I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 17 June 2019

6.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

David Collings

 

Deputy Chairperson

Katrina Bungard

 

Members

Garry Boles

 

 

Jim Donald

 

 

John Spiller

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Adele White

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Vanessa Phillips

Democracy Advisor

 

11 June 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 891 378

Email: vanessa.phillips@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Hilltop Heights Residents Association                                       5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - MatthewBrajkovich - Flooding issues in Cockle Bay and solution planning                                                                                                                 6

9.2     Public Forum - Karen Gibson - Board of Trustees,  Te Uho o te Nikau Primary                                                                                                                                 6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Chairperson's report                                                                                                     9

12        Deputy Mayor update                                                                                                  11

13        Councillor update                                                                                                        13

14        Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 grant allocations                       15

15        Allocation of Community Safety Fund                                                                      39

16        Transfer of Local Board Transport Capital Fund to Auckland Council for work at Barry Curtis Park                                                                                                                    43

17        Howick monthly Auckland Transport update                                                          47

18        Advice on the progression of a change to zoning for properties near Stockade Hill, Howick                                                                                                                          57

19        Changes to Local Board Standing Orders                                                               63

20        Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme                                                                                                                                       69

21        Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 community services work programme                                                                                                                                       79

22        Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 Local Environment work programme                                                                                                                                       85

23        Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 Local Economic Development Work Programme                                                                                                                   95

24        Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 External Partnerships Work Programme                                                                                                                                       99

25        Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 Plans and Places Work Programme                                                                                                                                     103

26        Proposal to grant Pakuranga Tennis Club funding for lease rental                   107

27        Proposal to grant new community leases to Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated                                                                                                               111

28        Proposal to grant new community leases to Howick Children's and Youth Theatre Incorporated and The Girl Guides Association New Zealand Incorporated      125

29        Proposal to grant a new joint deed of lease to Shelly Park Cruising Club Incorporated and The Scouts Association of New Zealand                                                                135

30        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     145

31        Workshop Records                                                                                                    149  

32        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 20 May 2019 and the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 6 June 2019 as  true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Hilltop Heights Residents Association

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Tony Bracefield on behalf of the Hilltop Heights Residents Association will be in attendance to present to the board on the upgrade of Earnslaw Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Tony Bracefield on behalf of the Hilltop Heights Residents Association will be in attendance to present to the board on the upgrade of Earnslaw Park; in particular, the playground equipment and the draining of a patch of lawn that cannot be used throughout winter.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Tony Bracefield on behalf of the Hilltop Heights Residents Association and thank him for his presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - MatthewBrajkovich - Flooding issues in Cockle Bay and solution planning

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Matthew Brajkovich will be in attendance to speak about flooding issues in Cockle Bay and solution planning

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Thank Matthew Brajkovich for his attendance and discussion on flooding issues in Cockle Bay and solution planning.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Karen Gibson - Board of Trustees,  Te Uho o te Nikau Primary

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Karen Gibson, Board of Trustees, Te Uho o te Nikau Primary School, will be in attendance to address the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Karen Gibson will update the board on the current status of Te Uho o te Nikau Primary School.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Thank Karen Gibson, Board of Trustees, Te Uho o te Nikau Primary School, for her attendance and update on Te Uho o te Nikau Primary School.

 

 


 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2019/09296

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the Board on any announcements and note the Chairperson’s written report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Chairperson’s verbal update and written report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Deputy Mayor update

File No.: CP2019/09335

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity for the Deputy Mayor to update the board on regional matters of interest.

2.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Deputy Mayor to update the board on regional matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Providing the Deputy Mayor with an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the verbal report from Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Councillor update

File No.: CP2019/09292

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Howick Ward councillors to update the local board on regional matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Howick Ward councillors with an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters of interest since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the verbal and written report from Councillor Paul Young.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 grant allocations

File No.: CP2019/08890

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019, including three deferred grant applications from Howick Local Grants Round Three 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Community Grants Programme 2018/2019 (Attachment A) on 16 April 2018. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

3.       This report presents applications received for Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 (Attachment B) and deferred applications from Howick Local Grants Round Three (Attachment C).

4.       The Howick Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $395,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year. In addition, there is a $31,200 underspend in the arts, community and events (ACE) budget from the Community Safety Initiatives, Healthy Howick Concept Plan, Event Partnership Fund and Movies in the Park project budgets that has been reallocated to the community grants budget. 

5.       A total of $231,694 was allocated to Local Grants Round One, $48,501 was allocated to Local Grants Round Two, $76,750 was allocated to Local Grants Round Three and $38,500 was allocated to Quick Response Round One.

6.       Uxbridge Arts and Culture Trust (QR1907-119) refunded $1,500 as they were unable to deliver the Whare Tapere project. Shiloh Creative Life Centre (QR1907-125) refunded $500 as they were unable to deliver their “Back to Basics” project. Therefore, a total of $2,000 was added back into the 2018/2019 grants budget.

7.       Therefore there is a remaining budget of $32,755 to be allocated to quick response round two.

8.       Thirty-two applications were received for Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019, requesting a total of $69,789.00.

9.       Three applications, deferred from local grants round three to quick response round two, are also to be considered by the local board in this report. A total of $145,198 is requested for the three deferred applications.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 listed in Table One.

Table One: Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1907-204

Auckland Seniors Support and Caring Group Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the performance fees, venue hire, refreshments and speaker fees to host a Chinese moon festival.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-211

Auckland Bone and Stone Carving Academy Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the facilitator, administration and photography fees to run two one-day bone carving workshops.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-220

Harlequin Musical Theatre

Arts and culture

Towards the musician's fees to deliver 14 performances of the production, "Company."

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-223

Howick Art Group

Arts and culture

Towards the venue hire and advertising costs to deliver an art exhibition.

$2,500.00

Eligible

QR1907-230

Manukau Orchestral Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards rent and storage costs at Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-201

Howick Village Business Association

 

 

Community

Towards the purchase of ten steel gazebos.

$2,125.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1907-203

Combined Probus Club of Botany Downs

Community

Towards the venue hire of Highland Park Community House, Howick Croquet Club and Eastview Baptist Church to conduct organised activities.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-205

Botany and Flat Bush Ethnic Association Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, trainer wages and equipment for a weekly exercise group.

$2,800.00

Eligible

QR1907-208

Pakuranga Inter-Church Charitable Trust (operating as Pakuranga Counselling Centre)

Community

Towards counsellor fees to deliver counselling sessions for young people.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-209

South East Auckland Senior Citizens' Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the venue hire, hall setup and clean up, decorations, entertainment and newsletter to host a Diwali celebration.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-210

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of wooden toys and resources for the Howick Pakuranga and Pakuranga Chinese playgroups.

$1,670.00

Eligible

QR1907-213

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards the cost of printing take-home workbooks for students in the Howick Local Board area.

$3,000.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1907-215

River of Life Christian Church Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of lollies, prizes and toys for a family-friendly Halloween event.

$900.00

Eligible

QR1907-218

River of Life Christian Church Trust

Community

Towards a mini golf course hire and a magician's fee as part of a youth holiday programme.

$1,075.00

Eligible

QR1907-221

Sowers Trust

Community

Towards petrol costs to deliver youth mentoring services.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-222

Highland Park Community Creche Incorporated

Community

Towards the annual rental cost.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-224

Sports Implementation Foundation

Community

Towards the costs to deliver the "Believe and You Will Achieve" programme to students at Buckland’s Beach Intermediate.

$2,300.00

Eligible

QR1907-225

Anjie Wang

Community

Towards the advertising and hosting costs to deliver a female youth empowerment conference.

$400.00

Eligible

QR1907-226

Parenting Place Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of delivering mental health and life skills presentations to schools in the Howick local board area, including wages, materials, transport and communication.

$3,000.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1907-227

Inner Wheel Club of Howick

Community

Towards venue hire and the purchase of resources, clothing and hygiene products for children at Stand Children Services.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-228

The Depot Management Committee (The Depot Community Trust)

Community

Towards the purchase of cleaning and maintenance equipment.

$2,693.00

Eligible

QR1907-229

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of 20 chairs.

$1,110.00

Eligible

QR1907-234

Cession Community Trust

Community

Towards hosting the "Easter Hunt", "Halloween Carboot Party" and "Christmas on the Lawn" events, including advertising costs, supplies and bouncy castle hire.

$2,450.00

Eligible

QR1907-237

Independent Living Service Trust

Community

Towards the cost of petrol for two coaches and a coordinator.

$1,875.00

Eligible

QR1907-231

The Howick Golf Club Incorporated

Environment

Towards the purchase of native plants.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-206

Auckland Ice Figure Skating Club

Sport and recreation

Towards ice rink hire for the Auckland club championships.

$2,000.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1907-207

Pakuranga Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of tennis balls.

$1,486.00

Eligible

QR1907-212

Howick Softball Club (Fencibles) Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a line marking machine.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-214

Howick Gymnastic Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards operational costs including power, water, phone and rubbish removal.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-216

Te Tumu

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of twelve paddles and two steering blades.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1907-219

Pakuranga Athletic Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs to deliver a junior track and field day, including newspaper advertising, participation ribbons and various equipment.

$2,616.00

Eligible

QR1907-233

St Marks Catholic School Pakuranga

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a basketball hoop.

$2,789.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$69,789

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the Local Grants Round Three 2018/2019 deferred grant applications as outlined in Table Two:

Table Two: Howick Local Grants Round Three 2018/2019 deferred applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG1907-311

The Howick Childrens Charitable Trust

Events

Towards the overall costs to run the Howick Santa Parade, including traffic management, website build, setup and clean up, advertising, management and entertainment.

$40,198.00

Eligible

LG1907-328

Rotary Club of Pakuranga Trust

Events

Towards the overall costs to deliver a community firework display and festival.

$50,000.00

Eligible

LG1907-347

NewHope Community Church Trust

Events

Towards the infrastructure costs needed to deliver a Christmas event.

$55,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$145,198

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

11.     The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

12.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

13.     The Howick Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2018/2019 (Attachment A) on 16 April 2018 and will operate two quick response and three local grants rounds for this financial year. 

14.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department, will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

17.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Howick Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

19.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

20.     A summary of each application received through Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 (Attachment B) is provided.

21.     A summary of each deferred applications from Howick Local Grants Round Three 2018/2019 (Attachment C) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

23.     Nine applicants from Howick Quick Response Round Two indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted 2018-2028 Long-Term Plan and 2018/2019 local board agreement.

25.     The Howick Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $395,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year. In addition, there is a further $31,200 from the ACE budget that has been reallocated to community grants from the following projects:

·   $7,700 budget saving from the Community Safety Initiatives

·   $15,000 budget saving from the Healthy Howick Concept Plan

·   $4,000 budget saving from the Event Partnership Fund

·   $4,500 budget saving from Movies in the Parks.

26.     A total of $231,694 was allocated to Local Grants Round One, $48,501 was allocated to Local Grants Round Two, $76,750 was allocated to Local Grants Round Three and $38,500 was allocated to Quick Response Round One.

27.     Uxbridge Arts and Culture Trust (QR1907-119) refunded $1,500 as they were unable to deliver the Whare Tapere project. Shiloh Creative Life Centre (QR1907-125) refunded $500 as they were unable to deliver their “Back to Basics” project. Therefore, a total of $2,000 was added back into the 2018/2019 grants budget.

28.     Therefore, there is a remaining budget of $32,755 to be allocated to quick response round two.

29.     Thirty-two applications were received for Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019, requesting a total of $69,789.00.

30.     Three applications deferred from local grants round three to quick response round two are requesting a total of $145,198.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Following the Howick Local Board allocation of funding for Quick Response Round Two, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision and facilitate payment of the grant.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019

25

b

Howick Quick Response Round Two 2018/2019 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Howick Local Grants Round Three 2018/2019 deferred grant applications

29

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Makenzie Hirz - Senior Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grant Operations Manager

Shane King - Head of Operations Support

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


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17 June 2019

 

 

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17 June 2019

 

 

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Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Allocation of Community Safety Fund

File No.: CP2019/09780

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider how to allocate the Howick Local Boards $985,896 share of the Community Safety Fund that is available to fund road safety projects in the Howick Local Board area. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Established in the 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan, the Community Safety Fund sees $20 million dispensed across all 21 local boards for road safety initiatives. A local board’s share of the fund is based on a formula that assesses the number of deaths and serious injuries in that area. Howick Local Board’s budget is $985,896. 

3.       The Community Safety Fund is a capital budget designed to deliver projects raised by the local board that will help to prevent, control or mitigate identified local safety hazards. Individual projects must cost less than $1 million, be best practice, not be already funded, and conform to Auckland Transport standards. Nor will projects containing unconventional or unproven components such as new trials or pilot projects be considered.

4.       The Board has considered five potential safety projects.  Auckland Transport has assessed, scoped and provided estimated costs developed for each project it supports. The scoped and costed list of projects were workshopped with the Board on 4 June 2019.

5.       The board indicated support for one project; building a new pedestrian bridge over the Flatbush Culvert to provide safer walking access to Te Uhu o te Nikau Primary School. Auckland Transport recommends that the board support this project and also resolve to support one or more of the remaining three recommended projects, maximising the effectiveness of the board’s Community Safety Fund allocation. 

6.       If the board does not allocate all its share of the Community Safety Fund, it will be returned to Auckland Transport’s capital programme.  If the board wishes to progress projects in excess of the available funds, then the balance can be funded from the board’s Local Board Capital Transport Fund.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      request that $ 520,000 of the Community Safety Fund is allocated to building a new pedestrian bridge of the Flatbush Culvert to provide safe access to Te Uhu o te Nikau Primary School.

b)      request that:

i.      $420,000 of the Community Safety Fund is allocated to Stanniland Street Pedestrian Refuge, contingent on receiving the final costings and noting that it may need to top up the cost from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and that this project will take a longer time frame to deliver, and/or;

ii.      $520,000 of the Community Safety Fund is allocated Selwyn Road/Picton Ave roundabout Pedestrian Improvements, noting that this will need a top up from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, and/or:

iii)      $250,000 of the Community Safety Fund is allocated to Fordyce Avenue /Suzetta Place / Stansfield Place Intersection Improvement.

c)      note that any unallocated money from the Community Safety Fund will be returned to Auckland Transport’s general capital programme.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan allocated $20 million for Financial Year 2019/2020 and Financial Year 2020/2021 for local initiatives in road safety (the Community Safety Fund). $5 million is allocated Financial Year 2019/2020 and $15 million is allocated in Financial Year 2020/2021.  In order to promote safety at the local community level, the fund is apportioned to each local board area based on a formula that focuses on the numbers of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) in that area.

8.       The objective is to accelerate local community initiated safety projects around identified high-risk locations and local schools.  Local Boards were invited to submit proposals for projects addressing safety issues their communities have identified.

9.       The Howick Local Board share of the Community Safety Fund is $985,896 over the two financial years.

10.     Criteria for the fund includes physical measures raised by the local community to prevent, control or mitigate identified local road and street safety hazards which expose people using any form of road and street transport to demonstrable hazards which may result in death or serious harm. Individual project cost is to be no greater than $1 million.  Projects must consist of best practice components, conform to Auckland Transport standards and comply with New Zealand law.

11.     The fund does not cover the following:

·    Projects that are funded by existing Auckland Transport road safety or other capital works programmes including, but not limited to setting speed limits, seal extensions, maintenance, renewals and planned footpath upgrades (but can be used to augment these projects).

·    Projects not within the street, including parks, rail corridor, beaches and property not owned or controlled by Auckland Transport.

·    Projects that have unacceptable effects on network efficiency or introduce unacceptable secondary hazards or effects. 

·    Projects with an unacceptably high maintenance cost.

·    Projects that clash with other planned public projects.

·    Complex projects that may take greater than two years to deliver including but not limited to projects requiring significant engineered structures, complex resource consents and complex traffic modelling. 

·    Projects containing unconventional or unproven components including new trials or pilot projects.

·    Projects or components of projects that have no demonstrable safety benefit unless they are integral with a safety project.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     On 16 April 2019 Auckland Transport workshopped with Howick Local Board and provided advice regarding possible projects.  The local board has asked that Auckland Transport investigate the following projects recommended by Auckland Transport:

·    Stanniland Street Pedestrian Refuge - Installing a refuge island outside the retirement village to the south of Park Avenue.

·    Selwyn Road/Picton Ave roundabout pedestrian Improvements - Improve pedestrian facilities at the Selwyn / Picton Road roundabout.

·    Fordyce Avenue /Suzetta Place / Stansfield Place Intersection Improvement - Modify the intersection to prevent dangerous U-turns.

13.     The local board also has two projects that are currently being investigated for delivery using the LBTCF. The board asked Auckland Transport at the workshop on 16 April 2019 to consider whether these projects can be delivered using the Community Safety Fund instead of the LBTCF. The projects were:

·    Botany Downs Secondary College Crossing Point – Improving the crossing facilities for student of Botany Downs Secondary College who need to cross Chapel Road.

·    Flatbush School Road Temporary Pedestrian Bridge – Building a temporary bridge over the Flat Bush Culvert (on Flatbush School Road) allowing pedestrians to cross the culvert more safely.

14.     Auckland Transport workshopped the following projects and costings with the Howick Local Board on 4 June 2019.

·    Stanniland Street Pedestrian Refuge. This project is supported by Auckland Transport, but it is more complex than originally anticipated and requires more investigation.  Auckland Transport has provided a rough estimate of the potential cost of $420,000 and advises that if the board wishes to prioritise the project it needs to accept that it will take time and may cost more than originally indicated.

·    Selwyn Road/Picton Ave roundabout Pedestrian Improvements. Supported by Auckland Transport at a cost of $520,000.

·    Fordyce Avenue /Suzetta Place / Stansfield Place Intersection Improvement. Supported by Auckland Transport at a cost of $250,000.

·    Botany Downs Secondary College Crossing Point. Auckland Transport does not support delivery of this project from the Community Safety Fund. The reasons why were discussed in detail with the local board but generally hinge around the fact that any significant modification of the intersection would require the use of land owned by the school. 

A recommended approach to this project is to discuss it further with the school. Particularly, whether the school is able to use its land that is a large part of the intersection; and without which any significant modification is impossible. This is likely to take time but could be delivered from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, with the school’s support. 

·    Flatbush School Road Temporary Pedestrian Bridge. Supported by Auckland Transport at a cost of $520,000.

15.     At the workshop, the local board indicated that they would only support one project; the Flatbush School Road Temporary Bridge.  A recommendation to this effect is provided.

16.     Auckland Transport reminds the board the any Community Safety Funding not allocated will be returned to Auckland Transports capital programme.  The board could consider allocating funding to support one or more of the other recommended projects to better utilise the Community Safety Funding available.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The impact of this decision is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The projects allocated funding in this report will improve the road safety environment in the communities within the Howick Local Board area and the member’s opinions have been canvassed in two workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     If the recommendation to this report is adopted roughly half of the boards allocated Community Safety Fund will be utilised.

19.     Any unallocated funds will be returned to Auckland Transport for re-allocation to other areas. If the board wishes to progress projects in excess of the fund available in the Community Safety Fund the Balance can be funded from the board’s Local Capital Transport Fund.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Design and construction of approved list of projects.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Stallworthy Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Manager Unit, Auckland Transport.

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Transfer of Local Board Transport Capital Fund to Auckland Council for work at Barry Curtis Park

File No.: CP2019/09781

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To transfer $339,500 of the Howick Local Board’s Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) to Auckland Council for work at Barry Curtis Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport manages the LBTCF on behalf of the Howick Local Board.  On an as required basis, Auckland Transport reports on progress, provides advice and supports decision-making.

3.       This month, one decision relating to the LBTCF is required.

4.       It is proposed that $339,500 of LBTCF is transferred to Auckland Council, and the proposed footpath and pedestrian refuge adjacent to Barry Curtis Park’s Flat Bush Road carpark is delivered by Community Facilities, primarily because it links to other work Community Facilities is progressing in the area.

5.       The proposed recommendation and options were workshopped with the local board by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport officers on 19 February 2019.

6.       This report records the options discussed and provides the opportunity for the board to confirm its direction by ‘resolution’.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      authorise Auckland Transport to transfer $339,500 of the Howick Local Board’s Local Board Transport Capital Fund to Auckland Council to allow Community Facilities to deliver the section of footpath and pedestrian refuge in front of Barry Curtis Park’s Flat Bush School Road carpark.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport.  Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.  Projects must also:

·    Be safe.

·    Not impede network efficiency.

·    Be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

8.       The following table provides an overall summary of the current LBTCF position.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

9.       The project discussed in this report is a footpath running parallel to Flatbush School Road that will provide a safer pedestrian link to the park and a pedestrian refuge. The pedestrian link and refuge are shown in Figure 1.

 

Figure 1: Proposed footpath and pedestrian refuge

10.     Developing Barry Curtis Park has a long history, thoroughly considered by the board, and this project forms part of the broader planning for the park,

11.     Over time, working with Auckland Council officers, the board considered a range of reasonably practicable options for developing Barry Curtis Park, such as funding the project with LDI Capex or LBTCF.  At a workshop on 19 February 2019 the board supported this approach of using Community Facilities to deliver the project and have it funded from LBCTF, and requested that this option be formally reported so that it could be considered by members and direction provided by resolution.

12.     Auckland Transport supports the use of LBTCF to deliver a transport-related element of the plan for Barry Curtis Park. The proposal has transport outcomes, extending the existing pedestrian network and providing a safe crossing point on Flat Bush School Road.

13.     Staff in the Community Facilities department of Auckland Council have provided a firm price estimate for the proposed work of $339,500.  Staff from Community Facilities have also confirmed this project aligns with the broader development plans for Barry Curtis Park and there are synergies in them progressing the work as it links to other work they are doing in the area.

14.     Transferring funds from the LBTCF to Auckland Council to deliver transport related projects across parks is a sensible solution to delivering projects and is often done often across Auckland.  The process is a simple ‘book’ transfer of funds from the LBTCF to Auckland Council.

15.     A draft recommendation is included for members to consider.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The issues discussed in this report were workshopped with the Howick Local Board on a number of occasions, most recently on 19 February 2019. At the workshop on 19 February the board indicated their support for this project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     Auckland Transport has worked closely with Community Facilities on how best to fund and deliver this project. Community Facilities is in agreement with the proposed recommendation contained in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The issues discussed in this report were workshopped with the Howick Local Board on a number of occasions most recently on 19 February 2019. At the workshop on 19 February the board indicated their support for this project. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Study of the options indicates that none involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, so iwi consultation is not required at this time. Projects that continue will be reviewed again and if required iwi will be consulted and any concerns or suggestions considered in planning.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The financial implications of the draft recommendations are a commitment of an estimated $339,500 of the LBTCF to this project.

21.     This is a significant commitment but the project has a long history of consideration and discussion by the board and meets stated objectives of the Howick Local Board Plan 2017.

22.     With this commitment, the local board will still have approximately $2,800,000 available for other projects.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     Construction always involves an element of risk.  There can be fluctuation in the cost of contractors, material cost and adverse weather all of which can impact on a construction programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     If the recommendation is approved, Auckland Transport will immediately transfer the requested amount to Auckland Council.  Delivery of the project, reporting and construction, become an Auckland Council responsibility at that point.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Stallworthy, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Manager Unit, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Howick monthly Auckland Transport update

File No.: CP2019/09360

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Howick Local Board on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month but the report contains information about the following:

·        The wider ‘context’ involving a summary of the strategic projects or issues effecting the Howick area.

·        An update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF). 

·        Progress on local board advocacy initiatives.

·        A summary of consultation about future Auckland Transport activities is included as an attachment.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport June 2019 monthly update report.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. Auckland Transport reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

4.       Auckland Transport continues to deliver a number of strategic projects in Howick, discussed below.

Road Safety and Speed Management

5.       In 2018 the New Zealand Government committed to deliver a new road safety strategy in the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport. Auckland Transport has been focussed on supporting a Vision Zero approach to traffic safety.

6.       The reason for this change is to address an increasing problem in Auckland.  Road safety (including in Howick) has got worse over the last five years and Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are taking action to address the problem.

7.       The first major step is establishing a new Speed Bylaw consolidating speed limit changes in a set of local speed restrictions designed to slow traffic down in high-risk areas

8.       Auckland Transport consulted the community in early 2019 and received 11,007 submissions. The Howick Local Board made a written submission.

9.       Auckland Transport is considering the information gathered during the consultation period and a formal report with recommendations will be made to the Auckland Transport board in June 2019.  Auckland Transport’s board will consider the proposals and the submissions made, then decide on the final plan.  Auckland Transport plans to be making changes to the Speed Bylaw by August 2019.

10.     The effect in Howick is unlikely to be significant; at this stage, only three roads have speed controls proposed, but it is important that the board is involved and informed about the project. .

Airport to Botany Rapid Transport Network (RTN)

11.       This project will help deliver Auckland Transport’s public transport strategy by providing an east-west RTN linking Auckland Airport with Botany via Manukau.  The New Zealand Transport Agency, Auckland Airport and Auckland Transport are working together to plan and build the new RTN, which will be a bus or light rail link between Auckland Airport and Botany.

12.       The strategic plan is that the Central Rail Link, AMETI-Eastern Busway, Airport to Botany and electrification to Pukekohe all finish at roughly the same time, creating a ‘skeleton’ of the Rapid Transit Network (RTN) able to move people north/south and east/west.

13.       In April 2019 the project, team briefed the board about the results of the consultation that was undertaken in November and December 2018. The team provided information about early improvement projects and the new Puhinui Interchange.

14.       The aim is that in June 2019 the project team will discuss the project with Auckland Transport’s board, providing them with information from the consultation process and from the design process to consider and so they can confirm the project direction.  When this is finished the project team will return to the affected local boards and provide more information including confirmation of preferred routes. 

15.       Work on the Puhinui Station continues. An initial design is complete and Auckland Transport is technically reviewing it.  Concurrently, Auckland Transport is procuring a contractor for construction of the new station.

AMETI - Eastern Busway.

16.       AMETI – Eastern Busway is a $ 1.4 billion project to build New Zealand’s first urban busway providing congestion free ‘bus only’ lanes for commuters from Panmure to Botany. Work is progressing on Stage 1 of the AMETI –Eastern Busway.  Contractors have been working hard, focusing on completing enabling works like retaining walls and ‘haul’ roads (heavy duty roads for plant equipment to use) to access work sites. Figure 1 following shows a retaining wall under construction on the project.

Figure 1: Retaining wall being built

 

17.     This month work includes building more retaining walls, work at the intersection of Pakuranga Road and Ti Rakua Drive and development of a staging area for the work on Pakuranga Bridge.

18.     The express bus service continues to work well and become more popular with between 80 and100 people using the service.  Longer term, when the Lloyd Elsmore ‘park and ride’ and the temporary T2 lanes on Pakuranga Road open, Auckland Transport expects numbers to increase further.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Community Safety Fund

19.     Established in the 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan, the Community Safety Fund sees $20 million dispensed across all 21 local boards for road safety initiatives.

20.     The Community Safety Fund is designed to deliver capital projects identified by the local board that will help to prevent, control or mitigate identified local safety hazards. A local board’s share of the fund is based on a formula that assesses the number of deaths and serious injuries in that area and Howick Local Board’s share is $985,896. 

21.     Howick Local Board and Auckland Transport workshopped ideas for projects on 16 April 2019. This workshop identified the following five potential projects:

·    Stanniland Street Pedestrian Refuge - Installing a refuge island outside the retirement village to the south of Park Avenue.

·    Selwyn Road pedestrian Improvements - Improve pedestrian facilities at the Selwyn / Picton Road roundabout.

·    Fordyce Avenue /Suzetta Place / Stansfield Place Intersection Improvement - Modify the intersection to prevent dangerous U-turns.

·    Botany Downs Secondary College Crossing Point – Improving the crossing facilities for student of Botany Downs Secondary College who need to cross Chapel Road.

·    Flatbush School Road Temporary Pedestrian Bridge – Building a temporary bridge over the Flat Bush Culvert (on Flatbush School Road) allowing pedestrians to cross the culvert more safely.

22.     Auckland Transport assessed these projects and on 4 June 2019 workshopped them again with the board.  A detailed decision report with discussion of these potential projects is included in this agenda.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

23.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport.  Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    Be safe

·    Not impede network efficiency

·    Be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

24.     The fund allows local boards to build transport focused local improvements in their areas. Howick Local Board’s total funding in this term is approximately $3,200,000.

25.     The following table provides an overall summary of the current LBTCF position, including the increased LBTCF approved by Council and applying from 1 March 2018.  This summary does not show the $ 2 million the local board ‘ring-fenced’ or requested held in reserve. This action is an internal administrative measure and money in this state is shown in formal reporting as ‘available’.

Table 1: Howick LBTCF Financial Summary

26.     The projects that the board are working on are summarised in the table below:

Table 2: Local Board Transport Capital Fund Projects

General Overview

 

Project

Current

Status

Discussion

Half Moon Bay Ferry Pier  and Bus Turnaround

 

Completed.

 

 

Howick Village Centre Plan

 

Supporting the Howick Village Centre Plan.

 

Cascades Walkway

 

Building a footpath on Cascade Road that will provide access under the bridge on the western edge of the golf course to the walking track that follows the stream.

 

Botany Downs Secondary College Crossing

 

Improving the ability for Botany Downs Secondary School pupils to cross Chapel Road

 

Te Uho o Te Nikau School

 

Improving pedestrian access to the new school on Flatbush School Road.

 

Pakuranaga Road Safety Fence

 

Completed

 

Barry Curtis Park Footpath

 

Building a footpath and pedestrian refuge at the edge of Barry Curtis Park.

 

Notes: A ‘traffic light’ code is used to summarize the status of projects. The colours are used as follows:

Green – Project progressing ‘on time’ and on budget.

Orange – An issue has been identified that may need to be resolved.

Red - An major issue has been identified that needs to be resolved

 

 

Detailed Project Progress Report

 

Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal

Completed. 

 

Howick Village Centre Plan

The team or Council appointed project managers continue to work on this project slowly developing a plan for upgrading the Howick Village.

 

Cascades Walkway

Last month work started.

 

Botany Downs Secondary College Crossing

Auckland Transport has reported to the local board on whether or not this project qualifies for use of the Community Safety Fund.

The project does not, and Auckland Transport’s advice can be summarised as follows:

·    Building a new crossing point adjacent to the exiting signalised crossing is liable to create more problems than it solves and will interfere with traffic flow on Chapel Road.

·    Changing the phasing of the existing signals (to extend crossing time or create a Barnes Dance crossing) has been investigated and would interfere with traffic flow on Chapel Road.

·    The intersection itself is difficult to modify in any significant way because a significant part of the intersection is on school property. 

·    Building a bridge is prohibitively expensive and would require building on land owned by the school.

These factors mean the project cannot use the Community Safety Fund because all options are either too large and complex or impact traffic flow on Chapel Road.

Options exist for the school to manage student flow on school property (i.e. can be done relatively easy and without large investments) and these will be discussed further with the board.

Finally, if the board (or the next board) wish to keep pursuing this project, that is an option but it will require liaison with and agreement from the school.

 

Te Uho o Te Nikau School

Auckland Transport reported that this project can be completed utilising the Community Safety Fund.  A decision report is included in this agenda.

 

Pakuranaga Road Safety Fence

Completed

 

Barry Curtis Park Footpath

This is project identified by Auckland Council Community Facilitiies. 

It involves using funding from the LBTCF to deliver a transport related element of the plan for Barry Curtis Park. Specifically a footpath and pedestrian refuge at the corner of Chapel and Flatbush School Road.  More detail is provided in decision report included in this agenda.

 

 

27.     At this stage in the electoral term, the LBTCF can no longer be used.  It is too late in the term to deliver projects, so any money remaining is held by Auckland Transport for the next local board to use. 

Local board advocacy

28.     The following table is summary of Howick Local Boards Advocacy Initiatives and progress on them. . 

Table 3: Howick Advocacy Initiative Summary

Advocacy Initiative

Key Initiative

Status

A well-integrated efficient public transportation system

Advocate to Auckland Transport to maintain and upgrade existing transportation systems, including improving safety at congestion hot spots.

 

Since the last report Auckland Transport has supported this ‘Key Initiative’ by:

·      The express bus service between Panmure and Howick Howick Local Board advocated for to support AMETI  is now operational and averaging 80-100 passengers ad day

·      T2 lanes to speed up bus services and a ‘park and ride’ at Lloyd Elsmore Park are planned to be in service this month.

·      Stage One of the AMETI – Eastern Busway has started construction

 

Well designed and quality development in Howick

 

Continue to partner with Auckland Transport to develop the Half Moon Bay area as a transport hub

Auckland Transport has recently addressed a number of service issues.

Continue to develop integrated planning solutions which co-ordinate the planning, design and management of public spaces

Auckland Transport continues to support this project.

Parks and open spaces allow for a wide variety of recreational activities.

Continue to extend existing walkways and cycle ways, including informative signage.

Auckland Transport continues to work with Auckland Council to help support delivery of the Howick Walking and Cycling Pathway Plan.

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     No impacts form this month’s report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

29.     Over the last reporting period, Auckland Transport invited the local board to provide feedback on one proposal that is included in Attachment A.

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

30.     This section records Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions in this reporting period: 

Table 4: Traffic Control Committee Decisions May 2019

Street

Area

Work

Decision

Chapel Street

 

East Tamaki Heiighst

Bus Stop,/Bus Shelter

 

Carried

Wellington Street, Fencible Drive, Picton Street

 

Howick

No Stopping At All Times, P180 Parking, Loading Zone, Roundabout Controlled By Give-Way, Stop Control, Flush Median, Traffic Islands, Edge Lines

 

Carried

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     In this reporting period no projects required iwi liaison.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The status of the LBTCF is the most significant financial implication this month because there is a significant amount of money in this fund. At this time approximately, $3.2 million is not committed to projects.

32.     At this stage in term it is too late for new projects to be delivered using this fund.

33.     However, if the local board decides to transfer money from the LBTCF to Auckland Council for the Barry Curtis footpath project then the term will end with approximately $ 2.8 million unspent. This money is transferred to the next board to allocate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The proposed decision to receive the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all of its projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pakuranga Road Bus Stop

55

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Stallworthy, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Manager Unit, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Summary of Consultation Information

Sent to the Howick Local Board in May 2019

 

Project

Description of Proposal

Date

Pakuranga Road Bus Stop

 

4 May 2019

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Advice on the progression of a change to zoning for properties near Stockade Hill, Howick

File No.: CP2019/09786

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide advice on a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan to amend the zoning around Stockade Hill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Regional Policy Statement chapter of the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) seeks to achieve a quality compact city by enabling more people to live in and around centres and within moderate walking distance of centres and Auckland’s rapid and frequent service networks. This principle has been applied throughout Auckland, including in and around the Howick town centre and around Stockade Hill.

3.       After listening to the concerns of the Howick Local Board and the local community about the risk of the stunning coastal views from Stockade Hill being lost as a result of development, the council’s Governing Body agreed to initiate a change to the AUP (Plan Change 3) to restrict the height of buildings on the coastal side of Stockade Hill. Plan Change 3 has recently become operative.

4.       In December 2018 the Local Board requested advice on “how to progress a change in zoning for properties near Stockade Hill”. The Local Board subsequently received advice that the Local Board could request the Governing Body (via the Planning Committee) to initiate a further plan change. The Local Board was also advised that it could provide funding by way of community grants to eligible applicants and obtain independent planning advice on the merit of rezoning properties around Stockade Hill.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      notes the advice relating to a plan change to amend the zoning around Stockade Hill.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Properties immediately surrounding Stockade Hill are zoned Residential - Mixed Housing Urban in the AUP. Several properties immediately to the east are zoned Business – Mixed Use and Open Space – Community.

6.       The maximum permitted building height for the Mixed Housing Urban zone is 12 metres. In Howick the maximum permitted building height for the Mixed Use zone is restricted to 9 metres (8 metres and 7 metres for two sites) by a Height Variation Control.

7.       The map in table 1 shows the extent of these zones and the Height Variation Control in Howick.

 

 

 

 

Table 1: AUP zones and planning controls for Howick.

 

 

 

 

8.       After listening to the concerns of the Local Board and the local community about the risk of the stunning coastal views from Stockade Hill being lost as a result of development, the council’s Governing Body agreed to initiate a change to the AUP (Plan Change 3) to restrict the height of buildings on the seaward side of Stockade Hill.  Plan Change 3 replaced a previous viewshaft in the vicinity of Stockade Hill with a new viewshaft that spans 137 degrees towards the coast. A maximum permitted building height of 8 metres applies to specific sites within the viewshaft. These sites are shown on the map in table 1 above (shown with black dots). Plan Change 3 has recently become operative.

9.       While acknowledging the benefits of Plan Change 3, the Local Board remains concerned about the potential loss of views from Stockade Hill.  At its December 2018 business meeting the Local Board resolved as follows:

(HW/2018/213)

The Howick Local Board:

a)   urgently request advice on how to progress a change in zoning for properties near Stockade Hill.

10.     The Local Board subsequently received advice that it could request the Governing Body (via the Planning Committee) to initiate a further plan change. The Local Board was also advised that it could provide funding by way of community grants to eligible applicants and obtain independent planning advice on the merit of rezoning properties around Stockade Hill.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     In February 2019 the Local Board received advice from the Plan and Places department that a new plan change to amend the zoning around Stockade Hill is not supported for the following reasons:

·    the current zoning in the AUP promotes a quality compact urban form by focussing intensification in and around town centres, transport nodes and corridors. This applies to the spatial application of zones in Howick and is in accordance with the application of similar zoning patterns around other town centres in the Auckland Region.

·    the Stockade Hill Viewshaft Overlay, introduced through Plan Change 3, restricts building heights to ensure that new development is of a height that does not intrude into or obstruct views to the coastal environment.

·    the Height Variation Control that applies to the Mixed Use zone reduces the maximum building height to 9 metres (and 8 metres and 7 metres for two sites).

·    a character statement is currently being developed with the Local Board and interested members of the community to support the Special Character Area Overlay that applies to the Howick business area in the AUP. This statement will help to define the special character values present in the town centre so this can guide future development in the area going forward. The character statement will be introduced via a change to the AUP.

·    amending the zoning around Stockade Hill would not provide any additional certainty over protection of the views from Stockade Hill. While the permitted maximum building height would be reduced if the zones were changed (e.g. from 12 metres in the current Mixed Housing Urban zone to 9 metres in Single House Zone) any resource consent application for development to infringe the maximum permitted zone building height would be assessed on the built form, neighbourhood character and amenity, rather than with regard to the views from Stockade Hill.

12.     Expanding on the first point above, over time, the zoning within an around Howick town centre and around Stockade Hill has the potential to enable more people to live in close proximity to the amenities provided by the town centre. This includes existing residents who live in the local area, but due to changing circumstances, may want (or need) to live in a smaller property in the future.

13.     In relation to the final point above, within the AUP, the mechanism to protect views from public places such as Stockade Hill is through a viewshaft control. While not within the scope of Plan Change 3, during the course of the plan change hearings, the council’s landscape expert (Melean Absolum) was asked to consider whether she could support a further viewshaft being introduced to protect other views from Stockade Hill (i.e. those outside the 137 degree coastal viewshaft introduced by Plan Change 3). Ms Absolum confirmed she could not support such a viewshaft.

14.     As noted above, should the Local Board disagree with this advice, then the option is available to attend the Planning Committee and request that a rezoning plan change is initiated. If the Local Board wishes to pursue this option, it could commission independent planning advice.

15.     It is important to note that even if the Local Board obtains independent planning advice in support of a rezoning plan change, the Planning Committee may place a low priority on initiating such a plan change. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The recommendation made in this report does not have any impacts on the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Views from Stockade Hill are of interest to the Howick community as evidenced by the recent interest in Plan Change 3.  In addition, this matter is also of interest to the Local Board, who resolved in December 2018 to get urgent advice on how to progress a change to amend the zoning of properties near Stockade Hill, and further resolved in April 2019 (HW/2019/47) to adopt as an advocacy item for the Board’s 2019/2020 Local Board Agreement “to retain views from Stockade Hill”.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     A number of mana whenua entities have an interest in the Stockade Hill area. Should the Local Board wish to pursue the option of requesting the Planning Committee to initiate a further plan change, and if the Planning Committee agrees to do so, a draft of the plan change would be sent to all relevant mana whenua entities for feedback prior to public notification.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The Local Board would need to fund any independent planning advice sought.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     If the Local Board seeks independent planning advice, there is a risk the advice may not be supportive. As previously noted, there is also a risk that the Planning Committee may place a low priority on initiating a plan change of this nature.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     The Local Board will need to consider the advice in this report in determining whether to request that the Planning Committee initiates a further plan change and whether proceed with the engagement of independent planning advice.


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Celia Davison - Manager Planning - Central/South

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Changes to Local Board Standing Orders

File No.: CP2019/09773

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide information about the implications of the Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 and to recommend changes to the Howick Local Board’s standing orders to align with the change in the legislation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 (LGRSAA) makes changes to various statutes, including the Local Government 2002 Act (LGA), Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA), the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Dog Control Act 1996, the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 and the Rates Rebate Act 1973.

3.         The LGRSAA amends the Local Electoral Act 2001 to include a new principle for “representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls”, and imposes a new responsibility on the Chief Executive of the council by amending the Chief Executive’s responsibilities in the LGA s 42(2)(d):

(da)   facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

4.       Prior to the change, the LGA provided for an extraordinary meeting where:

(a)  It could be called by resolution, or by requisition by the mayor or one third of the members

(b)  The notice period was three days (unless it was called by resolution in which case the notice period could be not less than 24 hours)

(c)  If it needed to be called earlier it could be called by the mayor, or, if the mayor was unavailable, the chief executive. The notice period could be not less than 24 hours.

5.       As a result of the change, the meeting called under (c) above is referred to as an ‘emergency meeting’ rather than an’ extraordinary meeting’.

6.       There is a change to the definition of public notice – which requires notification on a council’s website in addition to a newspaper.

7.       There is a change to the definition of ‘working day’ to exclude a province’s anniversary.

8.       Staff are taking the opportunity, while considering changes to standing orders, to propose an unrelated change to the rules in the current standing orders regarding attendance by electronic link.  The current rule requires a member to be representing the council and unable to attend.  The proposed change removes the requirement to be representing the council.

9.       The Governing Body’s standing orders need to be changed to reflect the changes in the law.  A change to standing orders requires a 75 percent majority vote.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Note the new statutory responsibility of the chief executive:

facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

b)      Amend standing order 2.3.3 by replacing:

Calling an extraordinary meeting at earlier time

The mayor or chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call a meeting for an earlier time if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

with:

Calling an emergency meeting

The mayor or chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call an emergency meeting for an earlier time than is provided in Standing Order 2.3.2 if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

c)      Amend standing order 7.2.2 by replacing:

Notification of extraordinary meetings

Where the council calls an extraordinary meeting, but cannot give public notice to the extent required in Standing Order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting.

with:

Notification of extraordinary / emergency meetings

Where the council calls an extraordinary or emergency meeting, but cannot give public notice to the extent required in Standing Order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting. If it is not practicable to publish a notice in newspapers before the meeting, the council must publicly notify the meeting as soon as practicable on the council’s website and in any other manner that is reasonable in the circumstances.

d)      Amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

with:

Emergency meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22A of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

e)      Amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Meeting means:

(a)  any first or ordinary or extraordinary meeting of the governing body

with:

Meeting means:

(a) any first or ordinary or extraordinary or emergency meeting of the governing body

f)       Amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Publicly notified means notified to members of the public by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

with:

Publicly notified means made known to members of the public by a notice on the council’s website, until any opportunity for review or appeal has lapsed, and by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

g)      Amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

(a)  Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

(b)  a day in the period commencing with 25 December in any year and ending with 15 January in the following year.

with:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

(a)  Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

(b)  Where Waitangi Day or ANZAC Day falls on a weekend, the following Monday

(c)  Auckland Anniversary Day

(d)  a day in the period commencing with 20 December in any year and ending with 10 January in the following year.

h)      Amend the following standing orders:

i)        SO 2.3:

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

ii)       SO 7.2.4:

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

iii)      SOs 1.1.3, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 7.3.1:

replace the words “extraordinary meeting” with “extraordinary or emergency meeting”

i)        Amend standing order 3.3.3 to remove the requirement to be representing the council:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The governing body or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)   in emergencies.

The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The LGRSAA came into force on 21 March 2019.  The Act is an omnibus Act in that it makes minor amendments to several pieces of legislation.

11.       The LGRSAA amends the Local Electoral Act 2001 to include a new principle for “representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls”, and imposes a new responsibility on the Chief Executive of the council by amending the Chief Executive’s responsibilities in the LGA s 42(2)(d):

(da)   facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

12.     It amends the definition of “public notice” and “publicly notified” under the LGA and the LGOIMA to require notification both on the council’s website and in newspapers.

13.     It creates a new category of council meeting called an “emergency meeting”, separate from “extraordinary meeting”.  Previously, extraordinary meetings had two types of notice requirements.  Where the more urgent form of notice is used, the meeting is now referred to as an emergency meeting.  This applies to giving notice to members under the LGA and to public notices under LGOIMA.

14.     It amends the definition of working day under the LGA and LGOIMA to exclude a province’s anniversary day being counted as a “working day”.

15.     It amends the Dog Control Act 1996 by:

(i)    moving, with regard to disability assist dogs, the list of certifying organisations to a schedule which can be changed by regulation

(ii)   applying the new public notice requirements in the LGA to the annual report on the administration of the dog control policy.

16.     It amends the Local Electoral Act 2001 by adding to the principles in section 4:

(aa) representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls:

17.     It amends the LGA by specifying timeframes for making certain documents publicly available, including the long-term plan, annual plan and annual report. It also adds requirements for placing these on the council’s website.

18.     It amends the LGA by adding a provision for the Secretary of Local Government to specify forms for making documents available.

19.     It amends the Rates Rebates Act 1973 by making changes to the definition of income in regard to payments under the Veterans Support Act 2014 and winter energy payments under the Social Security Act 2018.  There is a minor change in relation to rates paid on a residential unit in a retirement village.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     The changes made by the LGRSAA are minor in nature, nevertheless it is necessary to amend the Governing Body’s standing orders in line with the changes so they reflect current legislation.

21.     The Governing Body may also wish to consider an unrelated change to standing orders while it is considering these changes.  Standing order 3.3.3 provides conditions for attending a meeting by electronic link:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The governing body or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)   in emergencies.

The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

22.     This standing order was adopted in 2015.  Since that time the technology has improved and remote attendance is now possible in the Town Hall. However, the conditions in the standing order are very limiting and do not allow attendance by a member who is out of Auckland but not representing the council. 

23.     Staff recommend amending the standing order by removing the requirement to represent the council in SO 3.3.3 (a):

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

24.     The proposed change would allow, for example, an appointed member of the Audit and Risk Committee living outside Auckland to attend by electronic link.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     The changes to the standing orders do not impact on the wider council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Local boards will need to make similar changes to their standing orders.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     The changes to standing orders brought about through the LGRSAA do not impact on the Māori community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     There are no financial implications to making these changes to standing orders.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     The law applies regardless of standing orders. If standing orders are not aligned to changes in the law there is a risk that the council may act inconsistently with the legislation by relying on standing orders that are not up to date with the law.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Following the Governing Body resolution to amend the standing orders, staff will make the appropriate changes and recirculate the updated standing orders.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Polly Kenrick, Business Manager, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Kerri Foote, Operations and Improvements Manager, Local Board Services

Louise Mason, General Manager, Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/09240

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme for the Howick Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing of all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

3.       The Howick Local Board 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme was developed through a series of iterative workshops between key staff and local boards since October 2018. The projects identified in the work programme have been prioritised for investment based on a combination of local board feedback, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input.

4.       The work programme provided in Attachments A and B to this report reflect the projects that were presented in the last local board workshop with modifications based on feedback from the board, and with the inclusion of projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes.

5.       This report recommends that the board approves the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme and associated budget in full for projects commencing in the first year of the programme and in principle for subsequent two years.

6.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes, including local and sports field development (growth), coastal and slips prevention programmes. Inclusion of these projects in the local board work programme is subject to approval by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

7.       It is recommended that the local board approve the inclusion of these projects in the work programme and provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee.

8.       A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects. These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year.

9.       Approval is sought for staff to commence work on these projects in the 2019/2020 year so that they can be delivered early in the event that other approved projects are delayed for any reason.

10.     In order to expedite delivery of the work programme, and to manage changes that may be required in a timely way, staff recommend that the board delegate decision making for amendments to the approved programme to the chair.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report

b)      approve in principle the 2020 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme (years 2 and 3) as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report.

c)      approve the risk adjusted programme (RAP) projects identified in Attachment A to the agenda report as projects that may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year, if required to meet expected financial expenditure for the 2019/2020 financial year.

d)      note that approval of budget allocation in the 2019/2020 year for multi-year projects may commit the board to the allocation of subsequent years’ budgets.

e)      note that the inclusion in the work programme of projects that are funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets are subject to approval of the identified budget allocation by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

f)       provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee in relation to the projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets.

g)      note that budget allocation for all projects in the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme are best current estimates, and amendments may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs as the year progresses.

h)      delegate to the chairperson authority to approve minor amendments to the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, following receipt of written advice from staff.

i)        delegate to the Manager Community Leases authority to use the agreed streamlined renewal process for lease renewals without variations.

j)        delegate to the chairperson approval of the minor capital works projects, following receipt of written advice, in accordance with work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 3241 Howick LDI Minor Capex Fund 2019/2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of Auckland. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

12.     Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. The 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, detailed in the attachments, contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance.

13.     Staff have engaged with the board in the development of the work programme through a number of workshops, including:

·    8 November 2018 where the board discussed their priorities for the future work programme

·    7 March 2019 where the board reviewed the first draft work programme and provided feedback

·    9 May 2019 where staff provided any further information requested in previous workshop and reviewed the revised draft work programme.

14.     This year’s work programme is a three-year programme to clearly demonstrate the phasing of project delivery and to enable the organisation to prepare for delivery.  The work programme is subject to a rolling review and each year the local board will be asked to approve a new three-year work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Capital works programme

15.     Investment in the capital works programme will ensure that council facilities and open spaces in Howick Local Board remain valuable and well-maintained community assets.

16.     The overall capital works programme includes projects for which the board has discretion to allocate budget, referred to as the local programme, and projects from regional programmes. 

17.     Specific projects within the work programme may have budget allocated from two or more budget sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

18.     The work programme includes both new projects and existing projects that have been continued from the previous financial year where those projects require multiple years for delivery (multi-year projects).

19.     Any projects that have budget approved in the current 2018/2019 financial year, but are unable to be delivered this year, will be deferred. Deferred budgets will be added to the work programme at a later date.

Local Programme

20.     The local programme includes those projects that the board is funding from its discretionary capex budgets, including:

·    Renewals
The board can allocate its renewals budget towards the renewal of any council owned asset

·    Locally Driven Initiative (LDI)
The board has the discretion to allocate its LDI budget to any projects that deliver a council asset or as a capital grant to a third party to deliver an asset made available for public use.

21.     In preparing recommendations for the local programme a number of matters have been considered, including:

·    strategic documents (e.g. local board plan)

·    service assessment input from Community Services

·    asset condition assessments

·    input from operational maintenance teams and staff working within facilities

·    budget availability.

22.     The Community Facilities work programme supports the achievement of the following 2017 Howick Local Board Plan priorities:

·      Involved and connected communities

·      Our future growth is managed effectively

·      Valuing our cultural diversity

·      A treasured environment

·      Our people are active and healthy.

23.     Other strategic documents of particular relevance have included:

·    The Auckland Plan 2050

·    Greenmount Concept Plan

·    Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan.

24.     These have influenced recommendations in the work programme by guiding the prioritisation of the programme and defining the scope of works to ensure the sought outcome is achieved.

25.     Some of the key projects to be accommodated in the work programme include

·    Flat Bush Multi-Purpose Facility

Design and construct a new library and multi-use community facility

·    Flat Bush Aquatic Facility

Development of an aquatic and recreation centre in Flat Bush.

·    Flat Bush – develop walkways and cycleways

Create a 32-kilometre network of shared walk and cycle ways throughout the Flat Bush area

·    Ostrich Farm – develop sports fields

Design and consent for sports fields in Ostrich Farm.

26.     The phasing of projects over various years is recommended to meet budget requirements.  In this regard careful consideration has been given to the delivery timing of several proposed projects which will be phased in later years.

27.     Of particular note in the work programme is the Greenmount development for public access which is subject to closed landfill approval.  Land is expected to be vested in 2020 and detailed design and consent will proceed upon the land being vested.

28.     The proposed work programme in Attachment A contains:

·    Number of projects excluding leases and contract lines over three years: 48

·    Indicative cost for proposed projects in the 2019/2020 financial year: $7,844,769

 

Regional Programme

29.     The Long-term Plan 2018 - 2028 includes budgets which support the delivery of regional programmes. These budgets are allocated to specific projects within a regional programme by the governing body.

30.     Where budget is allocated to a project in the regional programme that falls within a local board decision making allocation (e.g. a local park), that project is included in the local board work programme. The local board then has decision making responsibility for that project, within the parameters set by the governing body, namely location, scope and budget.

31.     Regional budgets include:

·    Local parks and sports field development (growth)

·    Coastal renewals

·    Slips prevention and remediation.

32.     Projects in these regional programmes are identified and prioritised based on consideration of a number of factors.

33.     For the local parks and sports field development programme, this includes:

·    Extent to which residential growth is generating demand for the project

·    Current levels of provision

·    Available budget.

34.     For coastal renewals and slips prevention and remediation this includes:

·    Asset condition

·    Relative hazard and risk

·    Available budget.

35.     The allocation of budget to specific projects will be approved by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

36.     The board has an opportunity to provide formal feedback, through resolution to this report, for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee prior to approval of the regional programmes.

Capital Programme Delivery

Cost estimates subject to change

37.     Budget allocations within the work programme are best estimates only. Project costings are subject to change and refinement as projects progress through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined around the specific work required and the cost of delivery of that work once the details are defined.

38.     The delivery of individual projects is managed within the overall work programme budget for each local board. Where significant changes to project budgets may need to be considered, or if new projects are added to the work programme, changes may be required to the programme to accommodate final project costs as the year progresses.

Risk adjusted programme

39.     A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects.

40.     These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year (i.e. year two of the three-year programme). Staff propose to commence work in the 2019/2020 year on the delivery of these risk adjusted projects.

41.     By progressing these identified projects alongside the 2019/2020 projects in the programme, it is intended that, should projects identified for delivery in year one of the work programme be delayed for any reason, staff will be able to proceed with agreed alternative projects to ensure that the full annual budget is delivered each year.

42.     Approval is sought from the board for staff to commence work on those projects identified in the work programme as risk adjusted programme projects in the 2019/2020 year.

Delegation for approval of changes to the work programme

43.     The delivery of the proposed work programme in an efficient and timely manner may require amendments to be made to the agreed work programme during the course of the year. Such amendments could include:

·    changes to project scope, budgets, timing

·    addition of new projects within available budget

·    cancelling or putting approved projects on hold.

44.     Any changes to the approved work programme require approval from the board. Approval will normally be sought through resolution at a business meeting.

45.     Local boards are also able to delegate authority to approve some or all amendments to the work programme to the chair, to another member of the board, or to staff. Such delegation would allow changes to be made without the timeframes required to provide formal reports and would support the efficient delivery of the work programme.

46.     Should the board choose to delegate authority to approve changes to the work programme, it is anticipated that any changes would be workshopped with the board prior to any delegated decision being taken. Any changes made under delegation would be reported back to the board in their quarterly report.

 

Leasing work programme

47.     Community leases, commonly on public parks and reserves, are a valuable way in which the council provides support to community organisations across the region. These groups provide a wide range of community activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities and are a key part of the mosaic of community activity and infrastructure in Auckland.

48.     Attachment B – Community Leases provides a detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2019/2020 financial year. Following approval of the work programme staff will proceed with review and renewal of these leases and licences as appropriate during the course of the financial year.

49.     Two additional project lines include those leases and licences proposed to be progressed in the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years respectively. It also includes the additional leases and licences that will be deferred from the 2018/2019 financial year to the 2019/2020 financial year.

50.     Straight forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations with a written memo to the board providing the opportunity for the board to request further information or a formal report. More complex community leases will be reported to the board at a business meeting.

 

Operational maintenance work programme

51.     The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

·    increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets

·    improving the safety of Community Facilities assets

·    ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users.

52.     In the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, there are three line items dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area:

·    Full Facilities Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, coastal management and storm damage response. From 1 July 2019 council is responsible for streetscapes maintenance from Auckland Transport

·    Arboriculture Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all tree management and maintenance

·    Ecological Restoration Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include pest plant management within ecologically significant areas and animal pest management across all parks and reserves.

53.     Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly report. Community Facilities is also providing additional weekly updates to all elected members on contractor performance.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

54.     The 2019 - 2022 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

55.     In particular, the council’s Service Strategy and Integration department were involved in the development of the Flat Bush Multi-Purpose Facility and the Flat Bush Aquatic Facility project scopes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

56.     The Community Facilities Work Programme has been created through a combination of local board feedback, asset condition assessments and agreed levels of service.

57.     The 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2018 to May 2019. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programmes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

58.     The 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

59.     Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

60.     Staff are also attending mana whenua forum’s monthly to receive feedback on specific projects within the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme.

61.     Activities in the work programmes that are specific to Māori outcomes include:

·        Howick - Auckland Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy - Growing Phase.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

62.     Table 1 below summarises the relevant budgets, proposed allocation and the balance of unallocated budget available.

Local Budgets

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

Renewals - Budget

$2,662,000

$1,405,375

$2,449,239

Renewals - Proposed Allocation

$2,627,000

$1,400,000

$2,415,000

Renewals - Unallocated budget

$25,000

$5,375

$34,239

 

 

 

 

Growth and Development - Allocation

$4,592,769

$16,452,992

$27,497,729

Coastal Renewals - Allocation

$315,000

$340,000

$500,000

Slips Prevention - Allocation

$20,000

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Capex - Proposed Allocation

$110,000

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Opex - Proposed Allocation

$60,000

$25,000

$25,000

 

63.     The proposed work programme can be accommodated within the available local board budgets. Approval of the work programme does not have significant financial implications, unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend.

64.     Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the board. These updates will identify progress of all projects and potential amendments to the approved programme including changes to budget allocation and timing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

65.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.  The risk adjusted programme (RAP) will be used to progress those projects identified as ready to proceed under the RAP.

66.     If the proposed Community Facilities work programme is not approved at the business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     Once approved, delivery of activities identified in the Community Facilities work programme will commence from 1 July 2019.

68.     The work programmes identify if further decisions are required for each activity. These will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

69.     Progress and updates on work programmes will be reported to the local board for each quarter of the financial year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Board Community Facilities BMR work programme 2019-2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Howick Local Board Community Facilities Leases work programme 2019-2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqui Thompson Fell - Work Programme Lead, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 community services work programme

File No.: CP2019/09697

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Howick Local Board community services 2019/2020 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each financial year, a work programme is developed that details the activities to be delivered in the local board area. The development process is supported by a series of workshops with the local board.

3.       To prepare for the 2019/2020 work programme staff representing relevant operational council departments worked together to ensure an integrated approach.

4.       This report presents the draft  community services 2019/2020 work programme, which responds to Howick Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes and reflects the priorities that have been agreed by departments across council.  The proposed work programme for 2019/2020 is included as Attachment A to this report.

5.       Delivery of new activities in the work programme will commence from 1 July 2019. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery progress, highlights, potential delays and budget implications.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the community services annual work programme 2019/2020 included as Attachment A to this report.

b)      delegate to the Howick Local Board Chair, in consultation with the board, to approve minor changes to the community services annual work programme 2019/2020 and/or associated changes in budget of up to $20,000 at any one time, provided any changes made under this delegation are noted in the next business meeting report that provides an update on delivery of the work programme.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board decides which activities to allocate its annual work programme budget to in order to achieve the outcomes set out in the Howick Local Board Plan 2017.

7.       The proposed work programme for 2019/2020 is included as Attachment A to this report.

8.       The development of the 2019/2020 work programme has built on the approach piloted for 2018/2019, which enabled staff to work in a more integrated way across departments to improve local outcomes.

9.       In preparation for the 2019/2020 work programme process, an overview group was created from the following council departments to develop an agreed approach to achieve improved integration:

·   Arts, Community and Events

·   Community Facilities

·   Libraries

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·   Parks, Sports and Recreation

·   Community Services - Service, Strategy and Integration.

10.     Teams made up of representatives from these departments were established to explore shared priorities and objectives for each local board area, and to develop the work programme in a collaborative way in response to local board plan outcomes.

11.     Table one shows the business objectives and strategic alignment for community services departments.

Table 1: Adopted community-based strategies and plans

Department

Business objectives

Strategies and plans

Arts, Community and Events

Provision of services, programmes, events and facilities that strengthen and connect communities and create a sense of belonging and pride

·  Hire Fee Framework

·  Events Policy

·  Toi Whītiki

·  Thriving Communities

Libraries

Provision of library services and programmes that support Aucklanders with reading and literacy, and opportunities to participate in community and civic life

·  Te Kauroa

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Provision of services to actively engage Aucklanders to lead healthy lives, connect with nature and value our cultural identity

·  Parks and  Open Space Strategic Action Plan

·  Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

·  Auckland Growing Greener Framework

·  Urban Ngāhere Strategy

Service, Strategy and Integration

Provision of service and asset planning advice and support more integrated delivery of community outcomes

·  Community Facilities Network Plan

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The local board provided feedback on proposed activities for the new financial year at a series of workshops between September 2018 and May 2019.

13.     Initial workshops were an opportunity for the local board to communicate to staff its strategic direction. At subsequent workshops, the local board discussed its priorities for budget allocation and requested further scoping for existing and new activities.

14.     The activities in the work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Howick Local Board Plan 2017.

15.     The work programme is made up of approved activities from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board.

16.       Budget is allocated to activities for the 2019/2020 financial year. If zero-dollars is shown this reflects that the project is able to be delivered in-house with no additional external technical advice and support.

17.     Table two shows activities and allocated budget that are new in 2019/2020 or are significantly different to the 2018/2019 work programme.

Table 2: New and significant changes activities

Line number

Activity

Activity description

 FY19

Budget

FY20

Budget

Local board plan outcome: Involved and Connected Communities

339

(new)

Community Grants

Grants to support local community groups through contestable grant rounds. The local board requested more budget to meet increasing community demand.

$395,000

$600,000

1314 (new)

Local Advertising Howick

Annual advertising in the Settling In magazine

$0

$5,000

Local board plan outcome: Our people are active and healthy

588

(new) 

Play service assessment

Investigate the current state and future needs of play in the local board area.  

$0

$40,000

 

785

(change)

Barry Curtis Skate Park Custodian

Provide year round activation service for skate park users.
Increase in budget is to provide for three additional activation services. 

$51,000

$65,000

 

18.     The way in which Community Places activities are presented in the work programme has changed for 2019/2020. Work related to the operation of venues for hire, community centres, houses, hubs and rural halls will now be reported by the following levels of service: Access, Activation and Intervention Programming.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The work programme has been developed by a collective of operational council departments.

20.     The interdepartmental connections made throughout the process will enable an integrated approach to delivery of the activities and allow for further collaboration throughout the year. These working relationships will also support an integrated approach to work programme development in future years.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The local board provided direction and feedback on the draft work programme at a series of workshops.

22.     These workshops provided an opportunity for staff to gain an understanding of local board strategic direction and priorities. Budget allocation, activity content and scoping were discussed and refined.

23.     The activities in the final work programme support achieving local board plan outcomes and objectives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Community services and Community Facilities have developed Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai!, a relationship approach which guides staff to deliver on agreed work programme activities and support the local board to achieve the outcomes in its local board plan.

25.     The approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori.

26.     Table three outlines the activities in the 2019/2020 work programme where Māori responsiveness is the primary outcome.

Table 3: Māori impact of proposed activities

Line number

Activity

Māori impact

87

Improving Responsiveness to Local Māori

Identifying key aspirations, priorities and opportunities to work in partnership to run events or programmes for Māori and increase civic participation.

942

Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori - Howick

Celebrating te ao Māori with events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Activities are funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: Asset Based Services (ABS) Opex; Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) Capex and Opex.

28.     Each activity line has a budget allocation, which covers the delivery for the 2019/2020 period. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects that the implementation costs are met through staff salary or other funding sources.

29.     The community services LDI budget for the local board for the 2019/2020 financial year is $1.835 million.

30.     Where activities are cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or to create a new activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The key risks for activities that are managed through the work programme are non-delivery, time delays and budget overrun. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery including highlighting any potential delays and budget implications.

32.     As the work programme includes ongoing activity and annually occurring events or projects, the associated risks have been identified and managed in previous years. Additional risk management for these activities is ongoing and can be reported quarterly.

33.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board through quarterly reporting when required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Delivery of approved activities will commence at the beginning of the financial year, 1 July 2019 and progress will be reported to the local board for each quarter.

35.     The work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick community services 2019/2020 work programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 Local Environment work programme

File No.: CP2019/09105

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Howick local environment work programme, totalling $355,250 of locally driven initiatives operational expenditure.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Howick Local Board has identified several aspirations in its 2017 local board plan, including ‘our natural and built environment is well-managed’ and ‘reduce waste through recovery, reuse and recycling’.

3.       To give effect to these aspirations, staff developed a number of options for projects for the board to consider funding through its 2019/2020 local environment work programme.

4.       The board provided feedback to Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff on the locally driven initiative projects it would like to fund at it’s 7 March 2019, 21 March 2019 and 9 May 2019 workshops. The board requested additional projects focussed on waste minimisation and to increase its funding contribution towards the Ōtara waterways coordinator.

5.       The eight projects supported by the board are focused on controlling pest plants and pest animals, improving water quality and stream environments, reducing waste to landfill and working with schools to provide environmental education.

6.       This report recommends that the board approve this local environment work programme and associated budgets for delivery within the 2019/2020 financial year (see Attachment A).

7.       The draft work programme has a total value of $355,250 which can be funded from the board’s existing budgets for local environmental programmes and represents a 102 per cent increase on the local environmental investment in 2018/2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the work programme for local environmental projects to be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate in 2019/2020 as summarised in the table below:

Project

Budget

Pest free Howick

$150,000

Howick stream improvement programme

$80,000

Industrial Pollution Prevention programme

$29,000

Sediment related water quality testing

$25,000

Household hazardous waste collection day

$11,250

Para Kore programme for business waste minimisation

$15,000

Waste minimisation in schools

$40,000

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

$5,000

Total budget

$355,250

 

b)      delegate authority to the chair, in consultation with the board, to approve minor changes to the 2019/2020 Howick local environment work programme and/or associated changes in budget of up to $20,000 at any one time, provided any changes made under this delegation are noted in the next business meeting report providing an update on the delivery of the local environment work programme.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       In late 2018, in alignment to its local board plan outcomes, the Howick Local Board provided strategic direction to staff in regards to the projects it would like to fund in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board noted its strong commitment to the environment, and indicated its interest in:

·   increasing support for pest-free initiatives to further reduce pest plants and animals in the environment

·   increasing support for water quality improvement initiatives to help restore local waterways, including funding support towards the Ōtara waterways coordinator

·   innovative initiatives to reduce the impact of waste, especially plastic, on the environment.

9.       In response to the direction set by the board, Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff provided a draft local environment work programme for the board’s feedback at a workshop on 7 March 2019.

10.     The board requested staff investigate expanding the stream improvement project to include more neat street events, and indicated it would like to increase its funding contribution towards the Ōtara waterways coordinator.

11.     The board also requested staff investigate ideas for additional projects focussed on waste minimisation, including a project around environmental education and waste minimisation in local schools. 

12.     At a workshop on 21 March 2019, staff presented three additional waste minimisation projects for the board’s feedback. The board indicated its support in principle for all of the proposed projects, with the exception of an action research project studying a family’s plastic consumption, and a community waste project focussed on supporting residents to book the council’s inorganic collections.

13.     Based on these workshop discussions, a total of eight local environmental projects to be funded from the board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget are proposed. These will be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate as part of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme. The draft work programme has been amended to reflect local board feedback and is included as Attachment A to this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     A brief description of each of the proposed projects for delivery as part of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme is provided below. Further detail on these projects is provided in Attachment A.

Pest Free Howick – $150,000

15.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our natural and built environment is well-managed’, the board has indicated it would like to increase their support for the development and implementation of pest-free Howick initiatives in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board allocated $110,000 towards this project in the Howick local environment work programme in the 2018/2019 financial year (resolution HW/2018/114).

16.     It is recommended the board allocate $150,000 to fund the following package of pest-free initiatives in 2019/2020:

·   part-time contractor to assist staff with planning and leading the facilitation and coordination of pest-free Howick activities ($35,000)

·   enhancing the ecological and recreational values of high value parks through pest plant and animal control ($27,000)

·   pest plant reduction on Te Naupata Musick Point through assistance on mana whenua owned land as well as reducing pest plant seed dispersal risks to the inner gulf islands ($15,000)

·   ongoing animal control on Te Naupata Musick Point working with mana whenua ($8,000)

·   community awareness and education initiatives to encourage and enable individuals and groups to control pest plants ($10,000)

·   empowering local students and community groups to control pest animals through local board assisted education programmes and equipment supply ($30,000)

·   pest plant control and planting maintenance on Ōtara Creek to enhance biodiversity and improve water quality ($25,000).

Howick stream improvement programme – $80,000

17.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our natural and built environment is well-managed’, the board has indicated it would like to increase their support for initiatives that improve water quality and stream environments in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board allocated $60,500 towards this project in the 2018/2019 financial year.

18.     At a workshop on 7 March 2019 the board requested that staff investigate including more ‘neat street’ events in this programme. ‘Neat street’s is an initiative which aims to raise public awareness of littering and illegal dumping, and how to reduce the impact of waste on the environment. At a workshop on 9 May 2019, staff recommended that only one ‘neat streets’ event be undertaken in 2019/2020, with the option of delivering more ‘neat street’ events in the following financial year. Learnings from the 2019/2020 ‘neat street’ initiative will be used to inform future ‘neat street’ initiatives in the local board area.

19.     It is recommended the board allocates $80,000 to fund the following package of water improvement and stream restoration initiatives in 2019/2020:

·   contribution towards the Ōtara waterways project coordinator to lead the implementation of projects from the Ōtara Waterways and Lake Project Strategic Plan within the local board area ($15,000)

·   delivery of one ‘neat street’ event in either Flatbush or Botany, with an aim to reduce illegal dumping and increase awareness about what do with waste ($15,000)

·   support a new residential Adopt a Spot programme which will identify, train and resource suitable community members to undertake regular weed control at Riviera Drive Reserve ($10,000)

·   continue to support a business focussed Adopt a Spot programme which encourages and supports business groups to adopt their local waterway through stream clean-ups, wedding bees and planting ($15,000)

·   continue to support a small building sites programme to provide educational workshops to encourage compliance and best practice ($10,000)

·   delivery of a community planting event along either the Ōtara or Pakuranga Creek, ($15,000), noting that this budget does not include funding for future planting maintenance which will be requested in the next financial year.

Industrial Pollution Prevention programme – $29,000

20.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our natural and built environment is well-managed’, the board has indicated it would like to support improvements to waterways through the delivery of an educational programme on industry pollution prevention in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board have supported an industry pollution prevention programme since 2014. The programme was last delivered in 2017/2018 with $20,000 of local board funding (resolution HW/2017/105).

21.     The purpose of this programme is to inform urban industry about the impacts their activities may be having on local waterways and to encourage awareness of good site management practices. This programme will focus on revisits of the East Tāmaki industrial area which was originally covered in two phases over 2015 and 2016. Uptake of recommendations during the initial programme was approximately 58 per cent. It is recommended that the board allocate $29,000 towards the continuation of this programme in the 2019/2020 financial year.

Sediment related water quality testing – $25,000

22.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our natural and built environment is well-managed’, the board has indicated it would like to support a water quality testing project aimed at reducing sedimentation in receiving environments in the 2019/2020 financial year. This project builds on the work undertaken through the small building sites ambassador project funded $20,000 by the board in 2017/2018 (resolution HW/2017/105).

23.     The purpose of the project is to determine the levels of sediment contaminants being discharged into Howick waterways as a result of small building site development activity. Water quality data will need to be collected for at least three years and will provide input into the regional strategic approach to sediment programme. It is recommended that the board allocate $25,000 towards this programme in the 2019/2020 financial year.

Household hazardous waste collection day – $11,250

24.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘reduce waste through recovery, reuse and recycling’, the board has indicated it would like to support a new initiative to reduce the impact of hazardous household waste on the environment in the 2019/2020 financial year.

25.     The purpose of this project is to provide Howick residents an opportunity to safely dispose of hazardous household waste items. The collection day will be a pre-booked event where residents book the service online prior to collection day. There will be one collection day which will enable a maximum of 500 collections.

26.     This collection day will be co-funded regionally, with the council’s Waste Solutions department also contributing $11,250 of funding. It is recommended that the board allocate $11,250 towards this project. This brings the total funding for this project to $22,500 in the 2019/2020 financial year.


 

Para Kore programme for business waste minimisation – $15,000

27.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘reduce waste through recovery, reuse and recycling’, the board has indicated it would like to support initiatives which reduce the impact of business waste on the environment in the 2019/2020 financial year.

28.     The purpose of this newly developed project is to educate local businesses in the Howick Village about the impacts their activities may be having on their local environment and to support them to reduce waste. This project will be delivered in partnership with Para Kore ki Tāmaki Makaurau who will work with the local business association to develop and deliver waste education initiatives, such as waste audits, that align with the principles of zero waste.

Waste minimisation in schools – $40,000

29.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘reduce waste through recovery, reuse and recycling’, the board has indicated it would like to support a new initiative which delivers environmental education and waste minimisation in local schools in the 2019/2020 financial year.

30.     The purpose of this project is to support local schools to develop and establish effective waste management systems for reducing their waste to landfill. It is recommended the board allocate $40,000 to fund the following waste minimisation in schools initiatives in 2019/2020:

·   provision of one waste audit kit for shared use between participating schools ($1,000)

·   provision of materials and equipment (such as bokashi bins, compost bins, worm farms, or a mulcher) to establish waste management systems in schools ($24,000)

·   engagement of a community waste coordinator for eight hours per week to assist schools with sourcing and implementing waste management systems ($14,000)

·   delivery of one community event in June 2020 to acknowledge the achievements of schools that have made significant waste reductions, and to share waste minimisation knowledge with the wider community ($1,000).

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum – $5,000

31.     To achieve the local board plan objective of ‘our natural and built environment is well-managed’, the board has indicated that it would like to continue to fund the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum in the 2019/2020 financial year. 

32.     The Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum was established in the 1980s as a joint community and political advocate for the environmental protection of the Tāmaki Estuary. The member boards include Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Ōrākei, Howick, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, and Ōtara-Papatoetoe local boards.

33.     The board allocated $5,000 towards the forum in the 2018/2019 financial year to co-fund a coordinator for the group, as well as support volunteer clean-up events. Funding of $5,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year is sought to continue to fund a coordinator for 12 hours per week to support the forum and associated groups in progressing the vision for the Tāmaki Estuary. Remaining funds not used for the coordinator contract will be used to implement projects, such as beach clean-ups, which progress the vision of the forum.

34.     During the 2018/2019 financial year the group achieved approximately 296 volunteer hours, engaged 148 volunteers, held four events and worked together to remove 1066 kilograms of rubbish from the estuary and surrounding waterways.

Additional project option (not supported): Everyday family plastic – $6,000

35.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘reduce waste through recovery, reuse and recycling’, staff proposed an everyday family plastics project for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year.

36.     The aim of this action research project was to build an understanding of plastic consumption by focusing on the realities of plastic in the lives of two Howick families over a year. Funding would have supported a communications campaign and provided a koha for the participating families.

37.     It was recommended that the board allocate $6,000 towards this project during the 2019/2020 financial year. At its 21 March 2019 workshop, the board indicated that it did not support the family plastics project due to other environmental priorities.

Additional project option (not supported): Howick community waste minimisation – $40,000

38.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘reduce waste through recovery, reuse and recycling’, staff proposed a community waste minimisation project in the 2019/2020 financial year.

39.     The aim of this project was to grow a network of waste minimisation champions and to support residents to reduce their waste and book into the council’s inorganic collection service. Funding would have enabled door to door engagement with residents living in illegal dumping hotspot areas, educational waste minimisation workshops, and support for local waste minimisation champions.

40.     It was recommended that the board allocate $40,000 towards this project during the 2019/2020 financial year. At its 21 March 2019 workshop, the board indicated that it did not support the Howick community waste minimisation project due to other environmental priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     The draft 2019/2020 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

42.     In particular, the council’s Licensing and Regulatory Compliance team and the Natural Environment Strategy team were involved in the development of the sediment related water quality testing project scope. Data collected from this project will help inform a regional strategic approach to sediment programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local impacts

43.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Howick Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2019/2020 work programme include Te Naupata Musick Point, the Ōtara Stream, East Tāmaki and the Tāmaki Estuary.

Local board views

44.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘a treasured environment’.

45.     The proposed local environment work programme was discussed with the board at workshops on 7 March 2019, 21 March 2019 and 9 May 2019. The board indicated its support of the proposed projects outlined in this report at its 9 May 2019 workshop.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     It is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

47.     Table 1 below outlines how each of the projects contributes towards Māori outcomes.

Table 1. Māori impact assessment of proposed projects for inclusion in the Howick Local Board’s local environment work programme

Project

Māori impact assessment

Pest free Howick

Te Naupata Musick Point is a site of significance to Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki. Several of the pest-free initiatives will help to enhance the cultural values of this land through the preservation of native plant species via pest plant control. Staff will work with Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki to build pest management capability and capacity to enable the iwi to undertake pest control on their own land.

Howick stream improvement programme

Initiatives delivered through this programme will help enhance the cultural values of the local environment through the preservation of native plant species via pest plant control and riparian planting. Feedback from mana whenua, as part of other consultations undertaken by the council, is supportive of projects that aim to improve water quality.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Industrial Pollution Prevention programme

This programme works to improve the mauri of waterways, so healthy ecosystems and biodiversity can be sustained. While this programme does not specifically engage with Māori, it is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

Sediment related water quality testing

This programme works to improve the mauri of waterways, so healthy ecosystems and biodiversity can be sustained. While this programme does not specifically engage with Māori, it is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

Household hazardous waste collection day

No specific engagement with Māori has been undertaken for this project. However, the outcomes of this project align with priorities for waste identified through consultation with mana whenua and mataawaka for the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018.

Para Kore programme for business waste minimisation

This project will be delivered by Para Kore ki Tāmaki Makaurau who will work in partnership with Te Whare o Matariki to develop and deliver waste education initiatives that align with the principles of kaitiakitanga and zero waste.

Waste minimisation in schools

This project will work with local schools participating in the established Enviroschools programme which integrates concepts of kaitiakitanga into educational outcomes and supports young people to foster a closer connection with Te Taiao (natural world around us).

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

The forum’s terms of reference state that members include ‘local iwi with a historical relationship with the Tāmaki Estuary’. To date, local iwi have not participated in the forum. Local iwi will be invited again to participate in the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     The proposed 2019/2020 local environment work programme requires the allocation of $355,250 of the board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget. This is a significant increase in investment from the previous financial year where the board contributed $175,500 towards the delivery of the 2018/2019 local environment work programme.

49.     This amount of $355,250 can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2019/2020. As such, the board’s approval will not have significant financial implications unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend. Regular quarterly updates on projects will be provided to the board tracking expenditure and identifying any projects at risk of non-delivery, over or underspend.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     If the proposed local environment work programme is not approved at the board’s June 2019 business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be able to be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

51.     The risks and proposed mitigation measures associated with each of the proposed projects have been outlined in Attachment B to this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.     Subject to the board’s approval, the delivery of this work programme will commence in the new financial year (1 July 2019). Regular reporting on project delivery will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2019/2020 local environment work programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Risks and proposed mitigation measures for 2019/2020 Howick local environmental projects

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Miriana Knox - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 Local Economic Development Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/09669

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Howick Local Board local economic development work programme for the 2019/2020 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report introduces the proposed Howick Local Board local economic development work programme for the 2019/2020 financial year included as attachment A to this report.

3.       The proposed work programme comprises;

·   Young Enterprise Scheme ($3,500)

·   East Auckland Tourism ($20,000)

4.       The total value of the local economic development programme for the 2019/2020 financial year is $23,500.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the local economic development annual work programme 2019/2020 included as attachment A to this report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       This report provides the board with the proposed local economic development work programme for the coming financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The local economic development work programme for 2019/2020 has been developed having regard to the local board’s priorities for local economic development set out in the Howick Local Board Plan 2017.

Young Enterprise Scheme ($3,500) 

7.       Auckland Business Chamber, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students.    

8.       Fostering youth entrepreneurship is a key requirement for developing an innovative economy and creating employment pathways for our young people. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and real profit and loss. Students learn key work skills and business knowledge including business fundamentals, planning, interpersonal relations, financial, decision making, reporting, risk management and team work. YES helps create a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship amongst Auckland’s young people. 

9.       The funding from the board will support the delivery of the overall YES program, including the Kick Start days in February 2020 where we will specifically acknowledge local board support. The Kick Start days are held in sub-regions (North, South, East, Central/West) where the first day students get to meet the Young Enterprise team, find out about their 2020 year, what YES is about and what is in store for them. All schools in the local board area that have shown an interest in YES are invited. In addition, the invite is extended to those schools that have not shown an interest to enable them to make a decision as to whether to participate.

East Auckland Tourism ($20,000) 

10.     The board has nurtured the growth of tourism and the development of working relationships between the Howick Business Association and other aligned business / tourism operators. The initial programme was on the understanding of a medium term, focused activity to identify and target operators within the Howick local board area, and to cross the boundary to work with the Clevedon Business Association and the Franklin Tourism Cluster.

11.     The past three years activity has proven very successful and the working relationships between all parties that the local board would like to further support the activity. This has been an excellent predictor of the capabilities and collaboration available in the area and ATEED fully supports this 2019/2020 work programme

12.     The programme is particularly timely given the Hunua Trail and Clevedon developments and will position the local board and its environs as a connector to the forming tourist routes and will encourage the search for new initiatives including Kayak Trail, Waikawa Bay and potential camping opportunities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The Tourism team within Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development will manage the administration of the funding on the local board’s behalf.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘A prosperous local economy’.

15.     The proposed local economic development work programme was workshopped with the local board on 9 May 2019. Amendments to the work programme have been made to reflect the direction received at the workshop.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     There are no direct impacts as a result of this report on Māori. However, in implementing the YES programme Māori students at participating schools will be able to benefit from the experience and learnings from the YES.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     The proposed 2019/2020 local economic development work programme of $23,500 will be from the board’s locally driven initiatives operating expenditure budget.

18.     The local economic development work programme progress will be reported directly to the board as part of the quarterly local board work programme report produced by Local Board Services.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     There is a risk that the budget remains unspent as a result of the fact that initiatives supported in the financial year do not require the full amount allocated or following the agreement of the programme external partners do not in turn proceed with the project.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Following approval by the local board the Local Economic Development and Tourism teams at ATEED will begin to implement the programme from 1 July 2019. Where there is a need for further scoping of activities this will be undertaken and presented back to the board as required.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick ATEED Work Programme 2019/2020 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chris Lock – Senior Strategic Advisor – Tourism - ATEED

Authorisers

John Norman – Strategic Planning Manager Local Economic Development ATEED

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 External Partnerships Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/09120

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Howick Local Board’s External Partnerships Work Programme for the 2019/2020 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report introduces the proposed 2019/2020 financial year External Partnerships Work Programme for the Howick Local Board, included as Attachment A to this report.

3.       The proposed work programme comprises of funding to support Business Improvement District projects with a total value of $45,000.  Of this amount the Greater East Tamaki Business Association is seeking a $15,000 and the Howick Village Business Association is seeking a $30,000 grant.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the External Partnerships annual work programme Business Improvement District top-up grants for 2019/2020 of $45,000 included as Attachment A to this report.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       The 2019/2020 External Partnerships Work Programme has been developed having regard to the Local Board’s priorities for business associations set out in the Howick Local Board Plan 2017.

5.       The board has advised that they wish to provide the two Business Improvement District (BID) programmes operated by the Greater East Tamaki Business Association (GETBA) and the Howick Village Business Association (HVBA) respectively with secured funding to undertake a range of programmes, events and initiatives which support economic development in the Howick local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Greater East Tamaki Business Association

6.       The Greater East Tamaki Business Association is seeking a $15,000 grant to continue their business attraction programme, which proactively promotes East Tamaki as a great place to do business and to work. The business attraction programme involves billboard advertising and business profiling in the New Zealand manufacturer online magazine.

Howick Village Business Association

7.       The Howick Village Business Association is seeking a $30,000 grant to continue to implement their strategic plan. The local board grant will be used to support a marketing campaign, to purchase Marketview Retail Spend data reports, and to support their visitor attraction programme.

8.       If approved, both business associations will be asked to provide a detailed report on how they have spent the local board grant on the proposed activities at the end of the financial year (July 2020).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

9.       There is no direct impact on any other council group as a result of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

10.     The proposed external partners business association programme was discussed briefly at the 7 March 2019 workshop as part of the broader work programme discussion. These funding grants were originally part of the Local Economic Development (LED) programme delivered by ATEED.

11.     Since the 7 March 2019 workshop these funding grants have been transferred to the Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) & External Partnership BID Team.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

12.     There are no direct impacts as a result of this report on Māori. However, in implementing the programme, consideration will be given to the need to consult with iwi and consider any impacts on Māori businesses arising from the specific project being undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

13.     The External Partnerships Work Programme progress will be reported directly to the local board as part of the quarterly local board work programme report produced by Local Board Services.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

14.     The External Partnerships Work Programme is dependent on the development of detailed proposals and associated funding agreements. There is a risk that the budget remains unspent where initiatives supported do not require the full amount allocated, or following the agreement of the programme external partners so not in turn proceed with the project.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

15.     Following the approval by the local board, the External Partnerships BID team will begin to implement the programme as approved by the local board. Where there is a need, further scoping of activities will be undertaken and presented back to the local board, as required.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick External Partnerships Work Programme 2019/2020 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - BID Partnership Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Howick Local Board 2019/2020 Plans and Places Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/09865

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Howick Local Board Plans and Places 2019/2020 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides information to support the Howick Local Board to make decisions required to approve the Plans and Places 2019/20 work programme.

3.       The board have identified projects which align with outcomes in the Howick Local Board Plan 2017 that includes “involved and connected communities” for the Howick Village Centre Plan and “a treasured environment” for the Howick Heritage Plan.

4.       A proposed work programme was discussed at workshops with the board in the past few months.

5.       The proposed work programme covers the following areas:

·    Continued implementation of the actions and projects in the Howick Village Centre Plan; and

·    Continued implementation of the actions and projects in the Howick Heritage Plan

6.       These two work programme items are regionally funded so there is no corresponding Local Board budget to be approved.

7.       In relation to the Howick Village Centre Plan, the following actions and projects were approved in the 2018/2019 financial year (HW/2018/113) and will continue to be delivered in the 2019/2020 financial year:

        $40,000 for wayfinding and information signage [LDI Capex]
        $40,000 for project management [LDI Opex]
        $20,000 for other projects outlined in the Village Centre Plan [LDI Opex]

8.       In relation to the Howick Heritage Plan, the following actions and projects were approved in the 2018/2019 financial year (HW/2018/113) and will continue to be delivered in the 2019/2020 financial year:
        $35,000 for interpretative panels and plaques [LDI Capex]
        $40,000 for project management [LDI Opex]
        $60,000 for other projects outlined in the Heritage Plan [LDI Opex]

9.       The proposed work programme for 2019/2020 is appended to this report at Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the Plans and Places annual work programme for 2019/2020 included as Attachment A to this report. 

b)      note that the Plans and Places work programme for 2019/2020 is regionally funded.

c)      delegate to the Howick Local Board Chair, in consultation with the board, to approve minor changes to the Plans and Places annual work programme 2019/2020, provided any changes made under this delegation are noted in the next business meeting report giving an update on delivery of the work programme.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. They outline the local activities to be delivered in each local board area for the next financial year.

11.     In preparation for work programme development, an overview group was created from relevant operational council departments to establish and navigate an agreed approach. The development of draft work programmes was supported by a series of workshops with the local board over the past few months.

12.     The Howick Village Centre Plan was adopted in June 2017. This was the first step towards achieving the 30-year vision for the village. It was agreed by the Local Board that the supporting actions identified under the Plan for the four concepts will be coordinated by Plans and Places and implemented via a range of projects. These will be delivered using a project manager, through a collaborative approach with the board, with a steering group established.

13.     The Heritage Plan was adopted in September 2016.  A project manager has overseen the progress of the approved plan, managed the Heritage Plan Steering Group and continued to drive activities set out in the heritage area.

14.     There have been a number of achievements to date. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     For both the Heritage Plan and the Village Plan, the proposed work programme continues the implementation of actions identified within the plans. Some actions have been achieved already, some have started and will continue to be progressed and new projects investigated and developed.

Howick Village Centre Plan

16.     Priorities identified for 2019/20 work programme include investigation and development of:

·                wayfinding and information signage to/at key places such as Stockade Hill

·                community facilities, the beach, toilets, car parking area

·                activation of laneways through lighting, signage and artwork

·                refurbishment of existing community noticeboard in the village square

·                improvements to bus shelter by the village square

17.     The co-ordination of transport linked projects focussing on pedestrian amenity and safety are already subject to discussion and will continue to be supported and developed.

Howick Heritage Plan

18.     The projects identified in the plan are priorities identified by the Heritage Steering Group and supported by the board. These include:

·         additional interpretative panels and plaques

·         expansion of the digital apps

·         formalisation of the Learning Unit

·         collecting recorded history

·      assessments of sites of historical/natural significance

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Wide interdepartmental connections were developed through the development of Howick Village Centre Plan - including Auckland Transport, ATEED, the community empowerment unit and Local Board Services.

20.     Involvement by representatives from these groups has continued through the ongoing implementation of the Howick Village Centre Plan. This involvement enables an integrated approach to delivery of the activities in the work programme and will allow for further collaboration throughout the upcoming year. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The development of draft work programmes was supported by a series of workshops with the local board over the past few months.

22.     The implementation of the two plans aligns to the following local board plan outcomes:

·        Involved and connected communities - this includes supporting more community involvement in shaping places and the future look and feel of Howick Village through the Howick Village Centre Plan

·        A treasured environment - this involves implementing the recommendations of the Howick Heritage Plan which is an online, guiding, living document. It includes information on items of natural significance, data on historical buildings and local features, educational resource material and a collection of personal narratives. These include identifying, preserving and protecting natural features, historic places, property and relics.

23.     Plans and Places will continue to report to the Local Board regularly on the implementation of the plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     This report provides information for local planning and development projects. It is recognised that planning and development [including heritage matters] has integral links with activities of interest to Māori. Some of the identified activities will require participation, contribution and consultation with iwi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The implementation of the two plans is already underway and will continue during the upcoming financial year.

26.     Subject to approval, this work programme will continue in the new financial year (1 July 2019).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     In order to continue the successful delivery of the outcomes within the two adopted Howick plans, Plans and Places recommendation is for the continued funding of a project manager. Plans and Places’ role will be to continue to co-ordinate the delivery of the actions and projects identified within the respective plans, via the project manager. 

28.     The main risks relate to the level of resourcing available within departments and Council controlled organisations to provide input into the ongoing implementation of the two plans.

29.     As the work programme includes ongoing activity, the risks are continuously assessed and managed.  Significant risks can be reported to the Board as required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Subject to approval, the ongoing co-ordination of the implementation of the two Howick plans by Plans and Places will continue with a project manager and a Steering Group in place.

31.     Reporting to the board will occur on a regular basis, along with contributions to the board’s quarterly performance report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Plans and Places Work Programme 19_20 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Craig Cairncross - Lead Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Proposal to grant Pakuranga Tennis Club funding for lease rental

File No.: CP2019/09341

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the provision of funding for lease rental to the Pakuranga Tennis Club.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Pakuranga Tennis Club Incorporated occupies land at Ōhuiarangi/Pigeon Mountain subject to a lease with the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Under the lease a rental fee and rates are payable.

3.       The Pakuranga Tennis Club Incorporated requests assistance from the Howick Local Board to meet its rental obligations under the lease.

4.       The Tūpuna Maunga Authority and the Pakuranga Tennis Club are in negotiations over an exit plan which will require an extension to the lease and on the basis that the club moves from the site to a proposed new facility at Lloyd Elsmore Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      provide a grant of $15,207.12 from the 2019/2020 Community Response Fund to the Pakuranga Tennis Club Incorporated to cover rental due under the lease between the Pakuranga Tennis Club Incorporated and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority for the period 1 October 2017 to 30 June 2019.

b)      provide a grant of $8,700 from the 2019/2020 Community Response Fund to the Pakuranga Tennis Club Incorporated to cover rental due under the lease between the Pakuranga Tennis Club Incorporated and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority for the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020, provided that the lease is renewed.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Pakuranga Tennis Club Incorporated (the Club) has a lease on reserve land at Ōhuiarangi/Pigeon Mountain under management of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  The Tūpuna Maunga Authority is the administering body of the reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and pursuant to Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act 2014.

6.       The Club (formerly known as Pakuranga Lawn Tennis Club) was incorporated on 6 June 1967.  The Incorporation has a purpose as follows:

“To promote tennis as a sport to the public, proving a friendly East Auckland club with a great social atmosphere as well as competitive tennis and to promote tennis as a sport to the public”.

7.       The club’s financial statements for the period ending April 2018 show some reliance upon donations and subscriptions along with reasonably balanced income and expenditure.  The statements also show membership of juniors and seniors in 2018 at approximately 370.

8.       On 19 November 1981, the club entered into a Deed of Lease with the former Manukau City Council for the leased area on the reserve for the purpose associated with a tennis club and other recreational activities and for a term of 15 years with a right of renewal for a further term of 15 years.  Then on 6 July 1998, the club renewed its lease for a further term of 15 years commencing from 1 November 1996.  That lease renewal expired on 30 October 2011.  On 20 April 2015 the Tūpuna Maunga Authority granted an interim lease to the club until 20 April 2017 and has continued on a month-to-month basis thereafter.  On 19 June 2017 the Tūpuna Maunga Authority granted a further lease.  This lease term is from 1 October 2017 until 30 June 2019 with a right of renewal of a further year until 30 June 2020.

9.       When the former Manukau City Council leased the site to the club, it was treated as a community group and its rental and certain outgoings were subsidised.  In particular, the lease that expired on 30 October 2011 stated that the council was responsible for rates.  The lease rental until 1 October 2017 was $10 per annum if requested and all rates were paid by the council. 

10.     The Tūpuna Maunga Authority operates under a new management system and charges market rentals (acknowledging the reserve status of the land and the underlying statutory functions which focus on the health and well-being of the maunga).  From 1 October 2017 the Authority has charged $8,700 plus GST rental per annum (total $10,005 GST inclusive) and on-charges rates relating to the lease site.

11.     The amounts that is payable for the lease are:

Period

Rental GST inclusive

Rental GST exclusive

1 October 2017 to 30 September 2018

$10,005.00

$8,700.00

1 October 2018 to 30 June 2019

$7,483.19

$6,507.12

1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020 (if renewed)

$10,005.00

$8,700.00

Total rental

$27,493.19

$23,907.12

 

12.     The total rental presently due is $17,488.19.  The total rental payable under the present lease to 30 June 2020 (if renewed) will be $27,493.19.  The club is GST registered and will be able to claim back the GST component of their rent so the total proposed grants is $23,907.12 (made up of $15,207.12 for the period to 30 June 2019 and $8,700.00 for the period to 30 June 2020 if the lease is renewed).

13.     The Auckland Council will pay the rates under the lease until 30 June 2019 and this cost is not sought from the board in the financial year to 30 June 2019.  This reflects the historical position under the previous lease where the council met the rates costs.  The rates covered by the council are as follows:

Rating year

Rates payable GST inclusive

2018/2019

$6,352.85

 

14.     The breakdown of rates for the 2018-19 year for the Club (the site includes clubrooms with liquor licence and courts) is as follows:

Capital value

General rates

UAGC

Waste

Natural Environment

Water quality

Total

$5,850,000

$5,407.82

$414.00

$224.17

$127.62

$179.24

$6,352.85

 

15.     Council staff are considering a formal policy position for rates for the 2019-2020 financial year and forward. 

16.     The Tūpuna Maunga Authority and the Club are in discussions to complete an exit plan for the club.  The discussions are contemplating the authority granting an extension to the club’s lease until around 2022 on the same terms and conditions and on the basis that the club would leave the site to join new premises planned at Lloyd Elsmore Park.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     Three options were considered in the development of this report.

18.     The preferred option of requesting the board support the club through two grants to cover the rental and have council cover the rates, noting that council has already agreed to cover the rates.

19.     The second alternative option was to request the board support the club through a grant to cover the rental and rates.

20.     The third alternative was to essentially do nothing and leave the club to fund the rent and rates due.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The proposed grant has been discussed with and endorsed by the Parks Sport and Recreation Team.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     At its workshop on 28 May 2019, the board expressed support for the proposed grant.

23.     The proposed assistance to the Club will have a localised impact. However, the Lloyd Elsmore Park Multi-Sport Facility project is contingent on the club’s continued existence, and delivering this project is important for the whole local board area. 

24.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority relating to the commitment of Local Development Initiative Opex.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     The proposed grant is of direct relevance to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority and they have had direct involvement in the development of this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The financial implications for the board is the commitment of currently unallocated Local Development Initiative Opex funding from the 2019/2020 Community Response Fund.

27.     There is a potential future financial impact if further funding is requested for rent from 30 June 2020 and/or rates from 30 June 2019.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     If the board does not resolve to grant the funds recommended this may materially affect the ongoing viability of the club and their ability to participate in the planned Lloyd Elsmore Park Multi-Sport Facility.

29.     The proposed assistance to the club sets a precedent.  However, it has been made clear that this assistance is only offered under exceptional circumstances, for the reasons described above.

30.     The proposed assistance to the club may create an expectation that potential further requests for funding for rent from 30 June 2020 and potentially rates from 30 June 2019 would be looked at favourably.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Subject to the local board approval to grant funds to cover the rental due under the lease, council staff will work with the club to formalise the proposed grant.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dominic Wilson - Head of Co-governance

Authorisers

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

Phil Wilson - Governance Director

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Proposal to grant new community leases to Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated

File No.: CP2019/08681

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated for the land at 600R Pakuranga Road, William Green Domain, Pakuranga.

2.       To grant a second new community lease to Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated for the land at 168R Gossamer Drive, Riverhills Park, Howick.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated (Fencibles) seeks new community leases for land at 600R Pakuranga Road, William Green Domain, Pakuranga and 168R Gossamer Drive, Riverhills Park, Howick.

4.       The leases for both sites commenced 1 June 2009 and expired 31 May 2019. Both are rolling over on a month-by-month basis until terminated, or a new lease is entered into.

5.       Under the Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, community groups that own their building have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term.

6.       Fencibles have submitted a comprehensive application. Leasing staff have assessed the application and are satisfied that the requirements under the occupancy guidelines have been met.

7.       This report recommends the Howick Local Board grant two new community leases to Fencibles.

8.       The recommendations within this report align with the Howick Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Our people are active and healthy.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated, for the footprint of the club-owned building comprising approximately 312m2, more particularly shown in Attachment A and situated at 600R Pakuranga Road, William Green Domain, Pakuranga, described as Allotment 67 Section 1 Small farms near the Village of Howick subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – initial term of 10 years commencing 17 June 2019 with one 10-year right of renewal with final expiry 16 June 2039

ii)       rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if requested

iii)      approve Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated’s Community Outcomes Plan to be attached to the lease as a schedule (Attachment C)

iv)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

b)      grant a new community lease to Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated, for the footprint of the club-owned building comprising approximately 640m2, more particularly shown in Attachment B and situated at 168R Gossamer Drive, Riverhills Park, Howick, described as Lot 1 DP 52077 subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – initial term of 10 years commencing 17 June 2019 with one 10-year right of renewal with final expiry 16 June 2039

ii)       rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if requested

iii)      approve Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated’s Community Outcomes Plan to be attached to the lease as a schedule (Attachment D).

c)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       This report considers two new community leases to Fencibles at William Green Domain and Riverhills Park.

10.     The Howick Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Fencibles – William Green Domain

11.     Fencibles hold an operative lease over the club-owned building situated at 600R Pakuranga Road, William Green Domain, Pakuranga.

12.     The lease commenced 1 June 2009 and finally expired 31 May 2019. Fencibles has applied for a new community lease to continue providing recreational services to the community.

13.     The club-owned building occupies a portion of William Green Domain legally described as Allotment 67 Section 1 Small farms near the Village of Howick. Allotment 67 is currently held by the Crown through Department of Conservation as a classified recreation reserve and is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in Auckland Council in trust for recreation purposes.

14.     The building comprises a large open floor, a kitchen and tuck shop, toilet and storage facilities. The building is in good condition, fit for purpose.

15.     The building is primarily used to host club meetings, team functions and hosting opposition teams throughout the week. The hiring out of the building to community users assists with fundraising efforts.

Fencibles – Riverhills Park

16.     Fencibles hold an operative lease over the club-owned building situated at 168R Gossamer Drive, Riverhills Park, Howick.

17.     The lease commenced 1 June 2009 and finally expired 31 May 2019. Fencibles has applied for a new community lease to continue providing recreational services to the community.

18.     The club-owned building occupies a portion of Riverhills Park legally described as Lot 1 DP 52077. Lot 1 is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve.

19.     The building comprises a large open floor, a kitchen and tuck shop, toilet and storage facilities. The building is in good condition, fit for purpose.

20.     The building is primarily used to host club meetings, team functions and hosting opposition teams throughout the week. The hiring out of the building to community users assists with fundraising efforts.

Fencibles

21.     Fencibles was established in 1995 following the amalgamation of Howick AFC and Pakuranga Town AFC.

22.     Fencibles has since grown substantially and currently has 1,800 members from junior through to senior ranks. Parents and guardians of youth and junior players are classed as associate members and their inclusion swells the club’s full membership to over 3,000.

23.     Fencibles have 16 senior men’s and women’s teams, 55 youth teams and 55 junior teams in Auckland Football Federation competitions.

24.     Fencibles have close ties with Eastern Suburbs AFC and Ellerslie AFC, supporting the formers franchise in the ISPS HANDA Premiership, National Youth League, and National Women’s Leagues, which provides Fencibles players with access to the highest levels of domestic competition.

25.     Fencibles is also an affiliated member of New Zealand Football through the Auckland Football Federation and is one of the largest clubs in New Zealand.

26.     Fencibles is managed by a committee of nine and employs one full-time and 12 part-time volunteers who assist with the day-to-day operations of the club. There is a separate players committee of six who represent current players.

27.     Fencibles employs a full-time Director of Football to oversee player and coach development.

28.     Fencibles expects to qualify for the coveted New Zealand Football Quality Mark Certification which ensures that the facilities, governance and operation standards are met and maintained by the club. This will allow the club to participate in a full range of competitions and coaching programmes. A central part of this is for the club to work closely with local schools to fulfil the New Zealand Football development requirements.

29.     The activity of Fencibles, users of the buildings and reserves supports the local board plan in that it serves the communities need by providing quality recreation and leisure facilities that foster and encourage an active and healthy lifestyle to people of all ages and abilities to use.

30.     The recommended term for tenant owned buildings is an initial term of 10 years with one 10-year right of renewal in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

31.     The financial accounts provided indicate that Fencibles funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

32.     Fencibles has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

33.     William Green Domain and Riverhills Park are contemplated in the Manukau Sports Park Management Plan.  Both are deemed for recreation purposes and captures the activity of soccer occurring on these reserves. Additionally, there will be no departure from the approved land use.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     The proposal to grant a new community lease to Fencibles in relation to Riverhills Park has been discussed with Parks Sport and Recreation (PSR) and Auckland Transport regarding the Eastern Busways Project (the project).

35.     A portion of Riverhills Park has been identified as an option to set-up a temporary construction yard for the project. The area identified cuts through one of the fields that Fencibles uses to host matches and training. The construction yard will not affect the lease area, which is the footprint of the club-room (refer to Attachment B).

36.     Parks Sport & Recreation have discussed potential layout options of the fields with Fencibles. Alternative sites to host matches and training in the interim have also been discussed. Fencibles currently uses various grounds such as William Green Domain, Sir Barry Curtis Park, Lloyd Elsmore Park, Greenmount Reserve Park and Meadowlands Reserve for training and matches.

37.     Council and Fencibles have assessed the impact of the busway project and advise that the club can maintain their current operations in the long-term.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     At its workshop on 26 March 2019 and at a second workshop on 21 May 2019, the local board expressed support for Fencibles and the proposed new leases.

39.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

40.     The land classification as recreation reserve, together with the reserve management plans for both William Green Domain and Riverhills Park contemplate the activities of the club.  Because the approved management plans recognise the club’s activities public notification of the intent to grant new leases is not required.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and individual local board plans.

42.     Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. An aim of community leasing is to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects. Additionally, it seeks to improve access to facilities and participation for Māori living in the Howick Local Board area.

43.     Iwi engagement was undertaken between 12 April and 13 May 2019 with the iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Howick Local Board area.

44.     No objection to the proposal to grant new community leases to Fencibles at both William Green Domain and Riverhills Park were received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     There are no direct costs to council associated with these new leases.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     Should the Howick Local Board resolve not to grant either community group with a new community lease, this decision will materially affect their ability to provide services to the Howick community.

47.     Staff advise that the benefits to the community of granting the new leases as recommended outweigh any risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Subject to the local board approval to grant new community leases to Fencibles, council staff will work with the group to formalise the lease documents.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan and Lease Area (William Green Domain)

117

b

Site Plan and Lease Area (Riverhills)

119

c

Community Outcomes Plan (William Green Domain)

121

d

Community Outcomes Plan (Riverhills)

123

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Setefano - Community Facilities Graduate

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Proposal to grant new community leases to Howick Children's and Youth Theatre Incorporated and The Girl Guides Association New Zealand Incorporated

File No.: CP2019/08687

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Howick Children’s and Youth Theatre Incorporated at 29R Granger Road, Star of the Sea Reserve, Howick.

2.       To grant a new community lease to The Girl Guides Association New Zealand Incorporated at 50R Vincent Street, Blundell Park, Howick.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Howick Children’s and Youth Theatre Incorporated (HCYT) seeks a new community lease for the land sited at 29R Granger Road, Star of the Sea Reserve, Howick. The current lease commenced 5 May 2008 and expired 4 May 2011. The lease is currently on a month by month roll over.

4.       The Girl Guides Association New Zealand Incorporated (Girl Guides) seeks a new community lease for the land at 50R Vincent Street, Blundell Park, Howick. The current lease commenced 1 May 2009 and expired 30 April 2019. The lease is currently on a month by month roll over.

5.       Both groups are well established and are delivering good outcomes for the community.

6.       The activity of HCYT, together with the building supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s need for access to quality facilities that grow and value cultural diversity through music, dance, theatre and visual arts.

7.       The activity of Girl Guides, together with the building supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s needs for access to quality recreational and leisure facilities and people are supported to actively contribute to their community.

8.       This report recommends that the Howick Local Board grant new community leases to HCYT and Girl Guides.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to Howick Children’s and Youth Theatre Incorporated for the land and building comprising 647 square metres (more or less) at 29R Granger Road, Star of the Sea Reserve, Howick legally described as Lot 3 DP 188910 comprising 3915 square metres and contained in certificate of title NA118D/390 (Attachment A) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        approve the public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Howick Children’s and Youth Theatre Incorporated for the land at 29R Granger Road, Star of the Sea Reserve, Howick

ii)       term – five years commencing 17 June 2019 with one five-year right of renewal and a final expiry date of 16 June 2029

iii)      rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if requested

iv)      maintenance fee – $1,000 plus GST per annum

v)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve the Community Outcomes Plan to be attached to the lease as a schedule

vi)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

b)      grant a new community lease to The Girl Guides Association New Zealand Incorporated for the land comprising 180 square metres (more or less) at 50R Vincent Street, Blundell Park, Howick legally described as Lot 47 DP 37405 comprising 1,019 square metres and contained in Part NA681/3 (Part-Cancelled) (Attachment B) subject to the following terms and conditions;

i)        term – 10 years commencing 17 June 2019 with one 10-year right of renewal and a final expiry date of 16 June 2039

ii)       rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if requested

iii)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve the Community Outcomes Plan to be attached to the lease as a schedule.

c)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       This report considers new community leases to HCYT and Girl Guides.

10.     The Howick Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Howick Children’s and Youth Theatre Incorporated

11.     The HCYT was established in 1996 and previously known as the Uxbridge Children’s Theatre from 1981. HCYT registered as an incorporated society on 13 February 1996.

12.     The core objectives of HCYT is:

a)      to provide a programme of education in drama for all interested children and youth in the community with the aim of developing in students their confidence, self-esteem, sense of community and skills in communication, theatre and performance

b)      to provide training and experience in a wide range of skills including speech and drama, mime and movement, song and dance, improvisation, storytelling and scriptwriting, stage makeup, mask and clown, lighting, sound, design, directing, tutoring, theatre administration and other areas necessary for the presentation of the performing arts

c)      to undertake the public display of the performing arts for the education of students and the entertainment and cultural enlightenment of members of the public.

13.     The lease for HCYT commenced 5 May 2008 and expired 4 May 2011. The lease is currently holding over on a month by month basis.

14.     The land occupied by HCYT is held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002 and legally described as Lot 3 DP 188910 comprising 3915 square metres and contained in certificate of title NA118D/390.

15.     The Star of the Sea Convent building occupied by HCYT is owned by Auckland Council.

16.     The building has strong historical links with the first Star of the Sea orphanage and played a pivotal role in the care of orphaned girls in Auckland. The memorial chapel inside commemorates the work of Bishop Cleary who furthered education and the welfare of children in Auckland during his episcopate from 1911 until 1929.

17.     The interior of the chapel is heritage protected, along with items of furniture within the chapel that have heritage value.

18.     The building is a mix of medium to large scale rooms, as well as two kitchens, a toilet block, a chapel, wheelchair access and storage areas. A building condition and seismic testing assessment has been completed and the building is in good condition fit for purpose.

19.     The HCYT use the building to host a variety of workshops and classes that foster and promote the art of theatre These include but are not limited to drama classes, rehearsals, speech and public speaking courses. The rooms are hired out to other community groups such as pilates, Plunket yoga classes, photography, kung fu, antenatal and piano classes.

20.     The HCYT has a strong subscribing membership of 250 members but can host up to 500 students a week through its workshops and classes. The HCYT is managed by seven staff members and 150 part-time volunteers.

21.     The HCYT provides opportunities for people to be involved in all facets of theatrical production including props, front of house, set building, stage crew and production management, and provides a successful training and experience base for the community.

22.     The HCYT put on eight productions per year that each occur over 10 days. The productions are spread evenly throughout the year.

23.     Although the building does not have a stage area for performances, HCYT occasionally use the front portion of the building to host summer productions and will use other performance stages at the Howick Little Theatre and Harlequin Musical Theatre. Smaller productions are held on-site, whereas large scale productions require a set stage.

24.     The activities and building support the local board plan in that it serves the community’s need for access to quality facilities that grow and promote cultural diversity through music, dance, theatre and visual arts.

25.     The recommended term for a lease of council owned building is five years with one five year right of renewal in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

26.     Council staff are negotiating a Community Outcomes Plan with HCYT which the report recommends will be submitted to the Chair and Deputy Chair for approval to be attached as a schedule to the lease deed.

27.     The financial accounts provided indicate that HCYT funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

28.     The HCYT has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

The Girl Guides Association New Zealand Incorporated

29.     Girl Guides registered as an incorporated society on 26 August 1971.

30.     The vision for Girl Guides is for all girls and young women to be valued, inspired and empowered to act and to change the world. To achieve this, Girl Guides focuses on three key strategic outcomes:

a)      to provide opportunities for girls and young women by offering activities and experiences focuses in girls as go-getters, innovators, risk takers and leasers.

b)      to be a voice for girls and young women on issues that affect them. To achieve this, Girl Guides focuses on a girl-led approach that highlights the importance of leadership and speaks out and acts on issues of importance to today’s girls and young women.

c)      to be a strong and vibrant movement that offers a range of volunteering options which meet the needs of a diverse volunteering base. This involves developing a sustainable organisational model to fund its mission.

31.     The lease for Girl Guides commenced 1 May 2009 and expired 30 April 2019. The lease is currently holding over on a month by month basis.

32.     The Girl Guides Hall occupies a portion of Blundell Park legally described as Lot 47 DP 37405 comprising 1019 square metres and contained in Certificate of Title Part NA681/3 (Part-Cancelled). It is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as local purpose (community buildings) reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

33.     The hall building was first used as the Church of England school in Howick and opened in October 1848. In 1899 parts of the building were reused to build the All Saints Sunday School and Parish Hall. The building was sold in 1955 for 35 pounds and moved to Vincent Street, where it was extended and restored as the Howick Guides Hall.

34.     The hall is approximately 180 square metres (more or less) and is owned by Girl Guides. It comprises a large open floor space, kitchen, toilet and storage areas. The hall is in good condition, fit for purpose.

35.     The hall is utilised by multiple community groups that include, spinners and arts classes, a Trefoil Guild, Pippins and Brownies. The space is hired out to the community which assists with upkeep and fundraising efforts.

36.     Girl Guides has a strong national paying membership of 6,992 members.

37.     Girl Guides is a non-profit organization assists girls and young women in becoming tomorrow’s leaders. Girl Guides programmes balance physical, mental and social development. There is a strong emphasis on community service and life skills.

38.     Girl Guides New Zealand is one of 150-member countries of the World Association of Girl Guiding and Girl Scouts. This relationship gives access to global initiatives like Free Being Me – a programme offered to learn body confidence and self-esteem, from valuing their bodies, standing up to social pressures and supporting others to be confident.

39.     The activity of Girl Guides, together with the building, supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s need by supporting people to actively contribute to their community and responding to the needs of the growing community.

40.     The recommended term for a tenant owned building is ten years with one ten year right of renewal in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

41.     Council staff are negotiating a Community Outcomes Plan with Girl Guides which the report recommends will be submitted to the Chair and Deputy Chair for approval to be attached as a schedule to the lease deed.

42.     The financial accounts provided indicate that Girl Guides funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     Leasing staff engaged with the Heritage department of council to obtain feedback on the Star of the Sea Covent building occupied by the HCYT.

44.     The interior of the chapel and furniture has heritage value, has been documented and will be captured in the lease document.

45.     Leasing staff also engaged with the Heritage Department of council to obtain feedback on the Howick Guides Hall.

46.     The hall is not recorded in the Cultural Heritage Inventory and is not captured in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

47.     The proposal to grant a new lease to HCYT and Girl Guides has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     At its workshop on 26 March 2019, the local board expressed support for HCYT, Girl Guides and the proposed new community leases.

49.     The activity of HCYT, together with the building supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s need for access to quality facilities that grow and value cultural diversity through music, dance, theatre and visual arts.

50.     The activity of Girl Guides, together with the building supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s needs for access to quality recreational and leisure facilities and people are supported to actively contribute to their community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and individual local board plans.

52.     Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. An aim of community leasing is to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects. Additionally, it seeks to improve access to facilities and participation for Māori living in the Howick Local Board area.

53.     Iwi engagement is being undertaken between 12 April 2019 to 13 May 2019 with the iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Howick Local Board area.

54.     Engagement includes:

i)        a mana whenua forum presentation on 27 March 2019

ii)       written notification of the proposals to grant new community leases to HCYT and Girl Guides to iwi groups representative of mana whenua with a specific interest in the Howick Local Board area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     Public notification of the intention to grant a new ground lease will be borne by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities unit.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.     Should the Howick Local Board resolve not to grant HCYT and Girl Guides with new community leases, this decision will materially affect their ability to provide services to the Howick community.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     Subject to the local board approval to grant new community leases to HCYT and Girl Guides, council staff will work with the groups to formalise the lease documents.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - HCYT Site Plan and Lease Area

131

b

Attachment B - Girl Guides Site Plan and Lease Area

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Setefano - Community Facilities Graduate

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Proposal to grant a new joint deed of lease to Shelly Park Cruising Club Incorporated and The Scouts Association of New Zealand

File No.: CP2019/08966

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Shelly Park Cruising Club Incorporated (SPCC) and The Scout Association of New Zealand (Scouts) as joint tenants for the land at 197R Sandspit Road, The Sandspit, Shelly Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The SPCC and Scouts seeks a new community lease as joint tenants for the land sited at 197R Sandspit Road, The Sandspit, Shelly Park.

3.       The operative lease for SPCC commenced 1 April 1991 and expired 31 March 2011. The lease is currently on a month-by-month roll over.

4.       The operative lease for Scouts commenced 1 December 2008 and expired 30 November 2018. The lease is currently on a month-by-month roll over.

5.       In their applications both groups indicated that they are prepared to share the leased area and maintenance responsibilities, as there is a mutual benefit and understanding between them. SPCC and Scouts have since signed a Memorandum of Understanding to work together and if granted a community lease, would cooperate during the term of the lease.

6.       The SPCC and Scouts buildings occupies a portion of The Sandspit Reserve legally described as Allotment 305 Parish of Pakuranga. Allotment 305 was originally set apart by the Crown under the Land Act 1948 as a recreation reserve and, under the Reserves and Domains Act 1953, vested in the former Manukau County Council, in trust, for recreation purposes.

7.       The land is currently held as unclassified recreation reserve. Classification of the reserve is required prior to a new lease being granted to SPCC and Scouts as per the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

8.       This report recommends that the Howick Local Board exercise its delegated authority under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 to classify The Sandspit reserve as recreation reserve.

9.       Subject to classification being approved, this report also recommends that the Howick Local Board grant a new community lease to SPCC and Scouts as joint tenants.

10.     In accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987, Auckland Council must publicly notify and engage with iwi on its intention to grant the proposed new community lease.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      resolve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 to classify The Sandspit Reserve legally described as Allotment 305 Parish of Pakuranga as classified recreation reserve.

b)      subject to the classification of the land being approved, grant a new community lease to Shelly Park Cruising Club Incorporated and The Scout Association of New Zealand as joint tenants for the land comprising approximately 3,611m2, more particularly shown in Attachment A and situated at 197R Sandspit Road, The Sandspit, Shelly Park, described as Allotment 305 Parish of Pakuranga subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Shelly Park Cruising Club Incorporated and The Scout Association of New Zealand as joint tenants for the land at 197R Sandspit Road, The Sandspit, Shelly Park

ii)       term – initial term of 10 years commencing 17 June 2019 with one 10-year right of renewal

iii)      rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum if requested

iv)      access to the walking track and The Sandspit reserve will remain open to public use

v)      delegate to the Chair to appoint a panel to consider submissions or objections received following the public notification of the intention to lease, and for the panel to decide in that regard

vi)      delegate to the Chair and Deputy Chair authority to approve the community outcomes plan to be attached to the lease as a schedule

vii)     the current operative community leases for Shelly Park Cruising Club and The Scout Association of New Zealand for their occupation of The Sandspit reserve will surrender upon a new lease being granted to both as joint tenants

viii)    all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     This report considers classification of The Sandspit Reserve as recreation reserve and granting a new community lease to SPCC and Scouts as joint tenants.

12.     A new community lease for SPCC and Scouts as joint tenants was discussed at a workshop with the Howick Local Board on 28 February 2019. No objections were raised at this time.

13.     The Howick Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land

14.     The SPCC and Scouts building is sited at 197R Sandspit Road, The Sandspit, Shelly Park. The land is legally described as Allotment 305 Parish of Pakuranga and comprises 7,919m2. Allotment 305 is currently held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as an unclassified recreation reserve, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977, and vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for recreation purposes.

15.     The Auckland Council as a reserve administering body is required to classify all unclassified reserves. To align the activities on the land to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977, council staff propose that Allotment 305 Parish of Pakuranga be classified as a recreation reserve. This classification is appropriate for the recreation activities undertaken on the reserve.

16.     The purpose of recreation reserves as set out in Section 17 of the Reserves Act 1977 is to provide for “recreation and sporting activities and the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public and for the protection of the natural environment and beauty of the countryside, with emphasis on the retention of open spaces and on outdoor recreational activities, including recreation tracks in the countryside”.

17.     Although Allotment 305 is mentioned in the Mangemangeroa Valley Reserves Management Plan, it is not classified, so public notification and engagement with iwi on council’s intention to classify the reserve and grant a new lease is required.

18.     As the land is owned by the Crown, a treaty clause will be inserted into the lease notifying the contracting parties that the land maybe used for redress purposes, pursuant to the Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975.

Shelly Park Cruising Club Incorporated

19.     The SPCC was established in 1959 and registered as an incorporated society on 7 August 1963.

20.     The primary objective of the club is the encouragement of yachting and boating, and other ancillary activities associated with aquatics in the community.

21.     The lease for SPCC commenced 1 April 1991 and expired 31 March 2011. The lease has since held over on a month by month basis.

22.     The buildings occupied by SPCC are tenant-owned and comprises a large open floor space, a kitchen, storage and toilet facilities. The building is in good condition, fit for purpose.

23.     Although the main clubhouse is open to other community users, access to the building is difficult as it sits at the bottom of the cliffside (refer to Attachment A). The walking track leading down from Sandspit Road is the only access point to the reserve.

24.     The SPCC is managed by 77 part-time volunteers and has a paying membership of 98.

25.     The SPCC hosts multiple racing events per year and with the inclusion of women’s yacht racing in the annual programme, it has attracted a strong number of women to the event and club membership.

26.     The SPCC organises an annual working bee which assists with the maintenance and up-keep of the facility, reserve and walking track. The club removes all rubbish and recycling at low tide.

27.     The SPCC and Scouts have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to work together and if granted a community lease, would cooperate during the term of the lease.

28.     The activity of the group together with the building supports the local board plan for access to quality recreational and leisure facilities and people are supported to actively contribute to their community.

29.     The recommended term for a tenant owned building is 10 years with one 10 year right of renewal in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

30.     Council staff are negotiating a Community Outcomes Plan with SPCC and Scouts which the report recommends will be submitted to the Chair and Deputy Chair for approval, to be attached as a schedule to the lease deed.

31.     The financial accounts provided indicate that SPCC’s funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

32.     The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

The Scout Association of New Zealand

33.     Scouts is a body corporate incorporated under the Scout Association of New Zealand Act 1956. The Howick Sea Scouts branch have provided scouting activities in the Howick area since 1940.

34.     The primary objective of Scouts is to empower youth through adventurous experiences to lead lives that make a positive difference.

35.     The lease for Scouts commenced 1 December 2008 and expired 30 November 2018. The lease has held over on a month by month basis.

36.     The buildings occupied by Scouts are tenant-owned and in good condition fit for purpose. They are used primarily for storage of boats and sailing equipment for its members.

37.     The group is managed by 16 part-time volunteers and has a paying membership of 84 ranging from young to senior members. The membership has doubled since 2014 and the effort is on-going to increase and attract new members.

38.     Scouts has four youth training sections; a Kea group which caters for school years one to three, a Cub pack that caters for school years four to six, a Scout Troop for school years seven to 10 and a Venturer Unit for school years 11 to 13.

39.     The groups are challenged through a system of badges and awards that can be earned by mastering a diverse range of skills. These skills aim to develop its members through practical sessions in a safe and controlled environment that include areas such as first aid training, camping skills, food hygiene, cooking classes, arts and crafts, water safety, sailing, kayaking, construction projects, map reading, compass and global positioning system use, community service, emergency survival to produce well rounded and prepared citizens.

40.     The SPCC and Scouts have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to work together and if granted a community lease, would cooperate for the term of the lease.

41.     The activity of the group together with the building supports the local board plan in that it serves the community’s needs for access to quality recreational and leisure facilities and people are supported to actively contribute to their community.

42.     The recommended term for a tenant owned building is 10 years with one 10 year right of renewal in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

43.     Council staff are negotiating a Community Outcomes Plan with Scouts and SPCC which the report recommends will be submitted to the Chair and Deputy Chair for approval, to be attached as a schedule to the lease deed.

44.     The financial accounts provided indicate that the group’s funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

45.     The group has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     The proposed decision has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of the council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     At its workshop on 28 February 2019, the local board expressed support for both community groups and the proposed new community lease, provided public access to the walking track and the surrounding beach remained. The requirement for public access to remain will be included as a specific amendment to the standard lease.

48.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and individual local board plans.

50.     Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. An aim of community leasing is to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects. Additionally, it seeks to improve access to facilities and participation for Māori living in the Howick Local Board area.

51.     Iwi engagement was undertaken between 23 April and 24 May 2019 with the iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Howick Local Board area.

52.     Engagement included:

i.        a mana whenua forum presentation held at the Auckland Council Manukau Civic Building

ii.       written advice of the proposal to classify the land as recreation reserve and to grant a new joint deed of lease to SPCC and Scouts was sent to iwi groups with an interest in the Howick Local Board area.

53.     Mana Whenua representatives at the forum informed council staff they had reservations regarding the granting of leases over a large area of reserve meant for public use and preferred a license to occupy as opposed to a community lease.

54.     Council staff advised there is no practical difference between the limitations on use imposed by a community lease in comparison to a license to occupy, however, a license to occupy is normally granted when there are no fixed assets on the land. As there are buildings and improvements on this land the leasing guidelines state that a lease is more appropriate.

55.     Council staff do not recommend that the proposed lease area be reduced as the buildings and improvements on the land require maintenance. If areas surrounding the buildings are not included, maintenance obligations cannot be undertaken without encroachments outside the lease area. 

56.     The only exclusive use the two groups will enjoy will be over their own buildings and improvements, the remainder of the leased area will remain available for public use and general access. This will be included in the lease as a condition and the local board is supportive of this.

57.     The above meets the requirements of Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 that council consult with iwi.

58.     No objection to either proposal was received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

59.     Once the classification approval is resolved by the board, staff will arrange for publication of notice in the Gazette confirming the classification. The cost of this will be borne by Community Facilities.

60.     Public notification costs of the intention to grant a new community lease will also be borne by Community Facilities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     Should the Howick Local Board resolve not to grant the SPCC and Scouts a new community lease, this decision may materially affect the group’s ability to undertake their core activities.

62.     Provided there are no objections to the public notification to classify the land and grant a new ground lease, council staff advise that the benefits to the community as recommended outweigh any risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     Subject to the local board approval to grant a new community lease to SPCC and Scouts, council staff undertake the statutory processes to approve the classification and will work with the groups to formalise the lease documents.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan and Lease Area

141

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Setefano - Community Facilities Graduate

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


 


 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/09297

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Howick Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       The governance forward work calendar for the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

2.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Howick Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

147

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 

Workshop Records

File No.: CP2019/09298

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report attaches the workshop records taken for the period stated below.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1 workshop records shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed, or decisions reached but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.  This report attaches the workshop records for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for workshops held on 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21 and 28 May 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 2 May 2019

151

b

Workshop record 7 May 2019

153

c

Workshop record 9 May 2019

155

d

Workshop record 14 May 2019

157

e

Workshop record 16 May 2019

159

f

Workshop record 21 May 2019

161

g

Workshop record 28 May 2019

163

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 June 2019