I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Albert-Eden Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 26 June 2019

4.00pm

Western Springs Community Hall, Hall 1, 956 Great North Road, Western Springs

 

Albert-Eden Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Peter Haynes

 

Deputy Chairperson

Glenda Fryer

 

Members

Lee Corrick

 

 

Graeme Easte

 

 

Rachel Langton

 

 

Ben Lee

 

 

Jessica Rose

 

 

Margi Watson

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Mark Macfarlane

Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

 

18 June 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 623 6090

Email: mark.macfarlane@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Proposed alterations and extensions to Mt Albert League Club rooms                                                                                                                     5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                           7

12        Notice of Motion - Member Rose - Climate Emergency Declaration                       9

13        Indicative business case: Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park                          27

14        Te Tohu O Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) Implementation Strategy                         51

15        Road stopping adjacent to School Reserve at Kingsland                                      73

16        Changes to Local Board Standing Orders                                                                83

17        Albert-Eden Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme 2019 – 2022  89

18        Approval of the Community Services 2019/2020 work programme                    113

19        Approval of the 2019/2020 Albert-Eden local environment work programme   133

20        Albert-Eden Local Board 2019/2020 Local Economic Development Work Programme                                                                                                                                     147

21        2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme                                                      153

22        Albert-Eden Local Board Progress and Achievements Report January 2018 - June 2019                                                                                                                             159

23        Auckland Transport Reports - June 2019                                                               201

24        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update from 1 November 2018 to 30 April 2019                                                                                                 223

25        Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities Bill                                                            229

26        Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill                                 283

27        Puketāpapa Local Board - Notice of Motion - Safe road sharing by buses and bicycles                                                                                                                       349

28        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                          355

29        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                357

30        Board Member's Reports                                                                                          359

31        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      369

32        Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Notes                                                            375  

33        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting, held on Wednesday, 22 May 2019 and the minutes of its extraordinary meeting, held on Wednesday, 5 June 2019, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Albert-Eden Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.1       Deputation - Proposed alterations and extensions to Mt Albert League Club rooms

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the Deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mark McLeay, President of the Mt Albert Rugby League club, will be in attendance to provide the Board with an update on the proposed alterations and extensions to Mt Albert League Club rooms located at Fowlds Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Mark McLeay for his attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Mt Albert Rugby League Club profile........................................................... 391

b          Concept Plans for Mt Albert Rugby Club at 50 Western Springs Road
Auckland.......................................................................................................
399

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) or Standing Order 1.9.1 (LBS 3.10.17) (revoke or alter a previous resolution) a Notice of Motion has been received from <Member Names>  for consideration under item 12.

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Notice of Motion - Member Rose - Climate Emergency Declaration

File No.: CP2019/10369

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/ExecutiveSummary.aspx

1.       Member Rose has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member Rose and Member Easte as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

3.       Supporting information is appended as Attachment A.

 

Motion

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note its concerns about the ecological and climate crisis

b)      commend the Governing Body on the Declaration of climate emergency

c)      note that the Governing Body will shortly be consulting on Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

d)      recommend that the Governing Body consider formally endorsing the New Urban Agenda

e)      request Auckland Council prioritise rapid decarbonisation projects and budgeting by putting the climate crisis at the centre of its thinking and decision making

f)       request Auckland Council establish a citizens Climate Emergency Panel to support rapid behaviour change

g)      recommend that all Auckland Council policies and plans be reviewed to align with the Auckland Climate Action Plan

h)      forward these resolutions to all other Local Boards, the Governing Body Members, and Auckland Transport for action.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Climate emergency declaration

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Indicative business case: Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park

File No.: CP2019/10509

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the indicative business case for the redevelopment of Chamberlain Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The redevelopment of Chamberlain Park was selected by the Albert-Eden Local Board as its  One Local Initiative for funding as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028. Funding of $22 million was earmarked for the project, following indicative and detailed business case processes.

3.       Staff have developed an indicative business case to inform decision-making. Preparation of the business case entailed an investigation of community need, an assessment of strategic alignment and an economic analysis.

4.       The needs assessment demonstrates a current and future community need. A gap in neighbourhood park provision has been identified. Projected growth will increase pressure on existing open space and create demand for new sport and recreation facilities.

5.       The strategic assessment shows strong alignment with council’s plans and strategic objectives.

6.       The economic case identified two options that deliver community benefits comparable to the capital and operational costs required to develop the new sport and recreation facilities.

7.       A range of options were considered, and two potential solutions identified:

·   Option one: Partial redevelopment based on implementation of phase three of the approved Chamberlain Park master plan (status quo).

·   Option two: Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park based on full delivery of the approved Chamberlain Park master plan (One Local Initiative).

8.       On balance, staff recommend the development of a detailed business case based on option two. It best responds to community needs and strongly aligns with the council’s investment objectives. The proposed new open space and facilities have widespread appeal and will deliver ‘belonging and participation outcomes’ under the Auckland Plan. There is a potential economic case for change. A cost-benefit analysis indicates the benefits are 0.96 times the costs.

9.       Project capital costs are estimated to be $29.7 million, which is more than the $22 million earmarked under the Long-term Plan 2018-2028. Increased costs are due to geotechnical issues at Chamberlain Park. Commercial or partnership opportunities and options to reduce these costs, and the financial risk to council, can be investigated as part of a detailed business case.

10.     The key difference between option two and option one is quantifiable community benefits are distributed to a wider range of Aucklanders versus a return on investment of $0.40 million over 34 years.

11.     There is a high risk of further legal challenges to the redevelopment of Chamberlain Park leading to increased financial and staff costs. This can be minimised by transparent and robust decision-making processes.

12.     The next step for staff is to prepare a report for the Environment and Community Committee outlining the above findings. It will include the views of the Albert-Eden Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      endorse the findings of an indicative business case for the redevelopment of Chamberlain Park which found:

i)        projected growth of 143,000 people (32.7 per cent) by 2036 in the Albert-Eden Local Board area leading to increased demand for new sport and recreation facilities

ii)       changing demographics with a decrease in New Zealand Europeans from 48 per cent to 38 per cent and an increase in Asian people from 34 per cent to 41 per cent by 2038

iii)      a gap in neighbourhood park provision in accordance with the Open Space Provision Policy

iv)      a shortfall of 27 field hours growing to 87 field hours by 2028

v)      a reduction in rounds played at Chamberlain Park Golf Course from 82,371 in 2001/02 to 50,239 in 2017/18

vi)      access to open space and new sport and recreation facilities will increase community benefits, in particular physical and mental health benefits

vii)     redevelopment of Chamberlain Park aligns with Auckland Plan outcomes

viii)    the quantifiable benefits of redeveloping Chamberlain Park are $1.2 million less than the capital and operational costs required to provide additional open space as well as new sport and recreation facilities - a cost-benefit analysis indicates the benefits are 0.96 times the costs

ix)      project capital costs are $29.7 million, which is more than the $22 million earmarked under the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

b)      endorse that the redevelopment of Chamberlain Park has a robust case for change and strategic alignment with council objectives and would deliver community benefits comparable to the capital and operational investment required.

c)      endorse the development of a detailed business case for the development of Chamberlain Park, commencing in 2019/2020 based on:

i)        development of a 3.6-hectare neighbourhood park with play area; shared walking and cycling paths and connections; the restoration of Watītikō/Meola Creek; two artificial fields; and a reconfigured nine-hole golf course with driving range and practice facilities

ii)       indicative funding of $22 million earmarked as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park is a priority for the Albert-Eden Local Board

13.     Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park was selected by the Albert-Eden Local Board as its One Local Initiative for funding as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028. Its proposal is based on the phased implementation of the approved master plan for Chamberlain Park.[1]

14.     It proposed reconfiguring the 18-hole golf course into a nine-hole golf course with a neighbourhood park, walking and cycling connections, two-artificial fields and a more diverse golf offering. New golf facilities will include a driving range, a practice area with some facilities targeting beginners.

15.     The local board’s objective is to appeal to a wider range of golfers and those interested in taking up the sport. It also seeks to provide access to open space, including a playground, to neighbouring residents. New sport and recreation opportunities will appeal to a range of Aucklanders.

16.     The Finance and Performance Committee approved provisional funding for the One Local Initiative projects [FIN/2018/85 refers].

17.     A total of $0.100 million was allocated to the Albert-Eden Local Board for a business case. The business case is developed in two parts - indicative and detailed.

18.     Funding of $22 million was earmarked for the development. Of this, $8.2 million was allocated to phase three including restoration of Watītikō/Meola Creek. The remainder was earmarked for later phases, following the indicative and detailed business case process.

Indicative business cases are a tool to support decision-making

19.     Auckland Council uses a three-stage process to investigate large-scale capital projects and new investment in community services or facilities. This approach is based on the Business Case model developed by the Treasury.

20.     The first stage begins with a needs assessment. This entails:

·   research into the profile of the community, including projected growth data

·   a summary of recent social research and any relevant community engagement surveys

·   a community facility stocktake (both council and non-council facilities)

·   a gap analysis which assesses current provision against council policy.

21.     An indictive business case considers the merits of a proposed investment. It helps ensure that there is a robust case for change before resources are committed to a project.

22.     The indicative business case considers strategic alignment with council objectives, including the Auckland Plan. It also includes an economic case which considers the costs and benefits of various options that may achieve council’s investment goals.

23.     A detailed business case can be built upon:

·   a needs assessment which demonstrates a robust case for change

·   a strategic assessment which shows alignment with council objectives

·   an economic case that identifies a preferred option(s) that delivers community benefits and value for money.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Staff have prepared an indicative business case for the redevelopment of Chamberlain Park that follows council’s three stage process. The key finding are outlined below. Attachment A provides a more detailed overview.

25.     Growth projected in the study area, will create demand for new and more diverse sport and recreation facilities, including golf.

·   The local population is projected to grow 32.7 per cent from 433,914 to 575,594 people between 2018 and 2038.

·   The ethnic make-up of the local board area is changing with a decrease in New Zealand Europeans from 48 per cent to 38 per cent and an increase in Asian people from 34 per cent to 41 per cent by 2038. Other ethnicities remain relatively stable.

·   Golf participation in the local board area is 2.5 per cent. New Zealand Europeans participation is 2.9 per cent. Asian, Māori, Pacific Peoples and other ethnic groups have lower rates of 2.5, 0.2, 2.0 and 1.0 per cent respectively. 

·   Sports preferences are changing with estimated golf participation by Albert-Eden residents falling by three per cent between 2017 and 2018.[2]

·   Chamberlain Park golf course had seen a reduction in rounds played from 82,371 in 2001/02 to 50,239 in 2017/18 despite population growth in the area. 

·   Many golfers are seeking diversity and flexibility and are seeking shorter and more flexible golfing options.

·   Inclusion of the reconfigured nine-hole golf course, driving range and practice area will allow for golfers to have a more diverse range of golf activities. The driving range also improves the financial viability of the development.

·   Walking and cycling rates of residents are 57 and 10 per cent respectively.

26.     The Albert-Eden Open Space Network Plan identified a gap in neighbourhood park provision based on an assessment against the Open Space Provision Policy.

27.     There is a current shortfall in sports field hours of 27 hours, growing to 87 hours by 2028.

·   The Albert-Eden Local Board area has a shortage of 75 lit field hours growing to 104 hours by 2028. 

·   Two artificial fields would provide an additional 90 field hours, meeting the forecasted demand shortfall.

28.     Chamberlain Park is an optimal location to respond to the projected population growth and respond to changing community need.

·   The Albert-Eden Local Board area has a shortage of available land making any open space acquisition for sport fields expensive. Current open space could be utilised to meet growing demand.

·   Offering a mixture of sport and recreation opportunities will allow a wider and more diverse section of the population to utilise public open space.


 

29.     Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park would increase community access through the inclusion of a neighbourhood park.

·   The neighbourhood park would provide an informal recreation space for a wide variety of users by including a playground and nature play as well as a barbeque area.

·   Park usage projections shows growth from an initial 15,909 usage hours in year one to 23,824 usage hours in year 34.

·   Provision of walking and cycling connections aligns with the key focus areas and moves of the Albert-Eden Open Space Network Plan.

30.     The development of Chamberlain Park aligns with Auckland Plan outcomes, see Table 1 below.

Table 1: Alignment with Auckland Plan 2050

Outcome

Direction or focus area

Alignment

Outcome 1: Belonging and participation

Direction 2: improve health and wellbeing of all Aucklanders by reducing harm and disparities in opportunities

 

Aligns through providing sport and recreation facilities for under-serviced and rural communities

 

Focus area 2:  provide accessible services and social and cultural infrastructure that are responsive in meeting peoples evolving needs

 

Aligns through providing a multi-purpose facility that can change in response to our changing population

 

Focus area 6: focus investment to address disparities and serve communities of greatest need

 

Aligns through providing the facility where there is an identified community need

 

Focus area 7: recognise the value of arts, culture, sports and recreation to quality of life.

 

Aligns through quantifying the benefits to the community of the facility

 

There is a robust strategic case for change for the proposed facility

31.     The needs assessment demonstrates a current and future community need.

32.     The strategic assessment shows strong alignment with council plans, strategies and resolutions.

33.     The economic case identified two options that deliver community benefits. Both options align with council’s investment objectives and critical success factors.

34.     There is a potential economic case for change. A cost-benefit analysis indicates the benefits are 0.96 times the costs. This shows that the community benefits are comparable to the capital and operational costs required to develop the new sport and recreation facilities.

35.     Typically, investors seek a ratio of more than one. Commercial or partnership opportunities and options to reduce council’s costs can be investigated as part of a detailed business case.

 

 

A range of options were considered, and two potential solutions identified

36.     Staff assessed two options as a part of the investigation:

·   Option one: Partial redevelopment based on implementation of phase three of the approved Chamberlain Park master plan (status quo).

·   Option two: Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park based on full delivery of the approved Chamberlain Park master plan (One Local Initiative).

Option one: Partial development of Chamberlain Park (status quo)

37.     The status quo entails the development of a 3.6-hectare neighbourhood park on the western end of the site, 850 metres of shared paths and connections and restoration of Watītikō/Meola Creek. This aligns with stage three of the master plan.

38.     The neighbourhood park would provide a diverse range of play opportunities through a playground and nature play. There would be a barbeque area and space for informal recreation.

39.     Under this option the golf course would remain 18 holes. Three holes would be shortened or reconfigured to fit the reduced land area following the creation of the neighbourhood park. These changes may reduce golfers’ enjoyment of this part of the course. The other 15 holes would remain the same.

40.     This option does not align with council’s investment objectives. It would provide a return on investment of $0.40 million over 34 years.

Option two: Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park (the One Local Initiative)

41.     Option two includes the components outlined in option one as well as two artificial fields and a diverse golf offering. This includes a reconfigured nine-hole golf course, driving range and practice area to appeal to a wider range of golfers. There are an extra 2100 metres of shared paths and connections. This option aligns with the full master plan, excluding an aquatic facility.

42.     The golf course would be redesigned to provide a better golfing experience. It would meet the handicap rating requirement with a par of 34 to 36 - typical for a nine-hole course.

43.     This option has strong strategic alignment. It provides a broad range of sport and recreation opportunities and delivers community benefits.

44.     There are higher costs with this proposal and subsequently a weaker economic case.

Option two aligns strongly with investment objectives and would deliver greater community benefits

45.     Option two aligns with critical success factors and council’s investment objectives:

·   Enable our communities: fulfil Auckland Plan outcomes through increased participation in sports and recreation by enhancing the current network of facilities.

·   Reduce inequities: reduce inequities between communities through providing facilities where the greatest need exists. This will address disparities in sport and recreation outcomes and ensure a robust network of facilities across Auckland.

·   Fit-for-purpose: provide greater efficiencies through investing in multi-use facilities rather than single codes. This will support our diverse communities and provide greater efficiencies.

·   Public benefits and outcomes: golf courses are currently only accessible to those who pay to play golf. Better access to golf courses for other activities such as walking and running will deliver greater benefits to more Aucklanders from council’s investment.

·   Aucklanders more active, more often: create a hierarchy of golf courses that offer a pathway to participation, regardless of experience, membership and club traditions, increasing participation particularly among women, young people and a wider range of ethnicities.

46.     The quantified benefits of option two (Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park) are comparable to the capital and operational costs required to develop the facility.

47.     The net benefits of option two are -$1.2 million in present day terms. The ratio of benefits to costs are at least 0.96. 

48.     The primary benefits of option two are the improved physical and mental health outcomes to users, exceeding $25 million. Other benefits include increased productivity, reduced unemployment and decreased crime.

49.     These benefits are distributed to a wider range of the community instead of primarily being for golf users. By optimising the public space and increasing the sport and recreation activities offered, a more diverse section of the population can enjoy Chamberlain Park.

50.     The capital cost of option two is estimated to be $29.7 million. The costliest element is the two-artificial sport fields at $16.2 million. This is due to the lava field under Chamberlain Park which means that considerable earthworks are needed to create a flat platform. Typically, two-artificial sport fields would cost around $4.2 million.

51.     The cost of the sports field should be weighed against the cost of acquiring new land for open space in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

Staff recommend the development of a detailed business case based on option two

52.     Staff recommend the development of a detailed business case based on option two (Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park). There is a robust strategic case for change and which will deliver community benefits as quantified in the economic case.

53.     The detailed business case will determine if option two is: (1) viable (the financial case); affordable (the commercial case); and (3) achievable (the management case).

54.     Commercial or partnership opportunities and options to reduce costs or increase revenue can be investigated as part of a detailed business case.

There are some limitations with the data, but these are not material

55.     Population growth is based on projections. There is a risk of growth being significantly lower than forecast. This would result in underutilisation of the facility.

56.     The cost-benefit analysis required the use of some assumptions. A key assumption was that demand was a mixture of new demand, current demand increased through closer service provision and current demand switching from other facilities. Only the first two provide quantifiable benefits to council.

57.     Other assumptions were made on inflation, the deadweight loss of council investment and consumer surplus. If these assumptions are incorrect it could weaken the economic case for investment. This financial risk has been mitigated by sensitivity analysis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

58.     If approved, council staff will prepare the detailed business case.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     Development of Chamberlain Park will enhance sport and recreational opportunities in the Albert-Eden Local Board area and neighbouring areas.

60.     People in the Albert-Eden Local Board area are highly active when compared to the Auckland region suggesting any facility will have high usage.

61.     The Albert-Eden Local Board selected the development of Chamberlain Park as its One Local Initiative for funding as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

62.     The views of the local board on the findings of the indicative business case are sought through this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.     The Māori population in the study area is low at only seven per cent of the population. The population will remain stable as the local board population grows.

64.     Māori participation in sport and recreation for the local board area is 79 per cent. This is the same as the rate for the local board area over-all.

65.     Māori participation in golf in Tāmaki Makaurau is 2.5 per cent, higher than Māori in Albert-Eden golf participation of 0.2 per cent.

66.     Māori in the local board will benefit from the more diverse sport and recreation offering as they play golf at a rate less than the general population.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

67.     Each local board identified one priority project through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 process. The Finance and Performance Committee then approved provisional funding for these local board projects [FIN/2018/85 refers].

68.     The Albert-Eden Local Board proposed the development of Chamberlain Park. A total of $0.100 million was allocated to develop an indicative business case. There remains $0.078 million for the development of the detailed business case.

69.     Funding of $22 million was earmarked for the development. Of this, $8.2 million was allocated to deliver the status quo option. The remainder was earmarked for later delivery stages, following the indicative and detailed business case process.

70.     Project capital costs are estimated to be $29.7 million. This creates a budget risk for council, however, there is sufficient One Local Initiative funding available to redevelop Chamberlain Park.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

71.     There are two main risk areas with option two as outlined in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Risk identification and mitigation

Type of risk

Risk Level

Mitigation

Legal risk

IF there are further legal challenges

THEN financial and staff costs will increase

 

High

This can be minimised by transparent and robust decision-making processes

Financial risk

IF costs of the project exceed initial estimates

THEN the costs could exceed the benefits

 

Low

This risk is assessed through sensitivity analysis and can be mitigated by obtaining detailed costing from a quantity surveyor

All council projects are subject to financial policy decisions on cost escalation and treatment of inflation

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

72.     The next steps are outlined in Figure 1 below, subject to the decisions of the Environment and Community Committee.

73.     If approved, work will commence on the development of a detailed business case in 2019/2020. This will include development of the financial, commercial and management cases.[3]

74.     The timeframe for delivering the new facilities will depend on a range of factors including:

·   how long it takes to develop and obtain approval for the detailed business case

·   the time required to negotiate any partnership or commercial development opportunities.

Figure 1: Project timing

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Redevelopment of Chamberlain Park Indicative Business Case Summary

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Francis Faessen - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Ruth Woodward - Manager Parks & Recreation Policy

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Te Tohu O Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) Implementation Strategy

File No.: CP2019/08018

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek adoption of Te Tohu o Te Auaunga Implementation Strategy for Albert Eden (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To help raise community awareness and give Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) a sense of place, the Puketāpapa Local Board funded the development of a Tohu, a recognisable symbol to represent the awa (creek).

3.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Te Auaunga Tohu in May 2017.

4.       The Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) Vision and Restoration Strategy for the upper catchment was published by the Puketāpapa Local Board in 2016 and identified community recognition and engagement as key to the successful restoration of of the awa.

5.       This vision was also shared by the Albert-Eden and Whau local boards, with sister strategies adopted for the middle and lower catchments of Te Auaunga.

6.       Following its adoption, the Albert-Eden, Puketāpapa, and Whau local boards funded the production of a design guide for the Tohu. This was subsequently adopted in October 2018.

7.       A partnership between three local boards, nine mana whenua groups and other stakeholders (including Friends of Oakley Creek), contributed to the production of Implementation Strategies for each local board. The resulting documents set out the initial strategy for implementation of the Tohu.

8.       Adoption of the Implementation Strategy by each of the three local boards will support an integrated approach for use of the Tohu across the entire catchment and demonstrate commitment to raising the profile of this awa.

9.       This report specifically seeks the adoption of the Albert Eden Implementation Strategy (Attachment A).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      adopt the Te Tohu o Te Auaunga Implementation Strategy for Albert Eden (Attachment A).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Te Auaunga is the longest urban stream in Auckland, flowing over 15 kilometers from its headwaters in Puketāpapa through the Whau and Albert-Eden local board areas with its mouth at the Waitemata Harbour.

11.     Sections of the catchment have been extensively modified and are polluted. This negatively impacts the health of the awa and the harbour.

12.     The Te Auaunga Vision and Restoration Strategy for the Upper Catchment, was published by the Puketāpapa Local Board in 2016, and identified a number of high level objectives for restoration of the lower catchment.

13.     This vision was also shared by the Albert-Eden and Whau local boards, with sister strategies adopted for the middle and lower catchments of Te Auaunga.

14.     The Tohu design was adopted in 2017, and Tohu design guide in 2018, by all three local boards. 

15.     Following this, the Te Tohu o Te Auaunga Implementation Strategy for Albert Eden was developed collaboratively between council staff, three local boards, nine mana whenua groups and other stakeholders, including the Friends of Oakley Creek.

16.     The Implementation Strategy outlines which elements from the design guide will be prioritised for delivery over the next three to five years.

17.     It also indicates locations where the Tohu could be installed.

18.     The plan embraces seven key elements (Attachment 1)

·   Mauri stone

·   Interpretive signage

·   Painting surfaces

·   Art installation

·   Milestone markers

·   Bollard markers

·   Horizontal surfaces

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The Whau, Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden local boards worked collaboratively with mana whenua and other stakeholders to provide input into the Implementation Strategy.

20.     The strategy was workshopped with the Albert-Eden Local Board 22 November 2018 and the awa-wide strategy was the topic of a governance hui 26 February 2019. Feedback from these hui was incorporated into the final document.

21.     Adoption of Te Tohu o Te Auaunga Implementation Strategy will result in increased community engagement and awareness of the importance of the awa.

22.     The Albert-Eden Local Board Plan (2017) supports the restoration of Te Auaunga through three outcomes. Outcomes Six and Seven of the plan seek a community that values its environment, and prioritises the care and protection of our streams and native biodiversity.

23.     Outcome One of the plan seeks increased community pride, belonging and involvement in the future of the area. Support for volunteer groups such as the Friends of Oakley Creek, who help to achieve many of the goals set by the board, is also outlined in the plan.

24.     Adoption of this strategy also reflects the desire of Auckland Council to deliver the vision of Auckland being a world class city, including a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Mana whenua were engaged as a partner throughout the development of the Tohu and design guide. Representatives from Te Akitai Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Whātua Orākei, Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, and Ngāti Whanaunga helped to provide advice to guide development of the design guide at multiple hui and on a site walkover.

26.     Possible future projects related to the Tohu are the development of carvings or art installations along Te Auaunga. Should these projects be funded and initiated, mana whenua would be engaged further to provide input.

27.     Te Auaunga is of cultural significance to Māori. Its waters weave together a cultural landscape of diverse cultural sites including mahinga kai, pā taua, papakāinga , wāhi nohoanga and wāhi tapu.

28.     Design of the Tohu itself represents the cultural significance of the awa and symbolises the importance of mana whenua as kaitiaki (guardians) of the catchment.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     Additional funding will be sought in the future through the Community Facilities work programme to progress further implementation of the Tohu.

30.     Future asset renewals within the catchment may also look to prioritise elements from the design guide.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The exact locations for the Tohu are yet to be determined, and due to unforeseen circumstances or site constraints there is a risk not all elements will be able to be delivered. Any variations will be raised for discussion with all stakeholders and partners.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Next steps are detailed investigation and design, as funding becomes available.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Tohu O Te Auaunga Implementation Strategy Combined

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Netty Richards - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mark Bowater - Manager Parks

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Road stopping adjacent to School Reserve at Kingsland

File No.: CP2019/09426

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement from the Albert-Eden Local Board, for staff to request from Auckland Transport, to stop the unformed road that is part of First Avenue, Kingsland, adjoining School Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council owns the recreation reserve known as School Reserve (“the reserve”) outlined in blue on the attached aerial photo (Attachment A). The address is 1A Western Springs Road, Kingsland.

3.       The development of a concept plan for the reserve revealed that part of the reserve is unformed road.

4.       The unformed road forms part of First Avenue and it cuts into the reserve, splitting the reserve into two parts.

5.       In order to improve connectivity within the reserve, the unformed part of First Avenue should be stopped and added to the reserve.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      endorse that Auckland Transport be requested to stop the unformed part of First Avenue and that the stopped area be added to School Reserve.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The reserve is legally described as Pt Allotment 44 Section 5 Suburbs of Auckland. By the gazette notice 1958 page 1656 Crown land was vested in the Mayor, Councillors and Citizens of the Borough of Mount Albert in trust for a recreation reserve. The reserve was classified as recreation reserve by gazette notice 1981 page 1570.

7.       The Albert-Eden Board requested staff to prepare a concept plan for the reserve at the end of 2018. The development of the concept plan revealed that part of the reserve is unformed road.

8.       The unformed road comprises approximately a 23 metre long strip of road adjoining School Reserve in Kingsland. It is covered in vegetation and has a pedestrian walkway built on it. It also cuts into the reserve splitting the reserve into two parts. The unformed road is shown in highlighted yellow on the attached aerial photo (Attachment B)

9.       Within the reserve there is a separate piece of land with the old Mt Albert Primary School building on it. This land is owned by the Crown (“Crown land”). The address is 78 First Avenue.

10.     The Crown land is legally described as Allotment 43 Section 5 Suburbs of Auckland, Record of Title NA78D/840. The only legal access the Crown land has to a road is to the unformed part of First Avenue. Copy of the title is attached as Attachment C.

11.     In order to improve connectivity within the reserve, staff recommend that the unformed part of First Avenue be stopped and added to the reserve.

12.     The Crown, as the owner of the land adjoining the unformed road, will need to consent to the road stopping.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Some of the advantages of stopping the road are:

·   increased connectivity and use of the lower terraces

·   increased connectivity around the dominant park buildings and existing vegetation

·   enhancing existing mature specimen trees and bush areas

·   connecting the rest of the neighbourhood and suburban park network.

14.     The disadvantages of stopping the road would be in the Crown land becoming land locked. However, this could be resolved by granting a right of way easement over the reserve.

15.     A road stopping process includes the following:

·   Auckland Council and Auckland Transport consult about future use of the unformed road, to establish whether there is any reason it cannot be stopped and what, if any, conditions are required

·   formal application submitted along with signed consents from service authorities and adjoining landowners

·   formal approval to road stopping and disposal obtained from Auckland Transport Board

·   survey plan of the affected land area to be amalgamated with the reserve is prepared

·   valuation of the land is obtained

·   notice of proposal to stop road is advertised in a newspaper circulating in the area

·   notice is affixed to the site announcing the stopping until the objection period closes (40 days)

·   if objections are received, the matter is referred to the Environment Court or the process is halted, if no objections are received the road is declared stopped

·   a title will issue in the name of Auckland Council and the land amalgamated into the reserve.

16.     The options available to Albert-Eden Local Board are to endorse or reject staff commencing the road stopping process.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The proposed changes to the reserve have been reviewed by the Community Facilities department. Road stopping will not impact upon any current and future works planned for this reserve.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     There will be no loss of public access or public enjoyment of the reserve or the road as a result of road stopping.

19.     The road stopping was discussed with the members of the Albert-Eden Local Board at a workshop held on 13 March 2019, and the local board requested staff to prepare this report for the Board’s consideration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     All community assets contribute significantly to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions. Where aspects of this proposed project are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

21.     Auckland Transport requires Iwi consultation and comment from its Māori Policy and Engagement Manager as part of the road stopping process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     Auckland Council will be responsible to meet all the Auckland Transport costs including valuation of the land, survey, public notifications, legal and LINZ cost. The value of the land will be accounted for in an intercompany asset transfer.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There is a risk that the Crown will not be willing to consent to the road stopping. This could be mitigated by offering to the Crown alternative road access and creating a right of way easement. The other option would be to acquire the Crown land.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Staff will make a formal application for road stopping to Auckland Transport.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

School Reserve

77

b

Stopped Road

79

c

Record of Title NA78D-840

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tamara Zunic - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor  

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Changes to Local Board Standing Orders

File No.: CP2019/09807

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide information about the implications of the Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 and to recommend changes to the Albert-Eden Local Board’s standing orders to align with the change in the legislation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 (LGRSAA) makes changes to various statutes, including the Local Government 2002 Act (LGA), Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA), the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Dog Control Act 1996, the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 and the Rates Rebate Act 1973.

3.       Prior to the legislation change, the LGA provided for an extraordinary meeting where:

(a)  It could be called by resolution, or by requisition by the mayor or one third of the members

(b)  The notice period was three days (unless it was called by resolution in which case the notice period could be not less than 24 hours)

(c)  If it needed to be called earlier it could be called by the mayor, or, if the mayor was unavailable, the chief executive. The notice period could be not less than 24 hours.

4.       As a result of the change, the meeting called under (c) above is referred to as an ‘emergency meeting’ rather than an’ extraordinary meeting’.

5.       There is a change to the definition of public notice – which requires notification on a council’s website in addition to a newspaper.

6.       There is a change to the definition of ‘working day’ to exclude a province’s anniversary.

7.       Staff are taking the opportunity, while considering changes to standing orders, to propose an unrelated change to the current standing orders regarding attendance by electronic link. The current standing order requires a member seeking to attend by electronic link to be representing the council and unable to attend. The proposed change removes the requirement to be representing the council.

8.       As detailed in LGA Schedule 7 clause 27 (3), a change to standing orders requires a 75 percent majority vote. The Albert-Eden Local Board’s standing orders need to be changed to reflect the changes in the law.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the new statutory responsibility of the chief executive:

facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

 

 

b)      amend standing order 2.3.3 by replacing:

Calling an extraordinary meeting at earlier time

The chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call a meeting for an earlier time if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

with:

Calling an emergency meeting

The chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call an emergency meeting for an earlier time than is provided in Standing Order 2.3.2 if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

c)      amend standing order 7.2.3 by replacing:

Notification of extraordinary meetings

Where the council calls an extraordinary meeting but cannot give public notice to the extent required in Standing Order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting.

with:

Notification of extraordinary / emergency meetings

Where the council calls an extraordinary or emergency meeting but cannot give public notice to the extent required in Standing Order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting. If it is not practicable to publish a notice in newspapers before the meeting, the council must publicly notify the meeting as soon as practicable on the council’s website and in any other manner that is reasonable in the circumstances.

d)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

with:

Emergency meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22A of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

e)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Meeting means:

(a)  any first or ordinary or extraordinary meeting of the local board

with:

Meeting means:

(a) any first or ordinary or extraordinary or emergency meeting of the local board

f)       amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Publicly notified means notified to members of the public by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

with:

Publicly notified means made known to members of the public by a notice on the council’s website, until any opportunity for review or appeal has lapsed, and by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

g)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

(a)  Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

(b)  a day in the period commencing with 25 December in any year and ending with 15 January in the following year.

with:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

(a)  Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

(b)  Where Waitangi Day or ANZAC Day falls on a weekend, the following Monday

(c)  Auckland Anniversary Day

(d)  a day in the period commencing with 20 December in any year and ending with 10 January in the following year.

h)      amend the following standing orders:

i)        SO 2.3:

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

ii)       SO 7.2.3

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

iii)      SO 7.2.4

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

iv)      SOs 1.1.3, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4 and 7.3.2:

replace the words “extraordinary meeting” with “extraordinary or emergency meeting”

i)        amend standing order 3.3.3 to remove the requirement to be representing the council:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)   in emergencies.

   The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the    vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The LGRSAA came into force on 21 March 2019.  The Act is an omnibus Act in that it makes minor amendments to several pieces of legislation.

10.     The LGRSAA amends the Local Electoral Act 2001 to include a new principle for “representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls”, and imposes a new responsibility on the Chief Executive of the council by amending the Chief Executive’s responsibilities in the LGA s 42(2)(d):

(da)   facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

11.     It amends the definition of “public notice” and “publicly notified” under the LGA and the LGOIMA to require notification both on the council’s website and in newspapers.

12.     It creates a new category of council meeting called an “emergency meeting”, separate from “extraordinary meeting”.  Previously, extraordinary meetings had two types of notice requirements.  Where the more urgent form of notice is used, the meeting is now referred to as an emergency meeting.  This applies to giving notice to members under the LGA and to public notices under LGOIMA.

13.     It amends the definition of working day under the LGA and LGOIMA to exclude a province’s anniversary day being counted as a “working day”.

14.     It makes minor amendments to The Dog Control Act 996, the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Rates Rebates Act 1973 and makes changes to the LGA by specifying timeframes for making certain documents publicly available. These legislative changes are minor in nature and do not impact on local board standing orders.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The changes made by the LGRSAA are minor in nature, nevertheless it is necessary to amend the Albert-Eden Local Board’s standing orders to align the language to reflect current legislation.

16.     The Albert-Eden Local Board may also wish to consider a change to standing orders which is not related to LGRSAA.   Standing order 3.3.3 provides conditions for attending a meeting by electronic link:

 

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)   in emergencies.

The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

17.     This standing order was adopted in 2015.  Since that time the technology has improved, and remote attendance to most local board business meetings is now possible. However, the conditions in the standing order are very limiting and do not allow attendance by a member who is out of Auckland for non-council reasons. 

18.     Staff recommend amending the standing order by removing the requirement to represent the council in SO 3.3.3 (a):

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The changes to the standing orders do not impact on the wider council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     This is a report to 21 local boards. All local boards need to make changes to align their standing orders to LGRSAA.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The changes to standing orders brought about through the LGRSAA do not impact on the Māori community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications to making these changes to standing orders.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     LGA Schedule 7 clause 27 (2) states that the standing orders of a local authority must not contravene the LGA or any other Act. If local board standing orders are not aligned to changes in the legislation, there is a risk that the local board may act inconsistently with the legislation by relying on standing orders that are not up to date.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Following the Albert-Eden Local Board resolution to amend the standing orders, staff will make the appropriate changes and recirculate the updated standing orders.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Polly Kenrick - Business Manager, Local Board Services

 

Authorisers

Kerri Foote, Operations and Improvements Manager, Local Board Services

Louise Mason, General Manager, Local Board Services

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme 2019 – 2022

File No.: CP2019/11079

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme for the Albert-Eden Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing of all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

3.       The Albert-Eden Local Board 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme was developed through a series of iterative workshops between key staff and local boards since October 2018. The projects identified in the work programme have been prioritised for investment based on a combination of local board feedback, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input.

4.       The work programme provided in Attachments A and B to this report reflect the projects that were presented in the last local board workshop with modifications based on feedback from the local board, and with the inclusion of projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes.

5.       This report recommends that the local board approves the 2019 - 2020 Community Facilities Work Programme and associated budget in full for projects commencing in the first year of the programme and in principle for subsequent two years, 2020-2022.

6.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes, including local and sports field development (growth), coastal and slips prevention programmes. Inclusion of these projects in the local board work programme is subject to approval by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

7.       It is recommended that the local board approve the inclusion of these projects in the work programme and provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee.

8.       A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects. These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year. 

9.       Approval is sought for staff to commence work on these projects in the 2019/2020 year if required, so that they can be delivered early in the event that other approved projects are delayed for any reason.

10.     In order to expedite delivery of the work programme, and to manage changes that may be required in a timely way, staff recommend that the local board delegate decision making for amendments to the approved programme to the chair. 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report. 

b)      approve in principle the 2020 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme (years two and three) as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report. 

c)      approve the risk adjusted programme (RAP) projects identified in Attachment A to the agenda report as projects that may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year, if required, to meet expected financial expenditure for the 2019/2020 financial year.

d)      note that approval of budget allocation in the 2019/2020 year for multi-year projects may commit the local board to the allocation of subsequent years’ budgets.

e)      note that the inclusion in the work programme of projects that are funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets are subject to approval of the identified budget allocation by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

f)       provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee in relation to the projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets.

g)      note that budget allocation for all projects in the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme are best current estimates, and amendments may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs as the year progresses.

h)      delegate to the chairperson authority to approve minor amendments to the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, following receipt of written advice from staff.

i)        delegate authority to the chair to approve minor capital works projects, following receipt of written officer advice, in accordance with work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 2362 activity name Albert-Eden - LDI minor CAPEX fund 2019/2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of Auckland. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

12.     Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. The 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, detailed in the attachments, contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance.

 

 

13.     Staff have engaged with the local board in the development of the work programme through a number of workshops, including:

·   31 October 2018 where the local board discussed their priorities for the future work programme

·   6 March 2019 where the local board reviewed the first draft work programme and provided feedback

·   8 May 2019 where staff provided any further information requested in workshop two reviewed the revised draft work programme.

14.     This year’s work programme is year one of a three year programme, with years two and three included for approval in principle, to clearly demonstrate the phasing of project delivery and to enable the organisation to prepare for delivery. The work programme is subject to a rolling review and each year the local board will be asked to approve a new year of a three year work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Capital works programme

15.     Investment in the capital works programme will ensure that council facilities and open spaces in Albert-Eden Local Board remain valuable and well-maintained community assets.

16.     The overall capital works programme includes projects for which the local board has discretion to allocate budget, referred to as the local programme, and projects from regional programmes. 

17.     Specific projects within the work programme may have budget allocated from two or more budget sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

18.     The work programme includes both new projects and existing projects that have been continued from the previous financial year where those projects require multiple years for delivery (multi-year projects).

19.     Any projects that have budget approved in the current 2018/2019 financial year but are unable to be delivered this year, will be deferred. Deferred budgets will be added to the work programme at a later date and included in quarterly performance reporting to the local board.

Local Programme

20.     The local programme includes those projects that the local board is funding from its discretionary capex budgets, including:

·   Renewals

o The local board can allocate its renewals budget towards the renewal of any council owned asset.

·   Locally Driven Initiative capital expenditure (LDI)

o The local board has the discretion to allocate its LDI budget to any projects that deliver a council asset or as a capital grant to a third party to deliver an asset made available for public use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

21.     In preparing recommendations for the local programme a number of matters have been considered, including:

·   strategic documents (e.g. local board plan)

·   service assessment input from Community Services

·   asset condition assessments

·   input from operational maintenance teams and staff working within facilities

·   budget availability.

22.     The Community Facilities work programme supports the achievement of the following 2017 Albert-Eden Local Board Plan priorities:

·   Albert-Eden has a strong sense of community

·   Our parks are enjoyed by all

·   Our community spaces are well used by everyone

·   Albert-Eden has thriving town centres and a growing local economy

·   Travelling around Albert-Eden is safe and easy

·   Our natural and cultural heritage is valued.

23.     Other strategic documents of particular relevance have included

·   Albert-Eden Inclusion and Diversity Project 2017

·   Albert-Eden Parks Accessibility Report 2017

·   Albert-Eden Open Space Network Plan 2018

·   Albert-Eden Sport and Active Recreation Facility Plan 2019 (draft)

·   2018 Albert-Eden Local Paths (Greenways) Plan

·   Te Kete Rukuruku: Māori naming of parks and places

·   Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) strategy – Tohu implementation.

24.     These documents have influenced recommendations in the work programme by providing strategic guidance for the prioritisation of the programme planning and delivery.

25.     Some of the key projects to be accommodated in the work programme include:

·   Western Springs Garden Community Hall – renewal of assets.

·   The project was brought forward for delivery under the risk adjusted programme to ensure the building is in a tenantable state and fit for purpose for the new tenants the Auckland Horticultural. Council to move in July 2019.Phyllis Reserve - development

o Implement stages of the concept plan for Phyllis Reserve Stage two development. This stage includes closing current car parks, construct the new car park in proposed location, close Springleigh Avenue entrance and provide a stand-alone toilet near the shared path (southern end Field one).

o Renewal of the park entranceway and road.

o Safety improvements for vehicles and pedestrians accessing the park.

·   Nicholson Park - bowling green development - stage three multi courts

o Development of the unused bowling greens to a multi-use court area, aligning to the concept plan for the park.

·   Nixon Park - investigate replacement toilets and changing rooms

·                Replace the toilets and changing rooms at Nixon Park. Stage one is to investigate options to renew in current location plus options to relocate and build a purpose facility for long term future use.

 

 

 

·   Mt Albert War Memorial Hall - renew floor

o Replacement of the hall floor and stage floor. The floor has become thin in places and cannot sustain heavy weight, due to use and multiple resandings. The floor and sub floor require replacement.

·   Mt Eden Memorial Hall - Comprehensive renewal

o Repaint the exterior of the building, comprehensive renewal required including completion of the roof replacement and full interior refurbishment.

·   Progress delivery of key concept plans recently completed.

·   School Reserve – design, consent and undertake lower field improvements.

·   Morvern Reserve – design, consent and implement priority actions.

26.     The phasing of projects over various years is recommended to meet budget requirements.  In this regard careful consideration has been given to the delivery timing of the renewal of park roads and carparks. The prioritisation of the renewal of Phyllis Reserve car parks and renewal of the entranceway at Fowlds Park, has meant that the full replacement of the car park at Mt Albert War Memorial Park, outside the recreation centre, will be phased in later years.

27.     Of particular note in the work programme is the key development works planned for Phyllis Reserve. Implementation of stage two of the concept plan for Phyllis Reserve includes closing current car parks, construction of the new car park in the new location, closure of Springleigh Avenue entrance and provision of a stand-alone toilet near the shared path (southern end Field one). This stage will be funded through growth, SH16/20 and Asset Based Services (ABS) renewal capital budget contributions.

28.     Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) capex funding of $72,000 resolved for ‘Gribblehirst Park - bowling greens re use’, as part of the 2018/2019 Community Facilities work programme (Resolution AE/2017/69), is to be returned and reallocated within the 2019/2020 financial year. The scope of works to renew the pathways, fencing, electricals and lighting are to be funded with Asset Based Services (ABS) capital renewals in the 2019/2020 financial year.

29.     The proposed work programme in Attachment A contains:

·   Number of projects (excluding leases and contract lines) over three years: 56

·   Indicative cost for proposed projects in the 2019/2020 financial year: $5,939,268

Regional Programme

30.     The Long-term Plan 2018 - 2028 includes budgets which support the delivery of regional programmes. These budgets are allocated to specific projects within a regional programme by the Governing Body.

31.     Where budget is allocated to a project in the regional programme that falls within a local board decision making allocation (e.g. a local park), that project is included in the local board work programme. The local board then has decision making responsibility for that project, within the parameters set by the Governing Body, namely location, scope and budget.

32.     Regional budgets include:

·   Local parks and sports field development (growth)

·   Coastal renewals

·   Slips prevention and remediation.

33.     Projects in these regional programmes are identified and prioritised based on consideration of a number of factors.

34.     For the local parks and sports field development programme, this includes:

·   Extent to which residential growth is generating demand for the project

·   Current levels of provision

·   Available budget.

35.     For coastal renewals and slips prevention and remediation this includes:

·   Asset condition

·   Relative hazard and risk

·   Available budget.

36.     The allocation of budget to specific projects will be approved by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

37.     The local board has an opportunity to provide formal feedback, through resolution to this report, for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee prior to approval of the regional programmes.

Capital Programme Delivery

38.     Budget allocations within the work programme are best estimates only. Project costings are subject to change and refinement as projects progress through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined around the specific work required and the cost of delivery of that work once the details are defined.

39.     The delivery of individual projects is managed within the overall work programme budget for each local board. Where significant changes to project budgets may need to be considered, or if new projects are added to the work programme, changes may be required to the programme to accommodate final project costs as the year progresses.

Risk adjusted programme

40.     A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects.

41.     These are projects that have budget allocated in principle in the 2020/2021 financial year (i.e. year two of the three-year programme). Staff propose to commence work in the 2019/2020 year on the delivery of these risk adjusted projects.

42.     By progressing these identified projects alongside the 2019/2020 projects in the programme, it is intended that, should projects identified for delivery in year one of the work programme be delayed for any reason, staff will be able to proceed with agreed alternative projects to ensure that the full annual budget is delivered each year.

43.     Approval is sought from the local board for staff to commence work on those projects identified in the work programme as risk adjusted programme projects in the 2019/2020 financial year.

Delegation for approval of changes to the work programme

44.     The delivery of the proposed work programme in an efficient and timely manner may require amendments to be made to the agreed work programme during the course of the year. Such amendments could include:

·   Changes to project scope, budgets, timing

·   Addition of new projects within available budget

·   Cancelling or putting approved projects on hold.

45.     Any changes to the approved work programme require approval from the local board. Approval will normally be sought through resolution at a business meeting.

46.     Local boards are also able to delegate authority to approve some or all amendments to the work programme to the Chair, to another member of the local board, or to staff. Such delegation would allow changes to be made without the timeframes required to provide formal reports and would support the efficient delivery of the work programme.

47.     Should the local board choose to delegate authority to approve changes to the work programme, it is anticipated that any changes would be workshopped with the local board prior to any delegated decision being taken. Any changes made under delegation would be reported back to the local board in their quarterly report.

Leasing work programme

48.     Community leases, commonly on public parks and reserves, are a valuable way in which the council provides support to community organisations across the region. These groups provide a wide range of community activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities and are a key part of the mosaic of community activity and infrastructure in Auckland.

49.     Attachment B – Community Leases provides a detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2019/2020 financial year. Following approval of the work programme staff will proceed with review and renewal of these leases and licences as appropriate during the course of the financial year.

50.     Two additional project lines include those leases and licences proposed to be progressed in the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years respectively. It also includes the additional leases and licences that will be deferred from the 2018/2019 financial year to the 2019/2020 financial year.

51.     Straight forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with Chief Executive delegations to Community Facilities, with a written memo to the local board providing the opportunity for the local board to request further information or a formal report. More complex community leases will be reported to the local board at a business meeting.

Operational maintenance work programme

52.     The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

·   Increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets.

·   Improving the safety of Community Facilities assets.

·   Ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users.

53.     In the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, there are three-line items dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area:

·   Full Facilities Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, coastal management and storm damage response. From 1 July 2019 council is responsible for streetscapes maintenance from Auckland Transport.

·   Arboriculture Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all tree management and maintenance.

·   Ecological Restoration Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include pest plant management within ecologically significant areas and animal pest management across all parks and reserves.

54.     Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly performance report. Community Facilities is also providing additional weekly updates to all elected members on contractor performance.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The 2019 - 2022 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

56.     In particular a number of departments have come together to ensure a planned cohesive approach for the future of the Epsom Community Centre. Community Facilities are working closely with Community Places to ensure the planned upgrade capital works are fit for purpose for the new management team and are delivered at a time that ensures minimal down time for the management of their community services.

57.     The council’s Community Services and Community Facilities Landscape Design departments were involved in the development of key concept and actions plans, which set the future strategic vision for these open spaces. These include for:

·   Morvern Reserve – new pathways, seating, tables

·   School Reserve – lower field and upper carpark improvements

·   Louis Adolphis Durriea Reserve – landscape and park amenity improvements

·   Nicholson Park - development of the un used bowling greens into a multi-use court.

58.     Parks Sport and Recreation have undertaken a Be. Accessible Report for the Albert-Eden Local Board area which identifies current provision and the future accessible provision needs. Following on from the Be. Accessible Report, a strategic prioritised action plan provides further guidance for future asset investment.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     The Community Facilities Work Programme has been created through a combination of local board feedback, asset condition assessments and agreed levels of service.

60.     The 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2018 to May 2019. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programmes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

62.     Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

63.     Staff are also attending monthly Parks and Recreation Mana Whenua forums to receive feedback on specific projects within the 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme.

64.     Activities in the work programmes that are specific to Māori outcomes include:

·   Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places).

·   Auckland Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy – growing phase.

·   Te Auaunga/Oakley Creek - Improve Te Auaunga/Oakley Creek path network and associated facilities, ensuring all signage is including approved Te Reo Māori and Tohu brand symbol.

·   Native ecological restorations at Howlett Reserve and Waterview Reserve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

65.     Table 1 below summarises the relevant budgets, proposed allocation and the balance of unallocated budget available.

Local Budgets

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

Renewals - Budget

$2,716,250

$2,231,144

$1,533,480

Renewals - Proposed Allocation

$2,456,000

$2,160,000

$1,533,480

Renewals - Unallocated budget

$260,250

$71,144

$0

 

 

 

 

Growth and Development - Allocation

$2,932,268

$2,500,000

$3,015,308

Coastal Renewals - Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Slips Prevention - Allocation

$0

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Capex - Proposed Allocation

$475,000

$445,000

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Opex - Proposed Allocation

$76,000

$0

$0

 

66.     The proposed work programme can be accommodated within the available local board budgets. Approval of the work programme does not have significant financial implications, unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend.

67.     Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the local board. These updates will identify progress of all projects and potential amendments to the approved programme including changes to budget allocation and timing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

68.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity. The risk adjusted programme (RAP) will be used to progress those projects identified as ready to proceed.

69.     If the proposed Community Facilities work programme is not approved at the June 2019 business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

70.     Once approved, delivery of activities identified in the Community Facilities work programme will commence from 1 July 2019.

71.     The work programmes identify if further decisions are required for each activity. These will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

72.     Progress and updates on work programmes will be reported to the local board for each quarter of the financial year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Facilities Work Programme 2019 - 2022

99

b

Community Leases Work Programme 2019 - 2020

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katrina Morgan - Senior Project Manager

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

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Albert-Eden Local Board

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Albert-Eden Local Board

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Albert-Eden Local Board

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Albert-Eden Local Board

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Albert-Eden Local Board

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

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Albert-Eden Local Board

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Community Services 2019/2020 work programme

File No.: CP2019/10914

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Community Services work programme (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each financial year, a work programme is developed that details the activities to be delivered in the local board area. The development process is supported by a series of workshops with the local board.

3.       To prepare for the 2019/2020 work programme staff representing relevant operational council departments worked together to ensure an integrated approach.

4.       This report presents the draft 2019/2020 Community Services work programme, which responds to the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes and reflects the priorities that have been agreed by departments across council.

5.       Delivery of new activities in the work programme will commence from 1 July 2019. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery progress, highlights, potential delays and budget implications.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report). 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board decides which activities to allocate its annual work programme budget to in order to achieve the outcomes set out in its 2017 Local Board Plan.

7.       The development of the 2019/2020 work programme has built on the approach piloted for 2018/2019, which enabled staff to work in a more integrated way across departments to improve local outcomes.

8.       In preparation for the 2019/2020 work programme process, an overview group was created from the following council departments to develop an agreed approach to achieve improved integration:

·   Arts, Community and Events

·   Community Facilities

·   Libraries

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·   Parks, Sports and Recreation

·   Community Services - Service, Strategy and Integration.

·   Local Board Services

9.       Teams made up of representatives from these departments were established to explore shared priorities and objectives for each local board area, and to develop the work programme in a collaborative way in response to local board plan outcomes.

10.     Table one shows the business objectives and strategic alignment for community services departments.

Table 1: Adopted community-based strategies and plans

wDepartment

Business objectives

Strategies and plans

Arts, Community and Events

Provision of services, programmes, events and facilities that strengthen and connect communities and create a sense of belonging and pride

·  Hire Fee Framework

·  Events Policy

·  Toi Whītiki

·  Thriving Communities

Libraries

Provision of library services and programmes that support Aucklanders with reading and literacy, and opportunities to participate in community and civic life

·  Te Kauroa

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Provision of services to actively engage Aucklanders to lead healthy lives, connect with nature and value our cultural identity

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

·  Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

·  Auckland Growing greener framework

·  Urban Ngāhere Strategy

Service, Strategy and Integration

Provision of service and asset planning advice and support more integrated delivery of community outcomes

·  Community Facilities Network Plan

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The local board provided feedback on proposed activities for the new financial year at a series of workshops between September 2018 and May 2019.

12.     Initial workshops were an opportunity for the local board to communicate to staff its strategic direction. At subsequent workshops, the local board discussed its priorities for budget allocation and requested further scoping for existing and new activities.

13.     The activities in the work programme respond to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in its 2017 Local Board Plan.

14.     The work programme is made up of approved activities from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board.

15.     Budget is allocated to activities for the 2019/2020 financial year. If zero-dollars is shown this reflects that the project is able to be delivered in-house with no additional external technical advice and support.

16.     Table two shows activities and allocated budget that are new in 2019/2020 or are significantly different to the 2018/2019 work programme.

Table 2: New and significant changes activities

Line number

Activity

Activity description

2018/2019 budget

2019/2020 budget

Local board plan outcome: Our community spaces are well used by everyone

780

(change)

Active recreation programme

Initiative will be spilt across two initiatives:

·    Learn to swim

·    Active participation programme

Reduction in budget is to target the learn to swim only for low decile schools with no pool for year one and two students.   This results in a saving, some of which will fund the active play programme. 

$20,000

$15,000

Local board plan outcome: Albert-Eden has a strong sense of community

40

Increase diverse community participation: Responsive programming for identified communities

Fund diverse community organisations to deliver responsive programmes for migrant communities, seniors and communities with diverse abilities and enable an increase in their sense of connection, safety and wellbeing.

 

$45,000

$60,000

42

Community-led placemaking: Community Gardens

Fund a community to maintain and coordinate a network of community gardens and provide seed funding to members of the network for enhancement of gardens.

$10,000

$20,000

1273

(new)

Social cohesion in new housing area

A pilot collaboration to support development of inclusive existing and new communities in Roskill South, Waterview and Owairaka.

 

 

 

$0

$10,000

Line number

Activity

Activity description

2018/2019 budget

2019/2020 budget

1304

(new)

Epsom Network and Community Programme Coordinator

Developing activities and events that increase and enhance communication and connections in the local Epsom community that contribute to increased local identity and sense of belonging

$0

$15,000

1305

(new)

Oral histories – diverse cultural heritage

Collect oral histories from two 'anchor' personalities in the diverse communities of Albert Eden that are part of inclusion and diversity programming. Stories will highlight work in their communities of affinity and the journey across to New Zealand.

$0

$5,000

Local board plan outcome: Albert-Eden has thriving town centres and a growing economy

1310

(new)

Albert-Eden Business Awards

Deliver a local business award programme and provide opportunities for businesses to benchmark their success against other local businesses.

$0

$25,000

Local board plan outcome: Our parks are enjoyed by all

726

Active Play Programme

Fund other community or partner organisations to deliver free to attend local programmes and initiatives. Focus on low-key activations done well and promoted widely.

$15,000

$20,000

823

Parks services planning programme

Parks services planning to identify needs and gaps in the parks network and develop outcomes to address the needs.

$40,000

$20,000

 

17.     The way in which Community Places activities are presented in the work programme has changed for 2019/2020. Work related to the operation of venues for hire, community centres, houses, hubs and rural halls will now be reported by the following levels of service: Access, Activation and Intervention Programming.

18.     Service, Strategy and Integration does not have any activities in the 2019/2020 work programme for the Albert-Eden area.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The work programme has been developed by a collective of operational council departments.

20.     The interdepartmental connections made throughout the process will enable an integrated approach to delivery of the activities and allow for further collaboration throughout the year. These working relationships will also support an integrated approach to work programme development in future years.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The local board provided direction and feedback on the draft work programme at a series of workshops.  

22.     These workshops provided an opportunity for staff to gain an understanding of local board strategic direction and priorities. Budget allocation, activity content and scoping were discussed and refined.

23.     The activities in the final work programme support achieving local board plan outcomes and objectives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Community Services and Community Facilities have developed Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai!, a relationship approach which guides staff to deliver on agreed work programme activities and support the local board to achieve outcomes in its local board plan.

25.     The approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori.

26.     Table three outlines the activities in the 2019/2020 work programme where Māori responsiveness is the primary outcome.

Table 3: Māori impact of proposed activities

Line number

Activity

Māori impact

45

Local Māori Aspirations

Work with mana whenua and mataawaka to increase responsiveness to local Maori aspirations:

• understand key aspirations and priorities for Māori in the area

• explore opportunities to work together

• share information and continue building stronger relationships with Māori.

355

Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) 2019/2020

Māori naming (and associated story telling) of parks and places in partnership with mana whenua to value and promote Auckland’s Māori identity and use of te reo Māori.

935

Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori

Celebrating te ao Māori with events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes:

·    Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Māori Language Week

·    Engaging with Iwi and Māori organisations

·    Whakatipu i te reo Māori - champion and embed te reo Māori in our libraries and communities. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Activities are funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: Asset Based Services (ABS) Operational Expenditure; Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) Capital Expenditure and Operating Expenditure.

28.     Each activity line has a budget allocation, which covers the delivery for the 2019/2020 period. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects that the implementation costs are met through staff salary or other funding sources.

29.     The community services LDI budget for the local board for the 2019/2020 financial year is $1,247,150.

30.     Where activities are cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or to create a new activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The key risks for activities that are managed through the work programme are non-delivery, time delays and budget overrun. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery including highlighting any potential delays and budget implications.

32.     As the work programme includes ongoing activity and annually occurring events or projects, the associated risks have been identified and managed in previous years. Additional risk management for these activities is ongoing and can be reported quarterly.

33.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board through quarterly reporting when required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Delivery of approved activities will commence at the beginning of the financial year, 1 July 2019 and progress will be reported to the local board for each quarter.

35.     The work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Services 2019/2020 work programme

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the 2019/2020 Albert-Eden local environment work programme

File No.: CP2019/09870

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Albert-Eden local environment work programme, totalling $141,850 of locally driven initiatives operational expenditure.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Albert-Eden Local Board identified an aspiration in its 2017 local board plan to achieve ‘we respect and protect our environment’.

3.       To give effect to this aspiration, staff developed eight options for projects for the board to consider supporting in the 2019/2020 financial year.

4.       The board provided feedback to staff regarding which of these projects it would like to fund at its 5 March 2019 and 8 May 2019 workshops. The recommended projects are:

·   Epsom Rock Forest landowner assistance programme (stage three) – $10,000

·   New project: Community weed control buffer project – $10,000

·   Bike hub implementation (Tumeke Cycle Space) – $10,000

·   EcoNeighbourhoods – $40,000

·   New project: Drains for Rain – catchpit stencil programme - $19,000

·   Community-led streamside restoration – Roy Clements Treeway – $3,500

·   Community-led streamside restoration – Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) – $28,000

·   Waitītiko (Meola Creek) restoration initiative – $21,350.

5.       This report recommends that the board approve its local environment work programme and associated budgets for delivery within the 2019/2020 financial year (see Attachment A). The draft work programme has a total budget of $141,850, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives operating expenditure budget for the 2019/2020 financial year

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme (as set out in Attachment A) and approves the allocation of $141,850 of locally driven initiative operating expenditure funding as summarised in the table below:

Project

Budget

Epsom Rock Forest landowner assistance programme (stage three)

$10,000

New project: Community weed control buffer project

$10,000

Bike hub implementation (Tumeke Cycle Space)

$10,000

EcoNeighbourhoods

$40,000

New project: Drains for Rain - catchpit stencil programme

$19,000

Community-led streamside restoration - Roy Clements Treeway

$3,500

Community-led streamside restoration – Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek)

$28,000

Waitītiko (Meola Creek) restoration initiative

$21,350

Total

$141,850

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       In late 2018, in alignment to its local board plan outcomes, the Albert-Eden Local Board provided strategic direction to staff regarding the projects it would like to fund in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board noted its strong commitment to the environment, and in particular noted:

·   increased support for volunteer stream groups who undertake stream restoration and planting projects

·   the development of a bike hub in at Gribblehirst Park

·   support for stencils on drains to highlight stormwater issues.

7.       In response to the direction set by the board, Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff provided a draft local environment work programme for the board’s feedback at a workshop on 5 March 2019.

8.       The board indicated its support in principle for the proposed projects, but requested that staff clarify what would be achieved with the budgets for both community-led streamside restoration projects. In response to this, staff presented the deliverables for each of these budgets for the board’s consideration at its 8 May 2019 workshop.

9.       Based on these workshop discussions, a total of eight local environmental projects to be funded from the board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget are proposed. These will be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate as part of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme. The draft work programme has been amended to reflect local board feedback and is included as Attachment A to this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     A brief description of each of the proposed projects for delivery as part of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme is provided below. Further detail on these projects is provided in Attachment A.

 

 

Waitītiko (Meola Creek) restoration initiative $21,350

11.     To achieve the local board plan outcome ‘we respect and protect our environment’, the board has indicated that it would like to continue to fund a project focused on a catchment approach to restoring Waitītiko (Meola Creek). In 2018/2019 the local board allocated $40,200 for this project.

12.     It is recommended that the board allocate $21,350 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards this initiative in the 2019/2020 financial year. This budget will cover:

·   water quality monitoring and riparian restoration planting at four sites on the Albert-Eden side of Waitītiko, and two sites on the Waitematā side ($21,350 contribution from Albert-Eden Local Board, and $19,200 from Waitematā Local Board, reflective of the number of sites in each local board area)

·   prizes for a moth plant pod competition developed by Mount Albert Grammar School’s Envirogroup students ($1,000)

·   project management ($5,700)

·   weed control and planting site preparation ($5,000)

·   Point Chevalier School and other plant supply ($6,700)

·   Meola community meetings ($450)

·   Waitītiko Open Day through a community planting day ($2,500).

EcoNeighbourhoods $40,000

13.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘sustainable practices are encouraged and fostered’ and key initiative to ‘support and develop local sustainability programmes in partnership with the community’, the board would like to continue to fund the EcoNeighbourhoods project in the 2019/2020 financial year.

14.     An EcoNeighbourhood group comprises of groups of six or more neighbours from different households within the board area, with an objective to adopt sustainable practices and increase resilience within their homes, lifestyles and neighbourhoods.

15.     It is recommended that the board allocate $40,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards this project in the 2019/2020 financial year. This will be the sixth year that the board has provided funding towards this project, including $29,000 towards the project in 2016/2017, $30,000 in the 2017/2018 and $40,000 in the 2018/2019 financial year.

16.     The 2019/2020 budget will enable up to 18 EcoNeighbourhood groups to receive up to 20 hours of facilitation support from the project manager. The groups can receive up to $1,000 worth of support including incentives, discounts and training to support behaviour change.

17.     EcoNeighbourhood groups decide what sustainable living actions they wish to undertake and a project manager supports these groups to take action. The activities that groups have or will undertake include carbon footprinting, beekeeping, sustainable food production, water conservation, waste minimisation, energy reduction, and biodiversity initiatives.

Epsom rock forest landowner assistance programme (stage three) – $10,000

18.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our unique environment is protected and enhanced’, the board has indicated that it would like to continue funding the Epsom rock forest landowner assistance programme in the 2019/2020 financial year.

19.     The board provided $10,000 towards the second stage of this project in 2018/2019, which supported engagement with 50 properties in the Epsom area that have Mount Eden lava rock forest on their land. Landowners received advice and biodiversity action plans where appropriate, and also received ecological restoration support tools such as composting weed bags and traps.

 

20.     It is recommended that the board allocates $10,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards stage three of this programme in the 2019/2020 financial year. This budget will support:

·   follow-up actions on the properties surveyed from the previous stages of the project

·   awareness raising of the values of the rock forest

·   the identification of management needs and support landowners require to carry out active management of the rock forest remnant on their property.

21.     To support the implementation of the biodiversity action plans, staff will provide additional incentives and support to these landowners through the regional ecosystem budget.

Bike hub implementation (Tumeke Cycle Space) – $10,000

22.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘sustainable practices are encouraged and fostered’, the board has indicated that it would like to continue to fund a bike hub project. The board allocated $10,000 towards this project in 2018/2019 and then allocated a further $10,000 to fast track the project.

23.     It is recommended that the board allocates $10,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards stage two of this bike hub project in the 2019/2020 financial year, which will support:

·   developing operations of the Tumeke Cycle Space Bike Hub established at Gribblehirst Park in 2018/2019

·   developing a sustainable operating model for the bike hub that will result in predictable operating hours for users

·   securing funding and support from other sources to enable the development of the bike hub and its programmes.

New project: Community weed control buffer project – $10,000

24.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our unique environment is protected and enhanced’, the board has indicated it would like to fund a new community weed control buffer project for the 2019/2020 financial year.

25.     This project will support private landowners living next to high-value parks and reserves to control invasive weeds. The project will begin with private properties adjoining Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek). 

26.     The aim of the project is to reduce weed densities on private properties and create a buffer to protect high-value parks and reserves from continued weed invasion. This will include:

·   identifying key buffer areas around Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek), with support from the local community group, Friends of Oakley Creek

·   identifying target weed species to be included for control

·   liaising with owners and occupiers and undertake weed control with permission from the landowner

·   providing advice and support for landowners and occupiers

·   if budget permits, identifying additional areas adjoining other high-value parks and reserves to be included in the buffer project.

New project: Drains for rain - catchpit stencil programme – $19,000

27.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our unique environment is protected and enhanced’, the board has indicated interest in a drains for rain - catchpit stencil programme project for the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

 

28.     This project will use stencilled paint-marking of publicly-owned stormwater catchpits in selected shopping and business areas in the Albert-Eden local board area, with community-designed message and imagery that stormwater catchpits are for rain water only. Local schools will be contacted through the sustainable schools network as part of the design development.

29.     It is recommended that the board allocates $19,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards the drains for rain project in the 2019/2020 financial year, which will support:

·   the creation of at least two suitable community-sourced stencil designs

·   stencils applied to 500 to 600 catchpits of the 5,200 catchpits in the Albert-Eden local board area.

Community-led streamside restoration - Roy Clements Treeway – $3,500

30.     To achieve the local board plan key initiative to ‘continue to support restoration initiatives focused on improving biodiversity and connecting ecological corridors’, the board has indicated that it would like continue supporting community-led streamside restoration in the 2019/2020 financial year, but requested that this be split into two projects at Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) and Roy Clements Treeway, to better focus on the respective community groups.

31.     A budget of $3,500 will be provided to the St Lukes Environmental Protection Society to undertake streamside restoration at Roy Clements Treeway to improve the health of Waitītiko (Meola Creek). The budget for 2019/2020 will be used to continue weed control and infill planting.

Community-led streamside restoration – Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) – $28,000

32.     To achieve the local board plan key initiative to ‘continue to support restoration initiatives focused on improving biodiversity and connecting ecological corridors’, the board has indicated that it would like continue supporting the community-led streamside restoration at Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek).

33.     A budget of $28,000 will support Friends of Oakley Creek to undertake streamside restoration projects at Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek).

34.     The key deliverables for 2019/2020 involve:

·   setting up a nursery at the UNITEC Mount Albert campus - $15,000

·   weed control and planting days - $9,000

·   volunteer support and facilitation cost - $4,000.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The draft 2019/2020 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

36.     In particular, the council’s Park, Sport and Recreation department were involved in the development of the Epsom rock forest landowner assistance programme, and the Roy Clements Treeway and Te Auaunga community-led streamside restoration project scoping. If approved, they will contribute towards the delivery of these projects in the 2019/2020 financial year.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local impacts

37.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Albert-Eden Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2019/2020 work programme include Te Auaunga (Oakely Creek), Waitītiko (Meola Creek) and the Epsom rock forest.

Local board views

38.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘we respect and protect our environment’.

39.     The proposed local environment work programme was discussed with the board at workshops on 5 March 2019 and 8 May 2019 and direction received at these workshops have been incorporated into the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     It is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

41.     Table 1 below outlines how each of the projects contributes towards Māori outcomes.

Table 1. Māori impact assessment of proposed projects for inclusion in the Albert-Eden Local Board’s local environment work programme

Project

Māori impact assessment

Waitītiko (Meola Creek) restoration initiative

Te Mahurehure Marae continues to offer their site for planting, weeding and water quality monitoring activities for Point Chevalier School, and will be supported to undertake pest control as part of Pest Free Point Chevalier. There are opportunities for Te Mahurehure Marae and Point Chevalier Pā Harakeke weavers to collaborate and contribute towards restoration plans through the regular Meola community meetings. Mana whenua will be invited to share local history and stories of Waitītiko with the wider Meola community at these meetings.

EcoNeighbourhoods

This project does not specifically target sustainable living for Māori. However, it is acknowledged that sustainable living practices have integral links with concepts of kaitiakitanga and the Māori world view, where people are closely connected to the land and nature.

Epsom rock forest Landowner Assistance Programme (stage three)

No direct engagement has been undertaken with Māori on this project. However, it is recognised that environmental management has integral links with the mauri of the environments and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

Community-led streamside restoration projects at Roy Clements Treeway and Te Auaunga

Plants for these projects will be supplied through a local Māori trust, and parts of the projects will be delivered by Māori contractors where possible. The projects supported through these budgets will increase the mauri of streams in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

 

Project

Māori impact assessment

Bike hub implementation (Tumeke Cycle Space)

There is potential for the bike hub initiative to contribute to Māori wellbeing through educating Māori groups about active transport options, which could result in financial savings and positive health outcomes. Opportunities to partner with Māori organisations in establishing the bike hub and providing the bike hub service will be explored.

New project: Community weed control buffer project

There are some areas of Ngāti Whātua-owned land bordering Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) which may be included as part of this project.

New project: Drains for Rain - catchpit stencil programme

No direct engagement has been made undertaken with Māori on this project. However, it is recognised that environmental management has integral links with the mauri of the environments and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The proposed 2019/2020 local environment work programme requires the allocation of $141,850 of the board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2019/2020. As such, the board’s approval will not have significant financial implications unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend. Regular quarterly updates on projects will be provided to the board tracking expenditure and identifying any projects at risk of non-delivery, over or underspend.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     If the proposed local environment work programme is not approved at the board’s June 2019 business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be able to be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

44.     The risks and proposed mitigation measures associated with each of the proposed projects have been outlined in Attachment B to this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     Subject to the board’s approval, the delivery of this work programme will commence in the new financial year (1 July 2019). Regular reporting on project delivery will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2019/2020 local environment work programme

141

b

Risks and proposed mitigation measures for proposed projects

145

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nick FitzHerbert - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator



Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board 2019/2020 Local Economic Development Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/09436

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Albert-Eden local economic development programme for the 2019/2020 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report introduces the proposed 2019/2020 financial year local economic development work programme for the Albert-Eden Local Board as set out in attachment A.

3.       The proposed work programme comprises the Albert-Eden Business Sustainability Kick Start Programme ($24,000).

4.       The total value of the Local Economic Development programme is $24,000.

5.       The board is being asked to approve the 2019/2020 local economic development programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 local economic development work programme as presented in attachment A to this report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report provides the local board with the proposed local economic development work programme for the coming financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The 2019/2020 local economic development work programme has been developed having regard to the local board’s priorities for local economic development set out in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2017.

Albert-Eden Business Sustainability Kick Start Programme ($24,000)

8.       The proposed project is a business sustainability development programme targeting ten businesses in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

9.       The programme aims to further increase participants' capability in environmental and sustainability related-practices including waste reduction, energy efficiency, travel planning and packaging.

10.     As part of the programme each business will receive 8 hours of sustainable business coaching. An individualised action plan will then be developed to assist participants to improve their business sustainability practices in the future.

11.     In addition, a series of three collaborative events will be held with the following themes:

·   Getting Started: Measuring up, energy efficiency, transport and carbon.

·   Beating Waste: Procurement, plastic and minimising waste. 

·   Sharing Successes: Communications, certifications and awards entries.

12.     Businesses will be invited to bring along their employees, suppliers and any passionately sustainability conscious customers to share their learnings and ideas for improving their sustainability outcomes.

13.     Participating businesses are expected to pay $500 directly to the service provider as their fee for participating in the programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The Local Board Economic Development Work Programme will be managed on behalf of the local board by ATEED.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The Business Sustainability Kick Start Programme noted above aligns with the local board plan outcome ‘Albert-Eden has thriving town centres and a growing local economy’.

16.     The proposed local economic development work programme was workshopped with the local board on Wednesday 6 March 2019, and a final draft was presented on Albert-Eden workshop on Wednesday 8 May 2019. Edits have been made to reflect the direction received at the workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     There are no direct impacts as a result of this report on Māori. However, in implementing the programme consideration will be given to the need to consult with iwi and consider any impacts on Māori arising from the specific projects being undertaken. Maori businesses will benefit from the programme if they chose to participate.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     The proposed 2019/2020 local economic development work programme will see the allocation of $24,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives operating expenditure budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2019/2020.

19.     The local economic development work programme progress will be reported directly to the local board as part of the quarterly local board work programme report produced by Local Board Services.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     There is a risk that participants signed up to the programme do not attend the course or only attend for some of the course. As this is a course for a maximum of ten businesses it is considered important that the participating businesses are committed to attend all the sessions. This is especially the case where we have a waiting list which there is potential for. To mitigate this a charge of $500 per participating businesses has been included in the project proposal.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Following approval by the local board the Local Economic Development team at ATEED will begin to implement the programme from 1 July 2019. Where there is a need for further scoping of activities this will be undertaken and presented back to the local board as required.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ATEED Work Programme 2019/2020

151

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Luo Lei Local - Economic Development Advisor

 

Authorisers

John Norman - Strategic Planning Manager LED

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme

File No.: CP2019/07795

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme has one key project, the Albert-Eden centres transformation programme. This project aims to develop design improvements for Greenwoods Corner and Sandringham village centres to improve the public realm and enhance the village feel. The project also involves monitoring development projects around Point Chevalier centre to see whether further work is required to enhance this centre in the future.

3.       The project has an operational budget of $130,000 for planning works that has been allocated in previous years and will be carried forward to 2019/2020. The scoping work for the centres transformation project has been put on hold in order to leverage budget benefits through alignment with the Integrated Corridor Management Programme, an Auckland Transport project which will address road safety, walking and cycling, public transport and improvements to the road and town centre environments.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       This report provides the local board with the 2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The Albert-Eden centres transformation programme involves design work to improve streetscapes in Greenwoods Corner and Sandringham centres. It also looks at Pt Chevalier centre to see what on-going projects are being delivered and if further spatial planning is required.

6.       While initial scoping was taking place in the two main centres, Auckland Transport began preparing a plan for major work in main arterial roads, including Sandringham and Manukau roads as part of the Integrated Corridor Management Programme.

7.       Plans and Places staff are working together with Auckland Transport to try to link these two projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       The local board has workshopped the centres transformation project with Plans and Places and attended site visits in Sandringham and Greenwoods Corner village centres in preparation for further stages of the project including scoping and design.

9.       During this time, AT started work on the Integrated Corridor Management Programme which will include the two village centres. Staff advice is to align the centres transformation programme with AT’s corridor programme in order to gain benefits through joint delivery. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

10.     The Albert-Eden centres transformation programme aligns with the following local board plan outcomes:

·   Outcome 4: Albert-Eden has thriving town centres and a growing local economy

·   Outcome 5: Travelling around Albert-Eden is safe and easy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

11.     Local planning and actions are integral to the interests and activities of Māori. Plans and Places has conducted initial consultation with local iwi who were supportive of the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

12.     The proposed 2019/2020 Plans and Place work programme will see staff continue to work on the centres transformation programme, noting that there is $130,000 locally driven initiatives operating expenditure budget in the 2018/2019 work programme which will be carried over to 2019/2020, so staff are not proposing any new funding in this work programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

13.     The main risk relating to this project is delivery, because the timing of the planning process of the Integrated Corridor Management programme will affect the work of Plans and Places.  At this point, the prioritisation of arterial routes is undecided which will impact when planning work can start in the Sandringham and Greenwoods Corner centres.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     Subject to approval of this work programme, Plans and Places staff will continue to work with Auckland Transport in the scoping of the centres transformation programme.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme

157

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Fiona Sprott - Team Leader - Planning

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator



Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Progress and Achievements Report January 2018 - June 2019

File No.: CP2019/10490

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Albert-Eden Local Board Progress and Achievements Report January 2018 – June 2019 and request its production and distribution.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached report notes the highlights and achievements of the Board for the period January 2018 – June 2019.

3.       Once approved this report will be published through the local communications team, and distributed by local board services.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the Albert-Eden Local Board Progress and Achievements Report January 2018 – June 2019.

b)      delegate authority to the Chairperson to approve any minor changes to the Albert-Eden Local Board Progress and Achievements Report January 2018 – June 2019.

c)      request officers proceed with the production and appropriate distribution of the Albert-Eden Local Board Progress and Achievements Report January 2018 – June 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Progress and Achievements Report January 2018 - June 2019

161

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor Albert-Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Reports - June 2019

File No.: CP2019/10055

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport monthly update to the Albert-Eden Local Board for June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each month, Auckland Transport provides an update to the Albert-Eden Local Board on transport-related matters and relevant consultations in its area, Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects and decisions of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee.

3.       The Auckland Transport Information and Community Safety Fund reports for June 2019 are attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport June 2019 update report.

b)      agree the following prioritised list to utilise the Community Safety Fund allocated to the Albert-Eden Local Board area:

Project

Description

Amount

Waterview School (Herdman Street)

Make improvements to the school’s new, relocated main entrance to increase visibility and safety for children.

$95,000

Mt Eden Normal Primary School

Upgrade crossings on Valley and Sherbourne Roads to a raised table pedestrian crossing.

$390,000

Our Lady of the Sacred Heart School

Provide a crossing facility for pedestrians needing to get to the bus stop across the road at 539 Manukau Rd

$390,000

Epsom Normal Primary School

Safety improvements around The Drive/Greenlane West

$340,000

 

Woodward Road

The provision of a safe crossing point and better pedestrian connection from Phyllis Reserve/Harbutt Res/Waterview Shared Path to the Mt Albert shops and train station.

$111,000

Great North Road (Western Springs)

Improve the pedestrian refuge for high numbers of pedestrians crossing in this area.

$390,000

New North Road near Wolseley Street

Provide a safer crossing point for those using the Morningside station

$390,000

Great North Road pedestrian safety, 1582 Great North Road, between Blockhouse Bay Road and signals

Add a pedestrian crossing point for people exiting the bus on Great North Rd. Extremely busy road with people waiting on median strip for a period of time to complete their crossing.

$390,000

Signalised crossing on Great North Road in Pt Chevalier Village - Improvement

Add crossing facility to reduce risky behaviour by pedestrians trying to cross the road against the lights.

$40,000

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport Information Report

203

b

Auckland Transport Community Safety Fund Report

213

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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Attachment A – Albert-Eden Community Safety Project Proposals

 

Project Name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

 

Waterview School (Herdman Street)

Make improvements to the school’s new, relocated main entrance to increase visibility and safety for children.

Pass

Routine – detail design required

 

Upgrade crossing amenity between Daventry St and the new school access 

- options may include further speed calming and improvement of inter-visibility between motorists and pedestrians

 

Will need to be located away from GNR to achieve approach sight distance. If located on the curve, there will be a reasonable amount of parking loss.

 

$95,000

CSFM 1.2

Mt Eden Normal Primary School

Upgrade crossings on Valley and Sherbourne Roads to a raised table pedestrian crossing.

Pass

Routine – detail design required

 

Upgrade crossings on Valley and Sherbourne Roads to a raised table pedestrian crossing.

 

This should provide both safer crossing points for pedestrians and calm traffic through the Valley Rd/Sherbourne Rd intersection.

$390,000

CSFM 1.2

Our Lady of the Sacred Heart School

Provide a crossing facility for pedestrians needing to get to the bus stop across the road at 539 Manukau Rd

Pass

Routine – detail design required

 

Pedestrian signalised mid-block crossing.

 

Connected communities route

$390,000

CSFM 1.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project Name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

 

Epsom Normal Primary School

Safety improvements around The Drive/Greenlane West

Pass

Routine – detail design required

 

Countdown timers at The Drive/Greenlane intersection

 

Raise existing zebra outside Epsom Primary

 

Upgrade School Zone signage.

 

Safety fencing is not best practice. Recommend increased parking enforcement.

 

$340,000

CSFM 1.5

Woodward Road

The provision of a safe crossing point and better pedestrian connection from Phyllis Reserve/Harbutt Res/Waterview Shared Path to the Mt Albert shops and train station.

Pass

Routine – detail design required

 

Relatively low pedestrian activity.

 

No pedestrian- related crash history, over the past five years within a 50m radius of this intersection.

 Collective risk is low-medium.

 

The ROC includes costs for sets of side islands each side of Woodward Rd, along with new footpath connections, tactile pavers and 1 new street light. Traffic Management costs are included and will cost a significant amount.

 

Woodward Road is not wide enough for a pedestrian refuge.

 

 

$111,000

CSFM

 1.9

 


 

Project Name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

 

Great North Road (Western Springs)

Improve the pedestrian refuge for high numbers of pedestrians crossing in this area.

Pass

Routine – detail design required

 

Improvements to the refuge islands would not be optimal. The safest option would be a mid-block signalised crossing due to the multilane approaches.

 

Crash history:

1 reported crash in the last five years involving a pedestrian.

 

$390,000

CSFM 1.10

New North Road near Wolseley Street

Provide a safer crossing point for those using the Morningside station

Pass

Routine – detail design required

 

Signalised mid-block crossing recommended as this is a busy arterial route.

 

Pedestrians count during morning peak around 60 pedestrians 

 

May reduce car parking on New North Road and could be affected by the Connected Communities project.

 

$390,000

CSFM 1.11

Great North Road pedestrian safety, 1582 Great North Road, between Blockhouse Bay Road and signals

Add a pedestrian crossing point for people exiting the bus on Great North Rd. Extremely busy road with people waiting on median strip for a period of time to complete their crossing.

 

Routine – detail design required

 

Mid-block signalised pedestrian crossing.

Possible loss of carparks.

Increased congestion on busy arterial road.

On a connected communities route.

 

$390,000

CSFM 1.12

 


 

Project Name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

 

Signalised crossing on Great North Road in Pt Chevalier Village - Improvement

Add crossing facility to reduce risky behaviour by pedestrians trying to cross the road against the lights.

 

Routine – detail design required

 

 

Count down timers will assist pedestrian behaviour.

The pedestrian delay should also be assessed. Low levels of pedestrian service will result in pedestrians taking risks. Review cycle times. Or consider changing to ‘hot response’ phasing where the pedestrian signal will immediately trigger, subsequent to providing at least the minimum allowable green time for vehicles movements.

 

$40,000

CSFM 1.13

The projects below failed to be eligible for the Community Safety Fund due to cost, inclusion in other AT work programmes and/or complexity.

Project Name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

 

Mt Albert Traffic Calming (Alberton Block)

Traffic calming on local roads between Mt Albert Road, New North Road, St Lukes Road and Alberton Avenue.

Fail

Complex – Investigation and Design

 

Exceeds budget

$1 million

CSFM 1.1

St Lukes Road /Morningside Road intersection red light camera

Red light runners observed here

Fail

Routine – detail design required

 

AT already has an agreed programme with NZ Police – this does not fit into that programme at the moment.

 

 

CSFM 1.6

Pt Chevalier Village pedestrian safety works

Improve pedestrian safety by removing slip lanes and providing fencing to prevent jay walking

Fail

Complex – Investigation and Design

 

This intersection is included in the AT cycle way project (Point Chevalier to Herne Bay).

 

CSFM 1.7

 


 

Project Name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

 

Sutherland Road

Sutherland Road is part of the NW cycleway. Vehicles can still enter Sutherland Road at speed – entry treatments and signage are needed to slow traffic and alert to the high number of cyclists.

Fail

Complex – Investigation and Design

 

Crash History:

-       1 reported bicycle related crash in the last 5 years. This was between two bicycle riders which resulted in a non-injury crash. (2017)

 

No demonstrative road safety benefit.

 

 CSFM 1.8

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update from 1 November 2018 to 30 April 2019

File No.: CP2019/10093

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Albert-Eden Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area for the six months from 1 November 2018 to 30 April 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Panuku is charged with balancing financial and non-financial outcomes in order to create and manage sustainable and resilient places where people want to live, work, invest, learn and visit. The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·   redevelopment of urban locations, leveraging off council owned land assets, mostly within existing suburbs

·   review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property

·   management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure

·   other property related services such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function, strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

3.       Panuku currently manages 65 commercial and residential interests in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

4.       There is one property that is currently under review as part of our rationalisation process.

5.       No properties were purchased, and 1 property was sold in the Albert-Eden Local Board area during the last six months.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 November 2018 to 30 April 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

7.       The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world class city. Panuku will play a significant role in achieving the Homes and Places and Belonging and Participation outcomes.

8.       Panuku is leading urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Papatoetoe, Ormiston and Flat Bush, Panmure, Pukekohe, City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

9.       Panuku manages around $2 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

10.     As at 30 December 2018, the property portfolio comprises 1636 properties, containing 1062 leases. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Development

11.     Dominion & Valley Road, Mt Eden – The site was previously identified for mixed-use retail / apartment development. Resource Consent for 102 apartments and seven retail units was declined by commissioners in August 2018 primarily due to the proposed effects on the surrounding properties, and the removal of a character supporting building.  Panuku appealed the decision and have now worked with Council and other submitters on a revised scheme to address issues raised, under the mediation process. Panuku has reached agreement with Council on the issues raised by the Regulatory and Heritage teams, and we are now progressing towards a formal hearing in August 2019, at which we time we expect a formal outcome to the appeal process, and a clear project direction.

Properties managed in the Albert-Eden Local Board Area

12.     Panuku currently manages 57 commercial and 8 residential interests within the local board area.

Business interests

13.     Panuku also manages the commercial return from business interests on the council’s behalf. This includes two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

14.     There are currently no managed business interests in the Albert-Eden local board area.

 

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

15.     The 2018-2028 Long-term Plan (LTP) reflects a desire of council to materially reduce or slow down expenditure and unlock value from assets no longer required, or which are sub-optimal for service purposes. In response to this, ACPL developed a new method of dealing with service property called ‘optimisation’, prior to the establishment of Panuku. 

16.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets approved in 2015. The process is a tri-party agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

17.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, with lower maintenance costs, operating costs as well as improved service delivery benefiting from co-location of other complimentary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a vast range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites and in many cases will result in intensification of land use, particularly residential, supporting Auckland Plan implementation.

18.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

19.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing review of council’s property assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that are no longer required for council service purposes and may be suitable for other public works and/or potential sale, and development if appropriate. Panuku has a particular focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the 2018-2028 LTP and the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

20.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

21.     Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal recommendations

$9.3 million as at 30 April 2019.

 

Process

22.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku Board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Under review

23.     There is one property currently under review in the Albert-Eden Local Board area listed below. This list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the Governing Body.

 

Property

Details

520 Dominion Road (aka 173 Balmoral Road), Mt Eden

A small landlocked property directly adjacent to Potters Park. It was acquired by the former Mount Eden Borough Council in 1940.

The property is a local purpose (Plunket rooms) reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

Panuku consultation with the Albert-Eden-Local Board is proposed for August/September 2019.

 

Acquisitions and disposals

24.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

25.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

26.     Panuku has so far purchased 11 properties for open space across Auckland in the 2018-19 financial year at a cost of $35.3 million and bought one property for stormwater use at a value of $188,000.

27.     No properties have been purchased in the Albert-Eden Local Board area during the reporting period

28.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 

Disposals

29.     In the current financial year to the end of May, the Panuku disposals team has entered into twenty-three sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $38.1 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

30.     As part of the Northern Corridor Improvements, Auckland Council has agreed to transfer various parcels of land to NZTA to facilitate the works. The compensation amount totals $6.5 million, of which $1.554 million is advance compensation for required land at Rook Reserve with the final compensation amount still to be agreed.

31.     Panuku 2018/19 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

32.     The one property sold in the Albert-Eden Local Board area in this period is 4 Amandale Avenue, St Lukes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

35.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries relating to a property in the local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Panuku work collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

37.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.         

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The next six-monthly update is scheduled for December 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sa Va'aelua - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Lisa Gooding - Senior Engagement Advisor

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities Bill

File No.: CP2019/10630

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider whether to provide formal views on the Government’s Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has submitted previously (in May 2017) on the Urban Development Authorities discussion document which signalled the Government’s intention to establish an urban development authority or authorities. The Albert-Eden Local Board provided feedback which was incorporated into the Auckland Council submission.

3.       The Government is now progressing the establishment of the authority though the Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill (the Bill), see Attachment A.

4.       The Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill was introduced in to Parliament on the 31 May 2019. The Bill establishes Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities as a new Crown entity by:

·   disestablishing HNZC and HLC putting HNZC and HLC’s assets into Kāinga Ora- Homes and Communities

·   repealing the Housing Corporation Act 1974

·   putting some of the functions and assets related to KiwiBuild that currently sit in the Ministry for Housing and Urban Development into Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities

·   setting up a new board of 6-8 members.

5.       A summary of the Bill, including its objectives and key functions, a timeframe feedback, and for the relationship to a subsequent bill yet to come, is set out in a memo to elected members, see Attachment B.

6.       Auckland Council staff will be drafting a submission for approval by the Planning Committee on 2 July 2019, to meet the 11 July 2019 deadline for submissions.

7.       The Albert-Eden Local Board could provide feedback, to form part of the Auckland Council submission, by 9 July 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      consider whether to provide formal views on the Government’s Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities Bill

231

b

Memo to elected members on the Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities Bill

279

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor Albert-Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill

File No.: CP2019/11060

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider whether to provide formal views on the Government’s Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Government has introduced the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill (the Bill).

3.       The Bill was developed in January 2018 as part of a global effort under the Paris Agreement to limit the global average temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.

4.       Originally the Zero Carbon Bill was to be a separate piece of legislation, however it now will be introduced as an amendment to the current Climate Change Response Act 2002. The amendment is to ensure all key climate legislation is encompassed within one Act.

5.       The Bill is made up of four main elements:

·        the establishment of a Climate Change Commission

·        updated emissions reduction targets

·        specific emissions budgets, and

·        the inclusion of a national adaptation plan.

6.       Attachment A contains a memo to elected members with information and the timeframe feedback, a summary of the Bill, the Bill in full and key elements of the Bill.

7.       Auckland Council staff will be drafting a submission for approval by the Environment and Community Committee on 9 July 2019, to meet the 16 July 2019 deadline for submissions.

8.       The Albert-Eden Local Board could provide feedback, to form part of the Auckland Council submission, by 10 July 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      consider whether to provide formal views on the Government’s Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo to elected members including the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill, a summary and its key elements

285

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor Albert-Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Board - Notice of Motion - Safe road sharing by buses and bicycles

File No.: CP2019/10459

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Puketāpapa Local Board’s Notice of Motion and resolutions regarding the Safe road sharing by buses and bicycles.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On Thursday 16 May 2019, the Puketāpapa Local Board resolved the following:

Resolution number PKTPP/2019/65

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson J Fairey, seconded by Member D Holm:  

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)    advocate to Auckland Transport for improvements to support safer road sharing by buses and cyclists, particularly in bus lanes, by including the following in bus company service contracts and standard operating procedures:

i)       require all bus drivers and managers to participate in a programme about safe sharing with cyclists, such as “Share The Road”, every five years, and as part of induction

ii)      timetabling that allows adequate breaks for drivers, so that they do not have to rush during or between routes to be on time

iii)     include effective and easy to use complaint procedures for those concerned about bus movements in relation to other road users, in particular those on bicycles, which have options for restorative justice focused on behaviour change to support safety

b)    encourage Auckland Transport to work with accessibility and active transport advocates and local boards to identify places in the roading network where there is risk and conflict between buses and more vulnerable road users, and investigate opportunities to address these danger spots as a priority.

CARRIED

3.       This report is to receive the Puketāpapa Local Board’s Notice of Motion and resolutions regarding the Safe road sharing by buses and bicycles.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Puketāpapa Local Board’s Notice of Motion and resolutions regarding the Safe road sharing by buses and bicycles.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Julie Fairey - Safe road sharing by buses and bicycles

351

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2019/01089

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity to provide for the local ward area Governing Body Members to update the board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body Members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Governing Body Members Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey’s verbal updates.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2019/01109

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Chairperson will update the board on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the Chairperson will update the board members by way of a verbal or written report at a meeting of the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2019/01100

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for board members to give updates on projects, events-attended since the previous meeting and discuss other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an information item.  A written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda, if the board wishes to pass a resolution requesting an action taken under this item.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Board Member Reports for June 2019.

b)      receive Deputy Chair Fryer’s written report for June 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputy Chair Fryer - Board Report June 2019

361

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/01116

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Albert-Eden Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar which is a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Albert-Eden Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

· ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

· clarifying what advice is required and when

· clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the Albert-Eden Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

371

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2019/03255

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous month’s business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance to Standing Order 12.1.4 the board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of its local board workshops held over the past month following the previous business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Notes for the workshops held on 15 May 2019, 29 May 2019, 5 June 2019 and 12 June 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20190515 Workshop Record

377

b

20190529 Workshop Record

379

c

20190605 Workshop Record

381

d

20190612 Workshop Record

385

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Macfarlane - Democracy Advisor - Albert - Eden

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Mt Albert Rugby League Club profile            Page 391

Item 8.1      Attachment b    Concept Plans for Mt Albert Rugby Club at 50 Western Springs Road
Auckland                                                        Page
399


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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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26 June 2019

 

 

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[1] The aquatic centre has been excluded from this indicative business case as current work is underway to determine the optimal way to deliver aquatic provision in Albert-Eden Local Board.

 

[2] Sport NZ Insight tool.

 

[3] One of the key objectives of the detailed business case will be to identify opportunities to deliver the facilities at lower cost to council. Opportunities to increase revenue, undertake partnerships or obtain sponsorship will be investigated.