I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 28 September 2021

10.00am

Local Board Office
7-13 Pilkington Road
Panmure

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Maria Meredith

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Debbie Burrows

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Blair Morrow

Democracy Advisor

 

28 September 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 027 278 6975

Email: Blair.morrow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     The Period Place - Danika Revell              5

9          Public Forum                                                                            6

10        Extraordinary Business                                       6

11        Governing Body Member's Update                    7

12        Chairperson's Report                                           9

13        Board Member's Reports                                   15

14        Proposed land exchange at Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve, Glen Innes                    17

15        Public feedback on proposal to make a new Public Trading Events and Filming Bylaw 2022                                                                              27

16        Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua - Age-friendly Auckland Action Plan                                         93

17        Local board feedback on the kerbside refuse charging mechanism policy                            149

18        Public feedback on proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw 2015                    167

19        Draft Business Improvement District Policy (2021) Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi                                                                            223

20        Public feedback on proposal to amend the Water Supply and Wastewater Network Bylaw 2015                                                                    273

21        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multiboard Round One 2021/2022, grant allocations                            293

22        Local board feedback on the Central Government's proposed Three Waters Reform                                                                            361

23        Governance Forward Work Calendar             365

24        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                                        369

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 24 August 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       The Period Place - Danika Revell

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Danika Revell with the opportunity to present to the board on the work The Period Place does in the community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Danika Revell of The Period Place.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Danika Revell of The Period Place for her attendance.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2021/14336

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/14337

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report for September 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 September 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Chair's Report

11

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2021/14338

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the board members report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Proposed land exchange at Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve, Glen Innes

File No.: CP2021/14424

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on the public consultation of a proposed land exchange under the Reserves Act 1977 of approximately 2779m² of Taniwha Reserve with approximately 10,472m² of the land held by Tāmaki Regeneration Limited.

2.       To seek the views of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on the proposed land exchange.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board resolution [MT/2021/19] supporting public notification of the proposed land exchange and the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee (PACE) resolution [PAC/2012/13] approving public notification to enable the Local Board to undertake informed decision-making to support the land exchange, staff called for objections to be heard in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 (RA).

4.       Council received a total of five submissions. Four submissions were in support of the proposed land exchange and one submission was against it. The sole objector wishes to be heard in person.

5.       Although the concerns raised in the objection may be out of the scope of the proposed land exchange, the objector’s right under section 120 of the Reserves Act 1977 to be heard in person remains.

6.       Staff recommend the objector is heard in front of an appropriate but yet to be determined forum prior to PACE considering the proposed land exchange.

7.       Staff recommend that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board support the proposed exchange of approximately 2779m² of Taniwha Reserve with approximately 10,472m² of the land held by Tāmaki Regeneration Limited.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)   support the recommendation by Auckland Council staff that the sole objector to the proposal is heard in front of an appropriate but yet to be determined forum prior to PACE committee considering the proposed land exchange; and

 

b)   support the proposed land exchange of approximately 2779m² being part of Taniwha Reserve located at 193-195 Taniwha Street, Glen Innes and legally described as Lot 142 DP 42356 for the land held by Tāmaki Regeneration Company located at:

 

Adjacent to Maybury Reserve West (Southern Part)

i.    12A, 12B, 12C,12D,12E, 14A, 14B, 14C, 14D, 14E Maybury Street Legally described as Lot 4 DP 184600 Record of Title NA114C/639.

Area of land exchange: 1,286m²

ii.   1/12 Maybury Street

Legally described as Lot 2 DP 184600 Record of NA TitleA114C/637

Estimated area of land exchange: 118.8m² (subject to survey)

iii.   2/12 Maybury Street

Legally descried as Lot 3 DP 184600 Record of Title NA114C/638

Area of land exchange: 617m²

iv.  Part 4 Maybury Street

Legally described as Part of Lot 7 DP 187240 Record of Title NA116B/742

Estimated area of land exchange: 70.1m² - subject to survey

v.   Part 8 Maybury Street

Legally described as Lot 1 DP 184600 Record of Title NA114C/636

Estimated area of land exchange: 110.7m² - subject to survey

        Adjacent to Maybury Reserve - West

vi.  200A, 202 Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 165 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/197

Area of land exchange: 1,072m²

                       

vii.  192, 192A, 198A Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 166 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/198

Area of land exchange: 2,008m²

 

viii. 184,184A, 184B,190A Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 167 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/199

Area of land exchange: 2,008m²

 

ix.  180-182A Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 168 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/200

Area of land exchange: 1216m²

Adjacent to Taniwha Reserve East

x.   45 Epping Street 

Legally described as Lot 128 DP 39662 Record of Title NA43A/178

Area of land exchange: 751m²

 

xi.  47 Epping Street

Legally described as Lot 129 DP 39662 Record of Title NA43A/179

Area of land exchange: 771m²

 

xii. Part 49 Epping Street

Legally described as Lot 130 DP 39662 Record of Title NA43A/180

Estimated area of land exchange: 774m² - subject to survey

 

xiii. Part 179A Taniwha Street (to be taken under the Public Works Act 1981)

Legally described as - Fee Simple 1/7share in 3423 m2, Lot 1-2 Deposited Plan 188991 and Leasehold Flat 7 Deposited Plan 189275 and Garage 7 Deposited Plan 189275 Part NA119B/168

Estimated area of land exchange: 329m² - subject to survey

 

xiv. Part 179B Taniwha Street (to be taken under the Public Works Act 1981)

Legally described as Fee Simple 1/7 share in 3423 m², Lot 1-2 Deposited Plan 188991 and Leasehold Flat 5 Deposited Plan 189275 and Garage 5 Deposited Plan 189275 Record of Title NA119B/166

Estimated area of land exchange: 26.7m² - subject to survey

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Tāmaki Regeneration Limited (TRL) owns the majority of residential land in the Tāmaki area on which it is undertaking a major residential housing development. This development intensifies housing and population density which creates a need for TRL and council to provide sufficient public open space to meet future demand.  

9.       The development requires certain parts of local reserve lands to be exchanged for newly created reserves within the vicinity of the new development.

10.     Part of Taniwha Reserve has been identified as suitable for exchange with TRL land and future residential development. Accordingly, TRL has requested that Auckland Council exchange part of Taniwha Reserve (approximately 2,779m²) for the land held by TRL (approximately 10,472m²).

11.     The proposed land exchange will be carried out under section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977 (RA) except for the land at 179A and 179B Taniwha Street that will be taken by declaration under section 20 of the Public Works Act 1981 for recreation purposes.

12.     On 13 May 2021 the PACE approved public notification of the proposed land exchange under section 15(2) of the RA [PAC/2021/13]. 

13.     Staff publicly notified the proposed land exchange in accordance with the RA.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Public consultation

14.     Following public notification under section 15(2) of RA, a total of 5 submissions (including 1 objection) were received during the public notification period between 17 May to 14 June 2021.  

15.     The sole objector raised the following questions:

·           What is the rationale behind the Panmure/Tāmaki area losing reserve and having      them rezoned for housing while Glen Innes was gaining reserve?

·           Is the Ruapotaka Marae land part of a Treaty of Waitangi settlement deal and how     does it affect the land exchange in the future?

·           The Maungakiekie Tāmaki Local Board have a direct conflict of interest, as members         also sit on the TRC Board and support this Land Exchange.

·           What are the costings for a new Marae and a new community centre?

 

16.     Staff responded to the objector as per the email in attachment A. However, the objector still wishes to be heard in person.

17.     Staff consider that the concerns raised in the objection are out of the scope of the proposed land exchange, because they do not directly address the intent and purpose of the proposed exchange, however the objector’s right to be heard in person under section 120 of the RA remains.

18.     Staff recommend the objector is heard in front an appropriate but yet to be determined forum.

 

The proposed land exchange is deemed to be a high priority when assessed against council’s open space policy

 

19.     If approved by PACE, the proposed land exchange is expected to have positive benefits to the community including:

·      improving access to, and the functionality of, Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve. The reserves would better meet the needs of existing and future residents.

·      improving crime prevention by increasing road frontage, sightlines and visibility into the parks from the surrounding roads

·      enabling any future development of a shared pathway connection between Maybury and Taniwha reserves to the Glen Innes town centre.

 

·      enabling the development of a destination playground at Maybury Reserve and the extension of Ruapotaka Marae onto Maybury Reserve West. These actions are listed in the Open Space Network Plan for part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034.

 

20.     The land exchange would result in an approximate loss of 2,779m² and a gain of 10,472m² of land to Auckland Council at no capital cost. The net gain for Auckland Council is 7,693m² of open space.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Parks and open spaces can serve as ecological corridors. They can promote and protect native plants and animals, enhance biodiversity and increase resilience to environmental change. Vegetation captures carbon from the air, helping slow the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

22.     Vegetated areas, including grass, help reduce maximum temperature ranges in urbanised areas. Parks and open spaces can also help reduce flood risk during rainstorms by buffering peak flows and reducing the volume and velocity of stormwater runoff.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Staff have engaged with various internal council stakeholders within the Customer & Community Services Directorate who were supportive of the proposed land exchange. No objections were received from other Council group members. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     At its meeting on 23 March 2021, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board resolved [MT/2021/19] to:

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Unitary Plan and individual local board plans.

26.     Iwi engagement was undertaken in May and June 2021 with the iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

27.     None of the iwi groups objected to the proposed land exchange.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The consideration passing from one party to the other under the proposed land exchange is treated as being equivalent in all respects.

29.     The estimated median ongoing maintenance consequential costs (OPEX costs) for the additional reserves per annum based on the proposed open space plans are as following:

Maybury Reserve – West (southern part)                                                               

Opex Cost $3,000

Maybury Reserve – West

Opex Cost $6,000

Taniwha Reserve

Opex Cost $2,500

Estimated total additional Opex costs  

$11,500 per annum

 

30.     Please note:

·    The above table only shows operational costs to Community Facilities (CF) for the additional areas. It does not include any required development costs.

·    The table does not consider 2,779m² of Council’s reserve land that will be transferred to TRL and therefore reducing the overall costs to CF.

·    This land exchange is a part of a major residential housing development in the Tāmaki area and further land exchanges between Auckland Council and TRC may well reduce the maintenance cost to CF. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     While the single objector is yet to be heard, staff consider there is a low risk of the objector’s concerns significantly impacting upon the proposed exchange as the exchange has been a part of the proposed Tāmaki Regeneration Exchange exchanges since 2016 and is included within the Open Space Network Plan for part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034. There is a low risk of the objector seeking a judicial review of council decision-making processes if the council proceeds with the land exchange. This will be mitigated by clear communication about the reasons for the decision to proceed with the exchange if PACE approves it.

32.     If the land exchange does not proceed, there is a risk of a lost opportunity to acquire land for future public open space, to meet the recreation demands of the population in an intensified urban area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Staff will provide opportunity for the objector to be heard in front of an appropriate but yet to be determined forum.

34.     The local board’s views on the proposed land exchange will be considered by the PACE Committee on 11 November 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Response to objector

25

     

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tamara Zunic - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Public feedback on proposal to make a new Public Trading Events and Filming Bylaw 2022

File No.: CP2021/12735

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposed new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Tauhokohoko, Whakahaerenga me te Tango Kiriata Tūmatanui / Auckland Council Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022, before a final decision is made.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To enable the local board to provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal, staff have summarised the feedback and provided a structure for deliberations.

3.       The proposal helps to minimise safety risks, nuisance and the misuse of council-controlled public places (for example footpaths, local parks and civic spaces) by continuing to regulate trading, events and filming activities.

4.       Council received responses from 75 people and organisations at the close of feedback on 16 July 2021. All feedback is summarised into the following topics:

Topic

Description

Proposal 1

Continue to regulate trading, events and filming in a similar way to the current Bylaw.

Proposal 2

Clarify the need for rental micromobility devices to be approved under their own licence instead of a mobile shop licence as they currently are.

Proposal 3

Clarify which activities require an approval, don’t require an approval as long as certain conditions are met, and are not addressed in the Bylaw.

Proposal 4

Update the title, structure, format, definitions, and wording to ensure that a new bylaw is easier to read, understand and comply with.

Other

Other bylaw-related matters raised in public feedback and other additional matters.

5.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal, and if it wishes, present those views to the Bylaw Panel. Taking this approach will assist the Panel and Governing Body to decide whether to adopt the proposal.

6.       There is a reputational risk that feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people and organisations, and does not reflect the views of the whole community. This report mitigates this risk by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback.

7.       The Bylaw Panel will consider all local board views and public feedback on the proposal, deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body on 20 October 2021. The Governing Body will make a final decision in November 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive public feedback on the proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Tauhokohoko, Whakahaerenga me te Tango Kiriata Tūmatanui 2022 / Auckland Council Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022 in this agenda report.

b)      provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal in recommendation (a) to assist the Bylaw Panel in its deliberations.

c)       appoint one or more local board members to present the views in (b) to the Bylaw Panel on 19 October 2021.

d)      delegate authority to the local board chair to appoint replacement(s) to the persons in (c) should an appointed member be unable to present to the Bylaw Panel on 19 October 2021.

Horopaki

Context

Bylaw regulates trading, events and filming in council-controlled public places

8.       The current Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 / Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ture ā-Rohe Hokohoko, Whakahaerenga i ngā Wāhi Tūmatanui 2015 seeks to protect public safety, minimise nuisance and misuse of council-controlled public places caused by trading activities, events and filming.

9.       The rules are enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance Unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education and enforcement).

10.     The current Bylaw is one part of a wider regulatory framework that includes the:

·    Reserves Act 1997, Resource Management Act 1991, Food Act 2014, Road User Rule 2004, Trespass Act 1980, Fair Trading Act 1986, Customer Guarantees Act 1993, Electricity (Safety) Regulations 2010 and Auckland Unitary Plan

·    Auckland Council Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013, Signage Bylaw 2015, Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 and Waste Management and Minimisitaion Bylaw 2019

·    Auckland Transport Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015.

11.     The current Bylaw will expire on 26 February 2022 and council must adopt a new bylaw before that date to avoid a regulatory gap.

Council proposed a new bylaw for public feedback

12.     On 27 May 2021, the Governing Body adopted a proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Tauhokohoko, Whakahaerenga me te Tango Kiriata Tūmatanui / Auckland Council Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022 (Bylaw) for public consultation (GB/2021/51).

13.     The proposal arose from a statutory review of the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 (see figure below).

14.     The proposal helps to minimise safety risks, nuisance and the misuse of council-controlled public places (for example, in local parks, reserves and civic spaces) by:

·    continuing to regulate trading, events and filming in a similar way to the current Bylaw

·    clarifying the need for rental micromobility devices to be approved under their own licence instead of a mobile shop licence as they currently are

·    clarifying which activities require an approval, don’t require an approval as long as certain conditions are met, and are not addressed in the Bylaw

·    updating the title, structure, format, definitions, and wording to ensure that a new bylaw is easier to read, understand and comply with.

15.     The proposal was publicly notified for feedback from 8 June until 16 July 2021. During that period, council received feedback from 59 people and 16 organisations. In addition, the ‘AK Have Your Say’ webpage received 525 hits.[1]

The local board has an opportunity to provide views on public feedback

16.     The local board now has an opportunity to provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal before a final decision is made.

17.     Local board views must be provided by resolution to the Bylaw Panel. The local board can also choose to present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 19 October 2021.

18.     The nature of the local board views are at the discretion of the local board but must remain within the scope of the proposal and public feedback. For example, the local board could:

·   indicate support for matters raised in public feedback by people from the local board area

·   recommend how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Feedback from people in the local board area supports the proposal

19.     A total of four people from the local board area provided feedback to the proposal. There was majority support for all proposals. This is similar to the totals from all people who provided feedback.

 

Support of proposal in the local board area

Proposal

Total support from local board area

Total support from people across Auckland

1:       Continue to regulate trading, events and filming in a similar way to the current Bylaw.

75 per cent support

25 per cent opposed

66 per cent

(40/61 submitters)

2:       Clarify the need for rental micromobility devices to be approved under their own licence instead of a mobile shop licence as they currently are.

100 per cent support

74 per cent

(46/62 submitters)

3:       Clarify which activities require an approval, don’t require an approval as long as certain conditions are met, and are not addressed in the Bylaw.

100 per cent support

75 per cent

(44/59 submitters)

4:       Update the title, structure, format, definitions, and wording to ensure that a new bylaw is easier to read, understand and comply with.

100 per cent support

83 per cent

(48/58 submitters)

20.     Key themes from feedback from people in the local board area are consistent with key themes from all public feedback. For example, that the proposal:

·    addresses the health and safety risks of rental micromobility devices

·    should give Screen Auckland more decision-making for filming.

21.     The full proposal can be viewed in the link. Attachment A of this report contains a draft Bylaw Panel deliberations report which includes a summary of all public feedback. Attachment B contains a copy of all public feedback related to the local board area.

Staff recommend the local board provide its views on public feedback

22.     Staff recommend that the local board provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback by resolution, and if it wishes, present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 19 October 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     There are no implications for climate change arising from decisions sought in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The proposal impacts the operation of several council departments and council-controlled organisations. This includes Auckland Council’s Licensing and Regulatory Compliance Unit, Events in Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships Unit, Alcohol Licensing and Environmental Health Unit, Auckland Unlimited (previously known as Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development), and Screen Auckland. These teams are aware of the impacts of the proposal and their implementation role.

25.     The proposal may also impact the Auckland Transport Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015. Auckland Transport is aware of the proposal. Auckland Transport has also made council aware of Auckland Transport’s review of its bylaw.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The proposed new bylaw impacts on local governance as it regulates trading, event and filming activities in council-controlled public places, for example local parks.

27.     Local boards views were sought on a draft proposal in April 2021. The draft was supported in full by 13 local boards and with suggested changes by eight local boards.

28.     A summary of local board views and changes made to the proposal can be viewed in the link to the 11 May 2021 Regulatory Committee agenda, page 191 (Attachment B to Item 12).

29.     This report provides an opportunity to give local board views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal, before a final decision is made.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Māori have strong bonds to the land as kaitiaki. The proposal supports the Independent Māori Statutory Board Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau by minimising the misuse of council-controlled public places and facilitating opportunities for Māori business owners.

31.     The proposed rules for trading, events and filming in council-controlled public places apply to activities undertaken by Māori, particularly major or international events.

32.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were notified of the proposal and given the opportunity to provide feedback through face-to-face meetings, in writing, online and in-person.

33.     Those submitters who identified as Māori supported Proposals One, Three and Four which is consistent with the overall percentage of the Auckland-wide feedback. Comments included that the proposed regulation seems sensible and provides appropriate balance between mitigating risks and enabling businesses to operate. While the support for Proposal Two was split, submitters agreed that rental micromobility should remain regulated.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     There are no financial implications arising from decisions sought in this report. Costs associated with the special consultative procedure will be met within existing budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.    The following risks have been identified:

If...

Then...

Mitigation

The feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people and organisations.

The feedback may not reflect the views of the whole community.

This risk is mitigated by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     On 20 October 2021, the Bylaw Panel will consider all formal local board views and public feedback on the proposal, deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body. The Governing Body will make a final decision in November 2021 (refer to the ‘Process to make the new Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022’ diagram in Context).

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Bylaw Panel Deliberations Report

33

b

Public feedback from people in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Magda Findlik - Principal Policy Analyst

Sam Bunge - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Paul Wilson - Senior Policy Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua - Age-friendly Auckland Action Plan

File No.: CP2021/13238

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua - Age-friendly Auckland Action Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The number and diversity of older Aucklanders is growing, and this creates challenges and opportunities for improving the age-friendliness of our environment, infrastructure, and services now and in the future.

3.       Older people experience barriers to participation across all areas of life.

4.       The draft Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua Action Plan (Action Plan) is our commitment to supporting older Aucklanders to participate fully in their communities.

5.       It is a region-wide, cross-sector plan that commits the council, council-controlled organisations (CCOs) and sector partners to improve outcomes for older Aucklanders through the delivery of tangible and meaningful short, medium and long-term actions. 

6.       To develop the Action Plan, staff listened to over 3,000 Aucklanders who shared their thoughts on what is needed to improve the age-friendliness of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland.

7.       Engagement with kaumātua and whānau to hear what is important to Māori led to the development of our unique Age-Friendly Tāmaki Makaurau Framework. The Framework combines the WHO domains with Te Ao Māori concepts and reflects the bicultural identity of Aotearoa and the diversity of Tāmaki Makaurau.

8.       Many activities within the plan will benefit people of all ages and what we do now to improve older Aucklander’s accessibility and quality of life will also benefit future generations.

9.       The Action Plan is constrained by actions needing to be delivered within existing resources, or as and when new funding can be secured. Greater or quicker impact could be possible in the future if budget is not such a limitation.

10.     By working together council and cross-sector partners can, however, leverage resources to achieve greater collective impact and prioritise efforts to where it is needed most.

11.     Over time the plan will help create an age-friendly lens that becomes embedded in the way council and partners design and deliver services and infrastructure. This will result in ongoing and incremental change that makes a tangible impact on the lives of older people.

12.     Community engagement on the draft Action Plan is underway and will be completed in September 2021.  

13.     The final Action Plan will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee for adoption in November 2021.

14.     The adopted Action Plan will enable Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland to join the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      support the draft Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua – Age-friendly Auckland Action Plan.

Horopaki

Context

15.     Auckland Council has a strong interest in the wellbeing of older people, because:

·   Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland is home to New Zealand’s largest population of older people[2] - this number will more than double between 2018 and 2043

·   of the current 65+ population, most are well-placed but some face hardship and this will increase[3] 

·   diversity in life stage, needs and abilities, culture, language, living situation and financial stability affect how older people contribute and participate in the community.

16.     In view of this, in July 2018 Auckland Council’s Environment and Community Committee resolved to become an Age-friendly City and seek membership to the World Health Organisation’s Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities (ENV/2018/88).

17.     The network includes cities that are committed to supporting each other and creating inclusive and accessible environments for all people to enjoy. It identifies eight interconnected domains of urban life that contribute to improving the wellbeing and participation of older people.

18.     To obtain membership to the network, council has led a process to develop a region-wide cross-sector Action Plan that will deliver over 80 actions to improve the age-friendliness of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland. 

19.     To develop the Action Plan, staff listened to over 3,000 Aucklanders who shared their thoughts on what is needed to improve the age-friendliness of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland.

20.     The Action Plan has been created to ensure infrastructure, activities and services are developed or adapted to respond to the diverse needs of Auckland’s growing and increasingly more diverse ageing population.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The problem/opportunity

21.     Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland’s older population is growing faster than any other age-group and faces challenges and barriers to participation across all areas of life.

22.     Our older people are taonga, and deserve to live full, meaningful lives where they can participate and are valued for the contribution they make to our communities. 

Our services and infrastructure need to respond and adapt to older peoples’ diverse needs

23.     Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland’s growing and increasingly diverse ageing population means we need short-term as well as longer-term, system-level solutions to ensure older people can actively participate in their communities now and in the future.

24.     The burden on the environment, infrastructure and on services such as healthcare will expand exponentially as the older population grows to a projected 432,800 Aucklanders by 2043. To enable older people to live active and full lives in Tāmaki Makaurau, we need to ensure infrastructure, activities and services are developed or adapted to respond to their diverse needs.

Older Aucklanders told us they face challenges related to accessibility across all areas including public space, buildings, transport, and housing options

25.     Older people told us they need:

Older Aucklanders can find it difficult to access information and to keep up to date with technology

26.     Older people told us they need:

Older people can feel invisible, disconnected, and discouraged from taking an active role in their community

27.     Older people told us they need:

Our response to the problem/opportunity

28.     The development of Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua – Age-friendly Auckland Action Plan (Attachment A).

29.     This is a cross-sector action plan that responds to the diverse needs and aspirations of older Aucklanders to improve their wellbeing and quality of life; and to make Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland a more age-friendly region.

Strengths

A cross-sector action plan will deliver collective impact in an innovative, sustainable, and equitable way

30.     Auckland Council has worked with a range of organisations and communities who are active in advancing the wellbeing of older Aucklanders including:

·   nineteen organisations with different specialities, such as health, recreation, and housing

·   regional and local organisations, ensuring a breadth of reach across communities.

31.     Together we identified and developed actions that will address the challenges and opportunities raised by older Aucklanders. This approach:

·   enables collaboration between the council, aged-sector organisations, and communities

·   creates opportunities to leverage resources and deliver greater collective impact over time.

·   develops an action platform for organisations to build upon

·   encourages interest and participation from other organisations to be part of delivery

·   recognises that improving the age-friendliness of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland relies on many different groups and agencies playing their part

·   ensures the delivery of actions that have impact for older Aucklanders of all ethnicities, abilities, and beliefs.

32.     It is anticipated that having a shared vision for an age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau will continue to build momentum within the organisations who are responsible for delivering actions.

33.     The intent is that over time an age-friendly lens will become embedded in the way council and partners design and develop services and infrastructure across the region.

34.     The result of this will be ongoing action and incremental change that makes a tangible impact on the lives of older people.

The Action Plan includes a mixture of over 80 new and existing actions

35.     Impact will be delivered through a mix of short, medium, and long-term actions. They are spread across all ten domains, but not equally.

36.     Some domains have more actions than others, for example the Housing Domain has fewer actions than the Respect and Social Inclusion Domain. This is because some things, such as refurbishing Haumaru Housing units take time and money to implement whereas supporting community-led social activities can use existing resource or may build upon activities that are already happening.

37.     Council’s actions are primarily focused in the areas where most council services are provided. These are:

·   Te Taiao; council maintains outdoor spaces and facilities for the community,

·   Respect and Social Inclusion; council hosts region-wide and local community events and activities that foster belonging and inclusion for diverse Aucklanders, and

·   Communication and Information; council informs communities about what is happening and offers support through libraries and community centres.

It has a unique Age-Friendly Tāmaki Makaurau Framework to reflect our bicultural foundations 

38.     Staff developed the Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau Framework in response to feedback from kaumātua.

39.     The framework provides a holistic way to frame the plan that integrates the WHO domains with Te Whare Tapa Whā- a Māori wellbeing framework - and Te Ao Māori values.

40.     It includes two additional domains and expanded another:

·   Culture and Diversity and Kaumātua and Kuia domains were added to reflect Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland’s diversity and bicultural foundations

·   The WHO Domain of Outdoor Spaces and Buildings was expanded to become Te Taiao, representing the natural and built environment.

41.     The framework is unique to Tāmaki Makaurau. It ensures the actions within the plan are meaningful, achievable, and impactful for older Aucklanders.

42.     The framework will continue to be used to guide how we collectively improve and evaluate the age-friendliness of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland.

The Action Plan will have a wider community and intergenerational impact

43.     The actions within the plan will benefit older people and others in the community now and, in the future. For example, ensuring all buses are accessible will benefit small tamariki (children) and disabled community members.

44.     Many activities within the plan benefit people of all ages and stages and what we do now to improve older Aucklander’s accessibility and quality of life will also benefit future generations.

Diagram

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Constraints and limitations 

It will take time to see the full, long-term impacts of the Action Plan

45.     The Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua – Age-friendly Auckland Action Plan will deliver impact but that will happen over time.

46.     Some actions are small and local and will not have significant or regional impact. However, there is opportunity for these local activities to be expanded as the age-friendly vision and plan gains traction.

47.     Some actions will be delivered immediately or are in progress, others will take time. For instance, making roads, buildings and parks more accessible will be achieved over time, subject to the roll-out of relevant capital works and renewal programmes.  

Council, CCOs and partner organisations are constrained by the financial impact of COVID-19 and operating within existing budget and resources

48.     The Action Plan has been developed on the basis that everyone is operating in a constrained financial environment and actions will be delivered within existing resources.

49.     The current assumption is that:

·   no additional budget will be available

·   where new funding is required, it will need to be reprioritised from elsewhere, secured through grants, or considered through budget-setting processes.

50.     Consequently, the first one to five years of the action plan focus on existing or new actions that are easier and more affordable to carry out within existing budgets.

51.     There is potential for this to change as the Action Plan evolves and if more funding becomes available in the medium to long term (5-10 years).

Success relies on cooperation, ongoing commitment, and resources to support collaboration

52.     The Action Plan relies on the dedication and commitment of council and partner organisations working together to improve the age-friendliness of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland:

·   many of the partner organisations are community-led with limited capacity and dependant on ongoing public funding

·   larger entities and agencies (including government and council departments) may have competing priorities

·   success is dependent on all parties continuing to prioritise age-friendly outcomes and delivering the actions they have developed.

53.     Resources will also be needed to support sector collaboration. It will take time and effort to facilitate organisations working together and supporting each other to build an age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau. 

54.     As part of council’s commitment to the plan, council staff will play a key backbone role in keeping the Action Plan alive, bringing partners together, and monitoring implementation and impact.    

Community views

55.     Staff undertook extensive community engagement in 2019-2020 to ensure the voices of diverse older Aucklanders were at heart of the plan. We developed surveys, held workshops across the region, hui with kaumātua and had one-on-one interviews with rainbow community members.

56.     Targeted engagement was facilitated by Age Concern, Toa Pacific, New Zealand Indian Senior Citizens Association, Hindu Elders Foundation Inc and The Selwyn Foundation to ensure we heard the diverse voices of older Aucklanders.

57.     Over 3,000 people shared their vision for an Age-friendly Auckland and told council what actions they think will support older people to live full, active and healthy lives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

58.     During our engagement we heard, particularly from kaumātua, that environmental wellbeing was missing from the WHO framework. The wellbeing of the natural environment is important to our own wellbeing, and we have a role in looking after our environment in all its forms.

59.     In response, we have expanded the existing WHO Domain Outdoor Spaces and Buildings to include Te Taiao (the natural environment), to recognise that the environment’s wellbeing and our own are connected.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

60.     This Action Plan includes actions developed with CCOs including Auckland Transport.

61.     The Seniors Advisory Panel acted as kaitiaki throughout the process, providing advice, guidance and feedback and contributing to workshops and action planning sessions.

62.     The Seniors Advisory Panel will continue to provide support and guidance on the Action Plan as it is delivered.

63.     Auckland Council, Seniors Advisory Panel and CCOs are aware of the impacts of the Action Plan and their role in implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

64.     Local boards have a strong interest in the wellbeing of older people. All local boards have outcomes that foster social inclusion and participation among their residents, and many have age-friendly specific goals and actions.

65.     Community engagement was held at locations across the region in 2019-2020, from Warkworth to Pukekohe.

66.     Two reports were produced on the findings, the Community Engagement Findings Report and the Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau Report.[4] These were shared with elected members, stakeholders, and the community. These reports were also published on the council Age-friendly website.

67.     Staff attended local board workshops in August and September 2021 to share the draft Action Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

68.     The Action Plan is relevant to Māori as tangata whenua and kaitiaki of the sky, land and sea and supports the Māori Identity and Wellbeing outcome within the Auckland Plan 2050

69.     In the 2018 Census older Māori made up over four per cent of the Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland over-65 population.

70.     Older Māori have lower levels of equity, income and rely heavily on superannuation. Actions that are focused on kaumātua delivered by Māori organisations and others will make a positive impact on wellbeing.

71.     The involvement of kaumātua, whānau and organisations has been influential on the design of the Framework, work on implementation; and ensuring this is a living document.

Engagement to better understand the needs of kaumātua and Te Ao Māori

72.     To ensure the Action Plan is relevant and effective for kaumātua, mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to a dedicated hui in February 2020. The hui was organised in partnership with Te Kōtahi a Tāmaki and hosted at Manurewa Marae.

Recognition of tangata whenua, hauora Māori concepts and Te Tiriti o Waitangi are important to kaumātua

73.     Kaumātua also told us:

·   Importance of building and marae accessibility – safety of our kaumātua

·   Utilising marae more e.g., events, programmes, line dancing, tai chi, learning Te Reo

·   Age-appropriate housing design

·   More disability parking

·   More Te Reo visible everywhere

·   Environmental recognition – care for Papatūānuku and te taiao incorporated into plan

·   Sport and recreation options available for older people and open areas for activities

·   Affordable digital communication.

74.     Te ao Māori values from the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s (IMSB) Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau are also imbedded in the Framework:

·   Whanaungatanga (Develop Vibrant Communities), in relation to the different opportunities to engage and participate in their own and other cultures.

·   Rangatiratanga (Enhance Leadership and Participation), in relation to the activities under Respect and Social Inclusion.

·   Manaakitanga (Improve Quality of Life), in relation to the Action Plan’s outcome of improving the hauora of older Aucklanders.

·   Wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori.

·   Kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to protecting Te Taiao now and in the future.

75.     These values underpin the way people and organisations will work together to deliver this plan with, and for, our communities.

76.     The Action Plan supports the IMSB’s Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing social, cultural, environmental and wellbeing for Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau.

77.     The Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau Framework incorporates the WHO framework, Te Whare Tapa Whā and te ao Māori. The unique Framework contributes to the awareness, education and understanding of Māori perspectives. 

78.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public engagement on the Action Plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

79.     The Action Plan has been designed to be delivered within the existing budgets and resources of council, CCOs and sector partners.

80.     Where additional investment is desired by Auckland Council to implement new or joint actions this will need be considered through Long-term Plan or Annual Plan processes.

81.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the Action Plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Adoption of a new plan may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support age-friendly outputs.

All public-facing communications and guidance about the new plan will reference that actions will be funded from existing budgets. Where new funding is required, this will be sought through grants and processes such as the long-term plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

82.     Public engagement for the Action Plan is expected to be completed by the end of September 2021.

83.     A summary of all feedback, including from local boards, and a final Action Plan will be reported for adoption by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in November 2021.

84.     Following adoption of the Action Plan, staff will seek membership to the WHO network.

85.     An annual progress report will provide details on the impact and success of our actions. This will include an update on the delivery of actions against the identified measures of success, high-level wellbeing indicators and examples of good and promising practice. This will be presented to the Governing Body, the WHO and shared with all organisations supporting delivery. 

86.     The Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua – Age-friendly Auckland Action Plan will be reviewed every five years.

87.     Baseline research was carried out in 2017 - The Older Aucklanders: A Quality of Life Status Report. The research is across the domains that contribute to quality of life and wellbeing. This research is being conducted this year and will be carried out every five years to help monitor progress and guide the development of future actions.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 September 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Age Friendly Akl

103

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cleo Matthews - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Local board feedback on the kerbside refuse charging mechanism policy

File No.: CP2021/13408

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal feedback from local boards on the kerbside refuse charging model policy review.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently committed to expanding the pay-as-you-throw (PAYT) funding model for kerbside refuse collection across the Auckland region. This reflects the policy within our Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 to provide consistent waste services across the region.

3.       This would involve moving the legacy Auckland City Council and Manukau City Council areas away from a rates-funded service to a PAYT funding model.

4.       Before we make this shift, Waste Solutions is reviewing the evidence to support the decision to move these areas to a PAYT model to assess whether PAYT is still the best solution for achieving the objectives of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.

5.       Evidence gathered so far is being assessed against three options:

·   all areas pay-as-you-throw (PAYT)

·   keeping a hybrid model (currently, 55 per cent of the region’s refuse collection is rates-funded, 45 per cent PAYT)

·   all areas rates-funded.

6.       The options will have a different impact on each local board area, depending on the current service charging mechanism relative to the proposed service change (Attachment A).

7.       A memo was circulated to all local boards on 23 July 2021 (Attachment B) outlining initial conclusions reached through the analysis of evidence gathered to date. This was used as a basis for discussion with local boards at workshops throughout August 2021 to understand their views on the risks and impacts of the potential options within their respective areas.

8.       This report seeks formal feedback from local boards, using the template in Attachment C as a guide, to inform the recommendation that staff will present to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 14 October 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the kerbside refuse charging model policy review.

Horopaki

Context

9.       The 2012 Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP) made provision to move all Auckland households towards a user-pays charging system for refuse collection, known in Auckland as pay-as-you-throw (PAYT). This transition to a consistent regional PAYT refuse service (weekly, changing to fortnightly over time) was confirmed in WMMP 2018.

10.     The decision was based on:

·   best evidence at the time that this was the most effective way to incentivise diversion from landfill and enable householders to reduce their waste costs

·   the understanding that technology would be available to enable pay-per-lift charging through radio-frequency identification (RFID) chipped bins.

11.     In legacy rates-funded areas, it was decided that the move to PAYT would take effect after the introduction of a food scraps collection service, to reduce the financial impact on households.

12.     Since then, more information has become available about the effectiveness of PAYT, particularly in the context of the other complementary services that the council has rolled out, for example regionwide recycling and the pilot food scraps service, due to be rolled out regionwide from early 2023. Prior to making the change to PAYT, Waste Solutions is reviewing the evidence base for this shift.

13.     In this review we are assessing several factors, including:

·   the potential effects of each funding model on communities

·   the potential waste minimisation impacts of each funding model

·   the expected cost to implement each funding model taking into account the changing financial circumstances of both ratepayers and council.

14.     To assist with this review, Waste Solutions commissioned independent consultants, Morrison Low, to examine the evidence currently available against the following aspects of the refuse collection service and its impact on the council, customers and the environment:

·   waste minimisation

·   cost effectiveness

·   reputation

·   technology

·   household responsibility / accountability

·  access / equity

·  downstream impacts on the collections industry

·  climate change

·  amenity

·  health and safety.

 

15.     Evidence gathered so far is being assessed against three options:

·   all areas PAYT

·   keeping a hybrid model (currently 55 per cent rates-funded, 45 per cent PAYT)

·   all areas rates-funded.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Currently, 55 per cent of Auckland households (legacy Auckland City and Manukau City) are provided with a rates-funded refuse service, with the remaining 45 per cent (legacy Franklin, Waitākere, Papakura and North Shore City Council) on a PAYT service provided by either the council or a private operator. There is no council refuse collection service in legacy Rodney, but under current policy there is a commitment to provide a PAYT service in the future. See Attachment A for a breakdown of council refuse collection services by local board area.

17.     Detailed analysis and advice were provided to local boards in a memo dated 23 July 2021 (Attachment B). This memo was marked confidential, but the need for confidentiality has now lapsed.

 

 

 

Conclusions on key issues

18.     Aotearoa/New Zealand is unique in having side-by-side competition between private and council services in the residential refuse collection market. This impacts the way PAYT operates and introduces a number of challenges not experienced overseas.

19.     Financial modelling currently indicates that PAYT is less cost-effective for the council than rates-funded solutions because of more complex systems, duplication of workloads by multiple suppliers and the council’s need to offer the service to properties across the entire region.

20.     Evidence from overseas found only a very weak link between marginal pricing changes and change in refuse quantities. This is consistent with a 2021 examination of refuse tonnages, which found no clear evidence that PAYT areas of Auckland produce less refuse per capita than rates-funded areas.

21.     The current price in Auckland does not appear to be a sufficient economic driver to motivate behaviour change in households.

22.     International evidence indicates the greatest waste minimisation is achieved through providing easy access to services that divert waste away from landfill (such as the recycling and food scraps collection services), good community education programmes, and reduced access to refuse volume to encourage use of the diversion services.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Enhancing access to diversion and resource recovery, along with optimising efficiencies around collecting refuse at the kerbside, presents opportunities to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions directly, for example through the reduction of vehicle movements and diversion of organic material from landfill, and indirectly by encouraging better resource use.

24.     Therefore, considerations to take into account when assessing options include the opportunities to minimise both direct and immediate impacts on greenhouse gas emissions, for example: 

·   emissions can be mitigated where the council retains greater control over household behaviour and container size (larger customer base), to drive higher participation rates from households in the weekly food scraps service which is critical to reducing methane emissions from landfill

·   emissions can be mitigated by choosing the option that will bring efficiencies to vehicle servicing routes. This includes reducing duplication of refuse collectors operating side-by-side in the same areas of Auckland.

25.     The rates-funded option provides the opportunity to reduce total truck kilometres travelled from a sole supplier, the ability to specify the truck requirement through the procurement process and efficiencies in route design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     This review is about the way in which council charges for domestic kerbside rubbish collections and so views have not been sought from the wider council family.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     Local boards provided feedback through the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 development process. All local boards supported the proposed WMMP. Only Devonport-Takapuna, Manurewa, Ōrākei and Papakura Local Boards expressed views on refuse charging mechanisms within their responses.

28.     Staff provided a detailed memo to all local boards on 23 July 2021, outlining the early findings of the review, acknowledging that detailed works on costs and equity were still being completed.

29.     Staff attended workshops with local boards between 29 July and 24 August 2021 to present on the key points of the review and seek views on the current refuse collection services. Informal feedback was noted during these workshops.

30.     This report seeks formal feedback from the local board using the template provided in Attachment C to inform the recommendation to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 14 October 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were engaged in the development of the 2018 Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and identified priority actions for Māori.

32.     The council partners with Para Kore ki Tāmaki – a Māori-developed and implemented programme that integrates mātauranga Māori and zero waste principles and practices to support marae, Māori organisations, Kura Kaupapa Māori and Kōhanga Reo to divert significant quantities of recycling and organic waste from landfill.

33.     Staff outlined the purpose of the review and early findings to the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Regional Hui on 9 July 2021 and then at a Regional Projects Workshop on 20 July 2021. Members of the forum receiving the presentation raised concerns that poorer communities had fewer choices in relation to controlling their waste production. Staff acknowledged that this was recognised by Waste Solutions and that multiple approaches are needed, including advocacy to central government on phasing out hard-to-recycle plastics and the introduction of product stewardship schemes.

34.     Staff are also working with specialist community facilitators Rākau Tautoko and Waste Solutions community partners to hold targeted focus groups with Māori and Pacific communities during August and September 2021 to seek their views on different refuse collection payment mechanisms. These views will inform the recommendation to Environment and Climate Change Committee on 14 October 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     In terms of cost-effectiveness, when comparing rates funded with PAYT models, the Morrison Low study concluded that the rates-funded option provides greater cost-effectiveness for the council than both the current hybrid model and the PAYT option due to economies of scale.

36.     This was based on:

·   cost: results of financial modelling commissioned by the council, using existing parameters and the weekly PAYT service, show that the cost of delivering a rates-funded service is similar, but costs the community significantly less overall when all service costs, including private collection costs, are included.

·   cost sustainability: an estimated variation in cost per pickup based on the number of customers serviced by Auckland Council which shows that the cost of operating the council service increases sharply when the council is servicing less than 30 per cent of the community. At 30 per cent, it is approximately double the cost per pickup compared to 80 per cent.

37.     Further analysis of costs is being carried out by council staff as part of this discovery phase.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     High level risks are outlined in Table 1. More detailed risks and mitigations will be examined as part of the development of options for Environment and Climate Change Committee throughout September.

Table 1: Kerbside refuse charging policy review high level risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

The perception of unfairness in offering the same service/charge to all households: households that produce large amounts of waste are favoured under the rates-funded model, whereas households that produce less waste are favoured under the PAYT model.

Staff are investigating the cost of offering three different bin sizes (80l/120l/240l) under the rates-funded model to accommodate different households’ needs.

There is no agreement on which charging model works best for the whole of Auckland

Consideration of a hybrid model will be presented as part of the options analysis to Environment and Climate Change Committee on 14 October 2021. 

The preferred option costs council more to deliver than the current hybrid option.

Detailed costs will be provided for all three options. These will be presented at workshops with elected members and local board chairs as part of the Annual Budget 2022/23 process. This will include analysis of the cost to the community and an estimate of the cost of failing to meet Auckland’s climate change goals.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Staff are currently engaging with elected members, local boards, industry and community groups, prior to developing options and recommendations to take to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for a decision on 14 October 2021.

40.     Local board feedback received by 28 September will help inform the recommendation, and will be included within the report.

41.     In addition to the above, the following studies are currently underway, or have recently concluded: 

·   radio-frequency identification (RFID) trial to show whether this service will be able to be operated at scale, with a sufficiently low error rate to be considered feasible in Auckland

·   detailed analysis of costs of all options

·   investigation of the social impacts of the three options.

42.     The results of these studies will conclude the desk-based discovery phase and will inform the final evaluation of options by Morrison Low. This final report will help to inform the recommendation that will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 14 October 2021.

43.     If the Environment and Climate Change Committee decide to deviate from current Waste Management and Minimisation Plan policy by approving either the rates-funded or hybrid model option, the current proposal is to engage more widely on options through a special consultative procedure as part of the Annual Plan 2022/2023 process.

44.     Local boards will be consulted on the preferred option, which will include a more detailed analysis of the timings of any changes to service, during that process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Current refuse services and impact of options by local board area

155

b

Memo Kerbside refuse charging review

157

c

Template for local board feedback – refuse charging

165

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarah Le Claire - Waste Planning Manager

Authorisers

Parul Sood - Manager Waste Planning

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Public feedback on proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw 2015

File No.: CP2021/13443

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to a proposal to amend Auckland Council’s bylaw and associated controls about animals before a final decision is made.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To enable the local board to provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to a proposal to amend the Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture-ā-rohe Tiaki Kararehe / Auckland Council Animal Management Bylaw 2015 and associated controls, staff have prepared feedback summary and deliberation reports.

3.       The proposal seeks to improve the current Bylaw and controls to better minimise animal-related risks to public health and safety, nuisance, offensive behaviour and misuse of council-controlled public places.

4.       Council received responses from 189 people and organisations at the close of feedback on 16 July 2021. All feedback is summarised by proposal and other matters as following:

Topic

Description

Proposal 1

Require an approval to keep more than two standard beehives on urban premises with a land area of less than 2000 square metres (no approval currently required).

Proposal 2

Incorporate rules from another bylaw about the feeding of animals on private property.

Proposal 3

Update the definitions, structure, format and wording of the Bylaw and controls.

Other

Other bylaw-related matters raised in public feedback and other additional matters.

5.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal, and if it wishes, present those views to the Panel. Taking this approach will assist the Panel and Governing Body to decide whether to adopt the proposal.

6.       There is a reputational risk that the feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people and does not reflect the views of the whole community. This report mitigates this risk by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback.

7.       The Bylaw Panel will consider all local board views and public feedback on the proposal, deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body on 29 October 2021. The Governing Body will make a final decision in November 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the public feedback on the proposal to amend Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture-ā-rohe Tiaki Kararehe 2015 / Auckland Council Animal Management Bylaw 2015 and associated controls in this agenda report.

b)      provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal in recommendation (a) to assist the Bylaw Panel in its deliberations.

c)       appoint one or more local board members to present the views in b) to the Bylaw Panel on 29 October 2021.

d)      delegate authority to the local board chair to appoint replacement(s) to the persons in c) should an appointed member be unable to present to the Bylaw Panel on 29 October 2021.

Horopaki

Context

The Animal Management Bylaw enables council to regulate the keeping of animals

8.       Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture-ā-rohe Tiaki Kararehe 2015 / the Auckland Council Animal Management Bylaw 2015 (Bylaw) and associated controls (controls) seek to minimise animal-related risks to public health and safety, nuisance, offensive behaviour and misuse of council-controlled public places.

9.       The rules are enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education and enforcement).

10.     The Bylaw and controls are one part of a wider regulatory framework, including the:

·      Animal Products Act 1999 and Animal Welfare Act 1999 for animal welfare

·      Resource Management Act 1991 and Biosecurity Act 1993 to protect the environment

·      Dog Control Act 1996 and Auckland Council Dog Management Bylaw 2019 for the care and control of dogs.

Council proposed amendments to improve the Bylaw for public feedback

11.     On 27 May 2021, the Governing Body adopted a proposal to improve the Bylaw and controls for public consultation (Item 11, GB/2021/50).

12.     The proposal arose from a statutory review of the Bylaw (see figure below).

13.     The proposal seeks to better regulate the keeping of animals by:

·      requiring an approval to keep more than two standard beehives on urban premises with a land area of less than 2000 square metres (no approval currently required)

·      incorporating rules from another bylaw about the feeding of animals on private property

·      updating the definitions, structure, format and wording of the Bylaw and controls to make them easier to read and understand.

14.     The proposal was publicly notified for feedback from 8 June until 16 July 2021. During that period, council received feedback from 177 people and 12 organisations.

The local board has an opportunity to provide views on public feedback

15.     The local board now has an opportunity to provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal before a final decision is made.

16.     Local board views must be provided by resolution to the Bylaw Panel. The local board can also choose to present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 29 October 2021.

17.     The nature of the local board views are at the discretion of the local board but must remain within the scope of the proposal and public feedback. For example, the local board could:

·      indicate support for matters raised in public feedback by people from the local board area

·      recommend how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Feedback from people in the local board area supports the proposal

18.     A total of nine people from the local board area provided feedback to the proposal via online and email feedback.

·      for Proposal One, there was majority support for more rules about beekeeping (66 vs 33 per cent) from the local board area, greater than the total support from all people who provided feedback

·      for Proposals Two and Three, there was majority support from the local board area, similar to the total support from all people who provided feedback.

 

 

Support of proposal in the local board area

Topic

Local board area feedback

Auckland-wide feedback

1:       Require an approval to keep more than two standard beehives on urban premises with a land area of less than 2000 square metres (no approval currently required).

44 per cent support

22 per cent opposed (want more rules)

33 per cent opposed (want less rules)

0 per cent ‘other’

0 per cent no response

34 per cent support

6 per cent oppose (want more rules)

48 per cent oppose (want less rules)

10 per cent ‘other’

2 per cent no response

2:       Incorporate rules from another bylaw about the feeding of animals on private property.

67 per cent support

22 per cent opposed

0 per cent ‘other’

11 per cent no response

62 per cent support

15 per cent oppose

12 per cent ‘other’

11 per cent no response

3:       Update the definitions, structure, format and wording of the Bylaw and controls.

56 per cent support

33 per cent opposed

0 per cent ‘other’

11 per cent no response

64 per cent support

10 per cent opposed

15 per cent ‘other’

11 per cent no response

19.     Key themes from feedback from people in the local board area are consistent with key themes from all public feedback. For example, that the proposal should:

·      allow more hives than the currently proposed two

·      maintain current rules

·      address the nuisance caused by bee excrement.

20.     The full proposal can be viewed in the link. Attachment A of this report contains a draft Bylaw Panel deliberations report which includes a summary of all public feedback. Attachment B contains a copy of all public feedback related to the local board area.

Staff recommend the local board provide its views on public feedback

21.     Staff recommend that the local board provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback by resolution, and if it wishes, present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 29 October 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     There are no implications for climate change arising from decisions sought in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The proposal impacts council’s Licensing and Regulatory Compliance team who implement the Bylaw. The unit is aware of the impacts of the proposal and their implementation role.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The Bylaw is important to local boards as a topic of high community interest.

25.     Local board views were sought on a draft proposal in March and April 2021. The draft was supported in full by 13 local boards and with suggested changes by seven local boards. One local board opposed the proposal for public consultation.

26.     A summary of local board views and changes made to the proposal can be viewed in the link to the 11 May 2021 Regulatory Committee agenda (Attachment B to Item 11, page 101).

27.     This report provides an opportunity for local boards to provide views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal, before a final decision is made.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The Bylaw has significance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku.The proposal supports the key direction of kaitiakitanga in the Independent Māori Statutory Board Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau by minimising the misuse of council-controlled public places.

29.     The proposed amended bylaw also supports the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by clarifying how the Bylaw applies to Māori and papakāinga. For example, the proposal clarifies that limits on the ownership of animals in urban areas do not apply to papakāinga within the Māori Purpose Zone of the Auckland Council Unitary Plan.

30.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were notified of the proposal and given the opportunity to provide feedback through face-to-face meetings, in writing, online and in-person.

31.     The majority of people identifying as Māori who provided feedback support Proposals Two and Three (consistent with the overall public feedback). The majority of people identifying as Māori who provided feedback opposed Proposal One (consistent with the overall public feedback).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     There are no financial implications arising from decisions sought in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The following risk has been identified:

If...

Then...

Mitigation

The feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people.

The feedback may not reflect the views of the whole community.

This risk is mitigated by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback.

 

 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     On 29 October 2021 the Bylaw Panel will consider all formal local board views and public feedback on the proposal, deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body. The Governing Body will make a final decision in November 2021 (refer to the ‘Process to amend the Animal Management Bylaw 2015’ diagram in Context).

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Bylaw Panel deliberations report

173

b

Public feedback from people in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area

201

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Saralee Gore - Policy Advisor

Breanna Hawthorne - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Wilson - Senior Policy Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Draft Business Improvement District Policy (2021) Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi

File No.: CP2021/13449

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2021) and supporting documents.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The BID Team has implemented a review of the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi and supporting documents, as advised in the memo to local board members dated 23 April 2021. The memo can be found on the Auckland Council website, InfoCouncil.

3.       The review sought informal and formal feedback from local boards, BID-operating business associations, non-BID business associations, council-controlled organisations (CCOs), council departments and other external stakeholders.

4.       The review has focused on strengthening those parts of the policy relating to issue resolution and, following local board feedback, the financial sustainability of BID programmes.

5.       The review also focused on elected member needs and identifying any political risks and mitigations.

6.       The draft BID Policy (2021) has been before the Finance and Performance committee at a workshop on 18 August 2021. Feedback received has been incorporated into this version of the BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents.

7.       Staff are now seeking formal feedback from local boards on the draft BID Policy (2021) provided as Attachment A.

8.       Following formal feedback received from local boards, BID-operating business associations, non-BID business associations, CCOs, council departments and other external stakeholders, the final version of the BID Policy (2021) and support documents will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee for adoption on 9 December 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the draft Business Improvement District Policy (2021) and supporting documents by 1 October 2021.

Horopaki

Context

Overview of the Auckland BID programme

9.       BID-operating business associations are membership-based organisations independent of Auckland Council. The draft BID Policy (2021) supports the independent nature of the BID-operating business associations. They are responsible for the BID programme delivery, its success, and are accountable to BID members/BID affiliates.

 

10.     Local boards have the primary relationship with BID-operating business associations in their area:

·        Local boards and business associations have a vested interest in a particular place and share similar goals. Working collaboratively achieves greater outcomes.

·        Local boards have significant allocated decision-making responsibility for BID programme establishments, amending existing BID programmes, BID boundary changes, continuation/discontinuation and issue resolution.

11.     Auckland Council requires BID-operating business associations to fully comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (Kaupapa Hereā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) (refer Attachment A).

12.     The BID policy sets out the process for:

·        establishing, continuing/discontinuing BID programmes

·        changes to the BID programme boundary area/map

·        changes to the BID targeted rating mechanism

·        issue resolution

·        key stakeholder roles and responsibilities.

13.     The BID policy includes the engagement and reporting requirements for BID-operating business associations to ensure all BID members/BID affiliates have access to the relevant BID programme information. BID-operating business associations must use their Annual General Meeting (AGM) process to obtain formal member approval for the BID programme delivery, budget, and to confirm their BID targeted rate grant amount for the following financial year.

14.     The BID policy describes the balance between the independence of the BID-operating business association and the accountability role council has for monies collected as a public sector organisation. This balance is necessary to sustain public trust and confidence with the Auckland Council BID programme. 

The review

15.     Commencing April 2021, the review of the current policy began with communicating with local boards and all stakeholders involved in the management and operation of BID programmes across Tāmaki Makaurau, both BID-operating and non-BID business associations, council departments and interested parties. The process to date has included informal feedback and comments on the current policy.

16.     The review process focused on strengthening parts of the policy (and updating supporting documents) relating to issue resolution and, following local board feedback, financial sustainability of BID programmes.

17.     The review has also provided the opportunity to clarify the documentation between Auckland Council (collecting the BID targeted rate and the funder) and the BID-operating business association relating to the BID Programme Agreement (2016) document.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Rationale for the review

18.     The primary objective for reviewing the current 2016 policy is a focus on the issue resolution sections. Experience in this space over the last five years has illustrated gaps in the usefulness of the current policy to address and resolve issues in a timely manner.

 

19.     The review provided an opportunity to update parts of the policy relating to Auckland Council changes in operation, current business practices and where the advancement of technology has contributed to how business is done, for example zoom meetings.

20.     There was also an early opportunity to capture informal feedback from local boards and BID-operating business associations.

21.     The information and informal feedback collected in May, June and July of this year has been incorporated into the draft BID Policy 2021 (Attachment A) and supporting documents (Attachments B and C). A summary of the BID Policy (2021) requirements is provided with this report (Attachment D).

22.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Participants in the review

23.     In addition to local boards, there are a range of stakeholders involved in BID programmes, both internal and external to Auckland Council. The BID team set a programme of informal engagement, outlined in Table 1 below:

Table 1 – Key engagement activity

Stakeholder

Engagement

Dates

BID-operating business associations

Business associations without BID programmes

BID communication including newsletters and emails:

Sent to 50+ BID-operating business associations and other interested parties

March, April, May, June and July 2021

Three network meetings

May, June and July 2021

An average attendance exceeded 20+ BID-operating business associations

Four special workshops - topics included: issue resolution, conflict of interest and developing a board charter

June and July 2021

An average of 23+ BID programmes were represented at each workshop.

Local boards

18 local board workshop presentations

June and July 2021

Introduction memo and BID policy review information

Three special topic workshops - topics included: issue resolution, conflict of interest and developing a board charter

June and July 2021

An average of 16 local board elected members attended each workshop

Local Board Services Division Lead team

Presentation and information feedback received

Presentation on 18 June 2021

Finance and Performance Committee

Memo on BID policy review project

April 2021

Council departments including:

·    Legal Services

·    Connected Communities

·    Ngā Mātārae

·    Risk and Assurance

·    Finance and Policy

·    Local Board Services

Regular meetings, engagement and feedback

May, June, and July 2021

Independent polling agent

 

Engagement and feedback regarding the ballot/polling process

June 2021

Finance and Performance Committee workshop

The draft BID Policy (2021) V1 and support documents were presented and feedback received

18 August 2021

24.     The process to undertake the review of the current policy (2016) takes place from February 2021 to June 2022. Progress to date is set out in Table 2 below:

Table 2 - Progress to date

Date

Progress

2021

Feb/March

·    Project planning, stakeholder communications

April to July

·    Directed consultation with local boards and stakeholders on the current BID policy and identified themes

  issue resolution

  conflicts of interest

  board charter development

May/June

·    Cross council, external engagement and feedback

June/July

·    Draft BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents created

August 18

·    Finance and Performance Committee workshop

August/September

·    Distribution of draft BID Policy (2021) for formal feedback

Informal local board feedback

25.     Discussions with local boards during workshops centred around:

·        issue resolution – how to do this fairly and in a timely manner

·        operational issues – relating to management and governance of BID-operating business associations

·        opportunities for collaboration and cost savings between BIDs

·        elected members involvement with BID-operating business associations

·        growth opportunities for BID-operating business associations

·        continued dependence on local board funding.

Seeking local board formal feedback on the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

26.     Local boards are now being asked to provide formal feedback on a revised draft policy (2021) and support documents (Attachments A, B and C). Local boards are encouraged to engage with BID-operating business associations in their local board area (where relevant/possible) to help to inform this feedback process. 

27.     Any feedback from local boards will help the further development of BID Policy (2021). It would be, however, particularly useful to get local board views on proposed changes set out in Tables 3 and 4 below.

28.     Feedback from local boards, external stakeholders and any further feedback from BID-operating business associations will be reviewed by staff and this will help inform the final version of the policy. Formal feedback can be sent to bids@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

29.     Once the BID Policy 2021 is approved, other support material will be made available on the BID Auckland Council website www.bid.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz and include:

·        BID-operating business association constitution (template 2021)

·        BID-operating executive committee board charter (template 2021)

·        individual BID programme area maps

·        BID affiliate/BID business association membership qualification diagram

·        local board BID representative position description

·        template documents, including:

o   AGM agenda

o   AGM minutes

o   BID programme income and expenditure budget (for BID grant $120,000).

Summary of changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

30.     The key proposed changes incorporated into the draft BID Policy (2021) are set out in Table 3:

Table 3 - Key changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

Key change from current policy

Description

Note

2021 section, page

Issue resolution

 

Improving the ability to resolve issues with a clear process in a timely manner

An issue is identified as non- compliance with the BID policy

3.5, Requirement 24

BID Programme Funding Agreement (2021) Attachment B

Replaced BID Programme Agreement (2016)

Clarifies the relationship between the parties

3.1, Requirement 18

Size and scale of BID programmes

Minimum BID targeted rate grant $120,000

No change from 2016

Minimum BID targeted rate grant $120,000 remains

A new requirement for legacy BID programmes (11 in total) that currently receive less than $120,000pa to increase their targeted rate up to that amount over the next five years

A variety of options are suggested to achieve this

This requirement is a result of local board feedback on concerns to continually fund non-financially sustainable BID programmes

 

1.4, Requirement 3 and 4

Exceptional or unexpected circumstances

Council may, at its discretion, depart from the requirement set out in section 2.4 (25% of total voting forms must be returned for the ballot to be valid

Council will consider evidence of support to date, what is fair and any impact from amending the voting threshold mandate

 

3.4.2

BID operating business association constitution (template 2016)

This supporting document was included as part of the current policy and now removed from the BID Policy (2021)

This allows the business association to amend their constitution to suit their local needs, on the basis it’s not inconsistent with the BID policy

A template document is provided on the www.bid.auckland.govt.nz website

1.1, 2.3.2 Requirement 12

BID operating executive committee board charter (template 2016)

This supporting document was included as part of the current policy and now removed from the BID Policy (2021)

This allows the business association to amend their board charter to suit their local needs, on the basis it’s not inconsistent with the BID policy

A template document is provided on the www.bid.auckland.govt.nz website

1.1, 2.3.2 Requirement 12

31.     Minor changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) are set out in Table 4 below:

Table 4 - Minor changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

Minor changes to current policy

Description

Note

2021 section, page

Other council funding

 

Organisational view on risk regarding BID-operating business association receiving other council funding

The draft BID policy acknowledges other council funding grants allocated to BID-operating business associations

2.3.4, Requirement 16

Local boards – other roles

 

Updated

Refer to elected member conflicts of interest policy

A link to these documents can be found here

2.5.3

BID Annual Accountability Report (2021) Attachment C

Name change from BID Annual Accountability Agreement (2016)

To include BID targeted rate grant amount and copy of AGM resolution

3.2, Requirement 22, Table 2, item 9

Audit – provision for a review audit or full audit

Recognition of increased risk and increased reporting requirement based on the amount of targeted rate received

Set as a sliding scale

BID targeted rate grants less than $200,000pa must commission a review audit

BID targeted rate grants more than $200,000pa must commission a full audit

3.2, Requirement 23, Table 2, item 4

Rating mechanism - flat rate

Lifted the maximum flat rate amount from $500 to $900 per rateable property

To provide more flexibility for BID-operating business associations when considering BID programme budgets and the impact of BID targeted rates on ratepayers

3.1.2

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     The BID Policy (2021) focuses on the governance and accountability for BID-operating business associations. Individually the BID programme, through targeted rate-funding, can focus on advocacy and activities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Formal feedback will be sought from other council teams including CCOs and those who work and have an interested in the BID programme and business community space.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Local boards have engaged with the review of the BID Policy (2016) and their informal feedback has been incorporated into the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents. Table 1 outlines local board engagement to date.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Officers are working with Auckland Council’s Ngā Mātārae Unit to ensure that the BID Policy (2021) aligns with the Auckland Council Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     There are no financial implications for local boards under the draft BID Policy (2021).

37.     Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from the draft BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents.

39.     The policy describes the balance between the independence of the BID-operating business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

40.     The draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents set out the requirements and obligations for BID-operating business associations and are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members, and to undertake and meet all requirements set out in the policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Following formal feedback received from local boards, CCOs, BID-operating business associations, non-BID business associations, council departments, other external stakeholders and those with an interest in BID programmes, a final BID Policy (2021) and support documents will be updated and the steps outlined in Table 5 below will be completed by the BID team:

Table 5 - Progress to completion

Date

Progress

2021

August

·    Draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents updated to post Finance and Performance Committee workshop feedback

Mid-August to 1 October

·    Draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents distributed to local boards, BID-operating business associations, council departments, CCOs and other stakeholders for formal feedback

·    Update www.bid.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz website with feedback link

·    Feedback open 24 August to 1 October

October

·    Update draft BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents incorporating formal feedback

9 December

·    Presentation of final version of BID Policy (2021) and support documents to Finance and Performance Committee meeting

2022

January/February

·    Post Finance and Performance approval actions, communications with local boards, BID-operating business associations, all stakeholders, and update www.bid.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz website

March to June

·    BID Policy (2021) communication, support and advice

·    The BID team will provide assistance to the 50 BID-operating business associations to comply with the BID Policy (2021), including guidance with aligning their individual constitutions and governance documents to meet the timing of their 2022 AGM timeframes

42.     The BID Policy (2021), if approved by the Finance and Performance Committee in December 2021, would become operational on 1 July 2022. 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft BID Policy 2021

233

b

BID Funding Agreement

255

c

BID Annual Accountability Report

267

d

Draft BID Policy Requirements Schedule

269

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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28 September 2021

 

 

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28 September 2021

 

 

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28 September 2021

 

 

Public feedback on proposal to amend the Water Supply and Wastewater Network Bylaw 2015

File No.: CP2021/13768

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local board views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposed amendments to the Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ture ā Rohe Whakarato Wai me te Pae Kōtuitui Wai Para / Auckland Council Water Supply and Wastewater Network Bylaw 2015, before a final decision is made.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To enable the local board to provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal, staff have summarised the feedback and provided a structure for deliberations.

3.       The proposal helps to protect the water and water networks from damage misuse and interference and assist in the provision of reliable, safe and efficient water and wastewater services in Auckland.

4.       Council received responses from 46 people and organisations at the close of feedback on 16 July 2021. All feedback is summarised into the following topics:

Topic

Description

Proposal 1

To further define the rules regarding unauthorised taking of water from the water supply network

Proposal 2

To further define the rules regarding unauthorised discharges to the wastewater network

Proposal 3

Clarification of linkages to other legislation, bylaws and other documentation

Other

Other bylaw-related matters raised in public feedback and other additional matters

5.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal and, if it wishes, present those views to the Bylaw Panel. Taking this approach will assist the panel and Governing Body to decide whether to adopt the proposal.

6.       There is a reputational risk that feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people and organisations and does not reflect the views of the whole community. This report mitigates this risk by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback.

7.       The Bylaw Panel will consider all local board views and public feedback on the proposal, deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body on 5 November 2021. The Governing Body will make a final decision in November 2021.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive public feedback on the proposal to amend the Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ture ā Rohe Whakarato Wai me te Pae Kōtuitui Wai Para / Auckland Council Water Supply and Wastewater Network Bylaw 2015 in this agenda report.

b)      provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal in recommendation a) to assist the Bylaw Panel in its deliberations.

c)       appoint one or more local board members to present the views in b) to the Bylaw Panel on 5 November 2021.

d)      delegate authority to the local board chair to appoint replacement(s) to the persons in c) should an appointed member be unable to present to the Bylaw Panel on 5 November 2021.

Horopaki

Context

Bylaw protects the water supply and wastewater networks

8.       The Governing Body adopted the Ture ā Rohe Whakarato Wai me te Pae Kōtuitui Wai Para 2015 / Water Supply and Wastewater Network Bylaw 2015 on 25 June 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/62). This Auckland Council bylaw is administered by Watercare Services Limited.

9.       This bylaw seeks to protect the water supply and wastewater networks by:

·        requiring authorisation from Watercare to connect to or disconnect from the water supply or wastewater network and enabling Watercare to refuse connections where there is insufficient network capacity

·        ensuring appropriate standards for any new infrastructure under Watercare's control

·        protecting the quality of the water supply and prohibiting illegal use from hydrants

·        managing work near the water supply and wastewater network to protect it from damage

·        allowing for restricting the water supply to maintain enough drinking water in the event of drought or other emergency

·        managing inflows and illegal dumping of material into the wastewater network to avoid wastewater overflows.

10.     The bylaw is one part of a wider regulatory framework. Issues related to access to private property are addressed under the Local Government Act 2002 while those related to the compliance with water quality are addressed under the Health Act 1956.

11.     In addition, uniquely to Auckland, Watercare has a contractual relationship with its customers. This enables the bylaw to focus on matters relating to the impact of household and businesses’ behaviours on the public assets, while the customer contract addresses the rights and obligations for each customer’s water and wastewater connection.

Council proposed amendments to the bylaw for public feedback

12.     On 25 February 2021, the Governing Body adopted a proposal to make amendments to the Water Supply and Wastewater Network Bylaw for public consultation (resolution number GB/2021/11).

13.     The proposal arose from a statutory review of the Water and Wastewater Network Bylaw 2015 (see figure below).

14.     The proposal helps to clarify and further define the rules in the bylaw by clarifying:

·        the rules around the unauthorised taking of water from the water supply network

·        the definitions around unauthorised discharges to the wastewater network

·        linkages with other bylaws and documentation.

15.     The proposal was publicly notified for feedback from 8 June until 16 July 2021. During that period, council received feedback from 43 people and three organisations. In addition, the ‘AK Have Your Say’ webpage received 396 hits.[5]

Process to amend Water Supply and Wastewater Network Bylaw 2015

Graphical user interface, text, application, chat or text message

Description automatically generated

The local board has an opportunity to provide views on public feedback

16.     The local board now has an opportunity to provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal before a final decision is made.

17.     Local board views must be provided by resolution to the Bylaw Panel. The local board can also choose to present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 5 November 2021.

18.     The nature of the local board views is at the discretion of the local board but must remain within the scope of the proposal and public feedback. For example, the local board could:

·        indicate support for matters raised in public feedback by people from the local board area

·        recommend how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Feedback from people in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area

19.     A total of two people from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area provided feedback to the proposal. There was majority support for Proposals One, Two and Three, this is similar to the total support from all people across Auckland who provided feedback.

 

 

20.     Support of proposal in the local board area

Topic

Total support from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area

Total support from people across Auckland

1:       To further define the rules regarding unauthorised taking of water from the network

100%

70 %

2:       To further define the rules regarding unauthourised discharges to the Wastewater network

100%

79 %

3:       Clarification of linkages to other legislation, bylaws and documentation

100%

76 %

 

21.     Key themes from feedback from people in the local board area are consistent with key themes from all public feedback.

·    Supportive of all amendments

 

22.     The full proposal be viewed in the link. Attachment A of this report contains a draft Bylaw Panel deliberations report which includes a summary of all public feedback. Attachment B contains a copy of all public feedback related to the local board area.

Staff recommend the local board provide its views on public feedback

23.     Staff recommend that the local board provide its views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback by resolution and, if it wishes, present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 5 November 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     There are no implications for climate change arising from decisions sought in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     The bylaw impacts the operations of many Watercare teams in charge of the operations and the planning of water sources and water and wastewater networks. It also impacts some Auckland Council teams involved in compliance and stormwater management. Relevant staff are aware of the impacts of the proposal and their implementation role.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Local board members were invited to give feedback on the bylaw in December 2019. This included an offer by staff to present workshops to interested local boards at their meetings.

27.     Communication was received from one local board in relation to wastewater overflows, a matter unrelated to bylaw and already covered by the Resource Management Act 1991.

28.     This low interest in the bylaw review is consistent with the Auckland Council’s classification of the bylaw as ‘low impact and low interest to local boards’ under the agreed principles and processes for Local Board Involvement in Regional Policy, Plans and Bylaws 2019.

29.     An update on the findings and options stages were included in Watercare’s local board communications in June 2020.

30.     This report provides an opportunity to give local board views on how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback to the proposal before a final decision is made.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The bylaw contributes to the Māori plan’s key directions and aspirations of Manaakitanga (Improve Quality of Life ‘Satisfaction with our environments and standard of living’) and Kaitiakitanga (Ensure Sustainable Futures ‘lntergenerational Reciprocity’) by ensuring the public water supply and wastewater network is future-proofed and not contaminated or damaged, which would be detrimental to the people and the natural environment.

32.     Input by mana whenua was sought at a special hui of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in January 2020. The main concerns related to environmental issues beyond the bylaw scope, such as archaeological sites and clarifications of asset ownership and responsibilities.

33.     Staff sought input by mana whenua on the proposed options in June 2020. A meeting with the chairperson of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed his support for the direction taken and recommended a written update at the June 2020 forum to carry on the engagement.

34.     Watercare staff presented an update of the bylaw review process to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in mid-October 2020.

35.     Those respondents who identified as Māori during the public consultation were all generally supportive of the three proposals.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     There are no financial implications arising from decisions sought in this report. Costs associated with the special consultative procedure will be met within existing budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The following risks have been identified:

If...

Then...

Mitigation

The feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people and organisations

The feedback may not reflect the views of the whole community

This risk is mitigated by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback

 

 

 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     On 5 November 2021, the Bylaw Panel will consider all formal local board views and public feedback on the proposal, deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body. The Governing Body will make a final decision in February 2022 (refer to the ‘Process to make the amend the Water and Wastewater Network Bylaw 2015’ diagram in the ‘Context’ section of this report).

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Bylaw Panel Deliberations Report

279

b

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Submissions

285

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sharon Danks – Operations Delivery Manager - Watercare

Authoriser

Mark Bourne – Chief Operations Officer - Watercare

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multiboard Round One 2021/2022, grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/13956

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multi-Board Round One 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     This report presents applications received for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multi-Board Round One (Attachment B) 2021/2022.

3.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 27 April 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $112,522 for the 2021/2022 financial year. A total of $51,920 was allocated in the previous grant round. This leaves a total of $60,602 to be allocated to two local grants and two multiboard round.

5.     Fourteen applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multi-Board, Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $68,231.43.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multi-Board One 2021/2022, listed in Table One below:

Table One: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multi-Board Round One 2021/2022

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2022-120

The Operating Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards gift a seat theatre tickets and transport costs for low decile school and early childhood centre children between October 2021 and May 2022.

$4,348.00

Eligible

MB2022-113

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards operational costs including wages, rent, transport, and equipment to recruit, screen, and train up to 50 more Auckland men to be volunteers (Big Buddies) to Auckland boys who do not have a father in their life.

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-119

Pregnancy Help Incorporated

Community

Towards the community programme costs including staff wages. transport costs, printing and office rent from 1 October 2021 to 31 May 2022.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-121

The Student Volunteer Army Foundation

Community

Towards the Student Volunteer Army (SVA) "Kids Programme Volunteer Project" in various primary schools including the costs of school kits and providing administrative support from 31 October 2021 to 1 August 2022.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-136

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards delivering the Empowering Communities Programme across West and Central Auckland between 1 October 2021 and 30 June 2022

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-138

Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Community

Towards salaries for two “Kiwi Can Programme” Coordinators from 3 January 2021 to 22 July 2022.

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-139

Habitat for Humanity Northern Region Limited

Community

Towards the "Winter Warmer and Healthy Home Intervention Programme" including volunteer costs, items for the packs and co-ordination costs.

$1,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-140

New Zealand Tamil Senior Citizens Association

Community

Towards the “Seniors Wellbeing programme” including venue hire, transport, exercise equipment, various events, excursions, projector and screen, from 1 November 2021 to 31 October 2022.

$4,671.43

Eligible

MB2022-151

People Frist New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards training programmes for people with a disability, including decision-making, self-advocacy, financial capability and being safe, held at Royal Oak from 1 October 2021 to 30 September 2022.

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-152

Road Safety Education Trust

Community

Towards the operational costs to manage the delivery of the Road Safety Programme across Auckland, including wages for the programme co-ordinator, national manager and support staff for programmes between 1 October 2021 to 30 September 2022.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-161

The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board

Community

Towards the St John's Youth Development programme including venue hire, course fees, operational costs and First Aid kit renewals from 4 October 2021 to 30 June 2022.

$7,712.00

Eligible

MB2022-168

The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board

Community

Towards the purchase of 24 defibrillators to place in public spaces and Marae in each local board area.

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-101

The Auckland Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards a proportion of the annual operating expenses of the Auckland Softball Association.

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-124

East Skate Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the "Learn to Skate" programme including coaches, transport costs, equipment, venue hire, marketing and uniforms.

$4,500.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$68,231.43

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 27 April 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multi-Board, Round One 2021/2022 is provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Nine applicants applying to Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multi-Board Round one 2021/2022 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $112,522 for the 2021/2022 financial year. A total of $51,920 was allocated in the previous grant round. This leaves a total of $60,602 to be allocated to two local grants and two multiboard round.

23.     Fourteen applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multi-Board, Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $68,231.43.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocating funding for round one of the multi-board, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Grants Programme 2021/2022

299

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Multiboard Round One 2021/2022 - grant applications

303

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Local board feedback on the Central Government's proposed Three Waters Reform

File No.: CP2021/13979

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of its formal feedback, developed through delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair on the Central Government’s proposed Three Waters Reform.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s 28 April 2020 business meeting it delegated authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils (resolution: MT/2020/32).

3.       The local board’s feedback has been approved by the Chair and Deputy Chair for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission to the central government.

4.       A copy of the local board’s feedback is Attachment A of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board’s feedback on the Central Government’s proposed Three Waters Reform.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Feedback on the Central Government's Three Waters Reform Proposal

363

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Simone Tongatule - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/14339

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 September 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

367

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2021/14340

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 24 August to 21 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on 24 August to 21 September 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 September 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Record of Workshops

371

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 September 2021

 

 

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[1]    ‘AK Have Your Say’ webpage ’hits’ comprised of 54 ‘engaged’ participants (people who completed the online survey), 134 ‘informed’ participants (people who downloaded a document, visited a FAQ page or multiple project pages, or completed the survey) and 337 ‘aware’ participants (people who visited at least one page).

[2] Statistics New Zealand, 22.9% (163,161) estimated in 2017

[3] Ministry of Social Development. Briefing to the Incoming Ministers, October 2014, p.31. 

[4] A systems analysis conducted by Auckland Council’s Innovation Unit.

[5] ‘AK Have Your Say’ webpage ’hits’ comprised of 43 ‘engaged’ participants (people who completed the online survey), 88 ‘informed’ participants (people who downloaded a document, visited a FAQ page or multiple project pages, or completed the survey) and 265 ‘aware’ participants (people who visited at least one page).