Auckland Transport is running a One Day Event outside Rutherford School, on Kotuku Street, on Wednesday, 22nd May.  The event will run from 7:30am – 4:30pm.  The event is part of Auckland Transport’s Safe School Streets Pilot being trialed at Rutherford and five other schools across the Auckland region. (See attachment)

 

The purpose of the One Day Event is to change the way children are dropped off and picked up from school.

 

·    Drop-off/park and walk zones: These are located on Gloria Avenue and Old Te Atatū Road to reduce vehicle congestion. At these locations’ adults will be there to walk children safely to school.

·    Restricted parking on Kotuku Street: On the event day, parking will be restricted on Kotuku Street for residents only.

·    Safe walking streets: With less cars on Kotuku Street due to parking restrictions, walking along Kotuku Street will be safer for students walking and cycling.

·    Coffee cart, sausage sizzle and leisure zone: As part of the event, a coffee cart will be operating during the drop-off hours, while a sausage sizzle will be available during pick-up times.  A leisure zone will also be available in the Primary School carpark after school. Activities will include Pedestrian Safety games, giant Jenga, Mascots.

Next steps

14.       The next steps for Rutherford Primary and College is to introduce semi-permanent fixtures.  These are likely to be in place from July/August 2019, and during this time more detailed feedback will be taken. A rain date (for severe weather) is yet to be confirmed. Map of the area is attached - for more clarity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Auckland Transport provides the Henderson-Massey Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Map Of Safe School Streets Event (Kotuku Street,)

Under separate cover

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster - Elected Members Relationship Manager (Western Boards)

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and Amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Place

File No.: CP2019/07889

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a resolution from the Regulatory Committee and note the opportunity to contribute to the consultation on the proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places bylaw.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 11 April 2019, the Regulatory Committee resolved as follows:

Resolution number REG/2019/21

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson BC Cashmore, seconded by IMSB Chair D Taipari: 

That the Regulatory Committee:

a)      note that this committee completed the review of the Solid Waste Bylaw 2012 in March 2019 and:

i)       determined a bylaw is still the most appropriate way to address some waste issues, but not others

ii)       gave directions to prepare a new bylaw about waste

b)      recommend the Governing Body adopt the statement of proposal in Attachment A of the agenda report for public consultation, and confirm that the proposed new Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2019 and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015:

i)        are the most appropriate form of bylaw

ii)       do not give rise to any implications and are not inconsistent with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

iii)      are not inconsistent with the Waste Plan

c)      appoint Cr L Cooper, Cr P Hulse Cr W Walker and Independent Māori Statutory Board Member Glenn Wilcox to attend ‘Have Your Say’ events, to deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body on public feedback to the statement of proposal in Attachment A of the agenda report

d)      delegate authority to the Regulatory Committee chairperson to make replacement appointments to the panel if a member of the panel is unavailable

e)      delegate authority through the Chief Executive to a manager responsible for bylaws to appoint staff to receive public feedback at ‘Have Your Say’ events

f)       delegate authority through the Chief Executive to a manager responsible for bylaws to make any amendments to the statement of proposal in Attachment A to correct errors, omissions or to reflect decisions made by the Regulatory Committee or the Governing Body

g)      request through the Chief Executive that the manager responsible for local board services include this report and attachments on the waste bylaw statement of proposal on the agenda of all local boards for their information

3.       The following is the link to the Regulatory Committee meeting on 11 April 2019 – Item 10 Waste Bylaw Statement of Proposal, page 135 http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2019/04/REG_20190411_AGN_6989_AT.PDF.

4.       Full Regulatory Committee agenda’s are available through http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the 11 April 2019 Regulatory Committee resolution on the proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places bylaw.

b)      consider whether to provide views on the proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places bylaw.

c)       note that public consultation on the proposal is scheduled from 10 May to 16 June 2019. A panel will consider any feedback, deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body. A final decision on any new bylaw and bylaw amendments will be made on 22 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Suad Allie - Governance Advisor

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Confirmation of workshop records

 

File No.: CP2019/07927

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report presents records of workshops held by the Henderson-Massey Local Board on:

·       9 April 2019

·       6 April 2019

·       30 April 2019

·       7 May 2019

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Tuesday, 9 April 2019, the Henderson-Massey Local Board had briefings on:

·    Board Administration

·    Options for the future use of Massey Library Space

·    Henderson Christmas Festival 2018

·    Indicative Business Case for the Upper Harbour Local Board One Local Initiative

·    Memorial Application - James Ritchie Gilmour OBE & Myra Jane Gilmour

·    Consultation feedback discussion - Annual Plan

·    Unallocated 2018/19 LDI Opex

3.       At the workshop held on Tuesday, 16 April 2019, the Henderson-Massey Local Board had briefings on:

·    Board administration

·    Community Facilities Update

·    Arts & Culture update: Pacifica Arts Centre activities

·    Update Ecological volunteer and environmental programme FY 19/20

·    Te Atatū South Centre Plan

·    Upcoming business meeting reports

4.       At the workshop held on Tuesday, 30 April 2019, the Henderson-Massey Local Board had briefings on:

·    Board administration

·    HMLB workshop on Youth Connections work programme 2019-2021

·    Community Facilities work programme for FY2019/2020+

·    Henderson Massey Local Board - One Local Initiative (OLI)

·    Auckland Transport Community Safe Fund Presentation

·    Kauri Dieback Response in Local Parks

·    Unlock Henderson: ATEED Corban Estate Project


 

5.       At the workshop held on Tuesday, 7 May 2019, the Henderson-Massey Local Board had briefings on:

·    Board administration

·    Bike Provision

·    Facility Management Agreement Renewal

·    Final allocation of SH16/20 funding

·    Elected Member update

·    Advocacy items

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the records of workshops held on:

i)       9 April 2019

ii)       16 April 2019

iii)      30 April 2019

iv)      7 May 2019

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Local Board  Workshop Record - 9 April 2019

Under separate cover

b

Henderson-Massey Local Board  Workshop Record - 16 April 2019

Under separate cover

c

Henderson-Massey Local Board  Workshop Record - 30 April 2019

Under separate cover

d

Henderson-Massey Local Board  Workshop Record - 7 May 2019

Under separate cover

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)  

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Governance forward work calendar - May 2019

 

File No.: CP2019/07936

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Henderson-Massey Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·           ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·           clarifying what advice is expected and when

·           clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar for May 2019, as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work programme - May 2019

Under separate cover

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)  

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2019

 

 

Ward Councilors' Update

File No.: CP2019/07418

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Waitākere Ward Councillor to have an opportunity to update the Henderson-Massey Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      thank Waitākere Ward Councilors for their update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)  

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

     

    



[1] https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/109002369/underrepresentation-of-young-elected-members-woeful

[2] http://www.lgnz.co.nz/assets/e41e5fb07f/Elected-Members-Profile-Report-FINAL.pdf