I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland Domain Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 5 June 2019

3.00pm

Council Chambers
Auckland Town Hall

301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Komiti o te Papa Rēhia o Pukekawa /

Auckland Domain Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Mike Lee

 

Deputy Chairperson

Pippa Coom

 

Members

IMSB Member Renata Blair

 

 

Shale Chambers

 

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

 

 

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

 

IMSB Chair David Taipari

 

 

Vernon Tava

 

 

 

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Duncan Glasgow

Governance Advisor

 

30 May 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 09 890 2656

Email: duncan.glasgow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 



 

AUCKLAND DOMAIN COMMITTEE - Terms of Reference

 

Background

The Auckland Domain is an important regional park and also has areas within it managed by the Waitemata Local Board.  This committee is set up jointly by the Governing Body and Waitemata Local Board to co-ordinate decisions relating to the Domain.

 

 

 

Responsibilities

Decision-making responsibility for parks, recreation and community services and activities in Auckland Domain including those anticipated in the Auckland Domain Act 1987, which are the responsibility of the Governing Body or the Waitemata Local Board.

 

 

 

Powers

All powers of the Governing Body and Waitemata Local Board necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities including those powers conferred on Auckland Council pursuant to the Auckland Domain Act 1987.

 

 

 

Except:

(a)  powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)  where a matter is the responsibility of another committee or local board

(c)   the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(d)  the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million

(e)  the approval of final policy

(f)    deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest and which are controversial.

 


 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

Members of the public

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

General principles

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation

·          


Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

5.1     Public Input: Urban Polo                                                                                     7

5.2     Public Input: Auckland District Health Board                                                   8

5.3     Public Input: University of Auckland - Kari Street Commons Recreation Precinct                                                                                                                 8

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          8

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

8          Lantern Festival and ASB Classic events - report back on 2019 and approval for 2020                                                                                                                               11

9          Auckland Domain Event Approvals and Schedule from 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019                                                                                                                                       25

10        Kari Street Commons recreation facilities partnership with the University of Auckland                                                                                                                       39

11        Auckland Domain general update and approval of new infrastructure                59  

12        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 21 February 2019 as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

 

5.1       Public Input: Urban Polo

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make a presentation to the Auckland Domain Committee about holding a polo event in the Auckland Doman.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      receive the public input from Simon Wilson, Director – Urban Events Ltd, and thank him for attending.

 


 

 

5.2       Public Input: Auckland District Health Board

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To address the Auckland Domain Committee regarding the Lantern Festival and its impacts on Auckland District Health Board patients, staff and visitors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      receive the public input from Alex Pimm, Director – Patient Management Services and Justin Rawiri, Director – Risk and Emergency Management, and thank them for attending.

 

 

 

5.3       Public Input: University of Auckland - Kari Street Commons Recreation Precinct

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To address the Auckland Domain Committee regarding the Kari Street Commons Recreation Precinct.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      receive the public input from Carole McIntosh, Project Manager Campus Life, Sean Smith, Associate Director Campus Life – Sport and Recreation, and David Rutland, Interim Sport & Recreation Facility Planning, University Strategic Programme Office, and thank them for attending.

 

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 

Lantern Festival and ASB Classic events - report back on 2019 and approval for 2020

File No.: CP2019/07692

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the 2019 Lantern Festival and ASB Classic events.

2.       To request landowner approval for the 2020 Lantern Festival and ASB Classic events.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Both the 2019 Lantern Festival and ASB Classic events were deemed successful, however there were operational challenges, namely transport access across the venue.

4.       During the Lantern Festival, Auckland Hospital raised concerns about the lack of access for any hospital users, particularly on Thursday 14 February 2020. In consultation with Auckland Hospital and Auckland Transport the Traffic Management Plan was amended for the remaining three nights of the festival.

5.       The 2020 Lantern Festival requires seven days for pack in, four days for event delivery, and two days for pack out. 2020 is the fifth year of the five-year resource consent.

6.       According to the Auckland Domain Event Operational Guidelines, an event permit requires landowner approval from the Auckland Domain Committee:

7.       The ASB Classic: 6 – 18 January 2020, with 19 January 2020 as rain date. The Lantern Festival is from 13 – 16 February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      approve in principle the 2020 ASB Classic to take place on the Auckland Domain from 6 – 18 January 2020 with a rain date of 19 January 2020 in line with the site plan shown in Attachment A of the agenda report, subject to the provision of a more detailed public access plan.

b)      approve in principle the 2020 Lantern Festival to take place on the Auckland Domain from 13 – 16 February 2020, in line with the site plan shown in Attachment B of the agenda report.

c)      delegate authority to the General Manager Community Facilities, to set detailed conditions to protect the park environment and assets, minimise the impact of the event on neighbours and ensure the event is safe for all.

d)      delegate authority to the Deputy Chair of the Auckland Domain Committee or its equivalent, to approve a detailed public access plan for the ASB Classic.

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Auckland Domain is a high-demand site for a range of events. This is due to its central location, large capacity, public transport networks, limited adjacent residents and hospitality offerings. To manage these demands the Auckland Domain Committee adopted the Auckland Domain Event Operational Guidelines on 30 March 2015 (ADC/2016/9). The guidelines state that an event permit requires landowner approval from the Auckland Domain Committee if they:

·      are ticketed, and/or

·      take place over multiple days (more than 48 hours) including pack in and pack out, and/or

·      require an authorized road closure.

9.       Upon completion of stakeholder engagement, if requirements are met, Event Facilitation will issue an event permit under the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw (2015).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Lantern Festival

10.     The 2019 Lantern Festival was held at the Auckland Domain from 14 – 17 February. Over these four nights, 174,500 people attended.

·      Waste: The total waste collected at the venue was 17.34 tonnes and the diversion of waste to landfill was 10.62 tonnes or 62%. In 2018, 22,000kg was collected in total at the venue, and the diversion to landfill was approximately 50%.

·      Park condition: Community Facilities staff were satisfied with the condition of the park following the event at the handback meeting. This year saw the use of track matting and mulch.  This was approved through the Senior Maintenance Delivery Coordinator. 

·      Cycle and scooter access: Two bike stations with approximately 50 racks in each station were busy throughout the event. The hospital entrance station on Park Road was mostly full and the Football Road station was busy. We will be using this set up again for the 2020 event.

·      Walking route: There was a promoted walking route from the Newmarket and Grafton train stations, this will be promoted again with Auckland Transport for 2020. We will also look at a wider walking route, however this is not currently budgeted.

·      Stakeholder engagement: Concerns were raised by Auckland Hospital about the lack of access for hospital users, on the first night of the event. This in conjunction with a larger than usual number of vehicles on the network affected the access. This was a trend noted by Auckland Transport during the week of Lantern Festival and the increased congestion was noticed before the start of the Festival.

·      In consultation with Auckland Hospital and Auckland Transport the Traffic Management Plan was amended for the remaining three nights of the festival.

·      ATEED have met with Auckland Hospital since the event to gain a better understanding of the needs of the hospital’s users. Another meeting is scheduled for Friday, 24th May 2019 with the hospital to provide an update on a traffic management and communications plan.

·      ATEED consults with key stakeholders in and around the Auckland Domain in the planning phase and will continue these discussions to ensure plans are in line with stakeholder requirements.

·      The discussions with the Auckland Hospital and the Auckland Museum are largely around ensuring that access requirements are fit for purpose, as well as consulting with them on proposed operations that may affect them. Other essential stakeholders that the ATEED event team work with are:

o  Auckland Council Community Facilities

o  Auckland Council Waste Solutions

o  Auckland Council Environmental Health (Noise)

o  Auckland Council Heritage

o  Auckland Transport (Streetscapes, Special Events, Public Transport & Harbourmaster)

o  NZ Police

o  Fire & Emergency New Zealand

·      Parking management: There will be continued improvements planned for parking management in surrounding streets through the below mitigation for the 2020 event.

·      ATEED will be working to ensure there is closer communication with the Auckland Transport parking team on enforcing the existing resident only parking scheme and the event parking resolution so that the public are not parking in resident-only areas.

·      There will be a continued focus on improving public transport messaging and services. The aim is to reduce public driving to the event and instead, walking, cycling or taking public transport where possible.

·      There will be a review of the road closure times in surrounding streets to discourage event patrons from parking in residential parking areas, residents and emergency vehicles are exempt from these road closures and will have access maintained.

·      There will be engagement with the residents group on event traffic management plan and residents access and ensure that residents understand that vehicles in their area can be removed.

·      Businesses inside road closure areas will receive event notices well in advance and have contact with the ATEED team should there be an access requirement.

·      Antisocial behavior: ATEED will continue to work closely with the NZ Police to improve the antisocial behaviour in the surrounding streets. There will be improved staff deployment plans for both the NZ Police and security teams as well as an extension to the alcohol ban to take in more of the surrounding streets.

·      ATEED and Auckland Transport will be consulting more closely on the security measures at nearby transport stations.

·      ATEED, NZ Police and Auckland Transport work together on intel provided by the NZ Police during events to try to stop issues before they occur. For example, if large groups of people are congregating on trains, the NZ Police will dispatch officers to remove any groups that show antisocial behavior. The Police will also ensure that any antisocial behavior is managed before arriving at the Auckland Domain.

11.     The Lantern Festival is an annual four-day festival, celebrated on the first full moon following the Chinese New Year. The festival is proposed to begin on Thursday 13 February 2020 with Lantern-appreciation night, and end on Sunday 16 February with a fireworks display.

12.     The Lantern Festival is delivered by ATEED Major Events and would typically expect an attendance of 180,000 +/- people. The event in 2019 required seven days for pack in, four days event execution and two to three days for pack out.

13.     This request for landowner approval in principle is based on operational planning details from 2019 which remain largely unchanged for 2020 and is requesting that final operational details for the 2020 event are worked through with the asset owner Community Facilities.

14.     Table 1 shows the impact assessment that was carried out using the criteria in section 2.4 ‘Land Owner Assessment Criteria’ of the Domain Events Operational Guidelines document.


 

Table 1: Impact Assessment 2020 Lantern Festival

Category

Impact Assessment

Public restrictions

Minimal impact

·    Event is free to the public and/or is a not-for-profit event.

Utilises zones / expanse of area occupied

Minimal impact

·    Utilises Zone 1 and Zone 2.

·    The use of other areas of the park can continue with no impact or minimal disturbance to the regular users.

Duration and timing of event (including pack in and out time)

Medium impact

·    The number of events taking up Zone 1 being ‘the cricket ground’ will be restricted in accordance with the Auckland Domain Act.

·    Event will be on site for 13 days in total

Values of area occupied

Medium Impact

·    Area being utilised is in close proximity to a significant cultural or historic heritage site or significant trees and the event will engage heritage and arboricultural experts.

Pedestrian flows

Minimal/Medium Impact

·    Directing of pedestrians where paths are already formed or where an approved, temporary surface is provided, such as matting or bark.

Impact on public vehicle access

Significant Impact

·    Vehicle access into and through the Domain and surrounding streets is restricted by required road closure and approved traffic management plan.

Infrastructure involved

Minimal/Medium Impact

·    Some structures (Minimal self-supporting and weighted structures and lanterns) to be placed on a small area of zone 1. Hard stand areas will be utilised as much as possible.

Hanging objects

Medium Impact

·    The lanterns shall be attached to trees by suitably qualified arborists or under the direction and supervision of the appointed arborist in such a way that does not result in damage to any part of the tree.

·    Lanterns shall be attached only to trees which are determined to be suitable for the hanging of lanterns by Auckland Council’s Landscape and Arboricultural Advisor

·    No lantern, sign, bin or any other object shall be hung from a Scheduled Notable tree without written approval from Auckland Council’s Heritage Arborist. No lantern, sign, bin or any other object shall be nailed to any tree.

Event vehicle movements

Medium Impact

·    Low number of event vehicle requiring access through grassed areas away from trees.

·    All vehicle movements within the Domain will be restricted to the sealed roads unless approval has been provided for by the Team Leader Monitoring – Central, in consultation with the council advisors.

 

 

Access to power and water

Minimal Impact

·    Access to on-site power and water supplies is required and will be supplemented by the use of generators.

Amplified Noise

Medium Impact

·    Amplified music is core to the event - announcements as well as several stage performances. Noise limits must be consistent with permitted activities set out in the District Plan (Isthmus Section) or successive Auckland Unitary Plan as well as the approved resource consent. 

Use of water features

No impact

 

15.     ATEED recommend approving, in principle, the 2020 Lantern Festival to take place on the Auckland Domain from 13 – 16 February 2020.

ASB Classic

16.     The ASB Classic is an annual event held in the lower portion of the Auckland Domain adjacent to the existing ASB Tennis Arena. The fan zone dubbed “The Serve” will seek approval to provide two weeks of daily off-court entertainment from music, fashion shows, player appearances and the tennis on giant screens. The area is only for patrons who have purchased a ticket to the ASB Classic and will only operate when the ASB Tennis Arena is operational.

17.     This request for landowner approval in principle is based on operational planning details from 2019 which remain largely unchanged for 2020.  There continues to be some challenges with the public access provided through the venue as raised by members of the Auckland Domain Committee and changes have been requested.  A more detailed plan that addresses this issue is being prepared.  It is recommended delegation be given to a representative of the committee to sign off this aspect of the event and the remaining conditions be delegated to Community Facilities.

18.     The event is requesting a date of 6 January 6 – 18 January 2020 and would typically expect an attendance of 35 000 unique visitors. The event in 2019 required 20 days day/s for pack in, with no activity on the public holidays and sixteen days event execution and five days for pack out.

19.     Table two shows the impact assessment that was carried out using the criteria in section 2.4 ‘Land Owner Assessment Criteria’ of the Domain Events Operational Guidelines document.


 

Table 2: Impact Assessment 2020 ASB Classic

Category

Impact Assessment

Public restrictions

Significant impact

·    Event is ticketed but the event is aligned with

the Auckland Council Events Policy 2013 and the Auckland Major Events Strategy.

Utilises zones / expanse of area occupied

Minimal impact

·    The event is not in zone 1. Event does not disrupt the free-flow of casual users through the majority of the Domain.

Duration and timing of event (including pack in and out time)

Minimal Impact

·    No use of zone 1, creates no disturbance to sports use and does not unduly impact on an area of the Domain that is heavily used for passive recreation. 

Values of area occupied

Minimal Impact

·    Area being utilised is not in close proximity to a significant cultural or historic heritage site or significant trees.

Pedestrian flows

Minimal Impact

·    Pedestrians will be directed to already formed access paths.

Impact on public vehicle access

Significant Impact

·    Vehicle access into and through the Domain from Stanly Street is restricted by required road closure

Infrastructure involved

Minimal/Medium Impact

·    Some structures (Minimal self-supporting and weighted structures) to be placed on a small area of the Domain.

Hanging objects

No Impact

Event vehicle movements

Medium Impact

·    Low number of event vehicle requiring access through grassed areas.

Access to power and water

Minimal Impact

·    Access to on-site power and water supplies is not required. Power will be provided by generators or direct from the Tennis Centre.

Amplified Noise

Medium Impact

·    Amplified music is core to the event for announcements of upcoming matches and results. Noise limits must be consistent with permitted activities set out in the resource consent. 

Use of water features

No impact

 

20.     ATEED recommend approving, in principle, the ASB Classic to take place on the Auckland Domain from 6 – 18 January (19 January 2020 as a rain date), subject to review of the public access plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Major Event Facilitators will consult with Auckland Transport as per the ATEED Major Event Facilitation process, to ensure the road closures are adequate to support the 2020 ASB Classic and the 2020 Lantern Festival events.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Events can cause disruption to local residents and surrounding businesses. The Auckland Domain Event Operational Guidelines outlines the minimum level of consultation with affected stakeholders.

23.     As part of the wider major event facilitation process, ATEED will seek feedback from the Waitematā Local Board on each specific event as more detailed information for each application becomes available.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The Auckland Domain is a significant site for many iwi in the region. The Auckland Domain is a historic site of conflict and peace.  In particular the Pukekaroa, the area known as gum tree hill and the flanks of Auckland Hospital are known sites of cultural significance.  Both of these events avoid these areas (in line with the Auckland Domain Event Guidelines).

25.     ATEED have not identified any significant adverse impact for Māori in the event permit request for the 2020 ASB Classic or the 2020 Lantern Festival events.  

26.     ATEED have consulted with mana whenua through the ATEED Major Event Facilitation process and as was required through the resource consent application. The ASB Classic and the Lantern Festival will be in year five of a five-year resource consent.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     The event facilitation process provides for the council to recover costs for remedial works that may be required following an event.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     The ATEED Major Event Facilitation process is designed to mitigate any risks associated with having events in public open space.

29.     Although the Auckland Domain Committee may approve the event, further stakeholder consultation is required under the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw (2015). ATEED Major Event Facilitation will work with stakeholders to meet the requirements however if one or more stakeholders’ requirements cannot be met, there is a risk that the event may not be able to proceed. ATEED will work with stakeholders to ensure that all requirements can be met. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The ATEED Major Event Facilitation process outlines the series of steps to be completed for an event permit to be issued. This process is designed to ensure compliance, legality and ultimately a safe and enjoyable event.


 

31.     Stakeholder consultation and approval will be obtained through the ATEED Major Event Facilitation process from various internal and external parties. This process aims to ensure the operational plans for the event presents the minimum amount of risk and disruption possible to the land and local communities.

32.     Stakeholders who are requested to either approve the event or provide feedback may include, but are not limited to:

·      Auckland Hospital

·      Auckland Transport (Streetscapes, Special Events, Public Transport, Parking Services and Harbourmaster)

·      Auckland Council Community Facilities

·      Auckland Council Environmental Health (Noise)

·      Auckland Council Heritage

·      Auckland Council Resource Consents

·      Auckland Council Waste Solutions

·      Auckland Council Bylaws

·      Auckland Council Alcohol Licensing

·      Auckland Council Building Consents

·      Auckland Council Street Trading 

·      Auckland Emergency Management

·      Civil Aviation Authority

·      NZ Police

·      Fire and Ambulance

·      Local businesses and residents.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ASB Classic site map

21

b

Lantern Festival site map

23

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Liesl Dawson – Event Operations Manager

Authoriser

Jane Aickin - Kaiwhakahaere Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua

 



Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 


Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 



Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 

Auckland Domain Event Approvals and Schedule from 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019

File No.: CP2019/07755

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve an event permit request for the Auckland Arts Festival 2020, and provide an update on the schedule of permitted events at the Auckland Domain from 1 July 2018 – 30 June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have received an event permit request for the Auckland Arts Festival 2020: Place des Anges event, to be held at the Auckland Domain Committee, including an outline of proposed operations for the event.  

3.       Place Des Anges is a 60 – 80 minute immersive experience and aerial performance and it is anticipated that approximately 15,000 people will attend across the four nights of performances.

4.       The event requires seven days for pack in, four days for event delivery and two days for pack out and will likely require resource consent.

5.       As per the Auckland Domain Event Operational Guidelines, an event permit requires landowner approval from the Auckland Domain Committee.

6.       As required under the Auckland Domain Event Operational Guidelines, staff have compiled a summary of events scheduled to take place on the Auckland Domain between 1 July 2018 and 1 June 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)         approve the event permit for the Auckland Arts Festival 2020: Place des Anges event to take place on the Auckland Domain from 12 to 15 March 2020 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)         receive the summary of events scheduled to take place on the Auckland Domain between 1 July 2018 and 1 June 2019 (Attachment B to the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Auckland Domain is a high demand site for a range of events. This is due to its central location, large capacity, public transport networks, limited adjacent residents and hospitality offerings.

8.       To manage these demands the Auckland Domain Committee adopted the Auckland Domain Event Operational Guidelines on 30 March 2015 (ADC/2016/9).


 

9.       As per the guidelines, an event permit requires landowner approval from the Auckland Domain Committee if they:

·      are ticketed and/or;

·      take place over multiple days (more than 48 hours) including pack in and pack out and/or;

·      require an authorized road closure.

·      Upon completion of stakeholder engagement if requirements are met Event Facilitation will issue an event permit under the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw (2015).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Staff have received an event permit request for the Auckland Arts Festival 2020: Place des Anges event, to be held at the Auckland Domain Committee, including an outline of proposed operations for the event (Attachment A).

11.     The Auckland Arts Festival 2020: Place des Anges is a new high scale, ticketed, alcohol free event, which is part of the Auckland wide Arts Festival, held annually in March. The festival reflects Auckland’s contemporary, cosmopolitan city with its many communities.

12.     Place Des Anges is a 60 to 80 minute immersive experience and aerial performance. Cranes are used to support multi zipline wires, from which the show’s aerialists will perform, with giant inflatable cherubs, gymnasts and dancers to drop feathers on the audience at each show. The event will also involve food trucks, the numbers for which are yet to be confirmed.  

13.     It is anticipated that approximately 15,000 people will attend across the four nights of performances. The event requires seven days for pack in, four days for event delivery and two days for pack out.

14.     The event will likely require Resource Consent. Work will be undertaken with the Resource Consent team accordingly.

15.     Table one shows the impact assessment that was carried out using the criteria in section 2.4 ‘Land Owner Assessment Criteria’ of the Domain Events Operational Guidelines document.

 

Table one: Impact assessment

Category

Impact Assessment

Public restrictions

Significant impact

·    Event is ticketed with fencing.

Utilise zones / expanse of area occupied

Significant impact

·    Event will occupy Zone 1b and surrounding areas resulting in displacement of sporting activities for up to thirteen days. The event requires a road closure which will disrupt vehicle access.

Duration and timing of event (including pack in and out time)

Significant impact

·    The event requires seven days for pack in, four days for event delivery and two days for pack out, resulting in 13 days onsite.

·    The event is proposed to occur during the cricket season. 

Category

Impact Assessment

Values of area occupied

Significant impact

·    The event will utilize the upper sports fields resulting in displacement of sport for up to thirteen days.

·    Area being utilised is near a significant cultural or historic heritage site or significant trees. Pukekaroa is included within the event fence line, however, will be restricted from patrons.

Pedestrian flows

Medium impact

·     The event foot print will cause some restrictions on pedestrian movements through the area however access around the event site will be possible.

Impact on public vehicle access

Medium impact

·    Vehicle access into and through the Domain will remain open however road closures of some internal roads will be required. 

Infrastructure involved

Significant impact

·    The event requires 3-4 cranes to be placed on the upper sports field, along with additional infrastructure including marquees, ezi ups and containers. 

Hanging objects

No Impact

Event vehicle movements

Medium impact

·    Low number of event vehicles requiring access through grassed areas away from trees during pack in and pack out only.

·    Vehicle access to install crane infrastructure will be required.

Access to power and water

Low impact

·    Generators to be onsite.

Amplified noise

Medium impact

·    Amplified music will be in operation for the duration of the performance nights 7pm – 9.30pm. Noise limits must be consistent with permitted activities set out in Auckland Unitary Plan. 

Use of water features

No impact

 

16.     Staff recommend approving, in principle, the Auckland Arts Festival 2020: Place des Anges event to take place on the Auckland Domain from 12 to 15 March 2020.

Summary of Events scheduled to be held in the Auckland Domain over the 2018/2019 event season

17.    As required under the Auckland Domain Event Operational Guidelines, staff have compiled a summary of events scheduled to take place on the Auckland Domain between 1 July 2018 and 1 June 2019 (Attachment B).

18.     Thirty event permits were scheduled to be issued by the Arts, Community and Events, Event Facilitation team over the 2018/2019 event season to take place on the Auckland Domain. 

19.     One event permit was issued by Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development for the annual Lantern Festival 14 to 17 February 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Event Facilitation will consult with Auckland Transport as per the event facilitation process to ensure the road closures are adequate to support the Auckland Arts Festival 2020: Place des Anges event.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Events can cause disruption to local residents and surrounding businesses. The Auckland Domain Event Operational Guidelines outlines the minimum level of consultation with affected stakeholders.

22.     As part of the wider facilitation process, staff will seek feedback from the Waitematā Local Board on each specific event as more detailed information for each application becomes available.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The Auckland Domain is a significant site for many iwi in the region. The Auckland Domain is a historic site of conflict and peace. The memorial on Pukekaroa and the displays and interpretation managed by the Auckland War Memorial Museum pay tribute to significant events for Māori and the importance of the site to mana whenua.

24.     Staff have not identified any significant adverse impact for Māori in the event permit request for the Auckland Arts Festival 2020: Place des Anges event.

25.     The event organiser will consult with mana whenua through the facilitation process where required. Consultation will be conducted if a resource consent is required and/or the utilisation of Sites of Significance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The event facilitation process provides for Auckland Council to recover costs for remedial works that may be required following an event.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The event facilitation process is designed to mitigate any risks associated with having events in public open space.

28.     Although the committee may approve the event, further stakeholder consultation is required under the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw (2015). Event Facilitation will work with stakeholders to meet the requirements however if one or more stakeholders’ requirements cannot be met, there is a risk that the event may not be able to proceed. Staff will work with stakeholders to ensure that all requirements can be met. 

29.     As the Auckland Arts Festival events are considered part of the regular annual schedule of events, there may be a follow-on risk to reputation if these events are declined. Staff recommend approving the event permit application.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The facilitation process outlines the series of steps to be completed for an event permit to be issued. This process is designed to ensure compliance, legality and ultimately a safe and enjoyable event.

31.     Stakeholder consultation and approval will be obtained through the facilitation process from various internal and external parties. This process aims to ensure the operational plans for the event presents the minimum amount of risk and disruption possible to the land and local communities.

32.     Stakeholders who are requested to either approve the event or provide feedback may include but is not limited to:

·      Auckland Transport (Streetscapes, Special Events and Public Transport)

·      Auckland Council Community Facilities

·      Auckland Council Environmental Health (Noise)

·      Auckland Transport Harbour Master

·      Auckland Council Heritage

·      Auckland Council Resource Consents

·      Auckland Council Waste Solutions

·      Auckland Council Animal Management

·      Auckland Council Bylaws

·      Auckland Council Alcohol Licensing

·      Auckland Council Building Consents

·      Auckland Council Health & Safety

·      Auckland Council Street Trading 

·      Civil Aviation Authority

·      Civil Defense

·      NZ Police

·      Fire and Ambulance

·      Local Businesses and Residents.

33.     Following receipt of all relevant approvals required, Event Facilitation will issue a permit for the event.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Event Proposal Auckland Arts Festival 2020: Place des Anges

31

b

Auckland Domain Quarterly Report Annual Calendar 2018/2019

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mikaela  Otene - Team Leader Event Facilitation Central

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Jane Aickin - Kaiwhakahaere Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua

 


Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 



Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 



Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 



Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 


Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 


Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 

Kari Street Commons recreation facilities partnership with the University of Auckland

File No.: CP2019/07752

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To obtain approval from the Auckland Domain Committee for the development of an indoor court and outdoor turf facility at the Kari Street Commons area of the Auckland Domain.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       There is an existing shortage of indoor court sporting facilities across Auckland, including the City Centre of Auckland and the isthmus area.

3.       The University of Auckland are redeveloping the recreation facilities on its campus and as part of that redevelopment they are seeking to fund and build an indoor court and outdoor turf facility at Kari Street Commons.

4.       The Auckland Domain Committee has adopted a concept plan for the Kari Street Commons precinct which includes a space that is allocated for an indoor court facility and outdoor turf in partnership with the University of Auckland.

5.       The Auckland Domain Act 1987 provides legislative a framework which governs the use of the Domain. This Act does not allow leasing of land other than that already specified in the Act.

6.       To develop the facility the University of Auckland would fund, design and build the asset with ownership of the facility being held by Auckland Council. This will provide a positive legacy for Aucklanders and adherence to the Auckland Domain Act 1987.

7.       Auckland Council would contract the University of Auckland to operate the facility on its behalf for a three-year period while the university’s own facilities are being redeveloped. This management will include substantial community use of the facility.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      approve in principle the development of a partnership indoor court and outdoor turf facility with the University of Auckland at the Kari Street Commons.

b)      delegate final decision making over facility design, specification, legal agreements and facility management to the General Managers of Community Facilities and Parks, Sport and Recreation.

c)      note that due to the estimated budget being in excess of $2 million further decision making may be required by a committee of the Auckland Council Governing Body.

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

Kari Street Commons

8.       The Auckland Domain Master Plan 2016 includes Principle 5: “Improving Auckland Domain as a recreation and event destination”.  Within this principle was a specific action that gave rise to the Kari Street Commons project.  This was:

·    action 5.4: “Restore the Kari Street nursery site to an active recreation area, which can be also used as an event space. This space would take pressure off the sports fields and provide for other event opportunities.”

9.       The Auckland Domain Committee (committee) approved the Kari Street Commons Concept Plan in May 2018 (ADC/2018/14).

10.     Contained within the Kari Street Commons Concept Plan is a multisport indoor facility and a five-a-side artificial turf field. The plan indicated that this facility was to be developed in conjunction with the University of Auckland.

The University of Auckland

11.     The University of Auckland (university) has approved the significant redevelopment of their recreation facilities located at its campus on Symonds Street.

12.     During the redevelopment period they are seeking an interim location where they can offer continuity of services and physical activity for their students and other users.

13.     The university have presented a draft proposal to develop a two-court indoor facility and a five-a-side turf at Kari Commons. This is in alignment with the concept plan.

14.     The most intensive period of the university’s use of the proposed Kari Street Commons facility is during the redevelopment period of their existing facilities (initial period). This period is anticipated to be three years with the existing university recreation facilities being demolished in mid-2020 and the new facility completed in November 2023.

Indoor court facilities in Auckland

15.     There is a significant existing shortfall of indoor court provision in the Auckland region with a particular gap identified within the Auckland city centre and the central isthmus area.

16.     This shortfall is being compounded both by population growth within the city centre and surrounding areas and by changing preferences for sporting opportunity towards sport codes that use indoor facilities.

17.     The Auckland Indoor Court Facility Plan identifies a partnership with a tertiary partner as a recommended approach to increasing provision of indoor courts in the central Auckland area.

18.     There are limited alternative options currently available within the central city area for additional indoor court provision.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The 2019 Auckland Indoor Court Facility Plan recognises a significant and rapidly expanding gap in the provision of indoor court spaces to meet the needs of sporting codes played in these facilities.

20.     A recommendation within this plan is to develop a one to two court indoor facility within the city centre area in partnership with a tertiary provider. This facility would likely support community participation, local leagues, and recreational level participation.

21.     Located on the lower edge on the Auckland Domain the site at Kari Street Commons is situated close to the Auckland city centre and is easily accessible through active transport options, including being approximately a 10-15 minute walk from the Parnell Train Station.

The Auckland Domain Act 1987

22.     The Auckland Domain Act 1987 (Act) is the legislation relating to the control, management, and use of the Auckland Domain.

23.     Section 6(b) of the Act allows the Council to “at any time and from time to time to set apart any part of the Domain for gardens, open spaces, footpaths, roadways, or picnic grounds, and for the provision of any other like facilities for public recreation or enjoyment or for facilities and amenities necessary for the public using the Domain; and construct or develop those gardens, open spaces, footpaths, roadways, picnic grounds and other facilities for public recreation or enjoyment or facilities and amenities necessary for the public using the Domain”.

24.     It is considered that this section within the Act allows for the development of the indoor court and artificial surface facilities.

25.     Section 7 (3) of the Act states that council shall not have power to grant a lease or leases of any other part or parts of the Domain not specified within the Act. There is no provision within the Act for a lease of indoor and outdoor sport facilities at Kari Street Commons.

26.     The facility would need to be owned, from the outset, by Auckland Council. This would therefore be a legacy investment by the university into the Domain.

27.     The university are aware of this constraint and are willing to proceed on that premise.

Facility procurement approach

28.     To allow the delivery of a facility funded by the university and owned by Auckland Council, it is proposed that the university would be contracted to build the new facility on the site for Auckland Council, with provision made for the university to engage a third-party contractor to undertake the design and build component of the works.

29.     At the completion of construction, the university would transfer / pass ownership (and all warranties and guarantees) of the facilities to Auckland Council, at no cost, ensuring that these elements of the development are in favour of Auckland Council.

Facility design

30.     It is proposed that the indoor facility is a concrete pad with a suitable composite multipurpose sports floor surface and enclosed with a tensioned membrane covering (similar in concept to The Cloud facility) to create an indoor sporting environment.

31.     The outdoor space will entail an uncovered multipurpose artificial turf of approximately 1,000m2.

32.     Staff from the Community Facilities department of Auckland Council would be responsible for approvals of design and specification of the facility.

Facility operations

33.     It is intended that the university would be contracted to operate the facility during the initial period while the university’s existing recreation facilities are being redeveloped. This operation would be under a management agreement similar in approach to that of the contracted leisure sites within the Auckland Council network.

34.     The university would be responsible for delivering sport and recreation outcomes for the wider community alongside activities for its students.

35.     Indicative figures provided by the university indicate that 70% of the overall capacity will be available for use by the community as well as the university students, with 30% of programmable time being taken up by activities available to university students only. The available hours will vary based on the time of year as shown in the graphic below.

 

36.     Upon the completion and opening of the new university recreation facility at the Symonds street campus, the student only capacity at Kari Street would reduce in favour of use by the community.

37.     For the initial period, specific maintenance and repair responsibilities in relation to the buildings, fixtures, fittings and equipment at the facility would be confirmed through a management agreement with the university.

38.     As the asset owner, Auckland Council would be responsible for the long-term depreciation and renewal of the facility.  Adding this facility to the Auckland Council asset register will trigger provision of depreciation and renewal budgets.

39.     Following the initial period and the end of the university management agreement, Auckland Council will consider how best to manage this facility as a community facility. This includes the option of continuing the agreement with the university to manage the facility. A component of any future management would include a preferential and modest allocation of hours throughout the year for university use for a further agreed number of years. 

Kari Street Commons development

40.     The proposed university partnership facilities contribute to the wider implementation of the Kari Street Commons Concept Plan.

41.     As part of the Auckland Council commitment to the development at Kari Street Commons, $1.3m is committed for stage one.  Stage one includes grass terraces, landscaping, three basketball half courts, one basketball full court, open space, BMX learner track and re-purposed furniture to be delivered summer 2019/2020.  This is a win-win for both the university and Auckland Council as both parties funded developments will complement each other in terms of activation and use.

42.     The precinct will be developed as a pedestrian and cycle access facility with minimal car parking.  Vehicle parking will only be available to support deliveries, administration and disabled access. 

43.     As part of the university proposal, it requires that council develop the toilet facilities identified on the concept plan as part of the stage one development at the site. Auckland Council plans to deliver these as part of stage two of the development.

44.     This detail and point of difference between the two programmes still requires resolution.

Decision-making authority

45.     The Auckland Domain Committee has oversight and decision-making authority over the use and developments on the Auckland Domain.

46.     Decisions relating to most matters concerning Auckland Domain have been delegated to this committee, including items valued up to $2 million. For items exceeding this value, the matter must be referred to the relevant committee of the Auckland Council governing body.

47.     It is anticipated that the development of this facility will be valued between $2 - $3 million. A further decision may therefore be required from a governing body committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

48.     The development of an indoor court facility and an outdoor turf will provide for sporting facility demand that cannot currently be met by existing Auckland Council provision. The Active Recreation unit of Auckland Council believe this facility will improve the sport and recreation service outcomes for Aucklanders.

49.     The Community Facilities department will be responsible for the final approvals of design and specification of the facilities. They will also be responsible for elements of the ongoing maintenance as specified within a management agreement.

50.     The Parks, Sport and Recreation department will be responsible for the management agreements which will contract the operation of the facility. This will ensure the ongoing service outcome of active recreation for the community.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

51.     The Auckland Domain Committee was established to ensure the interests of both the Governing Body and the Waitematā Local Board were considered jointly, and to facilitate decision-making across both interested groups.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.     This facility was indicated in the Kari Street Commons Concept Plan and mana whenua were engaged as part of the development of this plan.  Specific mana whenua engagement around this project is yet to occur.

53.     In general, information gathered on recreation participation shows that Māori are more likely to participate in indoor codes across Auckland than the population norms. However, in the local area statistics indicate that Māori are less likely to be active in indoor court sports. This could indicate that a shortage of local indoor facilities is limiting the participation of Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     The capital costs of the development of the facility is forecast to be between $2 - $3 million. The responsibility for these costs would be held by the university.

55.     Once the facility is complete, ownership will be transferred to Auckland Council.

56.     Auckland Council would be responsible for the long-term maintenance, depreciation and renewal of this facility.

57.     Operational, programming and maintenance costs would be determined through a detailed schedule in a management agreement for the facility.

58.     As a pre-requisite for the development of the partnership facility Auckland Council is required to deliver other elements of the Kari Street Commons Concept Plan. Stage 1 will cost $1.3 million and has been programmed to be delivered during summer 2019/2020.

59.     As noted in paragraphs 43 and 44 the discussions around the provision of toilets are continuing and the impact on the Auckland Council programme of development are yet to be determined.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     The legal constraints of the Auckland Domain Act 1987 require all agreements and the facility developed in accordance of the Act.

61.     Auckland Council legal services are providing advice at each stage of negotiations around the facility development and will be required to approve any final agreements. The university have been advised to seek its own legal advice to ensure compliance with provisions of the Act.

62.     The catalyst for the university’s support of a development at Kari Street Commons is the redevelopment of the recreation centre on their campus. This redevelopment is on a specific timeframe with the partnership facility required by mid-2020. This timeframe leaves little margin and requires a smooth progression through planning and delivery for success.

63.     To adhere to the required timelines and ensure delivery of the project the facility will need to gain all necessary consents without significant delay. The University will be responsible for obtaining all the consents necessary for its part in the proposed development.

64.     Auckland Council currently has no financial exposure due to any delays or decisions not to proceed with the facility partnership.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     Staff to confirm all elements of partnership around the development of an indoor court and outdoor turf facility with the university.

66.     Mana whenua engagement and consultation on the development of the facility will be undertaken.

67.     Staff to seek any additional political decisions required to progress the development.

68.     A procurement process will be undertaken to contract the delivery of design and build of the facility.

69.     A management agreement for the initial period will be confirmed which outlines all operational details for the facilities management and programming.

70.     Legal services will provide oversight over all contractual requirements to ensure adherence to the Auckland Domain Act.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

University of Auckland proposal - Kari Street Commons

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Dave Stewart - Manager Sport & Recreation

Leigh Redshaw - Strategic Funding Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Bowater - Manager Parks

Jane Aickin - Kaiwhakahaere Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua

 


Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Auckland Domain Committee

5/06/2019

 

Auckland Domain general update and approval of new infrastructure

File No.: CP2019/07753

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To update the Auckland Domain Committee on recent activities in Auckland Domain.

2.         To seek approval for a new path name, the development of four new paths, a new trial “tap and go” device, and an extension of the Auckland Bowling Club carpark management agreement.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.         Since the 21 February 2019 meeting of the Auckland Domain Committee (committee) a range of activities have been occurring on, or associated with, Auckland Domain.  Of particular note is:

·      the formal opening of Te Ara Oranga, the new path from Titoki Street to the southern entrance of the Auckland War Memorial Museum.  This opening occurred on 27 May 2019 and provides a significant improvement for access to the Auckland Domain and the Auckland War Memorial Museum (AWMM) in particular from the Parnell side of Auckland Domain.  It is recommended that the committee retrospectively formally endorse the name that was gifted by the Taumata-a-iwi of AWMM.

·      Almost $1million of funding has been committed by the Waitematā Local Board for the development of four new paths and connections into or between roads in the Auckland Domain.  This funding is subject to approval being granted from this committee for the four new paths.  This is a substantial financial commitment and a big step forward in achieving the accessibility improvement aspirations identified in the Auckland Domain Master Plan 2016.

·      The Wintergardens nursery glasshouse development has been completed.  Staff are looking forward to shifting the wide range of exotic plants, usually kept at the nursery, from their temporary home into this new purpose-built facility. 

·      The Wintergardens hot and temperate houses have also been undergoing major maintenance to replace the timber joinery and framing. Works are due to be completed by mid-July 2019. A tender is being prepared for the roof glazing and seismic upgrade, with a tentative start date of September 2019.

4.         An agreement between Auckland Council and the Auckland Bowling Club, in regards to the management of the carpark adjacent to the club, is due to expire in June 2019.  An extension to this agreement is sought while alternative management arrangements are put in place.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      endorse the name Te Ara Oranga for the new path leading from Titoki Street to the southern entrance of Auckland War Memorial Museum noting that:

·        “Te Ara Oranga” is translated as the pathway of life or wellbeing and speaks to the connection with the Blind Foundation sensory garden immediately adjacent to the path and also acknowledges that the native trees of Pukekawa and the manu (birds) that rely on Pukekawa/Auckland Domain. 

b)      thank the Waitematā Local Board for their contribution to improving access to the Auckland Domain by way of providing $965,459 of funding from their Transport Capital Fund for new paths.

c)      approve the development of four new paths, described in this report and listed below:

i)        Titoki St carpark to Football Rd path

ii)       Football Road end to the Crescent

iii)      Centennial Path to Grafton Mews

iv)      Parnell Station to Lovers Lane.

d)      request that staff commence detailed design for the four new paths and report back to the Auckland Domain Committee or its equivalent to seek approval prior to lodging resource consent.

e)      endorse the trial of a new tap and go donation device in the Wintergardens on the condition that it is made clear that this is a voluntary donation device and that all net revenue will be for the sole purpose of improvements in Auckland Domain.

f)       delegate to the General Manager Community Facilities the authority to implement this trial and report back to the Auckland Domain Committee or its equivalent after a period of one year, if not before.

g)      endorse an eight-month extension of the Car Park Operation and Management Agreement with Auckland Bowling Club between Auckland Council and the Auckland Bowling Club on similar terms and conditions as the existing agreement.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Auckland War Memorial Museum

5.         The Auckland War Memorial Museum (AWMM) has had another busy Easter, ANZAC and school holiday period. They have managed this high demand and ongoing visitor support while also making great progress with their internal refurbishment project.  

6.         Of particular note this quarter is the opening of the pedestrian connection from Titoki Street through Auckland Domain to AWMM.  This was publicly opened on Monday 27 May 2019.  At this ceremony the name Te Ara Oranga was gifted.

7.         Te Ara Oranga was fully funded by AWMM with consent granted from this committee to design and build the path across Auckland Domain (outside of the AWMM lease). 


 

8.         Prior to the opening the AWMM completed a te reo Māori naming project within which they looked at the new path.  The naming project included a process whereby a very knowledgable Māori rōpu (group) undertook rangahau (research) and recommended names to the AWMM Taumata-a-Iwi (which is made up of representatives from Ngāti Whātu Ōrākei, Ngāti Paoa and Waikato Tainui). Following careful consideration the name Te Ara Oranga was gifted for the path by Taumata-a-Iwi member Te Hei Tamariki.

9.         Te Ara Oranga is translated as the pathway of life or wellbeing.  The name relates to the connection to the Blind Foundation, the sensory garden and the native trees that grew in that area of Pukekawa.  The sensory garden immediately adjacent to the path has assisted the blind in their appreciation of the plant-life and in their travel up to Pukekawa and the Auckland Domain.

10.      It also acknowledges that the wider area was part of a tui trail - where native trees were populated by tui especially during nesting and food gathering time.  Māori have traditionally always looked to natural tohu or signals to understand the environment and to check the wellbeing of the landscape and also the people.  Te Ara Oranga then can be linked to the journey of the manu (birds).  Re-invigoration of native planting around the pathway will encourage more birds to rest here.

11.      Decision making, including naming, at Auckland Domain (outside of the AWMM lease) rests with the committee.  As the official opening for the path occurred between decision making meetings the committee members were invited to consider the name via email.  It is recommended that the name Te Ara Oranga be retrospectively endorsed by way of a resolution which will, in part, help formally record this new name with the council. 

 


 

Photos from the opening day on 27 May 2019

Accessibility improvement programme

12.      At the 29 November 2018 Auckland Domain Committee meeting, a report on the Auckland Domain Accessibility Revised Stage 1 Improvement Programme was presented and the committee resolved to:

c)      recommend that funds governed by the Waitematā Local Board fund, in its Transport Capital Fund be utilised for the installation of new paths in Auckland Domain to support pedestrian movements between and along road corridors including paths from:

i) Football Road to the Titoki Street Carpark

ii) the corner of Wintergarden Road through to The Crescent

iii) Centennial path to Grafton Mews

iv) Parnell train station to Lovers Lane through the woodchip yard

And

e)      recommend that funds governed by the Waitematā Local Board be utilised to fund the expanded Kiosk Road carpark from their Parking Fund. 

f)       request feedback from Auckland Transport from their investigation into making Football Road, part of Grafton Mews and the full length of the Crescent one-way.

h)      recommend funding from the Annual Plan of $5 million over two years to enable delivery of stage one of the Accessibility Improvement Programme, beyond what can be achieved from Waitematā Local Board-sourced funding.

(Resolution number ADC/2018/36)

13.      1On 21 May 2019, the Waitematā Local Board requested that Auckland Transport commit $965,459 from their Transport Capital Fund for the development of the following four paths in Auckland Domain as detailed below: 

·      Titoki St carpark to Football Rd path

A 1.8m path that has taken account of the need to not unduly impact the tuff ring.  It will run close to George Street and turn into Football Road at Little George St which will be partially filled to restore the tuff ring in this area.  The path will also run along the top of the carpark and meet the new path developed by the museum.

·      Football Road End to the Crescent

A 1.8 metre wide path that runs from intersection of Football Road to The Crescent.  It will be approximately 25m moving from east to west and includes the development of a footpath on the west side of The Crescent to the public toilets.

·      Centennial Path to Grafton Mews

A 1.8 metre wide path that is approximately 53 metres long which sweeps north at the bottom of Centennial Path to connect part way along Grafton Mews north, avoiding most of the carparks, and including a path on a portion of Grafton Mews to enable a pedestrian connection to the path on Lower Domain Drive.

·      Parnell Station to Lovers Lane

This includes a new 3m wide primary path from the train station through the area informally known as the “chip yard” and onto Lower Domain Drive.  It will be approximately 210m long and will include excavation to ensure the path immediately adjacent to the railway platform is of an appropriate grade.  The remainder of this path already exists however the existing path will be resurfaced and realigned close to Lower Domain Drive to exit opposite the start of Lovers Lane.   The path includes electrical conduit to enable lighting for use during events.

14.      The approval for funding these paths was subject to the endorsement of the committee.  It is recommended the committee acknowledge this contribution to improving access to Auckland Domain and formally endorse the commencement of these projects.  Staff will then be able to progress detailed design and report back to the committee seeking approval for the designs and the implementation programme in due course.

15.      Funding is still being sought for carpark improvements at intersection of Domain Drive and Kiosk Road and for the trial gate system that is intended to open up carparks for visitors wanting to spend time in Auckland Domain.  The Waitematā Local Board will formally consider this in June and if supported this will be referred onto the Finance and Performance Committee for ratification. 

16.      As part of the 2019/20 Annual Plan deliberations the Mayor has commended Waitematā Local Board for providing funding to support the accessibility improvement fund and proposes a further $150,000 capital expenditure budget in 2019/2020 to support wayfinding.

17.      The Mayor noted that any further funding would only be considered once further advice can be provided on the one-way configuration for certain part of the roads, introduction of parking charges and the accounting for parking revenue.

Wintergardens nursery glasshouse replacement

18.      The long awaited Wintergardens nursery glasshouse replacement has now been completed. 

19.      This large new glasshouse structure replaces most (not all) of the older glasshouses that had reached the end of their useful life many years ago.  Staff had been patching up the old glasshouses for decades. 

20.      At the time of writing the report commissioning of the plant and automation systems had begun as well as training staff to use the new facility. Asphalting and re-surfacing works still needed to be completed to repair the surrounding areas following construction.

21.      A small official opening is being planned. 

  

Photos of the new Wintergardens nursery glasshouse as at May 2019

Wintergardens

22.      Work is currently underway to replace the timber joinery and framing of the temperate and hot houses within the Wintergardens complex. Works are progressing and are on track to be completed by mid-July 2019. A tender is being prepared for the roof glazing and seismic upgrade, with a tentative start date of September 2019.

23.      The Wintergardens hosted two National Geographic photographers from America who had made the journey to do a photoshoot of Prime Minister, Rt Hon Jacinda Arden. Feedback was received from National Geographic on what a great experience the photographers had at the Auckland Domain and how welcome they were made by Auckland Council and contractor staff. The photographers were very impressed with the Wintergardens and Fernery. The portraits taken on the day will feature in an upcoming book published by the National Geographic on Influential Woman of the 21st Century and a magazine article of the same nature. The National Geographic will be sending a copy of both the book and magazine to the council for our records.

 

(L- R Karl Beaufort Auckland Council, Erika Larsen – National Geographic, Rt. Hon Jacinda Adern PM, Andrian Mereuta – National Geographic, Jonathan Corvisy – AIM Services)

 

24.      The Wintergardens complex including the nursery glasshouses and heating system are a very popular tourist attraction.  They are unique heritage assets within an everchanging horticultural display of colour reflective of the Victorian gardening era.   

25.      The committee have been discussing revenue raising ideas to help support the ongoing development of the Auckland Domain.  These discussions have been associated with the number of unfunded improvements recommended in the Auckland Domain Master Plan, 2016.  With this in mind staff have been exploring the option of installing a “tap and go” device within the Wintergardens complex.  This device would provide an opportunity for visitors to the Wintergardens to donate a small amount toward the improvement programme by way of tapping a pay wave credit card.  It would be a voluntary donation and there would be a clear commitment provided to visitors that any funds donated would be for the sole purpose of investing in future improvements to the Wintergardens and Auckland Domain. 

26.      The cost to purchase a “tap and go” donation device would be less than $1,000 with an additional cost of a few thousand to house the device on a suitable secure plinth and create an electrical and wi-fi connection.  All of this would need to be carefully designed so as not to detract from the heritage integrity of the site.  There is also a small ongoing operational cost of $276 per annum and a transaction cost of $0.20 per donation.  It is expected the initial costs would be recovered by donations received over a period of one year or less (this is based on a conservative projection of twenty people donating $5 each every week throughout the year).  There are at least 15,000 large tourist bus visits annually to the Auckland Domain.  It is hoped that the high amenity value of the site and a low donation value would result in reasonably high voluntary contributions. This would ideally mean that over a few years the net proceeds could enable one or more of the priority projects in the Auckland Domain to proceed.

27.      It is recommended that the committee endorse this initiative and delegate to management the authority to implement the tap and go initiative as a trial and report back results to the committee after one year (if not before).

Auckland Bowling Club

28.      At the 30 August 2018 meeting of the committee it was resolved to:

b)      grant approval to extend the Car Park Operation and Management Agreement with Auckland Bowling Club, dated 14 November 2017, for a further term of one-year, and that the Chair write with notice of three months to the club, to 30 June 2019. 

(Resolution number ADC/2018/31)

29.      At the following meeting of the committee, on the 29 November 2019, it was agreed to endorse parking charges in Grafton Mews subject to consultation on this being undertaken (in alignment with Auckland Transport’s consultation process) and on the net revenue being returned to the Auckland Domain.  This and other improvements were dependent on Auckland Transport being able to include this in their work programme and funding being available for the traffic reports and consultation associated with these changes.

30.      Auckland Transport were not able to put this in their 2018/19 work programme, which was already at capacity.  However they have indicated that they may be able to include this in their 2019/20 work programme subject to the council funding the traffic reports and consultation. 

31.      At the time of writing is it understood that operational funding will be available through the annual plan for the necessary traffic reports and public consultation in 2019/20 financial year.  This will be supported by a formal request to Auckland Transport to fund the capital improvements (parking meters, signs and line marking) on the basis that the revenue from the pay and display will be used to offset the capital investment in the short term.  It will be conditional on net revenue from parking charges being returned to Auckland Domain once the initial capital investment is paid off. 

32.      As the alternative parking management regime will not be in place by 30 June 2019 it is recommended that the committee offer Auckland Bowling Club an extension of the Car Park Operation and Management Agreement.  This would be on similar terms and conditions but for only a period of eight-months. 

General Maintenance

33.      Over the last quarter new leaks were found in both the mirror pond and Valkyries fountain ponds which resulted in both ponds needing to be temporarily drained. At the time of writing specialists were assisting to locate the leaks and ascertaining the cause before works will be undertaken to repair and refill the ponds.

34.      A large cactus and rare hoya plants have been stolen from the Wintergarden greenhouses. Ways to deter and prevent future theft are being investigated.  All thefts are reported to the NZ Police.

35.      The eastern duck pond has been infested by the water plant duckweed – Lemna Minor.  The council’s Healthy Waters team, who manage the health of the water, were arranging clearance of the plant at the time of writing this report.  They are also looking into ways to address the weed if it returns. 

36.      Ongoing maintenance of the duck ponds, include silt clearing, is continuing. 

37.      The Auckland Domain hosted two unpermitted vigil events in the wake of the Christchurch attacks. In anticipation of large crowds the maintenance staff provided portaloos to increase sanitation services. Both vigils went ahead without any issues.

38.      Preparations for ANZAC Day this year were significant due to heightened security and the attendance of a member of the Royal Family. Both the dawn and civic services were carried out with no maintenance issues being reported.  Approximately 11,000 attended the Dawn Service and approximately 5,000 attended the Civic Service.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.      This report largely reflects ‘business as usual’ operational activity and is considered to be in line with council group activities.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.      This report largely reflects ‘business as usual’ operational activity and, in general, is not considered to have an impact on the significant values to mana whenua of Auckland Domain. Updates on larger projects will have been or will be the subject specific reports to the committee previously, or at a later date where Māori impacts will have been or will be reported on.

41.      Given the significance of the site to mana whenua and Māori of Auckland engagement on any new developments is essential and this has been reported on a case by case basis as projects arise.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.      As noted above there are a range of projects either occurring or proposed that require funding.  All maintenance and renewal works are within approved budgets.

43.      New funding has been received or still being sought for paths, carparking changes and wayfinding signage as discussed above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.      There are no substantive risks identified at this point in time. There are some trip hazards along path networks that are due to be upgraded and structural building risks at the Wintergardens which will be mitigated through planned project work. 

45.      Current projects discussed in this report are subject to operational health and safety plans. This includes a process for incident and near-miss reporting, which will be reported to the committee where this has occurred. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.      Over the next quarter, the following key steps will occur in relation to the matters raised in this report:

i)        Resourcing to be confirmed for Grafton Mews carpark changes (from Auckland Transport and the Annual Plan), wayfinding (from the Annual Plan), funding for the Kiosk Road car park and commuter parking management trial (from the Parking Fund via the Waitematā Local Board and Finance and Performance Committee).

ii)       Detailed designs for the four new paths will be progressed

iii)      Once funding is confirmed:

-       Detailed design for the redevelopment of the carpark at the intersection of Kiosk Road and Domain Drive can be progressed

-       Commence negotiations with Auckland Transport in respect to roles and responsibilities in relation to the proposed parking management trial

-       Traffic reports and a communication plan to be commissioned relating to changes agreed at the committee’s November 2018 meeting.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jane Aickin - Kaiwhakahaere Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua

Authoriser

Mark Bowater - Manager Parks