I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 13 December 2018

5.15pm

Local Board Office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Paul Walden

 

Members

Shirin Brown

 

 

John Meeuwsen

 

 

Bob Upchurch

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Safia Cockerell

Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

 

7 December 2018

 

Contact Telephone: 021 283 8212

Email: safia.cockerell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Rocky Bay Ratbusters grant application - Dave Malan                                   5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Councillor's update                                                                                                       7

12        Waiheke Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 and Waiheke Ecological Restoration Grant 2018/2019 grant allocations                                                          9

13        Rakino Hall future options                                                                                          19

14        Waiheke local parks land classification programme                                              81

15        Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update - December 2018                  113

16        Proposed Regional Public Transport Plan                                                             131

17        Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation                                                                  151

18        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 May - 31 October 2018                                                                                                                             159

19        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 165

20        Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings                                      169

21        Governance Forward Work Programme                                                                 177

22        List of resource consents                                                                                         183  

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal)  - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring the calm, bring all things good, bring peace….good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 22 November 2018, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Rocky Bay Ratbusters grant application - Dave Malan

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Dave Malan will be in attendance to speak to the Rocky Bay Ratbusters grant application.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank Dave Malan for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Councillor's update

 

File No.: CP2018/22502

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the verbal update from the Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Waiheke Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 and Waiheke Ecological Restoration Grant 2018/2019 grant allocations

 

File No.: CP2018/22633

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Waiheke Local Board Quick Response Round Two and Waiheke Ecological Restoration Grant 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board adopted the Waiheke Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 26 April 2018 (refer to Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

3.       This report presents applications received for the Waiheke Local Board Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 (refer to Attachment B) and Waiheke Ecological Restoration Grant 2018/2019 (refer to Attachment C).

4.       The Waiheke Local Board has set a total of $50,000.00 for the community grants budget for the 2018/2019 financial year.

5.       The Waiheke Local Board has set a total of $30,000.00 for the ecological restoration grant budget for the 2018/2019 financial year.

6.       A total of $28,630.00 has been allocated for one local grant round and one quick response round. This leaves a total of $21,367.00 to be allocated for 2018/2019.

7.       Ten applications were received for Waiheke Local Board Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019, requesting a total of $27,596.88, and two deferred applications are requesting a total of $11,486.00.

8.       This report also presents five applications received for the Waiheke Ecological Restoration Fund 2018/2019, requesting a total of $28,937.00.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019, as outlined in table one:

Table one: Waiheke Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 applications

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1918-202

Waiheke Playgroup Incorporated

Towards volunteer and general costs for the playgroup.

$3,966.00

Eligible

QR1918-203

Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated

Towards the weaving to ceramic engagement project

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1918-204

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards the Youth work team leader salary.

$500.00

Eligible

QR1918-205

Waiheke Amateur Radio and Electronics Club
umbrella’ed by

Community Networks Waiheke Incorporated

Towards equipment and venue hire costs for the club.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1918-208

Auckland Table Tennis Association Incorporated

Towards costs for a table tennis table and table tennis balls.

$953.00

Eligible

QR1918-210

Waiheke Youth Centre Trust

Towards hireage costs of the Waiheke Recreation Centre for the multisport programme.

$3,024.00

Eligible

QR1918-211

Waiheke Special Needs Group

Towards storage costs for equipment from November 2018 to 26 March 2019.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1918-213

Renew Rehabilitation Charitable Trust

Towards the mindful parenting course participation costs.

$3,825.00

Eligible

QR1918-214

The Artworks Theatre Incorporated

Towards website and online advertising upgrades.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1918-215

Waiheke Hope Centre

Towards furniture for the emergency accommodation.

$2,328.88

Eligible

Total

 

 

$27,596.00

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application deferred from Waiheke Local Grant Round One 2018/2019, as outlined in table two:

Table Two: Waiheke Local Grant Round One 2018/2019 deferred applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1918-102

Kashmir Postel

Towards the operational costs of "Taiao's Journey," a theatre play.

$3,990.00

Eligible

LG1918-111

Joe McCracken
Umbrella’ed by

Community Networks Waiheke Incorporated

Towards the Waiheke Arts and Innovation Festival in 2019

$7,496.00

Eligible

 

 

 

c)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Waiheke Ecological Restoration Grant 2018/2019, as outlined in table three below:

Table three: Waiheke Ecological Restoration Grant 2018/2019 applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

WER1819-04

Omiha Welfare and Recreation Society Incorporated

Towards the Rocky Bay Ratbusters project costs.

$4,135.00

Eligible

WER1819-05

Kaitiaki of Newton Reserve (KNR)

Towards professional weed removal and native plant costs.

$2,500.00

Eligible

WER1819-06

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society - Hauraki Islands Branch

Towards bait and bait stations costs.

$2,302.00

Eligible

WER1819-08

Te Matuku Bay Landcare Group

Towards a weed control project at Te Matuku Scenic Reserve.

$10,000.00

Eligible

WER1819-10

Waiheke Island Society for the Care of Animals (WISCA)

Towards the companion animal de-sexing campaign.

$10,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

$28,937.00

 

 

Horopaki / Context

9.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

10.     The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

11.     The local board grants programme sets out:

· local board priorities

· lower priorities for funding

· exclusions

· grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

· any additional accountability requirements.

12.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

13.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

14.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waiheke Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

15.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

16.     A summary of each application received through Waiheke Quick Response, Round Two 2018/2019 is provided (refer to Attachment B).

17.     The two deferred applications from Waiheke Local Grants Round One 2018/2019, relate to the Waiheke Artworks Courtyard activation project. The local board had previously identified activating the Waiheke Artworks Courtyard as a focus of its 2018/2019 arts response work programme. The local board had indicated that $10,000 from the Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) budget would be included in the grants budget, for the purpose of supporting community-led activation projects in the Waiheke Artworks Courtyard. Waiheke art and community organisations were subsequently notified of the additional grant availability.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

19.     Two applicants applying to Waiheke Quick Response Round Two indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

21.     The Waiheke Local Board has set a total of $50,000.00 for the community grants budget for the 2018/2019 financial year.

22.     The Waiheke Local Board has set a total of $30,000.00 for the ecological restoration grant budget for the 2018/2019 financial year.

23.     A total of $28,630 has been allocated for one local grant round and one quick response round. This leaves a total of $21,367 to be allocated for 2018/2019.

24.     Ten applications were received for Waiheke Local Board Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019, requesting a total of $27,596.88, and two deferred applications are requesting a total of $11,486

25.     This report also presents five applications received for the Waiheke Ecological Restoration Fund 2018/2019, requesting a total of $28,937.00.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

26.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local boards programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

27.     Following the Waiheke Local Board allocating funding for quick response round two and ecological restoration, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board Community Grants Programme 2018/2019

15

b

Waiheke Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 grant applications  (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Waiheke Ecological Restoration 2018/2019 grant applications  (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Agus Castro Pons - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grant Operations Manager

Shane King - Head of Operations Support

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Rakino Hall future options

 

File No.: CP2018/22342

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend to the Waiheke Local Board a preferred option to address Rakino Hall’s future.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The question of how best to maintain the ageing Rakino Hall, its future and management model has been considered on and off for over a decade without resolution.

3.       As the hall is located right on the edge of the Rakino wharf reclamation, it is subject to direct wave action from time to time and a recent engineering assessment costs options to address this as ranging from $290,000 to over $1m.

4.       Although Rakino Hall provides an important community and visitor function, it serves a very small community and the expenditure of this quantum of public funds needs careful consideration.

5.       This report notes that council’s renewals budget can be used to fund the $290,000 “lift and shift” option although this may have an impact on other priority renewals work. It recommends this option be included in the 2019/20 renewals work programme for consideration and subject to it being consulted on and supported.

6.          The report also discusses options for the future management of the hall and recommends that the lift and shift option be subject to agreement being reached on future management. It recommends the preferred option as being transfer of the hall to the Rakino Ratepayers Association, or secondly a community lease if the association agrees.

Te tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      agree to allocate $290,000 in renewals funding to lift and shift Rakino Hall as per Option 1 in the Tonkin and Taylor Rakino Hall coastal hazard issues and options assessment final report dated November 2018, subject to the following:

i)        the proposal being considered alongside other renewals priorities in the 2019/20 work programme

ii)       the proposal being consulted on through the 2019/20 Waiheke Local Board Agreement process and sufficient support being received for this proposal

iii)      on project completion Rakino Hall is either transferred to the Rakino Ratepayers Association at no cost or managed in a manner agreed between the local board and the association

iv)      associated land lease and reserve classification processes which include iwi consultation, being completed.

 

Horopaki / Context

Hall ownership and land status

7.       The Rakino Hall is an Auckland Council community facility managed by council’s Community Facilities department. It was moved to Rakino Island in the early 1960s from Motuihe Island where it had been a World War Two Navy barracks.

8.       The hall partly sits on a reclamation at the southern end of the island as shown in the below photo. The reclamation’s southern edge is both a seawall and foundation for the hall. The reclamation and associated structures also form the island’s public wharf which is managed and maintained by Auckland Transport.

 

 

9.       Rakino Hall consists of a main community room (single storey building in the photo), a kitchen and library which occupy the bottom part of the building to the left, and an upstairs art gallery and separate toilets to the rear.

10.     The hall straddles two land parcels. The hall itself sits on the eastern parcel which is crown owned, classified as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve, and vested in the Auckland Council. The two storey part of the building sits on the western parcel which is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as an unclassified esplanade reserve.

11.     Under the Reserves Act 1977, buildings are not permitted to occupy esplanade reserves so the area occupied by these facilities has now been surveyed to enable the whole footprint to be classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

Hall use

12.     The island has a permanent population of around twenty and up to 250-300 at peak periods during the summer holidays.

13.     As Rakino Hall isn’t on council’s on line booking system, no formal council held record of use is available. The Rakino Ratepayers Association and the Rakino Hall Committee chair have provided information showing that annually, over 20,000 people use the hall for one purpose or another or arrive by boat and interact with the hall’s facilities. This usage report is included at Attachment A.

14.     Other advice on the hall’s purpose provided previously by the association can be summarised as follows:

i.   the hall is the only public facility on the island

ii.  it is the natural hub for all movements to and from the island and provides shelter for those waiting for boats or ferry services

iii. it enjoys regular use by the community and in the last couple of years there have been many large events enjoyed by large numbers of locals and visitors based in and around the Hall

iv. as well a hall, it functions as the island’s library and arts centre, an evacuation and civil defence assembly centre and first aid post. It also has an emergency phone, post boxes and storage for fire and pest control equipment

Hall management and maintenance

15.     Auckland Council and/or the local community have managed and maintained the hall in a variety of ways over the years depending on council systems and processes at the time, practicalities and the Rakino community’s interest and ability to do more or less.

16.     For a period of time prior to 2015 council sub-contracted a resident builder to do necessary work.  For a couple of years after that the Rakino Ratepayers Association was officially contracted as hall caretaker and managed hall use, bookings and general care. In the past the association has undertaken various internal repair works including the replacement of damaged flooring in the main hall area and refurbishment of the art gallery at its cost.

17.     The hall is currently maintained by council’s Community Facilities department in a reactive manner in response to requests and issues. The association has suggested that the building has deteriorated due to the lack of a regular maintenance programme.

18.     Council sends contractors over as needed. The association notes that this arrangement is costly as often contractors need to come and assess what needs to be done, and come back again to do the work. Under the above past arrangement with a local builder, the initial assessment was done locally.

19.     In January 2018 a major storm over Christmas which coincided with a king tide resulted in damage to the parts of the hall. Locals undertook a range of repairs over the holiday period including removing the deck and replacing floor joists/ties, piles and weatherboards at their own cost.

Hall coastal protection

20.     As Rakino Hall is located right on the southern edge of the reclamation as shown in the above photo, it is constantly subject to coastal processes. At times these can be quite severe as shown in the below photo. There have been a variety of reports written and options identified to address these issues over the years.

 

21.     A 2012 report prepared for Auckland Transport proposed a replacement seawall in front of the existing concrete wall which was described as nearing the end of its life. It noted that only a remnant of a historic grouted rock wall intended to dissipate wave action remained (see top hall photo). This proposal never proceeded.

22.     In October 2014 the Waiheke Local Board received a report recommending that the hall be re-sited to prevent the threat of damage from severe storms and high tides. The board allocated $66,000 from its 2014/15 renewal budget for this purpose. Subsequent investigation identified that actual costs would be significantly greater and the proposal never proceeded.

23.     More recently Auckland Transport investigated what might be needed to protect the southern side of the reclamation and had a preliminary design for a new seawall costed at around $88,000. This wasn’t taken further as a resource consent was needed which was seen as outside Auckland Transport’s responsibilities.

24.     Council staff supporting the Waiheke Local Board’s interest in finding a way forward have recently looked into resource consent requirements for coastal protection works within the coastal marine area. This showed that such works would be expensive, potentially not get approval anyway and that regardless, they risked doing no more than just lessening the impact of storm events.

25.     In August 2017, council staff and Waiheke Local Board members met on site with a sub-committee of the Rakino Ratepayers Association formed specifically to discuss a way forward for the hall. The council team included two asset assessors with a specific role to investigate the hall and associated seawall condition and report back.

26.     Notes taken by the sub-committee record that council staff advised that the condition assessment could be carried out within a month and this would form the basis of a service solution which could take a further 4-5 weeks. The sub-committee asked that these results be provided in time for the Rakino Ratepayers Association’s Labour Weekend 2018 50 year celebrations.

27.     Two separate asset assessments were prepared for the hall and associated coastal assets. The hall assessment noted that while there were some repairs required, overall the building was in reasonable condition and should be fit for purpose for many years if properly maintained.

28.     The hall assessment noted that the building is poorly located and suffers from sea action particularly during south-westerly storms. It recommended investigating a number of options including additional sea wall protection, relocation and raising the building on site, demolishing the existing building and constructing a new purpose built facility off-site.

29.     The coastal assets assessment included the seawall, wharf and breakwater as well as the hall deck, overhanging roof and foundations. It concluded that a buffer zone of rocks/boulders in front of the wharf and beneath the location of the deck and rebuilding the remnants of the existing breakwater would be the most effective way to dissipate the wave energy from reaching the building directly. It recommended removal of the deck which had been damaged and is in poor condition.

30.     Both reports recognised that various consents and more technical investigations would be needed to advance these options. In further discussions with council’s coastal management services staff, it became clear that obtaining consents in this coastal environment would be difficult and it was agreed that a more formal and comprehensive report on options was needed. At its 26 July 2018 meeting the Waiheke Local Board allocated $20,000 for this purpose.

31.     Tonkin and Taylor were engaged to prepare this report which discusses the scale and type of coastal hazards faced by the hall and possible measures to address them. A copy of the full report which is a desk top report (no-one went on site) is included at Attachment B. Its executive summary (paraphrased) states that:

·    Rakino Hall is already subject to coastal inundation and erosion due to its location and these hazards are likely to increase with increasing sea level rise

·    The following six options were investigated at a high level to address these issues, including construction costs, effective design life (particularly in relation to sea level rise), planning issues and constructability.

i.   Relocation on existing reclamation (lift hall 1m, shift back 5m, build a 1m wall on the reclamation edge)

ii.  Relocation to alternative site

iii. Vertical seawall with a crest of 4.0m (and associated reclamation)

iv. Rock armour revetment with a crest of 4.0m (and associated reclamation)

v.  Raising reclamation levels

vi. Demolition and new structure at alternative location

 

·    These options provide a solution for a certain time period and then additional actions may be required depending on the rate of climate change

·    Raising the seawall (either via a vertical seawall or rock armour revetment) or moving the Community Hall back on the reclamation) would be effective for a period of 30-50 years, depending on the rate of sea level rise. Other options would be effective for significantly longer periods of time.

·    Collaborative engagement with the community and additional planning investigations is recommended.

32.     Each option is considered in detail in Section 4.2 of the report and summarised in section 4.2.6. (see Table 4.7 included here).

 

Table 4-7 Summary of options with rough order costs and main planning, consenting and constructability issues

Option

Construction rough order costs (rounded)

Effective design life

Planning issues

Constructability

Option 1: Relocation on existing reclamation (Site shift)

$ 290,000

30 to 50 years (2050-2070)

Consent required, but generally consistent with zoning provisions.

Medium

Option 2: Relocation to alternative site

$ 423,000

100+ years

Need to confirm ability to construct on proposed location, extent of tree pruning, support of local community

Medium

Option 3: Vertical seawall

$ 529,000

30 to 50 years (2050-2070)

Potentially challenging planning direction which may not support reclamation

High (intertidal and restricted access to CMA)

Option 4: Rock armour revetment

$ 255,000

30 to 50 years (2050-2070)

Potentially challenging planning direction which may not support reclamation

High (intertidal and restricted access to CMA)

Option 5: Raising reclamation levels

$ 938,000

100 years

Impact on other amenities particularly the wharf

High (complex staging to retain wharf operations and parking)

 

33.     The Waiheke Local Board has considered this report and next steps at recent workshops and suggested that in view of its budget constraints, the age and life of the facility and the importance of wisely spending ratepayers funds if it was to support any option it would most likely be Option 1. The board also agreed to provide the report to the Rakino Ratepayers Association to be considered at its 2018 Labour Weekend AGM and the association has responded that its preference is for Option 1.

34.     The local board also asked staff to investigate alternative scenarios such as granting the association adequate funds to develop a facility elsewhere. This is discussed further below. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

35.     Despite a number of investigations over the years into how best to protect and manage the hall, there has been no follow through and these issues remain unresolved. The purpose of this report is to seek decisions that will conclude these matters.

36.     While the most pressing issue is protecting the hall from coastal impacts, it is considered that agreeing how the hall should be managed and by whom should also be concluded at the same time.

37.     Rakino Ratepayers Association representatives are expected to attend the board’s 13 December business meeting and speak at public forum in response to this report’s recommendations.

Addressing coastal process issues

38.     Staff consider that the following options are available to the Waiheke Local Board:

·    Do nothing

·    Pursue any of the Tonkin and Taylor report options

·    Investigate other options

39.     Staff consider that the “do nothing” option, is really the status quo and is not an option if issues and history outlined above are to be resolved. Doing nothing would involve normal maintenance of the hall in its current location. Eventually coastal processes are likely to significantly damage the hall resulting in either expensive repairs or the need to demolish all or parts of the building. This could occur at any time.

40.     Staff have confirmed that renewals budget is available from 2019/20 to progress Tonkin and Taylor’s Option 1 ($290,000) without compromising delivery of other renewals priorities. As this is a rough order cost estimate only based on a desktop exercise, a more detailed cost investigation would be needed. The cost does however contain a 30 per cent contingencies allowance and the Rakino Ratepayers Association has advised that it could undertake some works itself, such as site preparation and re-establishment which are costed at $40,000.

41.     Option 1 appears to be the only one of Tonkin and Taylor’s options that would attract renewals funding. The Waiheke Local Board has no other budgets which are either sufficient or can meet the criteria to progress any of Tonkin and Taylor’s other options.

42.     The diagram explaining Option 1 from Page 12 of the Tonkin and Taylor report is shown here. As noted earlier, this option involves lifting the hall 1m on the existing hardstand, moving it back 5m and building a 1m seawall on the hardstand edge.

43.     Other options could include demolishing and not replacing the Rakino Hall. This will clearly be opposed by the Rakino Ratepayers Association. Demolition will itself come at a cost and given the wider uses of the hall such as a waiting area for travellers, and storage for emergency equipment etc, some form of shelter would need to be retained or constructed.

44.     A further option suggested by the local board is to provide a grant to the association to construct a facility elsewhere owned and managed by itself. Staff advice is that this would need to be funded by the local board and it does not appear there are either funds available, or a suitable mechanism to achieve this.

45.     Based on the above this report recommends that the Waiheke Local Board allocates $290,000 from its renewals budget to pursue Tonkin and Taylor Option 1. Given this cost relative to the small size of the Rakino community and other funding priorities, it is further recommended that the local board consult on this option as part of its coming 2019/20 Waiheke Local Board Agreement consultation process.

46.     It also recommends that progressing Option 1 be subject to a decision on the hall’s future management being made and this is discussed further below.

Addressing future hall management

47.     The question of which party or method should be used to maintain and manage Rakino Hall has never been comprehensively considered or answered. As noted above, Rakino Hall has been managed and maintained in different ways over the years. Formal responsibility for its maintenance and management sits with Auckland Council.

48.     It is recommended that a preferred hall management option should be discussed and agreed with the Rakino Ratepayers Association before a final decision to support Option 1 is made. This is because the proposed hall renovation investment is considerable and it makes sense that a hall management solution covers both structural and management matters.

49.     Staff consider that the following options are available to the Waiheke Local Board:

·    The council continues to maintain and manage the hall

·    As above but with agreed roles being undertaken by the community

·    The hall is leased to the Rakino Ratepayers Association and it assumes associated responsibilities

·    The hall is transferred to the Rakino Ratepayers Association at no cost and the association is granted a lease over the land.

50.     While the council managing and maintaining the hall is the default position, this is not necessarily the best option for the future and hasn’t resulted in the best outcomes in the past. It costs more for the council to manage and maintain the hall remotely from the city due to distance and the absence of island based contractors.

51.     Ongoing changes in council processes, systems and structures are considered to have contributed to hall management and structural matters remaining unresolved. They have also contributed to dissatisfaction being expressed by the Rakino community and locals getting on and doing things when they had to be done and the council wasn’t responsive. This has included significant maintenance and renovation works at times at no cost to the council, for example removing the deck and repairing foundations damaged in the most recent storm.

52.     This is the option of the council continuing to manage and maintain the hall with certain aspects being led by the community, albeit with costs paid by council as needed.  Having locally based contractual arrangements as has happened at times in the past would fit into this scenario.

53.     A formal lease over the footprint of the building to the association is another option. This would enable the community to manage the hall as it saw fit within the terms of the lease and free it from the issues it has experienced with council management. Although actual costs would fall to the community, in large part this appears to be what has happened to a greater or lesser extent over time anyway.

54.     Formal transfer of the hall to the community is the end of this spectrum with the community taking control of the hall’s future use and purpose, but still within the restrictions of the land’s reserve status. While the council’s resources wouldn’t be automatically available, the community could still apply for grants and assistance as many community groups which own halls do already.

55.     As noted above, any management outcome needs beyond the status quo needs to be discussed and agreed with the Rakino community. These options have been discussed in detail with the chair of the Rakino Hall sub-committee, including hall transfer to the association. Concerns were expressed about both transfer and lease options. These included it being the council’s obligation to manage and maintain the hall, costs, differing views within the association and anxiety that this could create internal problems, and the benefit of council managing the administrative burden given the finite resources of the community. In the past at least there has been some appetite expressed for transfer provided structural issues were addressed at the same time.

56.     This report recommends that the Waiheke Local Board seek local ownership or management of the hall for the reasons outlined above. This seems like a practical solution for a hall which has been lifted and shifted, which will be safe and secure for a further 30-50 years and which is hard for the council to manage well given its remoteness.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

57.     The Waiheke Local Board is the decision-maker over matters covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

58.     No iwi consultation has been undertaken in the preparation of this report. Iwi will be consulted as part of the proposed 2019/20 Waiheke Local Board Agreement consultation, if the local board agrees to pursue Option 1. Resource consent and land classification processes would include iwi consultation.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

59.     If the Waiheke Local Board supports proposed Option 1, it would be funded from its renewals budget.

60.     There are a number of pressures on the Waiheke Local Board’s budget for next year which might impact on the ability to advance the Rakino Hall project. These include a desire to fast track the skate park, and unresolved budget pressures on Onetangi Beach access points and the golf club access road.

61.     Trade-offs, along with project timing, scope and cost reviews will be needed. Rakino Hall can be considered alongside these other priorities as part of the 2019/20 work programme agreement process.

62.     If Rakino Hall is no longer formally managed or maintained by Auckland Council, this will reduce ratepayer costs. If the Rakino Ratepayers Association was the owner or manager, it would be able to apply to the Waiheke Local Board for grants to support its activities.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

63.     The biggest risk is considered to be that no clear decisions are made on the hall’s future. Given the structural risks identified in the Tonkin and Taylor report, staff recommend that a clear direction is identified and agreed by the local board.

64.     A further risk is that using $290,000 in renewals funding for Rakino Hall might compromise the ability of other high priority projects to proceed or be completed.

65.     There is also a risk that discussions around what to do create relationship issues both between the parties and internally with the Rakino community.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

66.     Next steps will depend on the local board’s decisions on this matter.

67.     If the board supports using renewals funding to lift and shift the hall, the renewals team will investigate and progress the steps needed for that. If this isn’t supported and there is no change to the hall management approach, the hall will need to be appropriately maintained by the council. If storm events result in further damage, decisions will need to be made on its future in response to these impacts.

68.     If the board supports any change to management arrangements, those will determine next steps we agreement, leases, roles etc.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rakino Wharf Building & Hall Facility Usage Data

29

b

Tonkin and Taylor Rakino Hall Coastal Hazard Issues and Options Assessment

31

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

John Nash - Programme Manager,Waiheke & Gulf Islands

Authoriser

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 



Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Waiheke local parks land classification programme

 

File No.: CP2018/23924

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To declare and classify land held under the Local Government Act 2002, and to classify and reclassify land held under the Reserves Act 1977 and approve public notification where required.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       A comprehensive land status investigation of all Waiheke local parks has been completed and identified a large number of unclassified reserves held under the Reserves Act 1977. This is a preliminary task in the development of a local parks management plan.

3.       The local board considered the local parks land classification report at the 22 November 2018 business meeting and requested a deferral of the report to the December meeting.  Further advice was requested on whether any additional proposed classifications could be publicly notified (Resolution number WHK/2018/228).

4.       This report provides updated proposals for a small number of land parcels. It also provides additional information about the rationale for the proposed classifications and gives reasons for why some parcels are exempt from requiring public notification under the Reserves Act.

5.       For park land held under the LGA, the local board has the option to continue to hold land under the LGA or to declare the land as reserve under the Reserves Act and classify it appropriately (Attachments B, C and D).

6.       The following were considered when assessing if land should best be retained under the LGA or declared a reserve under the Reserves Act and classified: the current and likely future use, continuity with adjoining land parcels and the benefits and constraints of legislation.

7.       Staff have individually assessed the merits of each option relating to 19 parcels of park land held under the LGA and propose that:

·    five land parcels are retained under the LGA (Attachment B)

·    13 are declared as a reserve and classified under the Reserves Act – public notification is not required (Attachment C)

·    one land parcel to be declared and classified as a reserve is publicly notified, as it is not currently zoned as open space in the Operative District Plan (Attachment D).

8.       Of the 214 land parcels held under the Reserves Act:

·    110 are unclassified and require classification to be included in the local parks management plan (Attachment E and F).

·    12 require reclassification to better reflect current or future use of the reserve (Attachment G).

·    88 require no further action as they are already classified.

·    four land parcels at Catherine Mitchell Reserve require further investigation.

9.       Each individual parcel of reserve land has been assessed. Classification actions for unclassified reserve land and reclassification actions for some incorrectly classified reserves are being proposed.

10.     Staff have considered the benefits and disadvantages of the Reserves Act and LGA in managing and enabling the use, protection and development of each local park, and developed a set of criteria to guide assessment of each land parcel.

11.     These criteria incorporate guidance from the Reserves Act 1977 Guide[1], consideration of the local park’s values, current and likely future use of the local park and feedback from the local board and mana whenua.

12.     Staff recommend that the local board approve classifying the land parcels that do not require public notification under the Reserves Act; and notifying the classification or reclassification of other land parcels as outlined in this report. The local board may choose to seek public feedback on those classification proposals that are exempt from public notification.

13.     Completing the reserve declaration, classification and reclassification processes will enable staff to proceed with preparing the draft local parks management plan once the first round of consultation has been completed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      confirm 5 parcels of land will continue to be held under the Local Government Act 2002 as described in Attachment B of the agenda report (dated 13 December 2018) will continue to be held under the Local Government Act 2002

b)      approve 13 parcels of land to be declared a reserve and classified according to their primary purpose, pursuant to section 14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 as described in Attachment C of the agenda report (dated 13 December 2018)

c)      approve public notification of the intention to declare and classify one parcel of land as described in Attachment D of the agenda report (dated 13 December 2018)

d)      approve the proposed classification of 103 parcels of reserve land pursuant to sections 16(1) and 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 as described in Attachment E of the agenda report (dated 13 December 2018)

e)      approve public notification of proposals to classify 7 parcels of reserve land pursuant to section 16(4) of the Reserves Act 1977 as described in Attachment F of the agenda report (dated 13 December 2018)

f)       approve public notification of the proposals to reclassify 12 parcels of reserve land pursuant to section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977 as described in Attachment G of the agenda report (dated 13 December 2018)

g)      approve a hearing panel, consisting of a minimum of three local board members in preparation for any requests to speak to objections or submissions on the proposed classifications that have been publicly notified under clause c) and e) above. The role of the hearings panel will be to hear submissions make recommendations to the local board on classification decisions.

 

Horopaki / Context

14.     Waiheke Local Board has allocated decision making responsibility for all local parks in the Waiheke local board area (the local board area).

15.     On 22 November 2018, the local board resolved to: “approve public notification of its intention to prepare a combined (omnibus) Local Parks Management Plan for all local parks and reserves in the Waiheke Local Board area, excluding the Rangihoua and Onetangi Sports Park and invite written suggestions on the proposed plan” (resolution number: WHK/2018/227).

16.     The Waiheke Local Parks Management Plan (local parks management plan) will be a statutory reserve management plan prepared in accordance with section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977 (RA).

17.     As part of preparing the local parks management plan, it is necessary to review whether local parks to be included in the plan are held under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) or RA, and if they are held under the RA whether they have been appropriately classified.

18.     The initial review of the land status of all local parks in the local board area has been completed. The outcomes of the investigation were presented to the local board at a workshop on 4 October 2018.

19.     The local board considered the local parks land classification report at the 22 November 2018 business meeting and requested a deferral of the report to the December meeting.  Further advice was requested on whether any additional proposed classifications could be publicly notified (Resolution number WHK/2018/228).

20.     Prior to the November meeting, staff were made aware of resolutions made by the local board regarding classification of four land parcels at Catherine Mitchell Reserve (Resolution number WHK/2016/142). Staff are currently investigating the information provided to the local board at the time and will report back to the local board in February 2019 should any further action be required for those land parcels.

21.     The deferral allowed staff to recheck the land status information for all land parcels, the rationale for classification recommendations and whether it is required to be publicly notified under the RA or exempt from notification under the Act.

22.     Based on this review, the following presents the updated information for all land parcels.

23.     347 land parcels, covering approximately 120 parks, were investigated. Of the 347 land parcels investigated, 233 are included in scope of the local parks management plan.

24.     114 land parcels are out of scope, as the local board does not have delegated decision-making authority for them. Examples of this are drainage reserves, land managed by the Department of Conservation, unformed roads and Whakanewha Regional Park.

25.     Of the 233 land parcels within scope, 214 are held under the RA, and 19 under the LGA.

26.     Of the 214 land parcels held under the RA, 114 are currently unclassified including the four parcels at Catherine Mitchell Reserve requiring further investigation.

27.     This report makes recommendations on actions for both land held under the RA and land held under the LGA.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

28.     The local board have the option to hold park land under the LGA or the RA.

29.     For land held under the LGA the following options have been considered:

·    continue to hold the land under the LGA

·    declare land currently held under the LGA to be reserve under the RA and classify appropriately.

30.     For land held under the RA, the following options have been considered:

·   classify according to its primary purpose

·   reclassify to align to its primary purpose

·   revoke the reserve status and hold the land under the LGA

·   continue to hold the land as unclassified reserve under the RA (status quo).

31.     The option to continue to hold the land as unclassified reserve, has been discounted as it would mean that the local parks management plan would not comply with the RA, the council would not be meeting its statutory obligations under the RA and staff would not be able to recommend public notification of the draft plan (once completed).

32.     Attachment A summarises the different options for land held under the LGA and land held under the RA.

33.     In assessing the options for each land parcel, staff have considered:

·    the intended purpose of the land when it was acquired, for example, was it vested as a recreation or esplanade reserve on subdivision

·    the long-term protection that the RA provides from inappropriate use and development

·    the benefits of unified and integrated management of individual parks and the local parks network as a whole

·    whether underlying Crown ownership of the local park prevents the reserve status being revoked

·    whether statutory processes and future decision-making will be streamlined

·    the need for greater flexibility and choice in how local parks are used by the public

·    whether revoking the reserve status of a particular land parcel would materially lead to a greater range of park activities being able to occur.

34.     The following sections outline in more detail the options for land held under the LGA and RA and the criteria on which assessments of each land parcel have been based.

Proposed actions for land held under the LGA

35.     When reviewing the future land status options for land under the LGA, staff considered the following questions.

·   Why does the council own the land and how was it acquired?

·   What is the primary purpose of the land?

·   What is the status of adjacent land parcels within the same park?

·   What is the current and likely future main use of the land?

·   What potential does the land have for protection, enhancement and development?

·   Is there likely to be a need to retain flexibility for future use?

Proposal to retain some land under the LGA

36.     Attachment B lists the land parcels that have been identified as best suited to remain under the LGA by applying the criteria above. This is primarily because either the current use does not align with any of the classification options in the RA and/or there is a likely need to retain flexibility for future use.

37.     No further action is required by the local board for land that is to remain under the LGA.

Proposal to declare and classify some land currently held under the LGA

38.     Any land held under the LGA which the local board wishes to manage under the RA must be declared reserve and classified appropriately in accordance with the RA.

39.     Attachments C and D list the land parcels held under the LGA that are being recommended to be declared a reserve under the RA and classified. 

40.     The predominant reason for declaring and classifying these land parcels is to reflect the primary purpose of the land. Most of these land parcels align with either recreation or scenic classifications.

41.     Section 14(2) of the RA requires public notification when declaring and classifying land as reserve, where land is not zoned open space in the Auckland Council District Plan – Hauraki Gulf Islands Section – Operative 2018 (the district plan).

42.     The land parcels to be declared reserve and classified in Attachment C do not require public notification as they are zoned Open Space (ecology and landscape) or Conservation in the district plan.

43.     One land parcel proposed to be declared and classified requires public notification, calling for any objections to the proposal (refer to Attachment D), as it is zoned as Traditional Residential in the district plan.

44.     Staff recommend that the local board declare and classify the land identified in Attachment C; and publicly notify their intention to declare and classify the land in Attachment D as reserve under the RA.

Proposed actions for land held under the RA

45.     As outlined above, there are three valid options for land held under the RA – classification, reclassification or revocation of the RA status.

46.     In the context of this investigation, staff have not identified any parcels of local park that warrant revocation of the reserve status and holding the land under the LGA.

Classification of land held under the Reserves Act 1977

47.     Classification involves assigning a reserve (or part of a reserve) a primary purpose, as defined in section 17 to 23 of the RA, that aligns with its present values. Consideration is also given to potential future values and activities and uses.

48.     Attachments E and F list the land parcels currently held as unclassified reserve under the RA, that require classification.

49.     Staff have considered the Reserves Act Guide[2] and the following questions when determining the primary purpose and appropriate classification for each land parcel.

·    Why does council own the land? Why was it acquired?

·    What are the main values of the land or potential future values, uses and activities?

·    What potential does the land have for protection, preservation, enhancement or development?

·    What is the status of adjacent land parcels within the park?

·    What potential does the land have for protection, enhancement and development?

·    Is there likely to be a need to retain flexibility for future use?

50.     Attachment E identifies the land parcels that require classification under section 16(1) or 16(2A) of the RA. These proposals do not require public notification under the RA.

51.     However, the local board may choose to seek feedback from the public on any proposal prior to making a decision to classify the land parcel.

52.     Classification is a mandatory action under the RA so following any public feedback, the local board would either need to:

·    confirm the proposed classification;

·    consider an alternative classification (which may require further public consultation); or

·    publicly notify its intention to revoke the land parcel’s status under the RA and hold the land under the LGA instead.

Public notification of classification

53.     The RA requires public notification of the proposals for classification of a reserve under section 16(1) of the RA except where:

·    the proposed classification aligns with the open space zoning in the district plan,

·    the reserve has been held under previous legislation for a similar purpose, or

·    the proposed classification was a condition under which the land was acquired. 

54.     Attachment F identifies the unclassified reserves that require the proposed classification to be publicly notified under section 16(4) of the Act.

55.     One proposal for classification, the Citizens Advice Bureau reserve, requires notification due to the land being zoned commercial. Six proposals require notification because the land was vested as an unclassified recreation reserve, while staff are recommending that these land parcels be classified scenic reserve to better reflect their ecological values.

56.     Objectors and submitters may request a hearing in which case it is proposed that a hearings panel consisting of at least three local board members is formed to hear any objections or submissions and to make recommendations to the local board on classification decisions.

Reclassification of some land held under the RA

57.     Reclassification involves assigning a different class to a reserve (or part of a reserve) to better cater for its primary purpose.

58.     Attachment G lists the land parcels of classified reserves that are recommended to be reclassified.

59.     The main reasons for the proposed reclassification are: to better align with the current or anticipated future use of the reserve; or to correct previous classification errors.

60.     Section 24(2)(b) of the RA requires all proposals to reclassify reserves to be publicly notified together with the reasons for the proposed change in classification. The RA does not require hearings on objections to any proposal for reclassification.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

61.     Staff have discussed the outcomes of the land investigation and the proposed reserve classification programme with the local board at a workshop on 4 October 2018.

62.     All land parcels proposed to be reclassified were discussed, as well as land parcels to be declared and classified, and land parcels to be retained under the LGA.

63.     Staff also gave an overview of the methodology and rationale used to determine the recommendations for unclassified reserves.

64.     Feedback from the local board members was generally supportive of the rationale and proposals for classification and reclassification of reserves that were discussed.

65.     Local board members expressed support to retain some land under the LGA. An example of this was the land parcels on which the Surfdale Hall is situated. 

66.     Amendments have been made to the proposed classification programme based on feedback from local board members present at the workshop.

67.     Following the decision by the local board on 22 November 2018 to defer the decision on classifications, a further workshop was held on 7 December 2018 to discuss the rationale for the proposed classifications/ reclassifications and whether public notification was required.

68.     Feedback from the local board workshop on 7 December 2018 was not able to be incorporated into this report prior to the close of the agenda. If required, updates to the attachments will be tabled at the meeting on 13 December 2018 and/or alterations to proposals can be raised as part of the chair’s recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

Engagement with mana whenua

69.     Staff have been working with interested mana whenua on land classification as part of the local parks management plan. Two hui have been held to date.

70.     At the first hui, held on 26 September 2018, staff gave an overview of the project and reserve classifications in general. Discussions on proposals for specific land parcels commenced.

71.     At the second hui, held on 5 October 2018, discussions continued on specific land parcels. All land parcels proposed to be reclassified were discussed, as well as land parcels to be declared and classified and land parcels to be retained under the LGA.

72.     Proposed reserve classification information was also sent to interested mana whenua to review on 3 October 2018, prior to the second hui.

73.     Mana whenua representatives from Ngāti Paoa, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Maru and Ngāti Whanaunga attended the hui. Mana whenua generally supported staff’s assessment, rationale and proposals for land classification.

74.     For some of the land parcels, mana whenua expressed a desire to give them a higher level of protection under the RA, i.e. classify a reserve as scenic reserve, instead of the proposed recreation reserve classification.

75.     Following advice from local parks and biodiversity staff, amendments were made to the proposed classification of some land parcels to accommodate mana whenua feedback.

Engagement with mataawaka

76.     Staff have communicated with the Piritahi Marae Committee in regards to the classification of the land the marae is situated on. With the assistance of the committee, staff have been able to confirm that no further action is required for the marae land parcels, as the land is already classified as local purpose (marae) reserve.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

77.     Financial implications include costs for:

·    public notices to declare and classify land held under the LGA (where required)

·    public notices to classify (where required) and reclassify for land held under the RA.

78.     These costs will be covered through Community Facilities existing operational budget.

79.     Costs for hearings that may be required to hear any objections to the proposals will be covered by the Hearings team.

80.     There are no financial implications associated with retaining land under the LGA.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

81.     The following table outlines the risks and mitigation associated with classification and reclassification of reserves and declaring and classifying land to be reserve.

Risk

Mitigation

Perception that the LGA offers park land less protection from sale or disposal than if it was held under RA

 

Both Acts require a public consultation process where land is proposed to be disposed of.

Retaining land under the LGA has only been recommended where flexibility for future use is likely to be beneficial (e.g. commercial use).

RA classifications constrain the range of uses that land can be used for

Current and likely future use of each individual land parcel proposed to be declared and classified under the RA has been assessed based on the considerations in paragraph 35 above and the Reserves Act Guide.

Public objections to proposed classifications delaying the management plan process

A small number of land parcels require public notification. Due to the small number being notified, the potential impact on timeframes for the management plan is anticipated to be minimal.

Potentially high number of submissions on proposed classifications, because the notification will occur at the same time as public consultation on the intention to prepare the plan.

Work with engagement team if additional resources are required. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

82.     Next steps vary depending on whether land is held under the LGA or RA and on the action that is taken i.e. declare and classify (notified or non-notified) for land under the LGA and classify (notified or non-notified) or reclassification under the RA.

83.     Attachment H outlines the next steps for each action for land held under the LGA and RA.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Possible actions under the Local Government Act 2002 vs the Reserves Act 1977

89

b

Land to be retained under the Local Government Act 2002

91

c

Land held under the LGA - to be declared a reserve and classified – public notification not required

93

d

Land held under the LGA – to be declared a reserve and classified – public notification required

95

e

Land held under the Reserves Act 1977 – to be classified – public notification not required

97

f

Land held under the Reserve Act – to be classified – public notification required

105

g

Land held under the Reserves Act – to be reclassified – public notification required

109

h

Outline of next steps for different actions under the Local Government Act 2002 and Reserves Act 1977

111

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Nicki Malone - Service and Asset Planner

Matthew Ward - Service & Asset Planning Team Leader

Helaina Farthing - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 



Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update - December 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/18142

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board on transport related matters in their area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) still has unallocated funds. There remains $1,061,520 in the LBTCF, which needs to be allocated by June 2018. 

3.       The local board’s advocacy initiative of a 10-year transport plan is being progressed and is being presented to Auckland Transports Executive Leadership Team for approval to move on to the next stage.

4.       Other Auckland Transport activities impacting on the local board area include Traffic Control Committee decisions pertaining to Parking changes at Matiatia, and the following regional initiatives:

· Matiatia update

· AT/Waiheke Local board relationship workshop

 

Te tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update - December 2018.

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area and includes information on the status of the LBTCF.

6.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. They report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in their Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities. 

7.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Quarterly report on Auckland Transport projects and activities

8.       Attached for the board’s information is information on Auckland Transport’s activities over the past quarter (July – September 2018).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

9.       Inserted below is a financial summary table that shows the total funds available in current political term, amount completed to date and remaining budget left.

Local Board Advocacy

10 Year Strategic Transport Plan

10.     Auckland Transport is working with the board on a 10-year strategic transport plan for Waiheke. This plan has been an advocacy item in the Waiheke Local Boards Plan.

11.     A number of internal meetings have been held to establish the current project and budget situation for Waiheke; these have been workshopped with the board to find where their priorities align with Auckland Transport.

12.     Next steps: these priorities will be presented to the Auckland Transport senior leadership team in December. Auckland Transport consult with the Waiheke community on projects in early 2019.

Other Auckland Transport news

Matiatia Changes – Update

13.     Old Fuel Pontoon – The fuel pontoon on the old wharf was completed at the end of November 2018. There were significant maintenance works done to the pontoon to allow safe access and to keep the pontoon operational.

14.     CCTV – Auckland Transport and the board agreed to fund CCTV cameras for Matiatia and Owhanake car parks. Auckland Transport expects these will be installed by 14 December. The primary purpose for these cameras is to help understand the current flow of the carparks to allow for improved design in the proposed upgrade.

15.     Parking Changes – At the September local board business meeting, resolutions were made by the board to make changes to the parking area at Matiatia, the on-street parking on Ocean View Road and the car parks in Oneroa.

16.     Auckland Transport will be able to deliver the additional mobility parks and the parking time limits in Oneroa by the end of December 2018; however, there has been an issue with the allocation of this parking area due to a resolution issue with The Transport Agency. It expected this will be resolved early in the New Year and all changes will be in place before March 2019.

Putiki Road Completion

17.     Auckland Transport expects to compete the sealing of Putiki Road before the 21 December. This project was put on hold in June 2018, as the road was too wet to hold the seal.

18.     Following the works on Putiki Road, our maintenance response will be a stand-by crew only for the holiday period, for urgent response. The maintenance programme will continue at the end of January 2019.

 

Waiheke Board/AT Relationship Workshop

19.     Auckland Transport is committed to the Waiheke Trial, an outcome of the Governance Review resolved by the governing body in early 2018.

20.     In August 2018, Auckland Transport Chief Executive Shane Ellison, visited the board to discuss a number of topics relevant to the Waiheke community. Part of this visit was a commitment to return to Waiheke with members of his Executive Leadership team.

21.     This second meeting is scheduled for 14 December and the outcome of the meeting is discuss the relationship between Auckland Transport and the Waiheke Local Board and moving towards a codesigned agreement of how we engage better with each other.

Waiheke Christmas Parade

22.     Auckland Transport has accepted the invitation from the Waiheke community to include our new Auckland Transport local electric minibus in the parade on 15 December.

Community Cycle Fund

23.     Auckland Transport invite the Waiheke community to apply for the latest round of the community cycle fund. This fund provides small amounts of funding for community groups to improve cycling within the community.

24.     Previously this fund had helped to fund Cycle Action Waiheke’s cycle event in June 2018.

Donald Bruce Road

25.     Auckland Transport and Sealink have been working together on improving safety on Donald Bruce Road. We don’t have any solutions at this stage but will provide the board details through email and workshops so there can be resolution as soon as possible.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

26.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

27.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

28.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

29.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

30.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board in February 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport quarterly report July - September 2018

117

b

Auckland Transport school community transport

129

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Melanie Dale, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport 

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Proposed Regional Public Transport Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/23817

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waiheke Local Board the opportunity to provide formal feedback on the proposed Regional Public Transport Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport is required to review its ten year Regional Public Transport Plan every three years. The plan describes the services that are integral to Auckland’s public transport network for the next 10-year period. This report requests the Waiehke Local Board give feedback on the plan, with special emphasis on the following four focus areas:

·   Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

·   Improving customer access to public transport

·   Improving Māori responsiveness

·   Harnessing emerging technologies

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide the following feedback on the Regional Public Transport Plan focus areas of:

i)        Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

ii)       Improving customer access to public transport

iii)      Improving Māori responsiveness

iv)      Harnessing emerging technologies

b)      provide additional feedback on local specific interests.

 

Horopaki / Context

3.       The Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act. It sets out the changes to Auckland’s public transport. Transport is a key component of a city’s success. Auckland is growing and as more people live and visit here, the number of trips taken on our transport networks is increasing. The space available for transport networks is finite. This means that we need as many people as possible to travel using efficient forms of transport; such as walking, cycling and public transport. These alternative transport options take less space and are more environmentally sustainable than private motor vehicles. With less pressure on the road network there is more capacity available for critical vehicles that need the road, including road-based public transport, emergency services and freight.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

4.       Attached is the summary document for the Regional Public Transport Plans. This document outlines the main changes proposed over the next ten years by focusing on four key areas:

Focus area one

Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

5.       Planning an enhanced rapid transit network through four main city-shaping projects to dramatically increase the speed and coverage of the rapid transit network:

·   City Rail Link

·   City to Mangere Light Rail and Northwest Light Rail

·   SH20B upgrade and Puhinui Interchange

·   Eastern Busway.

6.       Implementing improvements on key arterial routes to move more people. This will include bus priority, safety improvements and cycling and walking facilities. Increasing services on the rapid and frequent networks, with the aim to have services every 10 minutes during peak travel times. Using the rapid and frequent networks to help make great public spaces.

Focus area two

Improving customer access to public transport

7.       Continuing to deliver improved wayfinding sign systems across the public transport network to make it easier for people to find their way across the network. Increasing and improving the walking and cycling and other choices for access to public transport services, focussing on improving safety. Changing park and ride facilities to meet public demand.

Focus area three

Improving Māori responsiveness

8.       Partnering with mana whenua to trial services such as on-demand ride share connecting to marae, which are hard to access by conventional public transport. Ensuring te reo Māori audio announcements and signs for rapid transit stations (train and busway) and extending this across all public transport.

9.       Applying Te Aranga Principles when designing major interchanges and stations, with future potential to apply in the planning and design of the Light Rail Transit projects, Puhinui upgrade and stormwater management. Securing opportunities for Māori and local community employment, training and business development when constructing major public transport projects.

Focus area four

Harnessing emerging technologies

10.     Improving customer insights and data, and undertaking more thorough analytics of travel data to directly inform service improvements. Continuing to evolve AT mobile apps to meet increasing customer needs. Providing simpler and improved payment options for fares to make travel easier. Using new transport modes generated by new digital technology to supplement and complement existing services, increasing access. Ensuring we future proof for mobility-as-a-service models, which will change how people make travel choices.

11.     The full text of the proposed Regional Public Transport Plan can be accessed through Auckland Transport’s website on www.at.govt.nz/rptp.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

12.     Public transport has an impact right across the Auckland Region and therefore impacts all local boards in some way. This report seeks feedback from local boards on the most appropriate enhancements to Auckland’s public transport over the next ten years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

13.     The proposed Regional Public Transport Plan has a focus area of Improving Maori Responsiveness and includes initiatives such as: trialing new modes connecting marae with the public transport system, te reo announcements and signage across the public transport system and incorporating Te Aranga design principles into new facilities, such as bus and rail stations.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

14.     The report has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

15.     The report has no direct risks for local boards. Each individual project has its own set of unique risks and these will be dealt with as these projects are developed and implemented.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

16.     In terms of what happens to the proposed plan.

·   Public consultation runs until December 14

·   Feedback will be analysed over mid to late January 2019

·   The draft plan will be amended

·   The final proposed plan will go to the Auckland Transport Board in February or March 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Land Transport Plan summary document

135

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Stuart Knarston - Planning Projects Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Management team

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation

 

File No.: CP2018/23729

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To agree a local engagement event and adopt local content and supporting information for consultation as part of the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the relevant local board) for each local board area for each financial year. The local board agreement will be included in the Council’s Annual Budget 2019/2020.

3.       Consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 will take place from 17 February – 17 March 2019. Local boards will be consulting on their areas of focus for their 2019/2020 local board agreement.

4.       In December, the Governing Body will consider whether to consult on a proposal to transfer legal ownership of waterfront land and related assets to the council parent.  If the Governing Body decides to consult on that proposal, the consultation would take place at the same time as the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.  As a result, the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 would require the use of the special consultative procedure.

5.       There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Water Strategy discussion document. A report will be going to the Environment and Community Committee on 4 December 2018 to approve the discussion document for public consultation.

6.       This report seeks agreement from local boards on the Have Your Say event that will be held in their local board area during the consultation period, to give Aucklanders an opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback. It also seeks approval of their local content and supporting information for consultation.

7.       The Governing Body and local boards will agree regional and local items respectively for consultation by December 13. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the annual budget consultation document and supporting information, which will be approved by the Governing Body on 13 February 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      agree, subject to approval by the Governing Body, to hold the following Have Your Say event in the local board area during the Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation period:

i)        Round table Have Your Say event, Wednesday 6 March, 6pm, Local Board Office, 10 Belgium Street, Ostend.

ii)       Round table Have Your Say event, Saturday 9 March, 10am, Local Board Office, 10 Belgium Street, Ostend.

b)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events during the consultation period for the Annual Budget 2019/2020.

i)        local board members and chairperson

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Chief Financial Officer.        

c)      adopt Attachment A: local content for consultation and Attachment B: local supporting information for consultation.

d)      delegate authority to the local board chair to approve any final changes required following review by the council’s legal team of the consultation content of the Annual Budget 2019/2020 prior to publication, including online consultation content.

 

Horopaki / Context

8.       Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the relevant local board) for each local board area for each financial year. The local board agreement will be included in the Council’s Annual Budget 2019/2020.

9.       Local Board agreements set out (among other things) how the council will, in the year to which the agreement relates, reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board’s plan in respect of the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

10.     For the purposes of consulting on each local board agreement to be included in the council’s Annual Budget, the consultation document for the Annual Budget must include content relating to each agreement.

11.     Public consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 will take place from 17 February – 17 March 2019.

12.     In December, the Governing Body will consider whether to consult on a proposal to transfer legal ownership of waterfront land and related assets to the council parent.  If the Governing Body decides to consult on that proposal, the consultation would take place at the same time as the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.  As a result, the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 would require the use of the special consultative procedure, as a decision to proceed with the proposal would require an amendment to the council’s long-term plan.  Where an amendment to the long-term plan is being consulted on at the same time as consultation on the Annual Budget, the Local Government Act 2002 requires the council to use the special consultative procedure in relation to both matters.

13.     There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Water Strategy discussion document. A report will be going to the Environment and Community Committee on 4 December 2018 to approve the discussion document for public consultation.

14.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation process through a variety of channels which include verbal (or face-to-face), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

15.     The special consultative procedure requires the council to provide an opportunity for people to present their views to the council in a manner that enables “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” between the person and the council’s decision-makers, or their official delegates.   The council provides for this through its ‘Have Your Say’ events where people can have a face-to-face dialogue with elected members or other council representatives with an appropriate delegation. The Have Your Say event recommended to be held in the Waiheke Local Board area is:

·    Round table Have Your Say event, Wednesday 6 March, 6pm, Local Board Office, 10 Belgium Street, Ostend.

·    Round table Have Your Say event, Saturday 9 March, 10am, Local Board Office, 10 Belgium Street, Ostend.

16.     Local boards held workshops during October and November 2018 to determine their key activities for their 2019/2020 local board agreement. Boards are now requested to agree their local content and supporting information for consultation, as attached in Attachment A and B.

17.     Any new local BID targeted rates must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are therefore also requested to agree any new proposals for consultation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

19.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the Annual Budget 2019/2020. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the board, prior to finalising their local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

20.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were adopted in September and October of 2017, form the basis for local priorities.

21.     The approach to Māori engagement for the Annual Budget will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget.

22.     Regionally supported local Māori engagement in the South and West will be provided subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget, this will be integrated with Water Strategy engagement.

23.     Mana Whenua engagement on the Water Strategy is already underway, and will run throughout the March consultation period, annual budget discussions will be integrated with this process.             

24.     There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in the council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

25.     Event associated costs include venue hire and catering.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

26.     Local boards must agree their local consultation content and supporting information by 13 December 2018, in order for it to be formatted and reviewed in time to be incorporated into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation document and supporting information.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

27.     The Governing Body will approve the consultation document, supporting information and consultation process for the Annual Budget 2019/2020 on 13 February 2019.

28.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and local boards will make decisions on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and Local Board Agreements 2019/2020 respectively.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board content for consultation

155

b

Waiheke Local Board supporting information for consultation

157

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Beth Corlett - Strategic Project Advisor

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Anna Bray - Policy and Planning Manager - Local Boards

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 May - 31 October 2018

 

File No.: CP2018/22872

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Waiheke Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area for the six months from 1 May to 31 October 2018.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Panuku was established in September 2015 by the merger of two council controlled organisations, Waterfront Auckland and Auckland Council Property Limited.

3.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

4.       Panuku manages around $2 billion of council’s property portfolio; which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 May to 31 October 2018.

 

Ngā Mahi ā-Hapori / Local Activities

Portfolio Management

5.       Panuku manages ‘non-service’ properties owned by the council and Auckland Transport. Non-service properties are those that are not currently needed for service or infrastructure purposes. These properties were generally being held for planned future projects that are no longer required, such as road construction, park expansion or development of future town centres.

6.       As at 30 June 2018, the property portfolio comprises 1437 properties, containing 1119 leases. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

7.       The return on the property portfolio for the period ending 30 June 2018 was above budget, with a net surplus to the council and Auckland Transport shareholders of $3.9 million ahead of budget.

8.       The average monthly tenantable occupancy rate for the six-month period is more than 98 per cent, which is above the statement of intent target of 95 per cent.

Properties managed in the Waiheke Local Board Area

9.       Panuku currently manages 14 commercial interests within the local board area.

Business interests

10.     Panuku also manages the commercial return from business interests on the council’s behalf. This includes two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

11.     There is one managed business interest in the Waiheke Local Board area – the Hoporata Quarry in Ostend.

12.     Hoporata Quarry has been in operation on this site since the 1950s. Origin Quarries Limited is the operator, paying a royalty to the council based on sales on a monthly basis.

13.     The quarry operator has requested an extension to the operating agreement which expires in 2020 to reflect the term of the resource consent which expires 2032. Panuku are considering its options in relation to this extension.

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

14.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets approved in 2015. The process is a tri-party agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

15.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, with lower maintenance costs, operating costs as well as improved service delivery benefiting from co-location of other complimentary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a vast range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites and in many cases will result in intensification of land use, particularly residential, supporting Auckland Plan implementation.

16.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

17.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

18.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

19.     Target for July 2017 to June 2018:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$60 million disposal recommendations

$88 million as at 30 June 2018

(includes $62 million from the Papatoetoe, Avondale and Panmure priority locations)

20.     Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal recommendations

$4.8 million as at 31 October 2018.

 

Process

21.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Under review

22.     Properties currently under review in the Waiheke Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body.

Property

Details

6 Belgium Street, Waiheke

 

A commercial site acquired by the former Auckland City Council to locate a service centre which was to also include a library. However the library was located elsewhere. Council’s community & social policy department requested 6 Belgium Street, Waiheke progress through the rationalisation process to enable full review of future use options.

6 Belgium Street, Waiheke is subject to section 27B of the State-Owned Enterprises Act 1986, which provides that in certain circumstances the Waitangi Tribunal may return the land to claimants, irrespective of the current ownership.

A land covenant protects the right of Chorus New Zealand Ltd to operate a telecommunications network on the adjoining land and puts limitations on the use of 6 Belgium Street, Waiheke.

The Waiheke Local Board does not support disposal and requested that the site be retained for housing purposes or for a community swimming pool.

The council currently does not have a policy to provide council owned land at low or no cost for housing purposes. Following Panuku’s advice, the board commissioned a business case to inform a sustainable social housing development that would use the site. 

The council’s recreation services department has submitted an expression of interest requesting additional time to undertake an assessment of the subject site for a proposed swimming pool

7 Waitai Road, Waiheke

A commercial site acquired by the former Waiheke Road District in 1958 for the purpose of a works depot. Council’s community & social policy department requested 7 Waitai Road, Waiheke progress through the rationalisation process to enable full review of future use options.

The board does not support disposal and requested that the site be retained for housing purposes or for a community swimming pool.

The council currently does not have a policy to provide council owned land at low or no cost for housing purposes. Following Panuku’s advice, the board commissioned a business case to inform a sustainable social housing development that would use the site. 

The council’s recreation services department has submitted an expression of interest requesting additional time to undertake an assessment of the subject site for a proposed swimming pool.

 

Acquisitions and disposals

23.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

24.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

25.     Panuku purchased 12 properties for open space across Auckland in the last financial year at a cost of $27 million and bought eight properties for storm water use at a value of $4.9 million.

26.     Panuku purchased 8 properties for open space across Auckland in the 2018-19 financial year at a cost of $33 million and bought one property for storm water use at a value of $188,000.

27.     No properties were purchased in the Waiheke Local Board area during the reporting period.

Disposals

28.     The disposals team has sold six properties, realising $31.8 million of unconditional net sales proceeds, in the current financial year.  The Panuku 2018/19 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. The disposals team achieved $15.06 million of net sale proceeds in 2017/18.

29.     No properties were sold in the Waiheke Local Board area during the reporting period.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report is for the Waiheke Local Board’s information.

31.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries you have relating to a property in your local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

32.     Tāmaki Makaurau has the highest Māori population in the world with one in four Māori in Aotearoa living here. 

33.     Māori make up 12 per cent of the region’s total population who mainly live in Manurewa, Henderson-Massey, Papakura, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Māngere-Ōtahuhu and Franklin. Māori have a youthful demographic with 50% of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau under the age of 25 years. Five per cent of the Māori population in the region are currently 65 years and over.      

34.     There are 19 Mana Whenua in the region, with eight having indicated an interest in Panuku lead activities within the Waiheke Local Board area. 

35.     Māori make up 11 per cent of the Waiheke Local Board population, and there is one marae located within the local board area.   

36.     Panuku work collaboratively with Mana Whenua on a range projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

37.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Sven Mol - Corporate Affairs Advisor, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Theresa Walsh – Senior Engagement Advisor

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Chairperson's report

 

File No.: CP2018/22555

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the report from Chairperson Cath Handley.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair's report December 2018

167

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings

 

File No.: CP2018/22556

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are copies of the record of proceedings of the Waiheke Local Board workshops held on 15 November, 22 November and 29 November 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings of the Waiheke Local Board workshops held on 15 November, 22 November and 29 November 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20181115 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

171

b

20181122 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

173

c

20181129 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

175

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

 

File No.: CP2018/22592

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       Attached is a copy of the Governance Forward Work Programme for Waiheke which is a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Programme.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme

179

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

List of resource consents

 

File No.: CP2018/22593

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       Attached are the lists of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 3 to 9 November, 10 to 16 November, 19 to 25 November and 26 to 30 November 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         note the lists of resource consents lodged related to Waiheke Island from 3 to 9             November, 10 to 16 November, 19 to 25 November and 26 to 30 November 2018.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resource consent applications received from 3 to 9 November 2018

185

b

Resource consent applications received from 10 to 16 November 2018

187

c

Resource consent applications received from 19 to 25 November 2018

189

d

Resource consent applications received from 26 to 30 November 2018

191

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 

    

    



[1] Local Government New Zealand and Department of Conservation (n.d), Reserves Act Guide, retrieved from https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/about-doc/role/legislation/reserves-act-guide.pdf

[2] Local Government New Zealand and Department of Conservation (n.d), Reserves Act Guide, retrieved from https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/about-doc/role/legislation/reserves-act-guide.pdf