I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 13 December 2018

6.00pm

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Office
39 Glenmall Place
Glen Eden

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Greg Presland

 

Deputy Chairperson

Saffron Toms

 

Members

Sandra Coney, QSO

 

 

Neil Henderson

 

 

Steve Tollestrup

 

 

Ken Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Brenda  Railey

Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

 

7 December 2018

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21 820 781

Email: brenda.railey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: Anti-social behaviour at Atkinson Park                                       5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Waitākere Ward Councillor Update                                                                             7

12        Waitākere Ranges Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019                                     9

13        Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara                                                                         63

14        Reloctable pump track for Waitākere Ranges Local Board                                   85

15        Approval of Kauri Dieback Management Actions in Local Parks in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Area                                                                                                         99

16        Approval of coastal and marine environment projects as part of the 2018/2019 Waitākere Ranges local environment work programme                                                         171

17        Auckland Transport Update – December 2018                                                      197

18        Proposed Regional Public Transport Plan                                                             215

19        Waitākere Ranges Local Board Open Space Network Plan                                 235

20        Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation                                                                  239

21        Waitākere Ranges Local Board 2017-2020 Progress Report                               247

22        Board Member report - Steve Tollestrup                                                                271

23        Confirmation of Workshop Records                                                                       277  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               287

C1       Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua – Tranche 1: Plan Changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) and Auckland Council District Plan - Hauraki Gulf Islands Section 2018                                                                                         287  

 


1          Welcome

            Chairperson Greg Presland will open the meeting and welcome those present.

 

2          Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

Members were reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

            Specifically members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

The following are declared interests of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

Board Member

Organisation/Position

Sandra Coney

-   Waitemata District Health Board – Elected Member

-   Women’s Health Action Trust – Patron

-   New Zealand Society of Genealogists – Member

-   New Zealand Military Defence Society – Member

-   Cartwright Collective – Member

-   Titirangi RSA – Member

-   Portage Trust – Member

-   West Auckland Trust Services - Director

Neil Henderson

-   Portage Trust – Elected Member

-   West Auckland Trust Services (WATS) Board – Trustee/ Director

-   Kaipatiki Project - employee

Greg Presland

-   Lopdell House Development Trust – Trustee

-   Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust – Trustee

-   Combined Youth Services Trust – Trustee

-   Glen Eden Bid – Member

-   Titirangi Ratepayers and Residents Association - Member

-   Waitakere Ranges Protection Society - Member

-   Titirangi RSA - Member

-   Maungakiekie Golf Club - Member

Steve Tollestrup

-   Waitakere Licensing Trust – Elected Member

-   Waitakere Task force on Family Violence – Appointee

-   Piha RSA - Member

Saffron Toms

Nil

Member appointments

Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council:

Board

Organisation/Position

Sandra Coney

-   Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

Neil Henderson

-   Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

-   Rural Advisory Panel - Member

Steve Tollestrup

-   Glen Eden Business Improvement District - Member

-   Aircraft Noise Consultative Committee Group - Member

-   Local Government New Zealand Zone One Committee - Member

Greg Presland

-   Glen Eden Business Improvement District (alternate)

Saffron Toms

-   Ark in the Park

-   Manukau Harbour Forum - Chair

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 22 November 2018, including the confidential section, as a true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Anti-social behaviour at Atkinson Park

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Chris Joel regarding his concerns around anti-social behavior at Atkinson Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The presentation will cover problems that are occurring at Atkinson Park (specifically at the beach area) which include, late night noise, late night drinking, anti-social behavior, fires and car tipping .

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on anti-social behavior at Atkinson Park and thank Chris Joel for his attendance

 

 

9          Public Forum

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Waitākere Ward Councillor Update

 

File No.: CP2018/20815

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the Waitākere Ward Councillors to verbally update the Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      thank Waitākere Ward Councillors Linda Cooper and Penny Hulse for their update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Waitākere Ranges Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019

 

File No.: CP2018/23644

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Waitākere Ranges Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Waitākere Ranges Local Board Quick Response, Round Two 2018/2019 (refer to Attachment B).

3.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board adopted the Waitākere Ranges Local Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 26 April 2018 (refer to Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $75,000.00 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $43,705.00 has been allocated in one local grant round and one quick response round. This leaves a total of $31,295.00 to be allocated for 2018/2019.

5.       Fourteen applications were received for Waitākere Ranges Local Board Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019, requesting a total of $17,472.00.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board

a)      fund, part fund or decline applications received for Waitākere Ranges Local Board Quick Response Grants, Round Two 2018/2019.

Table One: Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round Two 2018/2019

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1919-201

Pasifika Migrant Services Trust

Funding towards three sessions on nutrition and six sessions on sports and physical activities.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-202

Waitakere Japanese Supplementary School (WJSS)

Towards costs for the WJSS after-school Programme Term Two, 2019

$500.00

Eligible

QR1919-203

Daphne Latzelsberger

Funding towards producing and delivering candles to the Grief Centre and Waitakere Hospital, including the cost of a candle making workshop for the local community.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1919-209

Piha Surf Life Saving Club Incorporated

Towards rescue tubes for the Junior Surf Programme.

$1,360.00

Eligible

QR1919-210

Empowerment Trust

Funding requested towards the facilitation and delivery costs of Kidpower for the young childrens programme, resource kits and Kidpower Confident Kids programme to two primary schools in the Waitakere area.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-211

VisionWest Community Trust

Towards traditional Christmas trimmings and treats to add to the hampers being distributed by VisionWest in the local board area.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-213

Te Roopu Manutaki Trust

Towards accommodation and catering for Te Matatini National Kapahaka Competition.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-215

Euphoria Entertainment Incorporated

Towards venue hire for the Youth Festival at the Waitakere Playhouse Theatre.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1919-216

Glen Eden Baptist Church

Towards the Water Weekend 2019 camp.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-217

Tuilaepa Youth Mentoring Trust Board

Towards the “Polyjam Summer Basketball Classic” event on 1 December 2019.

$1,000.00

Ineligible

QR1919-219

Titirangi Community House Incorporated Society

Towards replacement card tables for the community house

$700.00

Eligible

QR1919-220

Oratia Folk Museum Incorporated

Towards a corrugated iron water tank for the museum.

$1,412.00

Eligible

QR1919-221

Woodlands Park School

Towards the one year hireage of two 240 litre commercial compost bins.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-222

Kaurilands Kindergarten Incorporated

Towards 100 chairs for general use and two childrens car seats.

$1,500.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

$17,472.00

 

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

 

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme (see Attachment A).

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board will operate three quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice11.         The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

12.     In Waitākere Ranges Quick Response Round Two, one application received is ineligible, as the event has already occured.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views
13.  Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Waitākere Ranges Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

14.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

15.     A summary of each application received through Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round Two is attached (see Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes. Four applicants in this round have indicated their project targets Maori or Maori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

17.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

18.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $75,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year.

19.     A total of $43,705.00 was allocated for one local grant round, one multi-board round and one quick response round. This leaves a total of $31,295.00 to be allocated for 2018/2019.

20.     In Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round Two 2018/2019, fourteen applications were received, requesting a total of $17,472.00

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

21.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

22.     Following the Waitākere Ranges Local Board allocating funding for round one quick response, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Grants Programme 2018/2019

13

b

Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round Two 2018/2019 grant applications

17

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Robert Walsh - Community Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

Marion Davies - Grant Operations Manager

Shane King - Head of Operations Support

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


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13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara

 

File No.: CP2018/20804

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To gain approval of the name Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara and adoption of the outcomes plan for the reserve land located at 4-10 Sunnyvale Rd, Massey.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In 2015 land was acquired by Auckland Council in Sunnyvale Rd, Massey. After consultation with iwi, local residents, the Luckens family who gifted the land, and the Waitākere Ranges Local Board (local board) the name Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara has been agreed.

3.       To inform future development of this reserve the local board requested that an outcomes plan be produced. This plan has now been consulted on and finalised and requires formal adoption. (Attachment A).

4.       One of the recommendations of the outcomes plan is to renew and open up tracks. These tracks require realignment due to their encroachment onto private property. Additional realignment and an upgrade of surfacing in some areas may be required as a result of the presence of kauri.

5.       Discussions with the local board and mana whenua have supported the outcomes and further discussion will be undertaken once preliminary design and costings for the track work are finalised.

6.       During consultation dissatisfaction was conveyed by neighbours and the Luckens family at the establishment of native trees in a memorial glade in the reserve. It is requested that the local board support the relocation of these native plantings and the glade be restored. This suggestion is included in the outcomes plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve the name Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara for the reserve land located at 4-10 Sunnyvale Rd, Massey

b)      adopt the Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara Outcomes Plan

c)      request staff investigate retention and restoration of the memorial grove in Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara as an open grass area with daffodils for passive recreation as outlined in the outcomes plan

d)      request staff proceed with preliminary design of track renewal as outlined in the plan and report back to the board with costings and funding options

e)      request staff organise testing of kauri in Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara for the presence of kauri dieback disease.

Horopaki / Context

7.       In 2015, 35.5 hectares of land located at 4-10 Sunnyvale Road, Massey was acquired by Auckland Council. The vast majority of the land was gifted by the Luckens family as a nature reserve in perpetuity.

8.       The family requested the land be named Concordia Nature Reserve and that it be used primarily as an area of passive recreation for the people of Auckland as a place for peace, tranquillity and nature.

9.       The name Concordia commemorates the Concord of Peace reached at the end of World War 1, which was a key reason for the family originally acquiring the land in order to establish such a community space. The founding families third child, born at the end of the war, was named Audrey Concordia Luckens.

10.     The name Te Wāhi Mahara was suggested by Te Kawerau a Maki as a dual name in addition to Concordia Reserve. It means the place of remembrance, recollection and thought. This is reflective of the purpose the Luckens family had in creating the reserve and its inclusion is supported by them.

11.     The park is predominantly bush clad with a small stream and 3 wetlands. It was well maintained by the family, planted with natives and provides a lovely respite from the city and a peaceful bush walk.

12.     The family matriarch Lucy Luckens died in a horse riding accident here in 1933 and a memorial grove was established and planted with daffodils in her honour. This grove has since been planted with native trees as part of the resource consent requirements for subdivision of the land. However, the family and neighbours request that the trees be removed and relocated and the glade be maintained with daffodils in her memory.

13.     The reserve is currently inaccessible by the public due to the location of the tracks and maintenance is difficult for the same reason.

14.     In 2017 the Waitakere Ranges Local Board provided funding for an ecological assessment, and traffic assessment, to inform an outcomes plan that would guide development of the reserve. These specialist reports were completed and an outcomes plan was finalised in early 2018.

15.     Consultation on both the outcomes plan and the proposed name of the reserve was undertaken with the local community and iwi. Consultation included presentation and a small display at a public meeting in Swanson. A public meeting held with neighbours, local residents and Luckens family members in November 2017 along with emailing directly any affected stakeholders. A consultation summary is included as Attachment B.

16.     Suggestions arising from this consultation have where practicable have been actioned and incorporated into the outcomes plan where appropriate.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

17.     Feedback on the outcomes plan and proposed name have been positive and supportive.

18.     No objections or alternative suggestions for naming have been received.

19.     The outcomes plan provides future direction and guidance for development of the reserve which is supported by both mana whenua and residents.

20.     Kauri are located within this reserve and whilst the outcomes plan provides an overview it does not consider this in detail. Future concept development and detailed design should be undertaken that allow for the protection of kauri located here.

21.     Significant development is occurring within close proximity of this site with a large special housing area being developed in the Redhills area only 3km from the reserve. There is opportunity here to provide valuable recreational opportunities within a short distance of these developments. 

22.     It is recommended that the outcomes plan be adopted to ensure that any future development undertaken is in line with agreed outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

23.     The outcomes plan and name were workshopped with the local board in November 2017 where the board indicated support for both the plan and the name to be finalised.

24.     An additional workshop was held on 15th November 2018 to discuss the impacts of finding a large number of kauri in the reserve. The local board advised they would like the kauri tested for dieback and that future development of the tracks would be discussed once the results of the testing and available budgets were finalised.

25.     The implementation of recommendations outlined in the outcomes plan needs to be carefully considered in line with this new information but should proceed as outlined in the plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

26.     Both Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngāti Whātua were contacted early in the process of developing the outcomes plan and involved in discussions to finalise a name.

27.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei deferred to Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara replied they were happy with the Concordia name.

28.     Te Kawerau a Maki provided input into the plan including support for a passive recreational space with informal tracks and minimal infrastructure.

29.     The memorial glade restoration was discussed with Te Kawerau a Maki at a hui on 23rd March 2018 where they indicated support for its restoration. This support is subject to any natives in the glade being transplanted or replaced elsewhere in the reserve and adequate weed control being undertaken to ensure the area is maintained free of weeds.

30.     Further discussions have been held with Te Kawerau a Maki since the discovery of a larger than expected number of kauri. They advised they continue to support the outcomes plan but any track development should be undertaken in accordance with kauri dieback protocols and any paths opened should be to a standard that would protect kauri. Further discussion is required once standards are confirmed.

31.     Te Kawerau a Maki provided the name Te Wāhi Mahara to be used as a dual name in association with the name of Concordia Reserve. Te Kawerau a Maki have confirmed they support the name Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

32.     Adoption of the outcomes plan does not have any direct financial implications but in order to complete the outcomes within it, funding will be required.

33.     Currently $10,000 is available from the renewals budget to undertake detailed design to renew the paths and this will be planned in accordance with the outcomes plan guidelines.

34.     A physical works budget of $65,000 is available from renewals in 2019/20. This is not expected to cover any upgrades to the tracks and additional budget will be required to bring the tracks up to kauri dieback protection standards.

35.     Additional funding has not been confirmed but could be considered from the kauri dieback targeted rate, development contributions funding or local board discretionary funding. Options for funding will be worked through once detailed design is complete and costs are finalised.

36.     Funding will also be required to implement recommendations such as signage, on street parking and restoration of the memorial glade and open spaces. No funding is currently allocated to this work. Options include development contributions and local board discretionary funding.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

37.     There is a risk that no additional funding is allocated and no works are completed to deliver on the outcomes agreed in the plan.

38.     Testing of kauri may indicate that they are disease free and the local board may decide to leave the reserve closed to the public to protect kauri.

39.     If either of the above occur the outcomes plan can remain in place for future guidance when funding becomes available.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

40.     Community Facilities will provide costings on track renewal.

41.     A workshop is planned for early in 2019 where the local board will be able to prioritise Concordia Reserve alongside the other local parks with kauri for funding consideration from targeted rates.

42.     If the decision is made to renew and open tracks the local board will also need to consider providing funding to develop detailed design and costings for parking areas and signage. The project may be eligible for development contributions funding. Local board discretionary funding may also need to be considered.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara Outcomes Plan

67

b

Consultation Summary

83

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Dawn  Bardsley - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


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Concordia reserve                                 Te wāhi Mahara

 

CONSULTATION SUMMARY ON NAME AND OUTCOMES PLAN 2017/2018

1.   Email contacts

Te Kawerau a Maki

Ngāti Whātua

Luckens family

Residents and neighbours

Art Ants

2.   Meetings

 

25th May site meeting with Regional Parks and Te Kawerau a Maki

28th September Local Board workshop

25th October display at Swanson Design Guidelines launch – feedback forms provided

22nd November public meeting with 14 residents and neighbours and representatives of the Luckens family

3.   Feedback summary

·      Rubbish dumping in park and adjacent areas is of concern

·      Security of adjacent private property if park opened up

·      Parking concerns in regard to safety of the roads, visibility and vehicle accidents

·      Pedestrian accessibility and safety on roads

·      Tracks that currently cross private property boundaries

·      Dangerous trees along boundaries

·      Concern about plants establishing in daffodil glades

·      Would like kiwi hatchery established on site with predator fencing

·      Glades are good places for art/art classes

·      Interpretive signage and relocation of plaque is required

·      Kauri dieback and myrtle rust

·      Everyone is supportive of name Concordia Reserve Te Wāhi Mahara and would like the name finalised ASAP

4.   Actions taken

·      Traffic report completed identifying areas of potential parking and fed into outcomes plan

·      Ecological assessment completed and fed into outcomes plan

·      Feedback into Greenways Plan in regard to pedestrian access and safety

·      Information passed on to CF about dangerous trees

·      Glades identified as open grass areas in outcomes plan

·      Survey completed ascertaining correct boundaries and identifying where tracks cross private property

·      Signage and relocation of plaque included in outcomes plan


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Reloctable pump track for Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

File No.: CP2018/20705

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the purchase of a modular relocatable pump track and installing it in the two recommended parks: Sunvue Park, Glen Eden and Les Waygood Park, Piha.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board have expressed an interest in acquiring a relocatable pump track to test community needs in Piha and Glen Eden.

3.       The Parkitect relocatable pump track is a fibreglass modular track that is used by bikers, skaters and scooters. It is considered a cost-effective solution to provide immediate recreational value as well as test participation and site location to inform any decisions on more permanent infrastructure.

4.       The Parkitect relocatable pump track has performed well both in New Zealand and overseas. It has an expected life of 10 years and can be used at multiple locations over that time, providing benefit to a number of communities including but not limited to Glen Eden and Piha.

5.       The modular pump track is considered to provide the best return on investment because it provides for the widest range of riding modes and skill levels, a low risk of design flaws and the ability to install it at alternative locations to service more than one community.

6.       Various locations within Piha and Glen Eden along with two track designs were considered.  The speed ring configuration is preferred as it fits within the constraints of both the Les Waygood and Sunvue sites.

7.       The only site in Piha where the track can be accommodated that is not subject to flooding is the Les Waygood site. Sunvue Reserve has a pre-existing concrete pad so can be easily installed with no site works or remediation required.

8.       It is recommended that the relocatable pump track, speed ring configuration, be purchased and installed initially at Sunvue Reserve while consent is obtained for installation at Les Waygood Park, Piha.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve the purchase of a relocatable modular pump track for use in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area

b)      allocate $85,000 LDI capex for purchase, resource consent and installation of a relocatable modular pump track

c)      allocate $3,500 LDI opex for relocation and set up costs at Les Waygood Park, Piha

d)      approve the first installation of the pump track at Sunvue Reserve, Glen Eden and the second installation at Les Waygood Park, Piha

e)      delegate authority for finalising time periods and future relocation of the pump track to the Chairperson G Presland in liaison with staff.

 

Horopaki / Context

9.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has been approached by several community groups and organisations requesting installation of skate parks and/or pump tracks in Piha and Glen Eden to cater for youth in their respective areas.

10.     Council staff were requested to investigate the potential of a relocatable pump track as opposed to alternative permanent recreational structures in order to test community needs and provide information on usage at various locations.

11.     A strategic assessment was completed that considered these requests and was discussed with the local board at a workshop on 20th September. The strategic assessment concluded that this project is worthy of development and the initiate phase should be started. Funding is now required to enable this to proceed.

12.     As community demand centred around Glen Eden and Piha various sites were identified within these areas. It was considered at the September workshop that the best first trial sites would be Sunvue Reserve, Glen Eden and Les Waygood Park, Piha. Both these sites have flat areas that can accommodate a pump track and are easily accessible to their communities.

13.     The ‘speed ring’ track configuration is considered most suitable because it fits into the two recommended sites. See aerial layouts provided in Attachment A. The specifications of the ‘speed ring’ pump track are provided in Attachment B.

14.     The Parkitect modular pump track system requires a stable flat platform. It can be installed directly onto existing sealed or grass areas. Installation on flat grass areas for less than four weeks requires little or no site works. No site works are required for installation on existing flat concrete or asphalt surfaces that have no surface ponding.

15.     It is likely that in most parks the track will be installed onto a grass area for longer than four weeks. In this case plastic tiles placed underneath the track is the best solution for providing a stable and reasonably dry surface. Should the track be expected to remain in place for extended periods (eg: 12-18 months or more) it is recommended that either a concrete/gravel pad or artificial grass is used.

Consultation and feedback

16.     A modular pump track in a speed ring configuration has been installed in Burwood in Christchurch in an effort to revitalise an area in the red zone and provide activities for youth. See photo in Attachment B. Feedback was sought from Life in Vacant Spaces who part funded the installation in liaison with Christchurch City Council. It was advised that they have been overwhelmed with the popularity of the track.

17.     The Glen Eden Community House at Prospect Park, Community Waitākere, Sport Waitākere, Cycle West and the Auckland Transport Walking and Cycling Coordinator were contacted for feedback on possible temporary installation of a modular pump track in a speed ring configuration in Sunvue Reserve. Feedback was supportive and positive. A consultation summary is included as Attachment C.

18.     Water and Wheels (Piha) and the Piha Kids Charitable Trust were contacted about the possible temporary installation of a modular pump track (‘speed ring’ configuration) at Les Waygood Park. Feedback was primarily positive although questions were raised about the installation of a pump track over a half-pipe. This feedback has been considered below.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Skateboard halfpipe vs pump track

19.     In Piha the initial requests were for a skate park and a pump track with a half pipe being a cost-effective interim solution. The Glen Eden Residents and Ratepayers Association requested a mountain bike or BMX pump or jump track. Both communities express a desire to provide for needs of teenagers.

20.     A pump track is a continuous loop of berms (banked corners) and rollers (humps) which users ride not by pedaling, but by “pumping”, pushing their weight through the wheels.

21.     A well-designed pump track provides excellent community infrastructure facilitating fun physical activity for all ages and riding modes including scooters, skateboards and bikes.

22.     A skateboard half-pipe is a ‘U” shaped track, with two concave ramps facing each other across a flat middle section. Users ride the halfpipe by dropping in from the top of a ramp.

23.     A well-designed skateboard halfpipe provides excellent community infrastructure facilitating fun physical activity for users with the appropriate skill level.

24.     The difficultly level of a halfpipe is affected mainly by the vertical height of the ramps. A high steep halfpipe is too difficult for inexperienced riders; a low shallow halfpipe does not provide challenge to experienced riders.

25.     A skateboard halfpipe can be used by different riding modes including scooters and BMX bikes. However, the skill level required to ride a halfpipe on a BMX bike can be higher, which reduces the range of potential users.

26.     The cost for installation of a permanent half pipe 1.8m in height is expected to be similar to a relocatable pump track. The half pipe however is unable to be relocated as it is a permanent structure.

27.     In comparison to a skateboard halfpipe, a pump track is accessible to a wider range of riding modes and abilities. A pump track provides greater variation in challenge as learners can ride slowly whilst more experienced riders can obtain higher speeds and undertake small jumps on the track. This characteristic applies across all riding modes.

28.     There is some debate particularly amongst the Piha community as to the preferred location of a pump track/skate facility. Use of a relocatable track will allow a site to be trialled with usage and feedback monitored for future consideration.

Permanent vs temporary installation

29.     Piha and Glen Eden are over 20km apart. Provision of new permanent infrastructure in one community will not meet the needs of the other. However, a relocatable pump track enables the local board to service both communities in the short term. 

30.     Risks associated with permanent infrastructure include poor location and/or poor design resulting in low return on investment.

31.     The benefits of a modular relocatable pump track include the ability to trial different locations assessing usage, popularity and impacts to inform decision-making on future investment in permanent infrastructure. The relocatable track can also be moved to respond to high demand, or to activate parks and public spaces as required.

32.     The Parkitect modular pump track system has a very low risk for design error, which means that the Board can be confident in the accessibility and ride quality in any location or track configuration.

33.     The modular design of the relocatable track means that sections may be added to increase the length or configuration of the track to meet demand, or as funding allows.

34.     If the modular pump track is no longer required, it can be sold.

35.     The purchase and use of a relocatable track is supported so initial impacts of development are reduced, data on usage can be obtained and planning for long term solutions to meet community needs can be undertaken.

36.     Alternative future locations may also be considered such as Waitākere, Oratia, Huia and Te Henga.

Strategic Alignment

37.     Installation of the pump track at Sunvue Park and Les Waygood Park aligns with the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan participation priorities: More Aucklanders living physically active lives through participation in informal physical activity, recreation and sport; 8.1 Affordable and accessible options; 8.2 Children and young people being more active; 8.3 Promoting healthy and active lifestyles.

38.     Installation of the pump track at both parks contributes towards Local Board Outcome 3: Local communities feel good about where they live, by providing an activity for youth in these areas.

39.     The pump track installation also supports the key initiative in the Local Board Plan to deliver parks activation projects which bring the community into our parks and open spaces.

40.     The Piha Reserves Management Plan 1999 identifies Les Waygood Reserve as the main visitor access at North Piha and the focus for visitor activities in the northern area. It does recommend the carpark be extended to incorporate an additional 35 overflow carpark spaces on the grass area the toilet now occupies and where the relocatable pump track is proposed. A picnic area between the carpark and camp ground is also outlined in the plan. Given the temporary nature of the pump track it will not affect any future plans for the site nor contravene any of the outcomes proposed in the management plan.

41.     Les Waygood Park falls under Waitākere Ranges Heritage Act 2008. The installation of a pump track here does not create adverse effects on the environment or heritage features and recognises and provides for the community living in the area to enhance their social well-being.

42.     Sunvue Reserve does not have a management plan and is not part of the heritage area.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

43.     A workshop was held with the local board on 20th September to discuss options. Various designs and locations were discussed at this workshop.

44.     The speed ring configuration was supported due to the ease of it fitting in both Glen Eden and Piha community spaces without requiring additional site works.

45.     A second workshop was held with the local board on 15th November to confirm costs and zoning impacts. The local board advised they were comfortable with the costs outlined and would like the relocatable pump presented for funding consideration as soon as possible. They would like the pump track installed before the end of summer.

46.     The area around Sunvue Reserve is a low socio-economic area. Interest has been received from a local organisation who are wanting to discuss activation of parks in this area and potentially supplying free bikes to the local community that could be used on the pump track. This provides a great opportunity for some of the financially challenged families in the area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

47.     Installation of the pump track at Sunvue Park was discussed at a hui with Te Kawerau a Maki in November 2018. They raised no objections to the installation at this site.

48.     Initial discussions have taken place with Te Kawerau a Maki on the location of a skate-park/pump-track at the Les Waygood Park site. Te Kawerau a Maki indicated support in principle to this proposal subject to approval of final installation details.

49.     Ngāti Whātua have not been contacted with regard to development of the Les Waygood site.

50.     Further mana whenua engagement is required as part of any detailed design and resource consent processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

51.     The purchase, installation and relocation of the pump track will require allocations of $85,000 LDI capex and $3500 LDI opex. Costs for purchase, installation and relocation are outlined in Attachment D.

52.     It is possible there may be a small amount of loose litter generated by the extra activity relating to the use of a pump track but this will be collected as part of the normal scheduled maintenance run.

53.     Operational expenditure (LDI opex) will be required to relocate the track with final costs dependent on distance, installation surface and proposed time in situ.

54.     As the majority of installation sites will likely be grass a range of grass site preparation solutions were considered. The recommended option is grass tiles under the track circuit with the central area inside the track open and still requiring mowing. The tiles can be moved with the track to be reused at other sites. Along with having the lowest upfront cost, reusing the tiles dramatically reduces relocation costs. Cost comparisons are set out in Attachment D.

55.     All costs need to be met from local board discretionary funding. This includes ongoing operational costs involved in relocating the track over the next 10 years.

56.     All Parkitect pump tracks have a two-year warranty but the expected life of the unit is ten years. The supplier advises that no ongoing maintenance is required.

57.     Grafitti Guard have inspected the units and advise that graffiti is unlikely to adhere to the fibreglass surface and should be able to be easily wiped off should it occur.

58.     Graffiti has not been an issue at other tracks. The pump track owned by Panuku and located at Henderson for several months was not tagged at any time.

59.     In the unlikely event that a track is vandalised and damaged each separate module is able to be replaced individually. Delivery from Europe will take up to 3 months. In the interim it may be possible, if required, to change the layout of the track to accommodate damaged modules.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

60.     The track will be a temporary installation and there is a risk that the community will be unhappy upon the removal of it. This will be managed by a process of robust and comprehensive information prior to the track being installed and on-site signage ensuring that communities are aware of the time periods involved for the track.

61.     Les Waygood is in the coastal management area and is an open space: conservation zone. The installation of a pump track here is a non-complying activity and resource consent is required. It is considered unlikely that resource consent would be declined at the Les Waygood site and costs have been included for obtaining this consent.

62.     An existing desire line leads from the adjacent campground at Les Waygood Park to the area where the pump track would be located. It is expected that adequate room will be available around the side of the pump track to allow people from the campground to continue to short cut through to the surf club.

63.     No community consultation has been undertaken with local residents and neighbours, only with key community groups. It is possible that residents, particularly immediate neighbours, may not support the installation of a pump track. It is recommended that a community engagement process occur prior to the installation of the pump track at any reserve. Immediate neighbours should be contacted directly, key stakeholder groups emailed, and temporary signage installed onsite. Given the temporary nature of the track, should problems occur with the location it can easily be removed and relocated.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

64.     If the local board wish to acquire a track for this summer Council procurement processes need to start immediately. Community Facilities are aware of the proposal and will action any resolution as soon as practicable.

65.     If purchase can be confirmed prior to Christmas it is likely the pump track may be able to be installed late February or early March. All efforts will be made to shorten this time frame if possible.

66.     Engagement with local communities and neighbours needs to be undertaken to ascertain any community concerns that need to be addressed, and temporary signage should be installed in the park prior to installation.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aerial pump track layouts for Les Waygood and Sunvue Parks

91

b

Speed Ring track specifications

93

c

Modular pump track consultation summary

95

d

Cost estimate for modular pump track - speed ring

97

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Nick Harris - Sport & Recreation Team Lead

Dawn  Bardsley - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

CONSULTATION SUMMARY NOVEMBER 2018

RELOCATABLE PUMP TRACK

Piha

Piha Water and Wheels Charitable Trust

Water and wheels support the installation of a relocatable pump track at Les Waygood Park for a period of time however would prefer the installation of a permanent plywood half pipe, as they feel it would provide better value for the community in the short to medium term. They recommend further discussions between the stakeholders.

Piha Kids Charitable Trust

PKCT and WW met last week and the comms was they are all keen on the idea and can we get it going ASAP. They do want consideration for the older kids like a half pipe but as said let’s just get something in.

The idea of the modular track is simply to get something in place as a temporary measure for the community as we are getting a lot of feedback that they are keen to see something happening, test it out whilst some of these longer term options are being considered and worked on with the community. We feel this would be a positive step.

Glen Eden

Sport Waitakere

This would be a great addition to the community in Glen Eden and of greater benefit to the local young residents in the area surrounding Sunvue Park.

Walking and Cycling Coordinator for Auckland Transport

I think they are a great asset to a community and in particular seem to encourage a hard to reach age group to get active (10-18).

Community Waitakere and Community House

Have indicated they support a pump track in the zodiac area

This would be a great addition for the Glen Eden area and I can see the local young residents utilising this especially at Sunvue Park. This is a good opportunity to trial this type of activity for the area, which will allow us to gauge if a permanent track would be utilised or welcomed.

Cycle West

Think is it a great asset and works well in Christchurch especially for scooters and skateboards. Brighter Rainbows/Bike Works are interested in starting up bike programme in Glen Eden and are interested to meet and discuss how they could work in with the installation of a modular pump track in Glen Eden. Would like something in Te Atatu also.


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Approval of Kauri Dieback Management Actions in Local Parks in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Area

 

File No.: CP2018/23839

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse actions to prevent kauri dieback spread and protect healthy Kauri in local parks and reserves within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report presents the preliminary results of the parks and track prioritisation that was undertaken by council subject matter experts, as part of the regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme. This will be updated once the current survey work is completed.

3.       There are approximately 200 local parks throughout the Auckland region that contain kauri. Funding has been identified within the plant pathogen workstream of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate to support Kauri Dieback management. This funding will allow for upgrades of tracks and closures of parks with high value kauri across the local parks and reserves network. However, the funding available from the Natural Environment Targeted Rate will not be able to provide for the protection of all kauri in the region and a risk-based prioritisation approach has been applied.

4.       To manage investment across the region, local parks were analysed in terms of kauri ecosystem value, recreational value and kauri health status, noting that the primary objective of the regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme is the protection of healthy kauri.

5.       In the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area there are 55 local parks that contain kauri or kauri ecosystems. All 55 parks have been assessed for recreational value and allocated to one of four categories for management.

6.       The following table provides a summary of the findings:

Category

A

B

C

D

Definition

High to medium kauri ecosystem value and high to medium recreational value

High to medium kauri ecosystem value and low recreational value. 

Low kauri ecosystem value and high recreational value. 

Low kauri ecosystem value and low recreational value.

Number of parks

13

17

3

21

Proposed action

Upgrade selected tracks Temporarily close tracks/parks   until works have been completed.

Close tracks (or parks) indefinitely

Install hygiene station(s) at strategic locations

None

7.       13 local parks are currently classified as Category A under the prioritisation categories for the region-wide kauri dieback parks mitigation programme.  As above this means that these parks contain a high value kauri ecosystem, have high recreational values and require investment to bring them to kauri safe standard or to protect them from either infection or spread.

8.       At this stage, recommendations for these 13 parks are high-level only, focusing on potential asset solutions (track upgrades, re-alignment or re-routing of tracks, other works such as installation of boardwalks, and installation of hygiene stations) and non-asset solutions (closure of tracks or – in some cases - parks). Detailed investigations by a team of asset management experts and biosecurity staff are required to determine the exact nature of the works required, costs and achievable timelines. These investigations are under way and are expected to be finalised in early 2019.

9.       The recommended actions for the 13 Category A parks that will specifically reduce risk of kauri dieback spread will be funded from the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budget. Future work and recommendations, to be informed by asset management investigations, will be prepared for formal consideration by the Waitākere Ranges Local Board in early 2019. 

10.     This report seeks endorsement from the local board in regard of the recommended actions for the Category A parks within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area ahead of more detailed investigations and feasibility studies.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)    note the regional Kauri Dieback parks mitigation programme and approach for assessing and recommending actions for kauri dieback management in local parks, and the specific assessment for local parks within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.  

b)    endorse the following recommended actions to mitigate kauri dieback disease in local parks and reserves defined as Category A in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area, subject to further asset management and technical analysis:

i)     Concordia Reserve: Continue closure until tracks are of a kauri-safe standard[1].

ii)     Swanson Scenic Reserve: Indefinite closure of bush areas to protect healthy kauri, with the grass frontage area to remain open to the public.

iii)    Henderson Valley Scenic Reserve: Upgrade existing track where needed to kauri-safe standard to prevent possibly infected kauri in the park becoming a source of infection, and erect signage to avoid use of informal track through western part. 

iv)   Seibel Scenic Reserve: Upgrade track where needed to protect healthy kauri.

v)    Bill Haresnape Walk: Upgrade track to kauri-safe standard to prevent infected kauri in the park becoming a source of infection.

vi)   Mahoe Walk: Upgrade track to kauri-safe standard to prevent infected kauri in the park becoming a source of infection.

vii)   Tinopai Reserve: Upgrade track to kauri-safe standard.

viii)  Opou Reserve: Upgrade track to kauri-safe standard to prevent infected kauri in the park becoming a source of infection and retain access to viewing platform.

ix)   Paturoa Way: Upgrade track to kauri-safe standard to prevent infected kauri in the park becoming a source of infection.

x)    Rahui Kahika Reserve: Upgrade track to kauri-safe standard to prevent infected kauri in the park becoming a source of infection and maintain existing connections, combined with the indefinite closure of other tracks.

xi)   Titirangi War Memorial: Upgrade the main track to kauri-safe standard to prevent infected kauri in the park becoming a source of infection, combined with methods to deter use of informal desire lines.

xii)   Okewa Reserve: Maintain hygiene station and install signage.

xiii)  Glen Eden Picnic ground: Installation of signage, hygiene stations and other measures to protect kauri as required.

c)    note that these actions will be refined through the development of a detailed work programme which will brought back to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board for formal approval in early 2019.

Horopaki / Context

11.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has a strong interest in the management of kauri dieback. The importance of kauri is articulated in the board’s local board plan outcome ‘our unique natural habitats are protected and enhanced’. One of the local board’s key initiatives in its local board plan is to fund kauri dieback awareness-raising.

12.     In April 2018 the Environment and Community Committee resolved, among other kauri protection measures, to close the forested areas of the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park. The Waitākere Ranges Local Board provided strong advocacy and input for this closure and have requested options for kauri protection in local parks and reserves within its board area to be prepared.

13.     Local board advocacy and requests for staff advice and support for managing kauri dieback have been ongoing. Specifically, on 6 December 2017, Member Sandra Coney requested that staff provide information on the following:

       which local parks contain kauri

       what signage and hygiene measures are in place at those parks

       whether any surveys or tests have been carried out in those parks to ascertain whether any trees are infected

       recommendations as to whether any tracks/parks should be closed.

14.     At the 14 December 2017 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting, the local board requested that staff report back on these queries with urgency (resolution WTK/2017/185).

15.     On 22 December 2017 a memo was sent to the Local Board providing information on the above questions and further work instigated to provide comprehensive information on the presence of kauri dieback in local parks (Attachment A).

16.     Over the last year, alongside the closure of the regional park, a kauri park assessment process has been developed and recreational assessments have been completed. Ground truthing of local parks within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area and testing for dieback disease is currently under way and the results of this work will be available in the first half of 2019.

17.     To reduce the spread of kauri dieback, council’s main objective is to protect healthy kauri using a precautionary approach. To ensure that the Natural Environment Targeted Rate funding is allocated in line with this management approach to managing risk, council established a regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme in July 2018.

18.     This programme provides funding over and above any renewals funding provided for within local board budgets. Additional Natural Environment Targeted Rate funding will be considered in conjunction with other funding available (such as investment in renewals) and be focused on those tracks or sections of tracks where kauri are located within 30 metres of the track and that have been identified as high priority (Category A) in accordance with the process set out below.

19.     The programme commenced in July 2018 and is summarised in the diagram below (Figure 1).  Activities that have been completed are shown in green. The activities that are the focus of this report are shown in red.

 

 

Figure 1:          Overview of Regional Kauri Dieback Parks Mitigation Programme

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

20.     There are 55 local parks and reserves within the Waitākere Ranges local board area that contain kauri.

21.     The risk assessment for local parks in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area was completed in November 2018. Each park that contained kauri was assessed, and prioritised on the following basis:

·     The value of the kauri ecosystem being either high, medium or low.  Kauri ecosystem value was assigned by council ecologists based on the work undertaken by Singers et al (2017): Indigenous terrestrial and wetland ecosystems of Auckland.

·     The health status of the kauri – noted as infected, possibly infected or symptom free. This information was sourced from council’s active surveillance programme, which includes soil sampling. Health status is based on previous surveys completed in 2013. Soil samples have been collected to test that the health status conclusion is correct and these will be updated once the current sampling results are confirmed in 2019.

·     The recreational value of the park either high, medium or low. Staff analysed key recreational activities such as recreational trails, active transport, visitor destinations, volunteer activity and sports and recreation use. Reviews of reserve management plans (if applicable) and any other relevant strategic documents were undertaken. Mana whenua with interest in the parks and any other key stakeholders were also identified. For high and medium recreational value sites, key service outcomes were described, for example key connections, access to existing leased areas/ facilities and any future planned development.

22.     Each park was assigned to one of the following four categories, which are also shown in Figure 2:

·     Category A: High to medium kauri ecosystem value and high to medium recreational value. 

Selected tracks in these parks will be upgraded and/or provided with asset solution(s) that meet recreational outcomes and are considered to be kauri-safe. Where necessary, parks or tracks may be closed temporarily until works have been completed.

·     Category B: High to medium kauri ecosystem value and low recreational value.  Tracks (or parks) in this category are recommended for indefinite closure.

·     Category C: Low kauri ecosystem value and high recreational value.  The installation of hygiene station(s) at strategic locations is recommended for parks/tracks in this category. Some track upgrades may also be required.

·     Category D: Low kauri ecosystem value and low recreational value. No action is recommended for these locations.

Figure 2:          Prioritisation categories for regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme

 

23.     Attachment B to this report details the kauri health status and recommended actions for 34 of the parks that contain kauri within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. The remaining 21 parks were identified as having low recreational value and low ecological value, resulting in a category rating of D. These parks have not been included.

24.     In the context of the regional kauri dieback parks mitigation programme, kauri-safe means that a track has a dry, mud-free surface 100 metres before and after the location of kauri or kauri roots. This can be achieved in a variety of ways including boardwalks, box steps, applying geoweb soil confinement membranes and providing aggregate cover.

25.     Recommended mitigation measures also considered the following:

·     accessibility of kauri

·     track condition

·     commuter use of tracks

·     distance to infected areas

·     community concern

·     potential ease of implementing works

·     roadblocks and opportunities.

26.     Altogether, 55 local parks within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area that contain kauri were categorised as Category A, B, C or D, as per Attachment B to this report. 13 of these were identified as being Category A, and these will be further investigated early in 2019 to determine the most appropriate specific mitigation measures. These parks are:

·     Concordia Reserve (it is noted that this park is not currently open to the public)

·     Swanson Scenic Reserve

·     Henderson Valley Scenic reserve

·     Seibel Scenic reserve

·     Bill Haresnape Walk

·     Mahoe Walk

·     Opou Reserve

·     Paturoa Way

·     Tinopai Reserve

·     Rahui Kahika Reserve

·     Titirangi War Memorial

·     Okewa Reserve

·     Glen Eden Picnic Ground.

27.     The table in Attachment B provides an overview of the prioritised Waitākere Ranges local parks. The table notes the prioritisation category (A, B and C), and the recommended high-level mitigation measures. Category D parks (low kauri ecosystem value and low recreational value) are not shown.

28.     At this stage, recommendations are high-level only, focusing on asset solutions (which includes track upgrades, re-alignment or re-routing of tracks, the installation of boardwalks and/or hygiene stations) and non-asset solutions (closure of tracks or, in some cases parks).

29.     Detailed investigations by a team of asset management experts and biosecurity staff are required to determine the exact nature of the works required, costs and achievable timelines. These investigations are currently being scheduled and are expected to take place in early 2019.

30.     Local boards are responsible for decision making over local parks and reserves. The local board will receive a report on the findings of these investigations and recommendations for consideration and approval. This is expected to be within the first half of 2019. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

31.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has expressed strong support for managing the impact of kauri dieback on this taonga species.

32.     Under the allocation of decision-making allocation local boards have responsibility ‘for the use of and activities within local parks.’ As per the regionwide risk-based kauri dieback mitigation response programme process, staff have developed high-level options for local parks in the Waitākere Ranges area.

33.     The local board are asked to endorse this approach ahead of more detailed plans being developed for their formal approval in early 2019. Indefinite closure is recommended for most Category B parks, as in those that have high kauri ecosystem value and low recreational value. In most cases this is to prevent these parks becoming sources of infection. The tracks in these parks are generally unofficial and or unformed tracks.

34.     Closing parks and reserves or tracks will have an impact on the recreational activities and primarily local residents. These impacts have been, and will continue to be considered, and track upgrades or similar works in Category A parks are recommended to minimise these.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

35.     Kauri is a keystone species that supports a distinct New Zealand forest ecosystem, sustaining indigenous flora and fauna. Kauri is a taonga species and Auckland Council, in partnership with mana whenua, have a responsibility for the protection of the spiritual, economic and ecological values associated with this taonga and the ecosystems it supports.

36.     Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua kaitiaki kaimahi representatives have stressed the importance of the kauri species and a desire to work more closely with council and the Department of Conservation on this kaupapa. Staff will work with mana whenua on the regional approach to kauri dieback on a site by site basis.

37.     In December 2017, the challenge of managing the spread of kauri dieback in the Waitākere Ranges and the doubling of the disease spread over a five year period led mana whenua[2] Te Kawerau ā Maki to place a rāhui over the forested area of the Waitākere Ranges, including the regional park, local parks, Department of Conservation land, and private land covered by Te Waonui a Tiriwa (the Waitākere forest).

38.     This conservation measure was taken in response to the presence of kauri dieback, and the sacred obligation of kaitiakitanga, which is provided for under various pieces of legislation.

39.     When the Environment and Community Committee resolved a number of resolutions to protect kauri from kauri dieback including large scale closures in the Waitākere Ranges in April 2018 they directed staff to ‘work with Te Kawerau ā Maki and jointly agree any further potential openings in the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park.’

40.     Staff and Te Kawerau ā Maki have been working on this kaupapa in relation to the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park to give effect to these resolutions and support the principles of the rāhui.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

41.     The mitigation measures proposed in this report that will specifically mitigate risk of kauri dieback spread will be funded by the Natural Environment Targeted Rate.

42.     In some cases there may be extra track upgrade works required to remove muddy sections on lengths of track away from kauri.  Some of these works may need to be funded from the renewals budget if they are to be kept open. 

43.     Detailed design work will clarify these further needs and associated budget sources.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

44.     Closing parks and reserves or their tracks will have an impact on the recreational activities available in the Waitākere Ranges area. This may put extra pressure on open parks and reserves. However, the parks recommended for indefinite closure contain poor quality tracks and/or unofficial tracks only. Alternatives for recreational use can be publicised as part of the public education component of council’s kauri dieback programme.

45.     Achieving high levels of compliance with closed tracks and the use of cleaning stations will require considerable effort and resource. Public education and compliance is an integral part of council’s kauri dieback programme, and improved resourcing for this task is currently under way.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

46.     Following the local board’s decision on the recommendations provided in this report, staff will develop recommended works packages for each park, including indicative cost and delivery times in early 2019 and report these recommendations to the local board within the first quarter of 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo from Infrastrucutre & Environmental Services dated 22 December 2018 re Kauri in Local Parks

107

b

Overview of Waitākere Ranges local parks and recommended high-level kauri dieback mitigation measures

167

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Phil Brown - Biosecurity Manager

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Parks (North)

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Approval of coastal and marine environment projects as part of the 2018/2019 Waitākere Ranges local environment work programme

 

File No.: CP2018/18873

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the allocation of the $30,000 coastal and marine environment 2018/2019 budget towards a seabird survey ($6,000), a shorebird survey ($6,000), and a dog bylaw adherence study ($18,000), for delivery as part of the 2018/2019 Waitākere Ranges local environment work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In the 2016/2017 and 2017/2018 financial year, the Waitākere Ranges Local Board funded the development of a report to address the challenges being faced in protecting its coastal and marine environment (Resolutions WTK/2016/89 and WTK/2017/76). In response to this, the Big Blue Waitākere: Coastal and Marine Information Report was received by the board in June 2018 (Resolution WTK/2018/66). This report provided recommendations around options for coastal protection.

3.       In June 2018 a community hui was held in Glen Eden to discuss the report and gather ideas from the community around how initiatives they would like to support to protect the coastal and marine environment could be progressed and prioritised. 

4.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has allocated $30,000 to fund initiatives arising from the hui and report as part of the board’s 2018/2019 local environment work programme (resolution WTK/2018/83).

5.       Proposed actions from the hui and report were presented to the local board at a workshop on 18 October 2018.

6.       From the options available the local board expressed an interest in seabird and shorebird protection with a community focus. 

7.       This report recommends that the local board allocate its $30,000 coastal and marine project budget towards the following initiatives, to be delivered as part of the board’s 2018/2019 local environment work programme:

·        a seabird survey ($6,000)

·        a shorebird survey ($6,000)

·        a dog bylaw adherence study ($18,000).

8.       Further information on these projects is provided in this report. Subject to the board’s approval, delivery of these projects will commence in December 2018.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendations

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      allocate $6,000 of the board’s 2018/2019 coastal and marine budget towards a seabird survey.

b)      allocate $6,000 of the board’s 2018/2019 coastal and marine budget towards a shorebird survey and breeding monitoring. 

c)      allocate $18,000 of the board’s 2018/2019 coastal and marine budget towards a dog use and bylaw adherence survey.

Horopaki / Context

9.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board area faces a number of challenges in relation to the quality of the marine environment, in coastal, shore, near-shore and off-shore zones. Consultation undertaken for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2017 identified an aspiration to place greater emphasis on the local marine environment. To support this, the first step was to identify the existing data, information and conclusions about the local marine and coastal environment.

10.     Morphum Environmental was contracted in October 2016 to write a report on the coastal and marine environment of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. This report, known as the Big Blue Waitākere: Coastal and Marine Information Report, provides an overview of the area and management recommendations.

11.     A community hui was held on 20 June 2018 in Glen Eden to launch the Big Blue Waitākere Coastal and Marine Information Report and discuss what the community priority actions were in terms of protecting and restoring the coastal environment.

12.     In June 2018, the local board allocated $30,000 to fund initiatives arising from the hui as part of the board’s 2018/2019 local environment work programme (resolution WTK/2018/83).

13.     A summary of the community hui and some proposed actions for the allocation of this budget were presented to the local board at a workshop on 18 October 2018. These options are also further detailed later in this report. The recommended actions discussed at this workshop included a proposal for a seabird survey along the Waitākere Ranges Local Board coastline, a community workshop with Healthy Waters and Watercare to share information on water quality projects and issues, and the development of a hub to help coordinate pest control efforts at Te Henga. The local board expressed a preference for a seabird survey and assisting community-based seabird and shorebird restoration projects.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

Seabird survey

14.     Seabirds are among Auckland’s most threatened birds and are largely confined to pest-free offshore islands. The Waitākere Ranges area is a significant mainland seabird site, with pockets of known colonies of grey-faced petrel, diving petrel, sooty shearwater, flesh-footed shearwater, as well as little penguin nesting areas.

15.     The majority of the available habitat in the Waitākere Ranges area has not been systematically surveyed for seabirds outside of some discrete areas at Cornwallis, Karekare, Whatipu, Piha and the coast from northern Bethells to Muriwai. These areas will benefit from greater surveying to better identify breeding areas and success. They should also be assessed in relation to threats and management actions that could be taken to improve the status of the seabirds breeding there.

16.     Surveying seabirds is challenging, and over large areas is most effective with the help of a specially trained seabird detection dog. There is only one trained seabird detection dog who can complete this work. Based on the dog’s availability and key times to survey for seabirds, staff propose conducting a seabird dog survey in April 2019. The survey will run for approximately 10 days with the aim to cover further areas around Piha, Cornwallis, Whatipu and Karekare. This work will cost approximately $6,000. These are locations of community interest as well as some knowledge of seabird presence in the surrounds.

17.     A report and maps of seabird species distribution along with current threats, community and council management actions and opportunities will be provided to the board upon completion of the survey in June 2019.

18.     Ideally this survey would then be replicated around September 2019 to survey during this important seabird breeding time. This recommendation will be provided to the board for its consideration as part of the development of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme development.

Shorebird survey

19.     The Waitākere Ranges coastal area is under increasing pressure from human usage. Activities such as dog walking, filming and general recreational use can all be threats to native shorebirds such as New Zealand dotterel, banded dotterel, variable oystercatcher, pied stilt, white-fronted tern, red-billed gull, little penguin, and various shag species.

20.     In order to better protect important shorebird nesting and flocking areas it is important to first understand where and when the birds are within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board coastal area.

21.     Staff recommend that a comprehensive survey of shorebird sites be undertaken over the summer months with follow-up monitoring of active nests and roosts at sites that do not currently have volunteers undertaking this work.

22.     A report and maps outlining shorebird species presence along with community and council management, specific site challenges and pressures, and opportunities will be provided to the board upon completion of the survey in June 2019. The survey and monitoring work will cost $6,000 to complete.

23.     There are a growing number of individuals and community groups interested in protecting and managing the important shorebird populations along the Waitākere coast. As part of this project, the shorebird specialist will also support interested individuals and community groups to undertake ongoing survey and observation work and begin connecting people for a possible seabird and shorebird network on the Waitākere coast.

 

Dog bylaw survey

24.     In the Waitākere Ranges area, nearly all popular recreation beaches have threatened shorebirds and seabirds that are adversely affected by people and dog recreation. These areas are important foraging, roosting, nesting and resting sites for shorebird and seabird species, many of which are nationally and regionally threatened.  

25.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has the responsibility to set dog access bylaws for local parkland and adjoining areas. There are challenges with understanding the effectiveness of the rules, including their communication and enforcement as well as the prevailing social norms within communities and at particular locations.

26.     Alongside establishing dog access bylaws that can limit or manage the impact of dogs on shorebird and seabird species there is the opportunity to engage and communicate with dog owners to influence their behaviours. In particular, there are opportunities to better understand and influence interactions between dog owners, dogs, other recreators, and shorebirds or seabirds in many locations through behaviour change and social marketing approaches.

27.     The Department of Conservation and Auckland Council, in conjunction with the University of Auckland have undertaken a trial study at Harbourview-Orangahinga Reserve and Long Bay Regional Park - Can community-based social marketing techniques encourage compliance with dog leash bylaws near urban marine reserves in Auckland (Attachment A). This study first collected baseline data to look at how frequently dogs were walked off-lead at sites across Auckland. It then surveyed dog walkers to examine their attitudes towards off lead dog walking. Additionally, the researchers attempted to influence dog walker’s behaviour by putting up different signs and then examining subsequent behaviour.

28.     To better understand the effectiveness of current rules and develop ways of supporting sustainable dog and seabird and shorebird relationships in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area, it is recommended that $18,000 is allocated to repeating the baseline survey and dog walkers survey with refinement to the West Coast and Manukau contexts. The exact methodology and site selection would be developed with RIMU and University of Auckland social science specialists but would look to cover West Coast and Manukau beaches with both high recreation use areas, as well as quieter locations where birds may nest.

29.     This study would support understanding the effectiveness of, and compliance with, existing rules and enforcement in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area as well as potential changes to bylaws in the future, including new approaches to communicating the rules, gaining compliance and encouraging responsible dog ownership.

30.     Engaging students through community partners is the recommended approach to delivering this work. However, staff could also engage students or contractors directly.

Options Analysis

31.     A number of options for the allocation of the $30,000 fund were developed and discussed with the local board at its workshop on 18 October 2018. These included:

·    an environmental coordinator based in Te Henga to assist restoration activities in the coast area

·    Southern Waitākere seabird survey

·    a community workshop with Watercare/Healthy waters.

 

32.     From these options the local board expressed an interest in seabird protection. Based on this feedback staff have developed the following options for the local board’s consideration:

·    seabird survey

·    shorebird survey

·    dog bylaw survey

 

33.     Staff recommend the three options presented in this report as they present the greatest opportunity to deliver on the gaps of knowledge identified within the Big Blue Waitākere report, and are reflective of community and local board feedback and priorities. The seabird and shorebird surveys will provide baseline species distribution information to inform ongoing threatened species management and guide support to community led restoration efforts. All three projects will provide greater information to support the board with the management and implementation of dog bylaws.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

34.     The project options outlined in this report will be undertaken around coastal and marine areas within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. In particular, the seabird survey will be undertaken around Cornwallis, Karekare, Whatipu, Piha and the coast from northern Bethells to Muriwai, and the shorebird and dog bylaw surveys will be undertaken along the West Coast and Manukau Harbour.

35.     The local board supported a community hui in June 2018 to gather feedback on coastal protection and subsequently approved $30,000 to fund coastal protection initiatives arising from the hui as part of its 2018/2019 local environment work programme (resolution WTK/2018/83).

36.     The projects recommended in this report were workshopped with the board in October 2018, where the board indicated its preference for supporting a seabird survey and assisting community-based seabird and shorebird restoration projects.

37.     The proposed projects will further enable the Waitākere Ranges Local Board to deliver on its local board plan objective to protect marine and coastal environments.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

38.     It is acknowledged that many shorebird and seabird species are taonga to mana whenua, and the projects recommended through this report will assist in the protection of these species.

39.     While there is no direct engagement with mana whenua planned these projects, the results of the surveys will be provided to mana whenua at an Infrastructure and Environmental Services mana whenua hui once the results are available.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

40.     If the three projects proposed in this report are approved at the board’s 13 December 2018 business meeting, this will see the full allocation of the $30,000 coastal and marine budget for the 2018/2019 financial year.

41.     The allocation of $6,000 towards for an additional seabird survey by a detection dog during September 2019 will be recommended through the development of the board’s 2019/2020 work programme. September is an important breeding time, and it will be useful to identify nesting sites and gain greater understanding of population dynamics and structure at this time.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

42.     If the projects are not approved in December 2018 there is a high risk on non-delivery of this budget line. As the shorebird survey needs to be undertaken over December 2018 and January 2019, and the dog bylaw survey ideally should be undertaken over the high use summer months, these projects will not be effectively delivered within the 2018/2019 financial year if they are not approved at the board’s December 2018 business meeting.

43.     The seabird survey with a detection dog is dependent on the availability of the single trained dog. Staff have tentatively booked the survey time for April 2019, subject to the board’s approval. If the board does not confirm this booking and agree to the delivery of this project at its December 2018 business meeting, there is a risk that the survey will not be delivered within the 2018/2019 financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

44.     Subject to the board’s approval of the projects outlined in this report, delivery will commence with the shorebird survey in December 2018. Regular reporting on project delivery will be provided through the Infrastructure and Environmental Services’ contribution to the board’s quarterly performance report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Dog Bylaw Study

177

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Simon Mills Biodiversity Team Manager (North/West)

Jonathan Boow - Manager Bio Diversity

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – December 2018

File No.: CP2018/24110

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to respond to requests on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and, provide transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Waitakere Ranges Local Board and its community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

This is an information only report. This report:

2.       Provides a progress update to the Board on its current transport capital fund projects, along with financial information indicating how much budget the board has remaining in this political term.

3.       Attaches quarterly report material covering Auckland Transport’s activities over the July to September 2018 period.

4.       Notes consultation information sent to the Board for feedback and decisions of the Traffic Control Committee as they affect the Board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Update for December 2018 report.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       This report addresses transport related matters in the Waitākere Ranges local board area.

6.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    be safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

7.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. Auckland Transport reports on a monthly basis to all local boards, as set out in their Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the importance of the relationship Auckland Transport has with local boards.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF was $1,900,714, for the current political term. In addition, there is a sum of $596,937 which has been approved by Council and available from 1 July 2018.  Auckland Transport encourages the local board to prioritise making decisions on what projects they would like to allocate their remaining budget too. Auckland Transport has very limited time to deliver any project before the end of this electoral term.

Waitakere Ranges Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,497,651

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$992,198

Remaining Budget left

$1,505,453

Quarterly report for July to September 2018

9.       The following quarterly report material is attached to this monthly report:

i)        attachment A – report from Auckland Transport departments on their activities in the Waitakere Ranges Local Board area and regionally over the last quarter.

ii)       attachment B – report on Travelwise Schools activities in the Waitakere Ranges Local Board area over the last quarter.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Trailers at South Piha Carpark Entrance

10.     Auckland Transport has investigated this issue and as the trailers are parked on the road margin and not the roadway Clause 6.19 (7 day limit for trailers) does not apply. Below is the clause for reference.

   6.19 (1) Parking trailers on roadway

Except with the written permission of the road controlling authority given for a specified trailer, and in compliance with any conditions imposed by the road controlling authority in giving that permission, a person must not park a trailer on a roadway for a period exceeding 7 days.

Also below are the legal definitions for both road margin and roadway:

·    Road margin: Includes any uncultivated margin of a road adjacent to but not forming part of either the roadway or the footpath (if any).

·    Roadway: That portion of the road used or reasonably usable for the time being for vehicular traffic in general.

At this stage, no enforcement can be actioned by Auckland Transport.

Local Board Issues Being Investigated

11.     The Local board requested the following issues be investigated and they are in the initial investigation stage:

Albionvale Road Speed and Emergency Access

12.     Auckland Transport is fast-tracking implementation of a speed management plan to implement a safety infrastructure acceleration programme. Auckland Transport is in the process of fininalising our programme and timeline.  Auckland Transport will provide an update soon once this has been approved.

Speed Concerns on Kauri Point Road, Laingholm

13.     Auckland Transport is investigating this request.  A community meeting has been requested by the Local Board and will be look into once investigations are completed.

Consultation documents on proposed improvements

 

14.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board for its feedback, and are summarised below for information purposes only.

15.     After consultation, Auckland Transport considers the feedback received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on, or proceed with an amended proposal if changes are considered necessary.

·    Proposal to install a new footpath along Woodlands Park Road in Titirangi, to improve pedestrian accessibility and road safety;

·    Proposal to install a new footpath on Opanuku Road, Henderson Valley to improve pedestrian amenities

·    Proposal to improve visibility and accessibility by introducing broken yellow lines in Waerenga Place, Titirangi.

·    Proposal to improve access and visibility by introducing Broken Yellow Lines in South Titirangi Road, Arama Ave, Titirangi.

·    Proposal to install a new footpath on Levy Road, Glen Eden proposal to improve pedestrian amenities

Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee (TCC) report

16.     Decisions of the TCC during the month of September to November 2018 affecting the Waitakere Ranges Local Board area are listed below:

Date

Street (Suburb)

Type of Report

Nature of Restriction

Decision

 

1-November-18

 

Glenmall Place, Glen Eden

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

 

CARRIED

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri /

Next steps

20.     Auckland Transport provides the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Report from Auckland Transport departments on their activities in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area and regionally over the last quarter

201

b

Report on Travelwise Schools activities in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area over the last quarter

213

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster – Elected Members Relationship Manager (Western Boards)

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Proposed Regional Public Transport Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/24098

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waitākere Ranges Local Board the opportunity to provide formal feedback on the proposed Regional Public Transport Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport is required to review its ten year Regional Public Transport Plan every three years. The plan describes the services that are integral to Auckland’s public transport network for the next 10-year period. This report provides an opportunity for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board give feedback on the plan, with special emphasis on the following four focus areas:

·   Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

·   Improving customer access to public transport

·   Improving Māori responsiveness

·   Harnessing emerging technologies

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      provide the following feedback on the Regional Public Transport Plan focus areas of:

i)        Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

ii)       Improving customer access to public transport

iii)      Improving Māori responsiveness

iv)      Harnessing emerging technologies and

b)      provide additional feedback on local specific interests.

 

Horopaki / Context

3.       The Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act. It sets out the changes to Auckland’s public transport. Transport is a key component of a city’s success. Auckland is growing and as more people live and visit here, the number of trips taken on our transport networks is increasing. The space available for transport networks is finite. This means that we need as many people as possible to travel using efficient forms of transport; such as walking, cycling and public transport. These alternative transport options take less space and are more environmentally sustainable than private motor vehicles. With less pressure on the road network there is more capacity available for critical vehicles that need the road, including road-based public transport, emergency services and freight.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

4.       Attached is the summary document for the Regional Public Transport Plans. This document outlines the main changes proposed over the next ten years by focusing on four key areas:

Focus area one

Expanding and enhancing rapid and frequent networks

5.       Planning an enhanced rapid transit network through four main city-shaping projects to dramatically increase the speed and coverage of the rapid transit network:

·   City Rail Link

·   City to Mangere Light Rail and Northwest Light Rail

·   SH20B upgrade and Puhinui Interchange

·   Eastern Busway.

6.       Implementing improvements on key arterial routes to move more people. This will include bus priority, safety improvements and cycling and walking facilities. Increasing services on the rapid and frequent networks, with the aim to have services every 10 minutes during peak travel times. Using the rapid and frequent networks to help make great public spaces.

Focus area two

Improving customer access to public transport

7.       Continuing to deliver improved wayfinding sign systems across the public transport network to make it easier for people to find their way across the network. Increasing and improving the walking and cycling and other choices for access to public transport services, focussing on improving safety. Changing park and ride facilities to meet public demand.

Focus area three

Improving Māori responsiveness

8.       Partnering with mana whenua to trial services such as on-demand ride share connecting to marae, which are hard to access by conventional public transport. Ensuring te reo Māori audio announcements and signs for rapid transit stations (train and busway) and extending this across all public transport.

9.       Applying Te Aranga Principles when designing major interchanges and stations, with future potential to apply in the planning and design of the Light Rail Transit projects, Puhinui upgrade and stormwater management. Securing opportunities for Māori and local community employment, training and business development when constructing major public transport projects.

Focus area four

Harnessing emerging technologies

10.     Improving customer insights and data, and undertaking more thorough analytics of travel data to directly inform service improvements. Continuing to evolve AT mobile apps to meet increasing customer needs. Providing simpler and improved payment options for fares to make travel easier. Using new transport modes generated by new digital technology to supplement and complement existing services, increasing access. Ensuring we future proof for mobility-as-a-service models, which will change how people make travel choices.

11.     The full text of the proposed Regional Public Transport Plan can be accessed through Auckland Transport’s website on www.at.govt.nz/rptp.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

12.     Public transport has an impact right across the Auckland Region and therefore impacts all local boards in some way. This report seeks feedback from local boards on the most appropriate enhancements to Auckland’s public transport over the next ten years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

13.     The proposed Regional Public Transport Plan has a focus area of Improving Maori Responsiveness and includes initiatives such as: trialing new modes connecting marae with the public transport system, te reo announcements and signage across the public transport system and incorporating Te Aranga design principles into new facilities, such as bus and rail stations.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

14.     The report has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

15.     The report has no direct risks for local boards. Each individual project has its own set of unique risks and these will be dealt with as these projects are developed and implemented.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

16.     In terms of what happens to the proposed plan.

·   Public consultation runs until December 14

·   Feedback will be analysed over mid to late January 2019

·   The draft plan will be amended

·   The final proposed plan will go to the Auckland Transport Board in February or March 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Land Transport Plan summary document

219

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Stuart Knarston - Planning Projects Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Management team

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Open Space Network Plan

 

File No.: CP2018/21653

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the development of an open space network plan for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The key purpose of the open space network plan is to inform local board open space planning, resource allocation and advocacy over a 10-year period.

3.       Staff recommend that the Waitākere Ranges Local Board approve the development of an open space network plan. It would provide a framework to improve the quality of local parks and open space through greater connectivity, better access and utilisation.

4.       There are limited risks in developing the open space network plan. The plan may raise community expectations that all projects are fully funded. No additional budget is provided for the implementation of the open space network plan.

5.       If approved, staff will work with the local board to identify and analyse the current state.

6.       Once the current state is completed, the project will move to identifying the aspirations of the local board and key moves required to improve performance of the open space network.

7.       During the final stage of the project, the local board will identify prioritised actions to achieve the key moves and then adopt the open space network plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve the scope of work for the development of an open space network plan for the local board area.

Horopaki / Context

8.       An open space network plan is a key mechanism for Auckland Council to implement the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan 2013 at a local level.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

9.       The process for the development of an open space network plan involves research, investigation and planning phases as outlined in Figure 1.

10.     The scope of work includes:

·    identifying and analysing the current performance of the open space network, incorporating the work of existing local park development plans

·    identifying the aspirations and key moves required to improve performance of the open space network

·    identifying and prioritising local place-based actions to achieve the key moves.

 


Figure 1: Open space network planning process

 

11.     The scope of the open space network plan includes all open space controlled and managed by the local board, including parks, sports fields, greenways and outdoor civic areas.

12.     Out of scope are reserve management plans, regional parks, maunga, recreation facilities including stadiums, pools, indoor courts and cemeteries. However, the links to, and use of, the regional parks in the local board area will be considered as part of the plan.

13.     The target date for completion of the open space network plan is June 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

14.     Staff introduced the open space network plan and the components required for successful completion at a workshop with the local board on 22 November 2018.

15.     Staff will engage with the local board on the development of the open space network plan through further workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     Based on the 2013 Census, there are 5,001 people who identify as Māori in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

17.     Further population breakdown by age is as follows:

·    0-14: 1,776

·    15-24: 942

·    25-44: 1,257

·    45-69: 939

·    70 and above: 84.

18.     The predominant age groups are children 14 years of age and under, as well as adults aged 25-44, who will have different open space needs.

19.     Staff will engage with Te Kawerau ā Maki during the preparation of the plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

20.     Development of the open space network plan is funded by Community and Social Policy.

21.     No funding has been allocated for public consultation as the open space network plan informs local board decision-making. There is no statutory requirement to involve the public.

22.     No additional budget is provided for the implementation of the open space network plan.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

23.     There are limited risks in developing the open space network plan. The plan may raise community expectations that all projects are fully funded. However, no additional budget is provided.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

24.     Staff will work collaboratively with the local board to prepare the current state.

25.     Once the current state is completed, the project will then identify key moves and actions. These moves will improve the performance of the open space network.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Justine Yu - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Ruth Woodward - Manager Parks & Recreation Policy

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation

 

File No.: CP2018/23673

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To agree a local engagement event and adopt local content and supporting information for consultation as part of the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the relevant local board) for each local board area for each financial year. The local board agreement will be included in the Council’s Annual Budget 2019/2020.

3.       Consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 will take place from 17 February – 17 March 2019. Local boards will be consulting on their areas of focus for their 2019/2020 local board agreement.

4.       In December, the Governing Body will consider whether to consult on a proposal to transfer legal ownership of waterfront land and related assets to the council parent.  If the Governing Body decides to consult on that proposal, the consultation would take place at the same time as the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.  As a result, the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 would require the use of the special consultative procedure.

5.       There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Water Strategy discussion document. A report will be going to the Environment and Community Committee on 4 December 2018 to approve the discussion document for public consultation.

6.       This report seeks agreement from local boards on the Have Your Say event that will be held in their local board area during the consultation period, to give Aucklanders an opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback. It also seeks approval of their local content and supporting information for consultation.

7.       The Governing Body and local boards will agree regional and local items respectively for consultation by December 13. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the annual budget consultation document and supporting information, which will be approved by the Governing Body on 13 February 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      agree, subject to approval by the Governing Body, to hold the following Have Your Say event in the local board area during the Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation period:

i)        Annual Budget 2019/2020 Have your Say at the Public Forum section of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Business Meeting scheduled for 6pm, 28 February 2019 in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board office, 39 Glenmall Place, Glen Eden.

b)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events during the consultation period for the Annual Budget 2019/2020.

i)        local board members and chairperson

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Chief Financial Officer.

c)      adopt Attachment A: local content for consultation and Attachment B: local supporting information for consultation.

d)      delegate authority to the local board chairperson G Presland to approve any final changes required following review by the council’s legal team of the consultation content of the Annual Budget 2019/2020 prior to publication, including online consultation content.

Horopaki / Context

8.       Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the relevant local board) for each local board area for each financial year. The local board agreement will be included in the Council’s Annual Budget 2019/2020.

9.       Local Board agreements set out (among other things) how the council will, in the year to which the agreement relates, reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board’s plan in respect of the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

10.     For the purposes of consulting on each local board agreement to be included in the council’s Annual Budget, the consultation document for the Annual Budget must include content relating to each agreement.

11.     Public consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 will take place from 17 February – 17 March 2019.

12.     In December, the Governing Body will consider whether to consult on a proposal to transfer legal ownership of waterfront land and related assets to the council parent.  If the Governing Body decides to consult on that proposal, the consultation would take place at the same time as the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020.  As a result, the consultation on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 would require the use of the special consultative procedure, as a decision to proceed with the proposal would require an amendment to the council’s long-term plan.  Where an amendment to the long-term plan is being consulted on at the same time as consultation on the Annual Budget, the Local Government Act 2002 requires the council to use the special consultative procedure in relation to both matters.

13.     There will also be concurrent consultation on the Auckland Water Strategy discussion document. A report will be going to the Environment and Community Committee on 4 December 2018 to approve the discussion document for public consultation.

14.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation process through a variety of channels which include verbal (or face-to-face), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

15.     The special consultative procedure requires the council to provide an opportunity for people to present their views to the council in a manner that enables “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” between the person and the council’s decision-makers, or their official delegates.  The council provides for this through its ‘Have Your Say’ events where people can have a face-to-face dialogue with elected members or other council representatives with an appropriate delegation. The Have Your Say event recommended to be held in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area is:

·    Thursday 28 February, using public forum at the scheduled local board meeting.

16.     Local boards held workshops during October and November 2018 to determine their key activities for their 2019/2020 local board agreement. Boards are now requested to agree their local content and supporting information for consultation, as attached in Attachment A and B.

17.     Any new local BID targeted rates must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are therefore also requested to agree any new proposals for consultation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the Annual Budget 2019/2020 process.

19.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the Annual Budget 2019/2020. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the board, prior to finalising their local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

20.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were adopted in September and October of 2017, form the basis for local priorities.

21.     The approach to Māori engagement for the Annual Budget will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget.

22.     Regionally supported local Māori engagement in the South and West will be provided subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget, this will be integrated with Water Strategy engagement.

23.     Mana Whenua engagement on the Water Strategy is already underway, and will run throughout the March consultation period, annual budget discussions will be integrated with this process.

24.     There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in the council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

25.     Event associated costs include venue hire and catering.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

26.     Local boards must agree their local consultation content and supporting information by 13 December 2018, in order for it to be formatted and reviewed in time to be incorporated into the Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation document and supporting information.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

27.     The Governing Body will approve the consultation document, supporting information and consultation process for the Annual Budget 2019/2020 on 13 February 2019.

28.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and local boards will make decisions on the Annual Budget 2019/2020 and Local Board Agreements 2019/2020 respectively.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local content for consultation

243

b

Local supporting information for consultation

245

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Beth Corlett – Strategic Project Advisor

Authorisers

Anna Bray, Policy and Planning Manager – Local Boards

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board 2017-2020 Progress Report

 

File No.: CP2018/24223

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an easy reference for progress against the key initiatives in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2017–2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2017-2020 Progress Report (Attachment A) provides an overview on the progress of initiatives funded and delivered, or advocated on, under the Boards governance, in the context of priorities and the aspirations identified in the Wāitakere Ranges Local Board Plan 2017-2020.

3.       The report covers the first year of the local board plan period, from October 2017 through to October 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2017-2020 Progress Report, October 2017– October 2018.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2017-2020 annual progress report, October 2017-October 2018

249

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Raewyn Curran - Senior Local Board Advisor - Waitakere Rnge

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Board Member report - Steve Tollestrup

 

File No.: CP2018/24486

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.    To update the Waitākere Ranges Local Board members on projects, activities and issues.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.   Board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

3.   Member S Tollestrup is the lead for Economic and Community Development.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive member S Tollestrup’s December 2018 report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Steve Tollestrup's December 2018 report

273

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2018/22539

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops held in November 2018 by the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshop held are as follows:

          1 November 2018:

Titirangi Village - Public Toilet

Local Board Engagement Plan

West Local Boards: Response to Maori

Glen Eden town centre project

Annual reports on Community Outcomes Plans

          8 November 2018:

LBA/WP Workshop 1

Annual Plan presentation

15 November 2018:

1a. Waitākere Ranges Ecological Restoration Contracts and 1b. Waitākere Ranges Arboriculture Contracts

Project 17 / Full facilities update

Pest Free plan for South Titirangi

Te Kete Rukuruku Maori naming of parks and facilities

5. a) Concordia Reserve Outcomes and 5. b) Relocatable pump track

Draft Golf Facilities Investment Plan

22 November 2018:

Education and skills landscape in your LB area (COMET Auckland

Glen Eden Town Centre OLI

Monitoring and Reporting: Glen Eden Town Centre Implementation Plan

Waitākere Ranges Open Space Network Plan

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop records for 1, 8, 15 and 22 November 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop records for 1, 8, 15 and 22 November 2018

279

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

     

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

13 December 2018

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua – Tranche 1: Plan Changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) and Auckland Council District Plan - Hauraki Gulf Islands Section 2018

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(ba) - The item relates to an application for a resource consent or water conservation order or a requirement for a designation or heritage order under the Resource Management Act 1991 and the withholding of the information is necessary to avoid serious offence to tikanga Maori or to avoid the disclosure of the location of waahi tapu.

In particular, the report contains information on nominated sites and places of significance to mana whenua that has been provided to Council on a confidential basis until the plan change has been approved for public notification.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1]         ‘Kauri-safe’ means that a track has a dry, mud-free surface 100 metres before and after the location of kauri/kauri roots.

[2]  The Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008 recognises both Te Kawerau ā Maki and Ngāti Whātua as mana whenua. However, Ngāti Whatua has advised that they both recognise and support Te Kawerau ā Maki in this kauri dieback management role.