I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 19 June 2019

4.00pm

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Ann Hartley, JP

 

 

Kay McIntyre, QSM

 

 

Anne-Elise Smithson

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

Lindsay Waugh

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda  Short

Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

 

13 June 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: jacinda.short@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        17 Lauderdale Road Community Facility - Approval of concept design for redevelopment                                                                                                                                         7

12        Tuff Crater Perimeter Track Renewal                                                                       27

13        Kaipātiki Cycle Repair Stations                                                                                 47

14        Auckland Transport Monthly Update                                                                        57

15        Request for alcohol ban extension at Downing Street Reserve                            65

16        Awataha Northcote Public Art Plan                                                                        101

17        Boundary adjustment by way of land exchange pursuant to S15 Reserves Act 1977: 27-31 Greenslade Crescent, 140 Lake Road and 1R Greenslade Crescent, Northcote 151

18        New community lease to Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated at Kaka Street Reserve, R 20 Kaka Street, Northcote                                                                     165

19        Kaipātiki Local Board Local Economic Development Work Programme 2019/2020    175

20        Kaipātiki Local Board Plans and Places Work Programme 2019/2020               181

21        Kaipātiki Local Board Local Environment Work Programme 2019/2020            187

22        Kaipātiki Local Board Community Services Work Programme 2019/2020         199

23        Kaipātiki Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme 2019 - 2022      219

24        Changes to Kaipātiki Local Board standing orders                                              243

25        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report                                                         249

26        Members' Reports                                                                                                     251

27        Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update   253

28        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - May 2019                                       255

29        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     267  

30        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

31        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               273

C1       Service property optimisation - Bartley Street Toilets                                         273  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

                  i)        A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

                 ii)        A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 5 June 2019, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.


 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

17 Lauderdale Road Community Facility - Approval of concept design for redevelopment

File No.: CP2019/10575

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the concept plan for the rebuild of the community facility at 17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale, currently known as the Kaipātiki Project Environment Centre.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report describes the preliminary design for the rebuild of the community facility at 17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale currently known as the Kaipātiki Project Environment Centre (the  Centre).The project involves the demolition of the existing building and ancillary structures and the replacement with a new purpose-built community building.

3.       The site has been leased to the Kaipātiki Environmental Trust since 2004. This new building will continue to be leased by the trust and their input and requirements have informed the design. Throughout the design process flexibly and adaptability have been included to enable use by other tenants in the future if required.

4.       The design has been produced in collaboration with a design team, including internal and external stakeholders, specialist consultants, Iwi and Auckland Council representatives from Community Facilities.

5.       The design has developed in accordance with the draft Auckland Council green building framework. This framework supports sustainable development aligned with council and the Kaipātiki Local Board's outcomes to ‘protect our environment’, ‘provide high quality facilities’, ‘well managed services which meet community needs’, ‘active and healthy people’, and ‘identifying Kaipātiki as their kāinga (home)’.

6.       The estimated cost to deliver the building is $1,710,000. Budget provision for this cost is included in the proposed Kaipātiki Local Board work programme for the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the concept plan for the rebuild of the community facility at 17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale, currently known as the Kaipātiki Project Environment Centre as outlined in the design documentation (provided as Attachment A to this agenda report) and request staff progress the project through to construction.

b)      approve that the Green Building Framework is applied for the rebuild of the community facility at 17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale.

c)      note that the budget of $1,710,000 required to rebuild the community facility at 17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale is allocated from the following funding sources:

i)        $1,517,000.00 of Asset Based Services Budget is proposed to be allocated from the Kaipātiki Community Facilities renewals work programme for the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years to cover the renewal to today’s building code.

ii)       $200,000 of Locally Driven Initiatives capital budget that was allocated in the 2018/2019 financial year work programme item “Kaipātiki Project at Lauderdale Road Birkdale – renew/rebuild facility” for the enhancement of the proposed concept design to the green building framework.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       In 2017 the Kaipātiki Local Board resolved to rebuild the Centre at 17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale (resolution number KT/2017/147).

8.       A project steering group was formed to begin the concept design process. The project steering group included Kaipātiki Project manager and staff, architects, iwi representative and council staff.

9.       The project steering group set up workshops with Kaipātiki Project representatives and put together the primary purpose for the redevelopment of the facility:

Provide a community hub that can host a range of activities and groups in a functional, adaptive, and socially and ecologically regenerative facility.

10.     The benefits by fulfilling the primary purposes identified are:

·        Improving community well-being

·        Foster a proud, resilient and engaged community network of friends and partnerships

·        Connect people to nature through an asset providing inspiration, learning and a regenerative impact on the natural environment for generations to come.

11.     In June 2018, the local board was presented a project update which provided three options for the rebuild if the facility:

A.      Like for like

B.      To today’s standard

C.      To today’s standard + additional tenant.

12.     The concept design has been progressed based on Option C to provide housing for Kaipātiki Project and additional occupier to the facility. Since the presentation in June 2018 the number of full-time employment (FTE) at Kaipātiki Project has increased from four FTE to seven FTE.

13.     During the early design process possible additional occupants Pest Free Kaipātiki have been included in design discussions. During the process Pest Free Kaipātiki has determined that the facility at 17 Lauderdale Road would not be appropriate for their operation at this time.

14.     The developed concept plans were presented to the Kaipātiki Local Board during the Community Facilities workshop on 27 March 2019.

Green Building Framework

15.     Community Facilities builds, maintains, and renews community assets both buildings and open spaces across the Auckland region. As a provider of asset management solutions for Auckland Council, Community Facilities' aim is to create great places that Aucklanders love.

16.     Auckland Council and Community Facilities are tasked with reducing the green-house gas emissions and environmental impact and with creating high quality facilities by the Auckland Plan, supporting strategic plans such as the Low Carbon Strategic Action Plan, and by Local Board plans and outcomes.

17.     For the renewal of the community facility at 17 Lauderdale Road, environmental and social considerations have been addressed through an integrative design process and the application of the draft Auckland Council green buildings framework. The application of this framework aims to create a regenerative facility, where environmental, social and cultural outcomes are enhanced, where greater value is generated over and above that which would be delivered through a new facility built to today's building code.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The redevelopment of the community facility at 17 Lauderdale Road followed an integrative design process. This involved working together with a variety of stakeholders early in the project to develop purpose, design principles, and goals. This process involved personal from the community, Iwi, council, professional services, and had the benefit of generating and maintaining strong alignment between parties throughout the design process.

19.       The concept design (provided as Attachment A to this report) has been developed to adhere the design principles, in cooperation with stakeholders and local board outcomes, these are:

·        Relating to the landscape and working to the landscape design principles and axis

·        Oriented to the climatic conditions, movements of the sun and hours of use

·        Provide for current tenant’s particular requirements and use, but allow for other community uses and future adaption

·        Natural light and ventilation to all habitable spaces

·        Utilising verandahs for circulation

·        Collaborative workspaces, with provision for subdivision and potential for future adaption to community room use

·        Enable – but don’t privilege – vehicle movements

20.     The layout of the proposed redevelopment of the Centre includes the following key features:

·        Total Size: 138.4 m² (excluding deck)

·        Office: 6 to 8 FTE

·        Meeting room: 2 FTE

·        Kitchenette dual sided: access from office/ foyer and workroom

·        Toilet access internal and external

·        Workroom with operable wall partition:

o   Versatile use to provide additional office space as needed, but still allow for medium to large groups.

o   Lockable space – sperate form office

o   direct entry/ exit or via lobby

o   Toilets accessible via deck

o   Connectivity to deck and accessible route

o   Flexibility to hire out workroom separate

21.     The concept design for the redevelopment provides maximum versatility for Kaipātiki Project or any other future users. It is developed to utilise the existing site to its maximum.

22.     The design presented is the outcome of the concept design process as shown in below artist impression.


 

Image 1: Artist Impression

Image 2: Artist Impression

 


 

23.     The proposed floor plan of the facility is illustrated in image 3.

Image 3: Proposed floor plan

 

24.     To meet our project goal of delivering a regenerative facility, a facility which improves environmental and social outcomes, the project team choose to apply a green building framework to the design. The current concept has applied the draft Auckland Council green building framework. The objective of this framework is to ensure that Auckland Council supports the delivery of significant and sustainable positive impacts on social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being.

Green buildings and Kaipātiki Project Environment Centre

25.     Green buildings are designed to reduce or eliminate their impact on our environments and to enhance social outcomes. Green buildings use resources more efficiently (e.g. materials, energy, water and waste) and are more resilient to the external changes that may affect them, from climate-related weather effects to energy and/or water supply interruption. 

26.     The draft Auckland Council green building framework sets an actionable pathway to deliver sustainable development goals aligned with council and the Kaipātiki Local Board's outcomes to ‘protect our environment’, ‘provide high quality facilities’, ‘well managed services which meet community needs’, ‘active and healthy people’, and ‘identifying Kaipātiki as their kāinga (home)’.

27.     Specifically, these goals have been addressed through the following areas of the draft green building framework:

Community and place

·    Universal design, designing for all people regardless of age, and ability

·    Involving a range of stakeholders in the design process.

o   Engaging with the community,

o   Iwi engagement and Te Ao Maori design,

 

Energy

·    Reducing energy demand on-site.

·    Utilising zero carbon energy sources.

 

Health

·    Creating healthy buildings for occupants and visitors through the use of low impact materials, adhesives and finishes (timber treatment, glues, paints, etc.).

·    Promoting daylight access and a connection to nature.

 

Management

 

·    Utilising an integrative design process, involving a range of stakeholders.

·    Implementing a soft landings framework to ensure a smooth transition from project to operations.

·    Utilising sustainable procurement for added social and environmental benefit.

 

Materials

·    Reducing embodied carbon footprint in materials.

·    Utilising sustainable materials.

·    Minimising waste to landfill during construction and demolition.

·    Designing the building for deconstruction at the end of its life.

 

Water

·    Reducing water use within the building.

·    Managing on-site stormwater in parallel with site ecology through water sensitive design.

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The development of the proposed concept plan follows on from the investigation of facility renewal options completed between Community Services and Community Facility departments in 2017.

29.     Staff from the Infrastructure and Environmental Services department, who administer funding for the operations of the centre, have been provided with the opportunity to input into the development of the concept plan. They support the proposed concept plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The Local Board views and outcomes have been integrated into the design process of the redevelopment by:

·        Our people identify Kaipātiki as their kāinga (home).

o   The facility has been designed with community and iwi input, and has taken design inspiration from its unique environment, adjacent to the Eskdale Reserve and stream.

·        Our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy

o   The facility has been designed to protect its environment by:

§ minimising greenhouse gas emissions,

§ drawing on fewer resources,

§ Managing site stormwater in parallel with site ecology.

 

·        Our people are active and healthy.

o   The facility makes use of healthier materials and options for treatment (e.g. timber), and connects tenants and visitors with natural light and nature.

·        Our community facilities and infrastructure are high quality and well managed, and Services are well managed and meet community needs.

o   The facility has been designed to meet the community's needs through a new fit-for-purpose facility, whilst creating a healthy environment for all to work in and visit.

31.     The Kaipātiki Environmental Trust are currently housed in alternative accommodation as the current facility is in a condition that requires a high level of maintenance and is not fit for purpose for the current operations of the trust.

32.     The trust has been highly involved in the discussion around the design process and have informed its use and future use.

33.     The design principles reflect the use needs of the trust and will enable greater future use. The design of the new facility will enable the trust to run workshops and facilitate greater community involvement.

34.     The new facility will enable all staff to operate from 17 Lauderdale Road and enable them to run community events and workshops at the same time.

35.     The trust is planning to apply for grant funding for further development of the site and additional enhancements. The grant application will be submitted after resource consent application for the new facility has been lodged.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Providing a fit for purpose environmental centre will enable Māori to more easily participate and partner in ecological restoration activities and educational programmes within the Kaipātiki local board area, enabling better outcomes for Māori.

37.     Mana Whenua have been part of the concept development workshops and have provided input and feedback to the development of the concept design.

38.     Additional input is being sought from mana whenua during the developed design phase.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     To deliver a community facility which meets the requirements outlined the costs have been estimated at $1,710,000.00.

40.     For a building constructed to today’s building code, estimated costs are $1,477,000.00.

41.     There is a premium of $240,000 to deliver the proposed concept design to the green building framework.

42.     The differences between a standard (building code) and a green building represent action in energy, health, materials choices, water use, waste minimisation, and procurement. A building built to the current building code will deliver improved services for the Local Board and tenants, however, will not deliver the same level of value as the green design, and will not met the environmental and social goals of Auckland Council, the Local Board, the design team, and future occupants of the building. The green framework delivers the same base level of service, but combines delivery of strategic outcomes, and greater value for the community.

43.     The project to rebuild has current renewals funding allocation of $965,000.00 and consideration of additional funding allocation of Local Driven Initiatives capital expenditure of $200,000.00 for the enhancement of the building (resolution number KT/2017/147).

44.     Additional renewals funding is required to meet the estimated costs of the redevelopment of

a)    $552,000.00 to redevelop under the green building framework

b)    $312,000.00 to redevelop under today’s building code.

45.     The 2019-2022 Community Facilities renewals work programme is proposing adequate funding allocation for the rebuild of the facility under the green building framework.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     The green building design contributes towards the environmental and social goals of Auckland Council, the Local Board, the design team, and identified future occupants of the building. A business as usual approach to building design leaves these goals largely unaddressed. Proceeding with the base building concept design is a potential reputational risk for the local board, as such a decision is not aligned with publicly stated organisation and local board priorities.

47.     Without applying the green building framework, it will leave environmental and social goals largely unaddressed and will not result in the minimisation of harm or improvement to Auckland’s environment. By not addressing these goals in this redevelopment there is risk to their future application if such design interventions are not applied consistently.

48.     With the current building not fit for purpose for staff to operate from, the redevelopment of the Centre is essential.

49.     Resource consent is required, and the preparation and processing of this consent may have an impact on the time frame for construction.

50.     Without the approval of the concept design, the redevelopment cannot proceed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The table below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframe for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step. Unforeseen delays in the procurement, the resource consent process, planting season or contractor availability have the potential to delay completion of the project beyond the identified timeframe.

Developed Design

July to November 2019

Site investigation, resource consent application

(It is assumed that the consent application will be processed as a non-notified application.)

July to November 2019

Detailed Design

November 2019 to February 2020

Procure physical works contractor

February to April 2020

Physical works

May to March 2021

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Preliminary Design Report

17

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sandra May - Property Coordinator

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Tuff Crater Perimeter Track Renewal

File No.: CP2019/08873

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board on the draft concept plan design for the Tuff Crater perimeter track and the staged delivery approach of the physical works with Stage 1 being delivered per the available budget.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Tuff Crater perimeter track is a mixed-surfaced pathway currently used for recreational walking and cycling. The current condition of this asset has deteriorated and is due for renewal. 

3.       The track has been identified as a priority connection for the community under the Kaipātiki Network Connection Plan, and is supported by the users, stakeholder groups, iwi, and the local board. 

4.       The cost estimate for the scope of works is $1.8 million. This exceeds the currently available budget of $700,000.

5.       Staff recommend completing the design and obtaining resource consent for the full perimeter track and undertaking physical works in stages as available budget allows.

6.       The estimated cost of the proposed Stage 1 physical works can be met within the current budget. Stage 1 includes the St Peters Street overlook and southwest boardwalk.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the Tuff Crater perimeter track concept plan design dated May 2019 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report), for the renewal of the full Tuff Crater perimeter track and the advancement to progress into consent.

b)      approve the staged approach for physical delivery of the Tuff Crater perimeter track upgrade with construction of Stage 1 - St Peters Street overlook and southwest boardwalk in financial year 2019/2020.   

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Tuff Crater perimeter track is an existing 3.2-kilometre-long gravel and boardwalk recreational pathway from Heath Reserve to The Warehouse Way, Northcote.  It is comprised of a lookout structure at St Peters Street with a meandering coastal path through low-lying mangroves and mixed forest types. 

8.       This pathway connection was identified as a priority development in the 2016 Kaipātiki Connections Network Plan (KCNP) (resolution number KT/2016/120). The outlined objective was to better accommodate walking and cycling users. 

9.       Funding for this upgrade was confirmed by the Kaipātiki Local Board in the 2017/2018 work programme, and again carried forward in the 2018/2019 work programme (resolution number KT/2018/142). 

10.     The St Peters overlook was redesigned in 2016 and received consent.  However, the physical delivery was suspended, and the design was then included into the perimeter track upgrade project.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     A rough order of costs for the full scope of works was initially discussed at an August 2018 local board workshop, and again at a February 2019 workshop.  As the estimate demonstrated a budget shortfall, several options were reviewed on how to proceed. The local board indicated in principle support during the February 2019 workshop for completing the design and acquiring consent for the full perimeter track, while the delivery of the upgrade would be divided into stages.

12.     The stages for delivery were based on the existing conditions of the site. The overlook and southern boardwalk is currently showing the most deterioration and should be addressed as a priority. The remaining track is experiencing mild erosion from runoff and sloughing at the track edges, and whilst requiring attention, is considered a lower priority.

13.     The SeaPath pedestrian transportation project is currently in the business case phase and will likely be a prolonged process.  As the execution of this network connection will take several more years to advance, staff consider the connections to the SeaPath to be the lowest priority. 

14.     Staff recommend that acquiring a 10-year consent, and not a standard 5-year consent, would be best to facilitate the extended time to deliver the upgrade. This will allow more time to secure the necessary budget and complete the works.

15.     The St Peters Street overlook was redesigned and consented in 2016.  This design featured a combined staircase with adjacent seating linking the street-level cul-de-sac to the lower boardwalk. It was not delivered due to budget constraints, and later incorporated into the perimeter track project.

16.     The 2016 consented design has since been reviewed, with the intent to align the route above the coastal inundation zone and reduce the amount of boardwalk construction and vegetation clearance required. 

17.     An alternative overlook design was prepared and presented to the local board in April 2019.  This alternative design features no stairs, a straight-through alignment, and a minimised limit of disturbance. The local board, Forest and Bird, and iwi have expressed support for this alternative design.

18.     The preferred design is included in Attachment A, and the proposed staging of physical works is as follows:   

·    Stage 1 – St Peters Street overlook and southwest boardwalk;

·    Stage 2 – Boardwalk and gravel path upgrades, with bank stabilisation (north and south);

·    Stage 3 – Onepoto Domain/Exmouth Connection; and

·    Stage 4 – SeaPath connections.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Council’s Parks and Places Specialist and Maintenance Delivery Coordinator have been consulted and are supportive of the proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     A budget shortfall was initially identified at the August 2018 workshop, and the local board requested that the plans be further reviewed with Forest and Bird for input to assist in reducing project costs. Auckland Council staff worked extensively with the Forest and Bird volunteers to best address the extents of boardwalk, a potential revised overlook design, and to capture detailed concerns. 

21.     Options that addressed the budget shortfall were discussed at the February 2019 workshop, and the local board expressed support in principle for completing the full perimeter track design and multi-stage delivery. This option was reviewed with Forest and Bird and they expressed support as well.  

22.     Staff presented the revised overlook option at the April 2019 workshop.  The local board expressed support for the simplified platform, interpretive panel, new park sign, and elimination of steps.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The site contains recorded archaeological sites and is recognised as an outstanding natural feature due to being an extinct volcanic crater.  

24.     Engagement with mana whenua has occurred on several occasions, both before and after the concept plans were developed. The following hui and site visits have been held:

·      North-West Mana Whenua forum - October 2017;

·      Site walk over - November 2017;

·      Hui - March 2018; and

·      Second site walk - April 2019. 

25.     Feedback from Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Maru, Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngaati Whanaunga, and Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki included concerns with the exposed midden site along the track, the natural spring around Kowhai Point, general protection of water quality, and the encouragement of native plant materials.  

26.     The revised concept plans have addressed these concerns in the design by modifying the track materials, restricting the extents of disturbance, and removing man-made materials at key points. The engaged iwi expressed support for these solutions during the April 2019 site walk.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     A high level indicative cost estimate prepared in February 2019 showed a total track upgrade cost of $1.8 million. The available funding for this work is $700,000, leaving a shortfall of $1.1 million. 

28.     A range of financial strategies were prepared and discussed at the February 2019 workshop.  The local board supported the option of proceeding with dividing the physical construction efforts into stages, with the first stage using the available budget.

29.     Future stages of physical works will be delivered as and when budget is allocated to this project.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The risk of future maintenance has been mitigated by reducing the quantity of boardwalk and therefore reducing the amount of upkeep required of this site in the future.

31.     Sea level rise is a risk to this track as the alignment has portions in the tidal inundation zone.   This risk to the longevity of the asset has been mitigated by restricting the quantity of boardwalk to only the lowest lying areas and relocating the SeaPath connection away from the coastline. 

32.     The risk of the budget shortfall has been mitigated by pursuing a 10-year consent and phasing the physical works.  This will allow a longer period of time to allocate funding without the expense of reacquiring consent.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     A 10-year resource consent will be progressed based on the upgrade of the complete perimeter track and alternative overlook design. 

34.     Once consent is granted, detailed design will be completed and procurement for a contractor to deliver the physical works of Stage 1 will be initiated.

35.     Collaboration with iwi on the interpretive sign content and park name will be undertaken as the project progresses.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Tuff Crater Concept Plans

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kimberley Graham - Growth Development Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Cycle Repair Stations

File No.: CP2019/08874

 

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board on the design and location of four cycle repair stations with the allocation of additional funding. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Local Board has been actively supporting cycling, and cycling opportunities, within the local board area through various non-motorised transportation efforts. 

3.       The local board has indicated a desire to further support both recreational and commuter cycling in the community with the delivery of cycle repair stations at select sites. 

4.       The intention is to support active and healthy lifestyles within the community, and boost cycling infrastructure. 

5.       The local board initially approved the installation of five cycle repair stations in the Kaipātiki area. Based on further investigation and consultation with stakeholders, it is now proposed that only four stations are installed at four different sites.

6.       The chosen locations are: Marlborough Park, Onepoto Domain, Shepherds Park, and Birkenhead War Memorial Park.

7.       Quotes have been received by contractors to purchase and install the stations, and additional budget of $14,100 is required to complete the project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the design and location of four cycle repair stations at Marlborough Park, Onepoto Domain, Shepherds Park, and Birkenhead War Memorial Park, as shown in Attachment A to the agenda report.

b)      approve additional funding of $14,100 from the Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund to cover costs associated with the installation of four cycle repair stations as shown in Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Kaipātiki Local Board passed resolution KT/2017/78 in June 2017, which approved funding of $12,500 from the Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) to be used for the purchase and installation of five cycle repair stations at the following locations:

a)    Onepoto Domain, in the vicinity of the learn to ride track;

b)    Birkenhead War Memorial Reserve, at the pump track;

c)    Shepherd’s Park, in the vicinity of the playground and community house;

d)    Birkenhead Library; and

e)    Marlborough Park.

9.       The specific locations were investigated by staff and designed according to best practices of health and safety, security, and suitability.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The suggested location of the proposed station within Marlborough Park is to the north of the existing club-house building. This site is advantageous due to the overhead lighting from the building, the existing concrete pad, and close visual cue to users.

11.     The site selected within Shepherds Park is between the existing playground and bike path.  The site serves both user groups and will likely be well-used.

12.     The proposed location for a cycle repair station within Onepoto Domain is to the west of the existing bicycle racks. The site is immediately adjacent to a learn-to-ride loop and would serve those users. Installing a station in this park requires a resource consent.

13.     The southern portion of the pump track is the suggested location within Birkenhead War Memorial Park. This site offers immediate access to the pump track users and should be further utilised once the service road is upgraded to a shared path. However, this site is the most challenging due to the close proximity of a buried service line, existing bollards, existing signage, restricted access, and steep terrain. 

14.     Birkenhead Library was reviewed and found to not have a suitable location for a station.  The style of the plaza and historic monument is cohesive and represents an established public space. Council staff do not support the installation of a repair station at this location.

15.     Current cycle repair stations in Orewa have been heavily vandalised. These models featured cable connections to the repair tools which were cut and thus rendered the station inoperable.  Due to this vandalism, the supplier has discontinued the manufacturing of this model and now distributes chained tool sets. This revised attachment method is seen to be an appropriate deterrent to future damage but remains untested.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Council maintenance personnel have been consulted and are supportive of the revised model featuring chain connections and well-lit locations.   

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     All sites were reviewed with representatives of Bike Auckland, who supported three of the four sites recommended in this report, namely Marlborough Park, Shepherds Park, and Onepoto Domain. Bike Auckland considered these sites to be well-used by existing cyclists, relatively stable areas in terms of development plans, and not likely to be detrimentally affected by the new repair stations.

18.     Birkenhead War Memorial Park was not supported by Bike Auckland based on the distance to existing commuters and could be underutilised. 

19.     The Birkenhead Library was also not supported by Bike Auckland, as the style of the station would conflict with the aesthetics of an award-winning building and art installations. 

20.     The local board expressed support for four sites, with the exclusion of the Birkenhead Library, during the workshop on 13 June 2018, and again on 25 March 2019. The local board felt that the library site was an exceptional public space and could forego the addition of a cycle repair station.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Engagement with mana whenua was initiated only for the Onepoto Domain site, as this volcanic site is recognised as an outstanding landscape feature. Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara expressed support for the addition of the cycle repair station. There have been no further comments received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The total budget required to install four cycle repair stations is $26,600, which is based on a quote received by a contractor. The original budget allocation was based on limited information and on a design that would not have been suitable from a maintenance perspective.

23.     A sum of $12,500 has already been allocated to this project. The procurement and installation require an additional funding allocation of $14,100. This budget fits the criteria and can be funded through the Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund as advised by the Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Manager.

24.     The local board acknowledged this budget shortfall at the workshop held on 25 March 2019, and expressed indicative support for providing additional funding.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The expected risks include vandalism and damage resulting in a dysfunctional asset.

26.     To mitigate this, several measures have been implemented including placing the stations near overhead lighting, the use of chains to attach the tools, and the incorporation of a call centre sign so that any damage to the asset can be reported promptly. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Following approval procurement and installation of the stations at Marlborough Park, Shepherds Park, and Birkenhead War Memorial Park will proceed.

28.     Preparation and submission of the necessary resource consent application for the station at Onepoto Domain will also commence, with installation of the station following, and subject to, a consent being granted.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Kaipatiki cycle repair stations concept plans

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kimberley Graham - Growth Development Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update

File No.: CP2019/02158

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Auckland Transport Monthly Update Kaipātiki Local Board June 2019 report is attached.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Transport Monthly Update Kaipātiki Local Board June 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Auckland Transport Monthly Update June 2019

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Request for alcohol ban extension at Downing Street Reserve

File No.: CP2019/09918

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a decision on whether to extend the existing Downing Street Reserve night-time alcohol ban to 24 hours, seven days a week.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To enable a decision on whether to extend the existing Downing Street Reserve night-time alcohol ban to 24 hours, seven days a week, staff have assessed the request against legislative criteria. There are two decision-making options:

·     option one: Status quo - no extension to the existing night-time alcohol ban (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report); or

·     option two: Extension - extend the existing night-time alcohol ban to 24 hours, seven days a week.

3.       Staff recommend option one: Status quo. This approach recognises that the evidence does not meet legislative criteria of a high level of crime or disorder caused or made worse by alcohol consumption at the reserve during the day.

4.       If the staff recommendation is adopted, there is a risk that council is perceived to be unresponsive to day-time disorder incidents on the reserve. This risk can be mitigated by clearly stating the reasons for its decision. The local board may also wish to consider requesting a Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) assessment which may provide alternative solutions.

5.       Staff will notify the requester of the local board decision.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)     decline the request to extend the existing Downing Street Reserve night-time alcohol ban to 24 hours, seven days a week, noting that:

i)     the request does not meet Local Government Act 2002 criteria that requires evidence of a high level of crime or disorder caused or made worse by alcohol consumption in the reserve during the day;

ii)    the existing night-time alcohol ban will continue to apply; and

iii)    the New Zealand Police have powers to address crime or disorderly conduct under the Summary Offences Act 1981 and Crimes Act 1961 whether or not alcohol is involved.


 

Horopaki

Context

A request has been made to extend the night-time ban at Downing Street Reserve

6.       On 2 November 2018, a request was received to extend the existing night-time alcohol ban on Downing Street Reserve, Glenfield, to 24 hours, seven days a week (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

7.       The request refers to two areas of the reserve where issues are occurring. These areas are to the south of Downing Street along the southern edge of the reserve where there is seating, and at the southeast corner where there is a pergola.

8.       The existing night-time alcohol ban on Downing Street Reserve, Glenfield, applies from 10pm to 7am during daylight saving and 7pm to 7am outside of daylight saving (refer Attachment B to the agenda report).

Alcohol bans prohibit alcohol, are adopted by local boards and enforced by the police

9.       Alcohol bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places during specified times.

10.     The Kaipātiki Local Board has authority to adopt alcohol bans in its local board area under the Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 (resolution number GB/2014/121).

11.     A local board decision to adopt an alcohol ban must meet Local Government Act 2002 and Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 criteria (Table 1 and Attachment C).

12.     Police enforce alcohol bans using powers of search, seizure, arrest and $250 infringement fines. Police also have powers to address crime or disorderly conduct under the Summary Offences Act 1981 and Crimes Act 1961, whether or not alcohol is involved.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The evidence provided includes three disorder offences that are documented as being alcohol-related during the day over a 12-month period. Other evidence of police calls for service, damage, alcohol-related litter and people smoking cannabis are either not documented as being related to the consumption of alcohol. Incidences cannot be proven to have occurred during the day or not resulted in disorder.

14.     The requester was given an opportunity to provide further evidence, including any community support for the request. No further evidence has been able to be provided, which is due to constraints on the requester’s time and members of the community not wishing to be involved.

15.     Staff have assessed the information provided in the request against the legislative and bylaw criteria in Attachment C to the agenda report. Table 1 below provides a summary of this assessment:

Table 1: Summary assessment of alcohol ban request against statutory and bylaw criteria

Criteria

Staff assessment

Met/Not met

Is there evidence of a high level of crime or disorder caused or made worse by alcohol consumed there?

Summary of assessment against criteria

·    request does not provide evidence of crime at the location - it is limited to calls for service

·    evidence of disorder caused or made worse by alcohol at the reserve during the day limited to three drunk custody/detox incidents over a five-and-a-half-month period.

Overall assessment

·     evidence does not meet ‘high level’ legislative criteria required.

 

û

Criteria not met

Is the request appropriate in light of the evidence?

Summary of assessment against criteria

·    unclear from evidence whether current night-time ban is effective and whether extending the ban would reduce incidents

·    further information about time and issues with people drinking on the reserve, approach to enforcement of the current night-time ban, future enforcement Crime Prevention through Environment Design (CPTED) assessment needed

Overall assessment

·    request is not appropriate in light of the evidence provided.

 

û

Criteria not met

Is the request proportionate in light of the evidence?

Summary of assessment against criteria

·     to assess this criterion, the evidence must first indicate a high level of crime or disorder (see criteria 1 above).

Overall assessment

·     insufficient evidence to justify extending existing night-time ban.

û

Criteria not met

Is the request a justifiable and reasonable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms?

Summary of assessment against criteria

·      Police support the request and in general community supportive of alcohol bans, however

·      evidence does not meet ‘high level’ legislative criteria required

·      insufficient information to determine benefits of extending the current ban to day-time hours and whether it will be effective or more effective than alternative solutions.

Overall assessment

·    request does not provide enough evidence or information to be a justifiable and reasonable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms to drink responsibly on the reserve.

û

Criteria not met

 

16.     Staff have identified that the status quo responds to the assessment. The local board also has the option to extend the current alcohol ban. The two options are compared in Table 2 below:

·     option one: Status quo - no extension to the existing night-time alcohol ban (refer Attachment B); or

·     option two: Extension - extend the existing night-time alcohol ban to 24 hours, seven days a week.

Table 2: Comparative assessment of options to alcohol ban request

 

Option one: No extension to existing night-time alcohol ban (Recommended)

Option two: Extend existing night-time ban to 24 hours, seven days a week

Pros

Complies with legislative criteria.

No further limitations on people’s rights and freedoms to responsibly consume alcohol on the reserve.

Extension of alcohol ban supported by requester and Police.

Cons

Low level of alcohol related disorder during the day-time on the reserve may continue to occur.

Unclear from the information provided whether voluntary compliance with signage or Police enforcement would reduce the low level of day-time alcohol-related disorder on the reserve and/or displace incidents to other nearby public places.

Implementation costs to replace signage.

Risks

Reputational risk that council is not being responsive to day-time disorder incidents on the reserve.

Mitigation

Clearly state reasons for decision.

Request a Crime Prevention through Environmental Design assessment to identify alternative solutions.

Possible legal challenge due to insufficient evidence of a high level of day-time crime or disorder caused or made worse by day-time alcohol consumption on the reserve.

Mitigation

Local board clearly states how it considers that the legislative criteria have been met.

The risk of legal challenge is considered low.

 

Staff recommend the status quo with no extension to the existing night-time alcohol ban

17.     Staff recommend option one: Status quo - no extension to the existing night-time alcohol ban (refer Attachment B to the agenda report). This approach recognises that the evidence does not meet legislative criteria of a high level of crime or disorder caused or made worse by alcohol consumption at the reserve during the day.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Decisions related to the alcohol ban on Downing Street Reserve may impact the operation of council units involved in alcohol ban signage. Council units are aware of the impacts of possible changes to alcohol bans and their implementation role.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     In 2015, the Kaipātiki Local Board considered alcohol-related disorder on Downing Street Reserve and decided to retain a night-time alcohol ban (resolution number KT/2015/70). The night-time alcohol ban was first introduced in 2005 to address people drinking on the reserve at night.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Managing alcohol-related harm increases opportunities for health and wellbeing and is consistent with the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. Iwi have been widely consulted on the use of alcohol bans in the past and have to date been supportive of their use.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     There are no financial implications if the local board adopts option one: Status quo - no extension to the existing night-time alcohol ban.  If the local board adopts option two: Extension - extend the existing night-time alcohol ban (24 hours, seven days a week), there may be a minor cost for the local board associated with updating the current signage.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     There is a risk that adopting option one-Status quo may mean council is perceived to be unresponsive to incidents and damage on the reserve that occur during the day-time.

23.     This risk can be mitigated by clearly stating the reasons for its decision. The local board may also wish to consider requesting a Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) assessment which may provide alternative solutions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Staff will notify the requester of the decision. If the local board adopts option two: Extension - extend the existing night-time alcohol ban (24 hours, seven days a week), the current signage will need to be updated.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Alcohol ban request for Downing Street Reserve

71

b

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Map of existing Downing Street Reserve alcohol ban

89

c

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Assessment of alcohol ban request

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Pania Elliot - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Awataha Northcote Public Art Plan

File No.: CP2019/09604

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the Awataha Northcote Public Art Plan (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 10 July 2018, the Environment and Community Committee approved several public art plans to be undertaken by council’s Public Art team, including developing a public art plan for the Northcote area (resolution number ENV/2018/89).

3.       The plan was funded through the Arts and Culture Public Art operational budget as part of Public Art’s strategic drive to investigate investment in public art over the next ten years in areas undergoing high population growth and intensive regeneration.

4.       The purpose of the Awataha Public Art Plan (the plan) is to:

·      develop a plan for investment in public art in Northcote over the next 10 years that aligns with ongoing works in the area; 

·      create a cohesive and authentic outcome for the local board area; and

·      support the investment in public art that reflects place.

5.       The plan includes a summary of contextual findings, guidelines and recommendations for future investment in public art in Northcote.

6.       The local board is not required to provide budget for the delivery of the permanent artworks outlined in the plan.

7.       The plan recommends investment in a small number of projects that have a transformational impact and are complementary to ongoing local works.

8.       The plan recommends a phased approach to investment, which will allow timings, scale and partnerships of each opportunity to be maximized.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      endorse the Awataha Northcote Public Art Plan as outlined in Attachment A to the agenda report.

b)      note that the Kaipātiki Local Board is not required to provide budget for the delivery of the permanent artworks outlined in the plan, and that costs associated with delivery will be covered through Arts and Culture Public Art operational budgets.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       On 10 July 2018, the Environment and Community Committee approved several public art plans to be undertaken by council’s Public Art team, including developing a public art plan for the Northcote area (resolution number ENV/2018/89).

10.     The purpose of the plan is to:

·      develop a plan for investment in public art in Northcote over the next ten years that aligns with ongoing works in the area;

·      create a cohesive and authentic outcome for the local board area; and

·      support the investment in public art that reflects place.

11.     The plan was funded by the Arts and Culture Public Art operational budget as part of Public Art’s strategic drive to investigate investment in public art over the next 10 years in areas undergoing high population growth and intensive regeneration.

12.     In June 2018, a steering group made up of council and Panuku staff was established to develop the plan.

13.     Research and stakeholder engagement was carried out between June 2018 and October 2018, and the plan was drafted between November 2018 and March 2019.

14.     The plan was discussed with the local board at a workshop on 11 July 2018 and the final plan was presented at a workshop on 3 April 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The plan includes a summary of contextual findings, guidelines and recommendations for future investment in public art in Northcote.

16.     The plan outlines the following five major contextual considerations that define the opportunity for investment in Northcote over the next 10 years:

·       Intense population growth and change in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland.

·       Urban development and intensification in the Northcote township.

·       Mana whenua place significant value on the connection between people and place, and the inter-connectedness of the health of communities, land and water.

·       The Awataha Stream provides a geospatial framework and focus area for the plan. Investment in public art would be complementary to the ongoing work to repair the stream.

·       The diverse living heritage of Northcote that are unique, dynamic and authentic to this place.

17.     The plan recommends that any future investment in public art in Northcote meets the following objectives to:

·       create distinctive, high-profile signature works of public art;

·       make visible, and reinforce the specific character of Northcote; and

·       activate relationships and connections between people, nature and heritage.

18.     The plan recommends that any future investment in public art in Northcote exemplifies the following principles:

·       Authenticity: Public artworks make sense in this place and express the living heritage of Northcote.

·       Belonging: Public artworks will be distinctive identifiers and touchstones of Northcote.

·       Living connections: People and nature are not separate. Public artworks will invite connection, interaction and playful participation.

·       Exceptional: Public artworks will strive for excellence using innovative creative practices and technologies, including excellence of intent, concept, process and delivery.

·       Responding to change: Public artworks will look to the future and be designed for resilience, durability, sustainability, legacy and longevity, supporting changes in community and environment.

·       Complementary: Public art sits alongside and is complementary to existing cultural and creative activity in the area. Council’s investment in public art will build on the creative collaborations that are shaping Northcote’s public spaces and cultural futures.

19.     The plan provides a geospatial rationale for future investment in public art in Northcote that is defined by the Awataha Stream catchment area, starting at its source in the Jessie Tonar Reserve, running through the Northcote town centre, and ending at the receiving environment in Shoal Bay, Smith’s Bush. Nodes along the Awataha catchment, where the Awataha intersects with community life, are focus points for investment.

20.     The plan provides a conceptual framework for future investment in public art in Northcote that is hinged on the idea that Northcote’s township is the ‘vibrant heart’ of this living place and identity. The town centre is therefore a focus point for investment.

21.     The plan recommends investment in a small number of projects that have a transformational impact and are complementary to ongoing local works.

22.     The plan recommends a phased approach to investment, which will allow timings, scale and partnerships of each opportunity to be maximised.

23.     Table 1 below outlines the opportunities for investment in public art in Northcote, including the timeframes, that are recommended in the plan:

Table 1: Opportunities for investment in public art in Northcote

Phase

Timeframe

Name

Description

1

2019 - 2022

Temporary public art initiatives

Panuku-led, temporary public artworks to activate spaces under construction, celebrate community art and ease the strain and challenges of ongoing urban development on local residents.

2

2019 – 2024

Source of the Awataha

An integrated public art opportunity to make visible and highlight the source of the Awataha by embedding artists in the design and fabrication of the proposed regeneration of this section of the reserve.

3

2020+

Heart of Northcote

An integrated public art opportunity to enhance the heart of Northcote by embedding artists in the design and fabrication of the proposed new community facility and/or potential redevelopment of the town square.

4

2029+

Smiths Bush

An aspirational goal to design and install a public artwork of scale in Smith’s Bush at the receiving end of the Awataha where a major transport intersection will likely land, linking Northcote to the North Shore suburbs, Auckland City and Waitematā Harbour.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Council’s Public Art team collaborated with Panuku to prepare the plan. A steering group was established and included members from council and Panuku, including Director for Creative Strategy (Public Art), Project Manager (Public Art), Greenway Project Placemaker Lead (Panuku) and Placemaking Manager (Panuku).

25.     Public Art consulted on the plan with the Development Programme Office, Heathy Waters, Auckland Transport, Community Facilities, Park Services, Local Board Services advisors, and Arts, Culture and Events.

26.     Input from council groups has been acknowledged and incorporated into the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The plan can be used over the next 10 years to create a strategic collection of public art that reflects the community and natural environment and aligns with ongoing works in the local board area.

28.     The plan was discussed with the local board at a workshop on 11 July 2018 and 10 October 2018.

29.     Feedback received from the local board was incorporated into the final plan, which was presented to the local board at a workshop on 3 April 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     On 9 July 2018, 15 October 2018 and 6 May 2019, staff consulted with iwi representatives of the Panuku Project Working Group (PWG) about the plan.

31.     The plan includes the “Mana Whenua” section in Part One and the “Te Ao Māori” section in Part Two, which respond to Māori and incorporate the feedback received from iwi representatives of the PWG.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The plan was funded by Arts and Culture Public Art Operational Budget.

33.     The plan acknowledges that there is no expectation for the local board to provide budget for the delivery of the permanent artworks outlined in the plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The plan presents a strategy for public art, which is specific to the local board area over the next 10 years and identifies other development plans that it can compliment. There is a risk that unforeseen changes to development plans, the demographic of the community or the natural environment may result in the plan not being relevant at the time of implementation.

35.     This has been mitigated through the future proofing during the development of the plan and any proposed public art projects will be thoroughly scoped and will require feasibility assessments.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     The plan will be distributed to key stakeholders that have been engaged in the project.

37.     Council’s Public Art team will formally commence feasibility assessments on recommended opportunities, when appropriate.

38.     The local board can use the plan to guide public art investment in the future.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Awataha Northcote Public Art Plan

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Linda Hughes – Arts and Culture Project Manager

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Boundary adjustment by way of land exchange pursuant to S15 Reserves Act 1977: 27-31 Greenslade Crescent, 140 Lake Road and 1R Greenslade Crescent, Northcote

File No.: CP2019/10060

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the Kaipātiki Local Board’s endorsement for a land exchange between part of Greenslade Court, Greenslade Reserve and Piringa Court to enable a boundary adjustment, pursuant to S15 of Reserves Act 1977.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 25 August 2016, the Governing Body endorsed the Housing for Older People (HfOP) High Level Project Plan and the appointment of Panuku as Auckland Council’s lead agency for the redevelopment of the HfOP portfolio (resolution number GB/2016/209).

3.       Auckland Council owns three HfOP sites in Northcote, two of which known as Greenslade Court and Piringa Court and are co-located, providing a cumulative land area of 6,228m2. Adjoining the two sites is a public open space known as Greenslade Reserve. Part of Greenslade Reserve is owned by Auckland Council and part is owned by the Crown but administered by council. The portion of Greenslade Reserve that is the subject to this report is Crown owned (further called ‘Greenslade Reserve’)

4.       Greenslade Court contains 12 HfOP units that are currently vacant and not fit for purpose. Under Panuku’s Unlock HfOP programme the site is set to be redeveloped to accommodate approximately 40 new HfOP dwellings. The redevelopment of Greenslade Court would significantly increase HfOP stock in Northcote by 50% (nett of 24 units) which will provide a better utilisation of the site.

5.       The southern boundary of Greenslade Court and Piringa Court sites bordering the Greenslade Reserve is of an irregular alignment, which limits development options for the southern portion of Greenslade Court.

6.       A boundary adjustment (legally a land exchange under S15 Reserves Act 1977) is proposed to allow a common boundary realignment between the Greenslade Court, Piringa Court and Greenslade Reserve to create a more regular land shape to facilitate the proposed HfOP redevelopment at Greenslade Court. This action would yield approximately 4-5 more units and allow for a better building design, without reducing the total land area of Greenslade Reserve. A scheme plan showing the proposed exchange is attached in Attachment A.

7.       Without the boundary realignment, the proposed 40-unit development will not be achievable as it will not meet Unitary Plan requirements.

8.       The boundary adjustment would result in:

·     Greenslade Court gaining 254m2 (the site is current size is 1760m2 and the proposed new land area is 2014m2);

·     Piringa Court reducing by 254m2 (the site is currently 2989m2 and the proposed new area 2735m2); and

·     Greenslade Reserve gaining 445m2 from Piringa Court and reducing 445m2 to Greenslade and Piringa Court, with the total area proposed to remain at 1.4851 ha.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      request that the Environment and Community Committee endorse the land exchange between Auckland Council and the Crown comprising:

i)     Greenslade Court, being Allotment 408 Psh of Takapuna and Lot 4 DP 49408 held by Auckland Council in NA2A/526 gaining 254m2 land from Greenslade Reserve;

ii)    Piringa Court, being Lots 5-7 DP 66691 held by Auckland Council in NA 33A/219 reducing by approximately 445m2 to Greenslade Reserve and gaining approximately 191 m2 from Greenslade Reserve; and

iii)    Greenslade Reserve, being Lot 1 DP 54824 vested in Auckland Council, in trust (for the Crown) in NA13D/898 reducing by approximately 254m2 to Greenslade Court and 191m2 to Piringa Court and gaining approximately 445m2 from Piringa Court.

b)      note that if any objections are received, a report will be presented to the Regulatory Committee seeking appointment of an independent commissioner to assess the objections.

c)      note that if no objections are received, Panuku Development Auckland will seek approval from the Minister of Conservation to authorise the proposed exchange under section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977, which is required only for the portion of Greenslade Reserve that is subject to the exchange.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Greenslade Court comprises 1760m2 land with 12 HfOP dwellings. The existing HfOP units were built in the 1960s. The units are in poor condition and are currently vacant in anticipation of demolition and redevelopment to deliver a new apartment building with 40 new HfOP units. Panuku is negotiating a partnership agreement with an interested Crown agency to structure and progress development of the new HfOP units.

10.     The current boundary alignment is found to be limiting in achieving the optimum building positioning and redevelopment outcomes for Greenslade Court. The irregular alignment of the southern boundary, combined with the development restrictions set out in the Auckland Unitary Plan, result in a lower development yield and less desirable building configuration.

11.     Adjoining Greenslade Court is another council owned HfOP site named Piringa Court and a 2094m2 Crown owned – Auckland Council administered recreation reserve which forms part of a larger (1.4851ha) open space known as Greenslade Reserve. The proposed boundary realignment would not only benefit the Greenslade Court, but also the adjoining Greenslade Reserve and Piringa Court as it would provide the three sites with a straight boundary and enable the respective sites to be used efficiently for housing and recreation purposes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The boundary adjustment would highly benefit the Greenslade Court redevelopment project as it results in a more desirable development site. It is estimated that 4-5 additional HfOP units can be developed as a result of the proposed boundary adjustment, improving the site’s ability to provide more HfOP dwellings in an area of growing need.

13.     The boundary adjustment would also benefit Greenslade Reserve and the public for the following reasons:

·    As the current boundary is not straight, the area proposed for exchange is partially hidden from view from both Lake Road and Greenslade Crescent. The proposed land exchange would result in a straight boundary contiguous to Lake Road and Greenslade Crescent, which would improve sightlines and passive surveillance onto the northern end of Greenslade Reserve;

·    The land exchange will improve the boundary configuration for Greenslade Reserve without reducing the total land area.

14.     The area of Greenslade Reserve proposed for exchange contains two seats, two exercise machines and a section of pathway connecting Lake Road to Greenslade Crescent. Prior to commencement of the proposed construction work at Greenslade Court, it is recommended that the seating and exercise equipment be relocated to another part of the reserve. Panuku will work with the Kaipatiki Local Board as the asset owner in respect of this. The pathway will be adjusted to follow the new boundary.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     Parks and Recreation Policy is supportive of the proposed land exchange to enable the boundary adjustment as it considers the proposal would provide better open space for the public at Greenslade Reserve.

16.     Auckland Council Healthy Waters are supportive of the proposal as it aligns with their stormwater upgrade and management plan for Greenslade Reserve.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     The proposed land exchange was presented to the Kaipātiki Local Board in a workshop held on 13 February 2019. The board indicated it was supportive of the proposal. This report is intended to provide an opportunity for the board to formalise its view of the proposal.

18.     S15 of the Reserves Act 1977 gives power to the Minister, upon request from the administering body (e.g. Auckland Council), to authorise the exchange of any reserve land vested in an administering body. 

19.     The decision-making responsibility related to S15 of the Reserves Act 1977 currently rest with the governing body, and in making such decision the governing body would take into consideration the views of the relevant local board regarding the exchange.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     On 1 May 2019, 12 mana whenua iwi authorities were provided with preliminary notification of the proposed land exchange. They were invited to provide feedback on the proposed land exchange, including any site-specific issues of cultural significance that the Iwi would like council to consider in relation to the proposed exchange.

The following feedback was received:

a)    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

No feedback received for this site.

b)    Ngāti Maru

No feedback received for this site.

c)    Ngāti Paoa

No feedback received for this site.

d)    Ngāti Tamaoho

No feedback received for this site.

e)    Ngāti Tamaterā

No feedback received for this site.

f)     Ngāti Te Ata

No feedback received for this site.

g)    Ngāti Whanaunga

No feedback received for this site.

h)    Ngāti Whatua o Kaipara

No feedback received for this site.

i)     Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei

No feedback received for this site.

j)     Te Ākitai - Waiohua

No feedback received for this site.

k)    Te Kawerau ā Maki

No feedback received for this site.

l)     Te Runanga o Ngāti Whatua

No feedback received for this site.

21.     Following the local board endorsement and the Environmental and Community Committee approval to the land exchange Panuku will notify the 12 iwi groups of the Committee’s decision and inform them of the next steps Panuku will undertake to complete the exchange.  The next steps are outlined in paragraph 25-28 below.

22.     The iwi consultation for the development of Greenslade Court new HfOP complex is being dealt with separately to the land exchange proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The proposed land exchange is revenue neutral, and there would be no impact on the Long-Term Plan 2018-28.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The proposed land exchange would positively contribute to the development of the Greenslade Court HfOP complex as it would result in higher housing yield.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Once the local board resolves its views regarding the proposed land exchange, a report will be presented to the 10th July meeting of the Environment and Community Committee for decision meeting.

26.     If the Environment and Community approve the proposed land exchange Panuku will undertake public notification and further notify iwi groups having interest in the area of the proposed land exchange.

27.     If no objections are received, Panuku will seek approval from the Minister of Conservation to authorise the exchange under S15 Reserves Act 1977. This authorisation is required only for the portion of Greenslade Reserve subject to the land exchange.

28.     If objection(s) are received, Panuku will present the objections received to the Regulatory Committee and request that the committee appoint an independent commissioner to assess the objections.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Scheme plan

157

b

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Titles

159

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Adela Hadi - Technical Statutory Advisor

Authorisers

Letitia Edwards - Team Leader Portfolio Review, Panuku Development Auckland

Marian Webb - Manager Portfolio Strategy, Panuku Development Auckland

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

New community lease to Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated at Kaka Street Reserve, R 20 Kaka Street, Northcote

File No.: CP2019/09143

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated at Kaka Street Reserve, R 20 Kaka Street, Northcote.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated (Tenshin Akido) holds an operative community lease for a site at Kaka Street Reserve, R 20 Kaka Street, Northcote. The lease expired on 31 November 2017 and remains operative on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

3.       Tenshin Aikido has applied for a new community lease. The building and improvements on the site are owned by Tenshin Aikido.

4.       After assessing the group’s application, staff are satisfied that the group meets the requirements for a new lease under Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

5.       Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to Tenshin Aikido for a term of five (5) years commencing 1 July 2019 with one right of renewal for a further five (5) years.

6.       Kaka Street Reserve is part of a larger Panuku-led project. Panuku were consulted regarding the proposed new lease.

7.       The recommendations within this report align with the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes: “Our community facilities and infrastructure are high quality and well managed”, and “Services are well managed and meet community needs”.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated at Kaka Street Reserve, R 20 Kaka Street, Northcote for part of Lot 10 DP 53310 shown outlined in red and marked A on Attachment A of the agenda report on the following terms and conditions:

i)     term - five (5) years commencing 1 July 2019 with one right of renewal for a further term of five (5) years;

ii)    An early termination clause providing for the early termination of the agreement, by either party giving six (6) months’ notice; and

iii)    rent -$1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded.

b)      approve Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated’s Community Outcomes Plan (refer Attachment B to the agenda report) to be appended to the deed of lease.

c)      note that all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

Horopaki

Context

8.       This report considers the new community lease to Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated (Tenshin Akido) at Kaka Street Reserve, R 20 Kaka Street, Northcote.

9.       The Kaipātiki Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Land, Building and Lease

10.     Tenshin Aikido holds an operative lease for its building over a portion of Kaka Street Reserve, Kaka Street, Northcote. The land is legally described as Lot 10 DP 53310 and held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. The land status permits the proposed activity.

11.     In accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, if a reserve has an adopted reserve management plan and the groups activity is contemplated, public notification and iwi engagement is not required.

12.     Kaka Street Reserve, known locally as the Jessie Tonar Reserve, has no adopted reserve management plan. Therefore, in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, a new lease requires public notification and iwi engagement prior to a lease being granted.

13.     Public notification and iwi engagement have been undertaken as required by the Reserves Act 1977. No submissions opposing or supporting the proposal were received.

14.     The building is owned by Tenshin Aikido, and the group is making progress toward improving the building.  The group’s immediate maintenance plans include washing down the building, clearing the paths and replacing the mats inside the building. A long-term maintenance plan is also included in the community outcomes plan which will form part of the new occupancy agreement.

15.     The proposed ground lease is approximately 168m2 (more or less) and is more accurately represented by the area delineated in red and marked A on Attachment A of the agenda report.

Tenshin Aikido

16.     The group was first established in 1974 under the name NZ Ki Society.  The group first used the YMCA on the North Shore and have since grown and purchased their existing building from a scout group over 20 years ago.

17.     The purpose of the group is to provide training in the Japanese martial art of aikido. This incorporates developing health and wellbeing strategies.

18.     The group teaches adults and children the benefits of a healthy lifestyle through participation and commitment.

19.     The group makes the hall available for other groups to hire on a casual basis. They actively advertise the use of the building via local content websites and local advertising boards.

20.     Currently, Kaka Street Reserve is undergoing a restoration programme as part of the greenways project facilitated by Panuku.

21.     Kaipātiki Project volunteers are helping with the reserve restoration project. Tenshin Aikido have provided the Kaipātiki Project a storage room in its building for the duration of the restoration work.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the criteria for community occupancy agreements.

23.     Under the guidelines, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to re-apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy terms. As such, Tenshin Aikido is exercising this right.

24.     Due to the uncertain future state of the park, council staff recommend that the local board vary the term normally applicable to community groups who own improvements on Auckland Council land.

25.     Normally, a term of 10 years is recommended. However in this case, leasing staff recommend that a new lease be granted to Tenshin Aikido for a term of five (5) years with one right of renewal for a further term of five (5) years, as provided for in the guidelines.

26.     Local boards have discretion to vary the term of the lease as recommended above. The guidelines suggest that where a term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, the recommended term of five (5) years is provided for in the guidelines.

27.     Council staff are of the opinion that Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated meet the requirements under the guidelines to qualify for new community lease as evidenced below:

i)     it is a registered incorporated society;                   

ii)    it has complied with the terms of the operative lease;

iii)    it has a history of delivering quality services to the local community;

iv)   Tenshin Aikido has provided a copy of its financial accounts which indicate that its funds are sufficient to meets its liabilities and that it possesses adequate financial reserves; and

v)    Tenshin Aikido is managed appropriately as evidenced by its longevity and programmes offered.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The proposed lease to Tenshin Aikido was discussed with Panuku, who are working on the Unlock Northcote Project that includes work on Kaka Street Reserve.

29.     Panuku has raised no concerns regarding the lease but has expressed its preference for a shorter lease term, consisting of two five (5) year terms instead of the standard term provided for in the occupancy guidelines. Panuku also requested that an early termination clause form part of the agreement.

30.     This is substantially in line with the views expressed at the North-West Mana Whenua Forum where iwi representatives requested a lease term of five (5) years or less.

31.     The proposed lease has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of other council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     The new lease to Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated is contemplated in the Kaipātiki Community Lease Work Programme 2018/2019-line 2490, approved by resolution KT/2018/114.

33.     A memo to the local board recommending a new lease was circulated where the board expressed support for the proposed lease on 30 April 2019.

34.     Public notification commenced on 9 May and concluded on 6 June 2019. No submissions were received by the closing date of 6 June 2019. 

35.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

37.     Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Te Toa Takitini, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development projects.

38.     Iwi engagement has been undertaken and involved:

i)    a presentation at the North-West Mana Whenua Forum held at Orewa Service Centre on 5 March 2019; and

ii)   formal, written engagement commenced on 1 May 2019 and concluded on 30 May 2019. Detailed information on the land and Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated’s proposed occupation was forwarded to mana whenua, inviting iwi representatives to hui and/or for a kaitiaki site visit to comment on any spiritual, cultural or environmental impact with respect to the proposal.

39.     Mana whenua expressed their preference for a shorter lease term of five (5) years or less.

40.     No objections were raised and there were no requests for hui or kaitiaki site visits received from any of the iwi groups who responded.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     There are no cost implications to the local board approving a new lease to Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     Should the Kaipātiki Local Board resolve not to grant a renewal of the community lease to Tenshin Aikido New Zealand Incorporated, this decision will materially affect the group’s ability to undertake its core activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     Subject to the grant of a new community lease, council staff will work with the group to finalise the new lease document.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment A Site Plan Tenshin Aikido

171

b

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment B Tenshin Aikido Community Outcomes Plan

173

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Phillipa Carroll - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Local Economic Development Work Programme 2019/2020

File No.: CP2019/09439

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Kaipātiki local economic development work programme for the 2019/2020 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report introduces the proposed Kaipātiki Local Board Local Economic Development (LED) Work Programme for the 2019/2020 financial year, as set out in Attachment A. 

3.       The proposed work programme comprises local board support for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES).

4.       The total value of the Local Economic Development programme is $1,000.

5.       The board is asked to approve the 2019/2020 local economic development programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 local economic development work programme (as provided in Attachment A to the agenda report). 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report provides the local board with the proposed local economic development work programme for FY19/20.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The 2018/2019 local economic development work programme has been developed in consideration of the local board’s priorities for local economic development set out in the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017.

Young Enterprise Scheme ($1,000)

8.       Auckland Business Chamber, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services, and experience real profit and loss.

9.       Fostering youth entrepreneurship is a key requirement for developing an innovative economy and creating employment pathways for young people. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and real profit and loss. Students enrolled in YES learn key work skills and business knowledge including: business fundamentals, planning, interpersonal relations, financial, decision making, reporting, risk management and team work. YES helps create a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship amongst Auckland’s young people.

10.     The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the overall YES program, including the Kick Start days in February 2020 where we will specifically acknowledge local board support. The Kick start Start days are held in sub-regions (North, South, East, Central/West) and are the first day students get to meet the Young Enterprise team, and find out about their 2019 year, what YES is about, and what is in store for them. All schools in the local board area that have shown an interest in YES are invited. In addition, the invite is extended to those schools who have not shown an interest to enable them to make a decision as to whether to participate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development manages the administration of the funding on the Local Board’s behalf. Other departments have not raised any views on the impact of the YES scheme on their programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

12.     The proposed local economic development work programme was workshopped with the local board on 13 March 2019, and a final draft was presented at the 8 May 2019 workshop. Edits have been made to reflect the direction received at the workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

13.     While the YES programme does not specifically target Maori, Maori students at participating schools will have the same opportunity to participate in the programme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

14.     The proposed 2019/2020 local economic development work programme will see the allocation of $1,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives operating expenditure budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2019/2020.

15.     The local economic development work programme progress will be reported directly to the local board as part of the quarterly local board work programme report produced by Local Board Services.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     The Young Enterprise Scheme is of low risk as it is a national programme delivered locally by the Chamber of Commerce.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     Following approval by the local board the Local Economic Development team at Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) will begin to implement the programme from 1 July 2019. Where there is a need for further scoping of activities this will be undertaken and presented back to the local board as required.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - ATEED Work Programme 19/20

179

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

John Norman – Strategic Planning Manager – Local Economic Development, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development

Authorisers

Paul Robinson – Local Economic Growth Manager, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager, Local Board Services

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Plans and Places Work Programme 2019/2020

File No.: CP2019/09044

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme for the Kaipātiki Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Following its work programme workshop on 8 May 2019 the Kaipātiki Local Board supported the allocation of $45,000 (made up of $37,000 LDI opex and $8,000 carry-over from the completed 18/19 Sunnynook Plan) to develop “an agreed long-term local plan for Glenfield, identifying outcomes and actions that will help enhance the area as an attractive place to live and work”. Plans and Places will co-ordinate this work.

3.       The Plans and Places work programme is in Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of $45,000 (made up of $37,000 Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) opex and $8,000 carry-over from the Sunnynook Plan) for the development of the Glenfield Plan in the 2019/2020 financial year as part of the Kaipātiki Local Board work programme (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      approve the co-ordination role of Plans and Places for the development and delivery of the Glenfield Plan in 2019/2020 including identification of actions.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Preparation for the development of a draft local board work programme 2019/2020 was supported by a series of workshops with the local board. Initial workshops provided strategic direction and subsequent workshops identified priority activities to support that direction. The Board identified the need for a local plan for Glenfield.

5.       The Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 includes an outcome that “Our urban centres are vibrant”. An objective is that “Glenfield town centre is strengthened as a hub with an increased sense of place” with a key initiative being to “Plan the revitalization of Glenfield town centre.”

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The Plans and Places Department can co-ordinate this project. The study will be delivered by council staff, Auckland Transport, and consultants if required.

7.       The coordinating role undertaken by the Plans and Places Department will ensure that the study and the associated action plan are delivered in a timely manner.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       The development of the Glenfield Plan will involve collaboration with all relevant departments and CCOs across the council family, including an integrated approach for the delivery of the actions identified in the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       The project described above supports the local board’s work to achieve outcomes set out in the Local Board Plan 2017, namely the objective to strengthen the Glenfield town centre as a ‘hub with an increased sense of place’.

10.     The local board considered the draft 2019/2020 work programme at a series of workshops over April /May 2019. Discussions with Plans and Places during these workshops led to the proposal that Plans and Places will coordinate this project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

11.     It is recognised that local planning and actions are integral to the interests and activities of Māori. The delivery of the study and action plan will include engagement with Iwi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

12.     Funding of $37,000 opex has been allocated in the 2019/2020 LDI budget for this project. This is increased to a total of $45,000 with the addition of $8,000 carried over from the completed Sunnynook Plan budget of Financial Year 18/19.      

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

13.     If the proposed Plans and Places work programme is not approved at the board’s June 2019 business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed Glenfield Plan may not be able to be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

14.     Additionally, another potential risk is the level of resourcing available within council departments, council controlled organisations and stakeholders to participate in the development and finalizing of plan actions. This risk is mitigated as far as possible by seeking the relevant departments’ involvement in, and commitment to, the outcomes of the plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

15.     Subject to approval, a project programme will be reported to the board to commence development of the plan in the first quarter of next financial year 19/20.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Plans and Places Work Programme 19_20

185

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Warren Maclennan - Manager Planning - North/West

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Local Environment Work Programme 2019/2020

File No.: CP2019/09374

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Kaipātiki Local Board local environment work programme, totaling $220,000 of locally driven initiatives operational expenditure.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Local Board identified an aspiration in its 2017 local board plan to ensure ‘our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy’.

3.       To give effect to this aspiration, staff developed five options for projects for the board to consider supporting in the 2019/2020 financial year (see the options analysis in Attachment A of this agenda report).

4.       The board provided feedback to council staff regarding which of these projects it would like to fund at its 13 March 2019, 27 March 2019, and 8 May 2019 workshops. The board requested that one project proposal be declined (Streamside awareness) for reasons outlined in this report, and four projects be funded. The projects that the board supported were as follows:

·        New project: Water quality monitoring programme - $30,000

·        Industrial Pollution Prevention Wairau Valley - phase two - $30,000

·        Kaipātiki Project environmental programmes - $45,000

·        Pest Free Kaipātiki Strategy implementation - $115,000.

5.       The four projects supported by the board at its 8 May 2019 workshop (as listed above), which have a total budget of $220,000, are outlined in the recommendations below and in the draft work programme in Attachment A to the agenda report.

6.       Staff recommend that the board approve this local environment work programme and associated budgets for delivery within the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of $220,000 for environmental projects to be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate in 2019/2020 as summarised in the table below and Attachment A of the agenda report:

Project

Budget

New project: Water quality monitoring programme

$30,000

Industrial Pollution Prevention Wairau Valley - phase two

$30,000

Kaipātiki Project environmental programmes

$45,000

Pest Free Kaipātiki Strategy implementation

$115,000

Total

$220,000

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       In late 2018, in alignment to its local board plan outcomes, the Kaipātiki Local Board provided strategic direction to staff regarding the projects it would like to fund in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board noted its strong commitment to the environment, particularly its support for:

·        animal and plant biodiversity through pest-free initiatives

·        water quality improvements and monitoring

·        waste reduction across the area.

8.       In response to the direction set by the board, Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff provided a draft local environment work programme for the board’s feedback at a workshop on 13 March 2019.

9.       The board indicated its support in principle for most of the proposed projects. The board requested that the Industrial Pollution Prevention Wairau Valley - phase two project included revisits to sites in Birkenhead and Beach Haven that had been visited in phase one in the 2017/2018 financial year. The scope of work has been changed to reflect this.

10.     Staff recommended that the board fund a streamside awareness programme to give effect to the board’s water quality improvement aspirations. However, the board indicated it did not support this project at this stage, due to other environmental priorities and budgetary constraints.

11.     Based on the feedback provided at the 13 March 2019 workshop discussions, four local environmental projects to be funded from the board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget are proposed. These will be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate as part of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme. The draft work programme has been amended to reflect local board feedback and is included as Attachment A to this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The draft work programme included five options for projects with a total value of $220,000 as shown in Attachment A and summarised in Table 1 below. Some of these continued established projects that the board had funded in previous years (for example, Kaipātiki Project environmental programmes and funding for Pest Free Kaipātiki), while others were new projects which the board had not previously funded.

13.     Staff provided the board with advice as to which projects should be given the highest priority for funding based on criteria such as alignment with local board strategies, potential to achieve environmental and social outcomes, and value for money. Attachment A gives a brief description of each of the proposed projects for delivery as part of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme is provided below.

New project: Water quality monitoring programme - $30,000

14.     To achieve the local board plan objective to ensure ‘our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy’, the board has indicated it would like to establish a water quality monitoring programme in the 2019/2020 financial year.

15.     This project monitors and provides data on how current and future development affects local water quality in freshwater streams and the receiving coastal environments.

16.     The council's Research and Evaluation Unit have prepared a water quality monitoring programme report which has informed the development of this project. This report was provided to the board as part of the workshop discussion at the 8 May 2019 workshop.

17.     Based on the recommendations in the report, this project will focus on monitoring eight sites in the Kaipātiki Local Board area. These sites are:

·        Kaipātiki Stream - Witheford Scenic Reserve opposite Stanley Road

·        Eskdale Stream - Lower part of the Eskdale Reserve

·        Kahika Stream - Fordham Street in the Rangitira Reserve

·        Wairau Creek - Chartwell Avenue near Marlborough Park

·        Onepoto Stream  - Kauri Glen Reserve

·        Little Shoal Bay Stream - Le Roys Bush Reserve

·        Chelsea 1 Stream - Chatswood Reserve

·        Soldiers Bay Stream - Kauri Park Domain.

18.     The Research and Evaluation Unit have advised that one year of data will only provide a baseline of understanding of key issues at the eight sites and recommend a long-term data collection and analysis programme be undertaken before interventions are made. Additional funding will be sought from the local board in future financial years to ensure data collection can continue over the long-term.

Industrial Pollution Prevention Wairau Valley - phase two - $30,000

19.     To achieve the local board plan objective to ensure ‘our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy’, the board has indicated it would like to support phase two of the Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme in Wairau Valley in the 2019/2020 financial year.

20.     This programme is primarily educational and aims to inform urban industry and business about the impacts their activities may have on local waterways.

21.     The programme includes site inspections and discussions with business owners about potential issues around pollution as well as waste minimisation techniques and spill training. If changes are recommended, a report is sent to the business. 

22.     This project will continue visits within Wairau Valley started in 2018/2019, and will include revisits to businesses in Birkenhead and Beach Haven which had issues identified in 2017/2018.

23.     The project aims to complete 200 site visits conducted in the stage two target area with more than 50 per cent of recommendations implemented.

24.     Phase one of this project was supported by the local board in the 2018/2019 financial year, with an initial budget of $20,000 (resolution number KT/2018/113). The board reallocated a further $10,000 from the small sites ambassador programme towards the industrial pollution prevention programme in April 2019, bringing the project up to $30,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year (resolution number KT/2019/53).

Kaipātiki Project environmental programmes - $45,000

25.     To achieve the local board plan objective to ensure ‘our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy’, the board has indicated it would like to continue funding Kaipātiki Project environmental programmes in the 2019/2020 financial year.

26.     This funding will support the operation of the Kaipātiki Project Environment Centre at 17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale and delivery of environmental volunteer programmes and educational workshops and courses.

27.     Funding in 2019/2020 will support:

·        the development of backyard biodiversity groups for Eskdale Reserve Network and halo

·        leadership, advice and support for collaboration and shared learning for the Kaipātiki Restoration Network, using a community empowerment approach

·        leadership, advice and support for collaboration to develop and implement the Pest Free Kaipātiki 10-year strategy and action plan

·        restoration and nursery programme and volunteers (producing around 20,000 plants per annum)

·        running a volunteering programme for people with special needs or learning difficulties

·        programmes which develop the community's kaitiaki role.

28.     The board has been providing $45,000 a year to Kaipātiki Project Environment Centre since 2016/2017, and it is recommended that the board allocate a further $45,000 towards the continuation of these environmental programmes in the 2019/2020 financial year.

Pest Free Kaipātiki Strategy implementation - $115,000

29.     To achieve the local board plan objective to ensure ‘our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy’, the board indicated on 27 March 2019 that it would like to continue its support for the Pest Free Kaipātiki Strategy implementation in 2019/2020.

30.     This project will be delivered in collaboration with the Pest Free Kaipātiki Incorporated Society and will involve community engagement in pest animal and plant removal and habitat and species restoration projects across the local board area by community groups. Biosecurity and biodiversity staff provide technical and logistical support to the society and community groups who undertake the restoration projects.

31.     The project works on a community empowerment approach and a long-established collaboration between staff, Pest Free Kaipātiki staff, the board and the wider community.

32.     In the 2018/2019 financial year, the board allocated $100,000 towards the implementation of the Pest Free Kaipātiki Strategy (resolution KT/2018/113). It is recommended that the board allocate a further $115,000 towards the continuation of this work in the 2019/2020 financial year.

Additional project option (not supported): Streamside awareness programme - $5,000

33.     To achieve the local board plan objective to ensure ‘our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy’, staff recommended that the board support a streamside awareness programme in the 2019/2020 financial year.

34.     A budget of $5,000 was requested to support an educational and information gathering project, aimed at engaging community to help improve water quality in rivers, streams and harbours in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

35.     At the workshop on 27 March 2019, the board indicted that this project was not a priority at this stage, due to other environmental priorities and budgetary constraints. As such, this project has not been included in Attachment A for the board’s approval.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The draft 2019/2020 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

37.     In particular, the council’s Parks, Sport and Recreation department were involved in the development of the Pest Free Kaipātiki project scope. If approved, they will contribute towards the delivery of the project in the 2019/2020 financial year, by supporting volunteer engagement, helping the steering group to engage with communities and advising on best practice restoration work.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme will have positive environmental outcomes. Particular focus areas for the 2019/2020 work programme include supporting local community organisations to work towards implementation of the Pest Free Kaipātiki strategy across the whole of the local board area. Additionally, the Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme will improve the health of the Wairau stream and associated waterways.

39.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy’.

40.     Te proposed local environment work programme was discussed with the board at workshops on 13 March 2019, 27 March 2019 and 8 May 2019. The board indicated its support of the proposed projects outlined in this report at its 8 May 2019 workshop.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     It is recognised that environment management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

42.     Take 1 below outlines how each of the projects contributes towards Māori outcomes.

Table 1. Māori impact assessment of proposed projects for inclusion in the Kaipātiki Local Board’s local environment work programme

Project

Māori impact assessment

New project: Water quality monitoring programme

Managing water resources and maintaining water quality are significant issues for Māori. The role of mana whenua as kaitiaki for the environment is identified in The Schedule of Issues of Significance to Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau.

This project will provide information that can be used to better focus restoration efforts by mana whenua in their role as kaitiaki.

No consultation with mana whenua is anticipated for this project, however the information gathered could be made available to mana whenua for their use.

Industrial Pollution Prevention Wairau Valley - phase two     

This will help enhance cultural values of this land and water by restoring mauri of waterways and harbours.

Kaipātiki Project environmental programmes

 

Kaipātiki Project has a reciprocal relationship with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and uses the same methodology in its nursery and restoration projects. The projects that involve restoring the mauri of the forests and waterways support the cultural values of the land.

Pest Free Kaipātiki Strategy implementation        

Pest Free Kaipātiki held discussions with the local marae and local iwi when the project was initiated and plans ongoing consultation. Pest Free Kaipātiki have set up a kauri dieback working group and carry out significant education and training work to protect the local kauri forests, preserving this taonga of strong significance to Māori. With significant loss of kauri in the Waitākere area, the protection of the kauri in Kaipātiki is of particular significance to Māori.

Pest Free Kaipātiki will continue to confer with Te Kawerau ā Maki and other mana whenua, and with representatives of local marae and Arataki marae.

Streamside awareness programme   

No specific engagement with mana whenua or Māori community groups has been undertaken for this project. However, it is acknowledged that environmental protection and biodiversity values have integral links with concepts of kaitiakitanga.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     The proposed 2019/2020 local environment work programme requires the allocation of $220,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2019/2020. As such, board approval will not have significant financial implications unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend. Regular quarterly updates on projects will be provided to the board tracking expenditure and identifying any projects at risk of non-delivery, over or underspend.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     If the proposed local environment work programme is not approved at the board’s June 2019 business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be able to be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

45.     The risks and proposed mitigation measures associated with each of the proposed projects have been outlined in Attachment B to this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Following board approval, Infrastructure and Environmental Services will commence implementation of the local environment work programme from 1 July 2019, with regular quarterly updates to the board to track performance and expenditure. Where there is a need for further scoping of activities or to identify risks with delivery, this will be undertaken and reported back to the local board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Proposed 2019/2020 local environment work programme

195

b

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Risks of proposed 2019/2020 local environment projects 

197

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jaimee Maha - Team Leader Relationship Advisory

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Community Services Work Programme 2019/2020

File No.: CP2019/10251

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 community services work programme (refer Attachment A to the Agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each financial year, a work programme is developed that details the activities to be delivered in the local board area. The development process is supported by a series of workshops with the local board.

3.       To prepare for the 2019/2020 work programme, staff representing relevant operational council departments worked together to ensure an integrated approach.

4.       This report presents the draft 2019/2020 community services work programme, which responds to Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes and reflects the priorities that have been agreed by departments across council. The community services work programme includes activities from the following departments:

·    Arts, Community and Events

·    Libraries

·    Parks, Sports and Recreation

·    Service, Strategy and Integration.

5.       Delivery of new activities in the work programme will commence from 1 July 2019. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery progress, highlights, potential delays and budget implications.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 community services work programme (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board decides which activities to allocate its annual work programme budget to achieve the outcomes set out in its 2017 local board plan.

7.       In preparation for the 2019/2020 work programme process, an overview group was created from the following council departments to develop an agreed approach to achieve improved integration:

· Arts, Community and Events

· Community Facilities

· Libraries

· Infrastructure and Environmental Services

· Parks, Sports and Recreation

· Community Services - Service, Strategy and Integration.

8.       Teams made up of representatives from these departments were established to explore shared priorities and objectives for each local board area, and to develop the work programme in a collaborative way in response to local board plan outcomes.

9.       Table 1 shows the business objectives and strategic alignment for community services departments.

Table 1: Adopted community-based strategies and plans

Department

Business objectives

Strategies and plans

Arts, Community and Events

Provision of services, programmes, events and facilities that strengthen and connect communities and create a sense of belonging and pride

·  Hire Fee Framework

·  Events Policy

·  Toi Whītiki

·  Thriving Communities

Libraries

Provision of library services and programmes that support Aucklanders with reading and literacy, and opportunities to participate in community and civic life

·  Te Kauroa

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Provision of services to actively engage Aucklanders to lead healthy lives, connect with nature and value our cultural identity

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

·  Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

·  Auckland Growing greener framework

·  Urban Ngāhere Strategy

Service, Strategy and Integration

Provision of service and asset planning advice and support more integrated delivery of community outcomes

·  Community Facilities Network Plan

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The local board provided feedback on proposed activities for the new financial year at a series of workshops between October 2018 and May 2019.

11.     Initial workshops were an opportunity for the local board to communicate to staff its strategic direction. At subsequent workshops, the local board discussed its priorities for budget allocation and requested further scoping for existing and new activities.

12.     The 2019/2020 community services work programme includes activities form the following departments:

·    Arts, Community and Events

·    Libraries

·    Parks, Sports and Recreation

·    Service, Strategy and Integration.

13.     The activities in the work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in its 2017 local board plan.

14.     The work programme is made up of approved activities from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board.

15.     Budget is allocated to activities for the 2019/2020 financial year. If zero-dollars is shown this reflects that the project is able to be delivered in-house with no additional external technical advice and support.

16.     Table 2 shows activities and allocated budget that are new in 2019/2020 or are significantly different to the 2018/2019 work programme.

Table 2: New and significant changes activities

Line number

Activity

Activity description

FY19 budget

FY20 budget

Local board plan outcome: Our people identify Kaipātiki as their kāinga / He kāinga a Kaipātiki ki tō tātou iwi o reira

1315 (new)

Public Fireworks Event

Public fireworks display to be held at Onewa domain in partnership with Eventfinda Stadium

$0

$45,000

340

Community Grants (KT)

Budget reduced

$189,900

$151,400

Local board plan outcome: getting to and around Kaipātiki is easy / He māmā te haere atu me te haereere noa i Kaipātiki

797

(new)

Kaipatiki Connections Plan Update

Complete an update of the Kaipātiki Connections Plan. The update will include consolidation of key content in both the 2012 and 2016 versions, a summary of progress and a review of priorities.

$0

$40,000

Local board plan outcome: Our community facilities and infrastructure is high quality and well managed / He rangatira, he tōtika te arataki i ō tātou urunga hapori me ōna kaupapa whakahaere

1228

(new)

Investigate need and demand for library, community, arts and culture services in Northcote recognising current providers and anticipated growth

Undertaking community needs assessment and investigating options for provision of services in Northcote

$0

$0

Local board plan outcome: services are well managed and meet community needs / He tōtika te arataki i ngā ratonga kia eke ai ngā hiahia o te hapori

1060

Top up for funding agreements

Top up funding to include grant to Hearts and Minds.

$86,000

$106,000

1340

(new)

Community Arts Programme

For Northart to employ a Mandarin speaking Arts Co-ordinator to liaise with the local Chinese community to promote the gallery, its programmes and the studio space and to organise arts events including exhibitions, workshops, and classes.

$0

$17,000

3203

(new)

Community Arts Programme - Short Shorts

An annual, independent student film competition which aims to promote young aspiring film makers to explore a sense of place and community.

$0

$6,000

3231

(new)

Investigate service renewal of Birkdale Hall and Kauri Kids early childhood education centre

Provide advice on future investment in Birkdale Hall and Birkdale Kauri Kids early childhood education centre based on a strategic assessment

$0

$0

 

17.     The way in which Community Places activities are presented in the work programme has changed for 2019/2020. Work related to the operation of venues for hire, community centres, houses, hubs and rural halls will now be reported by the following levels of service: Access, Activation and Intervention Programming. Access is the provision of a booking service and facility management that enables communities to use the space they need for their activities. Activation includes access along with considered curation and coordination of facility activation. Intervention programming requires the delivery of targeted programme(s) that are not provided through access or activation that respond to an identified need or gap and have significant strategic alignment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The work programme has been developed by a collective of operational council departments.

19.     The interdepartmental connections made throughout the work programme development process will enable an integrated approach to delivery of the activities and allow for further collaboration throughout the year. These working relationships will also support an integrated approach to work programme development in future years.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The local board provided direction and feedback on the draft work programme at a series of workshops.  

21.     These workshops provided an opportunity for staff to gain an understanding of local board strategic direction and priorities. Budget allocation, activity content and scoping were discussed and refined.

22.     Staff have worked with community organisations and stakeholders that are recipients of local board funding to collaborate on the development of the work programme.

23.     The activities in the final work programme support achieving local board plan outcomes and objectives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Community services and Community Facilities have developed Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai!, a relationship approach which guides staff to deliver on agreed work programme activities and support the local board to achieve outcomes in its local board plan.

25.     The approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori.

26.     Table three outlines the activities in the 2019/2020 work programme where Māori responsiveness is the primary outcome.

Table 3: Māori impact of proposed activities

Line number

Activity

Māori impact

97

Manaakitanga

Increased understanding of Māori aspirations and how these relate to the local boards work programme. Increased Māori participation in democratic processes and levels of trust and confidence from Māori. Improved community cultural understanding.

362

Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Year 3

Māori naming (and associated story telling) of parks and places in partnership with mana whenua to value and promote Auckland’s Māori identity and use of te reo Māori.

909

Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori – Kaipātiki

Celebrating te ao Māori with events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes:

·    Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Māori Language Week

·    engaging with Iwi and Māori organisations

·    Whakatipu i te reo Māori - champion and embed te reo Māori in our libraries and communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Activities are funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: Asset Based Services (ABS) Opex; Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) Capex and Opex.

28.     Each activity line has a budget allocation, which covers the delivery for the 2019/2020 period. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects that the implementation costs are met through staff salary or other funding sources.

29.     The community services LDI budget for the local board for the 2019/2020 financial year is $1,168,000.

30.     Where activities are cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or to create a new activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The key risks for activities that are managed through the work programme are non-delivery, time delays and budget overrun. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery including highlighting any potential delays and budget implications.

32.     As the work programme includes ongoing activity and annually occurring events or projects, the associated risks have been identified and managed in previous years. Additional risk management for these activities is ongoing and can be reported quarterly.

33.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board through quarterly reporting when required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Delivery of approved activities will commence at the beginning of the financial year, 1 July 2019 and progress will be reported to the local board for each quarter.

35.     The work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Kaipātiki community services 2019/2020 work programme

207

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme 2019 - 2022

File No.: CP2019/09458

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme for the Kaipātiki Local Board, including all physical works, leasing and operational maintenance projects delivered by Community Facilities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing of all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

3.       The Kaipātiki Local Board 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme was developed through a series of iterative workshops between key staff and local boards since October 2018. The projects identified in the work programme have been prioritised for investment based on a combination of local board feedback, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input.

4.       The work programme provided in Attachment A and B of this agenda report reflect the projects that were presented in the last local board workshop with modifications based on feedback from the board, and with the inclusion of projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes.

5.       This report recommends that the board approve the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme and associated budget in full for projects commencing in the first year of the programme and in principle for subsequent two years.

6.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes, including local and sports field development (growth), coastal and slips prevention programmes. Inclusion of these projects in the local board work programme is subject to approval by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

7.       It is recommended that the local board approve the inclusion of these projects in the work programme, and provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee.

8.       A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects. These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year.

9.       Approval is sought for staff to commence work on these projects in the 2019/2020 year so that they can be delivered early in the event that other approved projects are delayed for any reason.

10.     In order to expedite delivery of the work programme, and to manage changes that may be required in a timely way, staff recommend that the board delegate decision making for amendments to the approved programme to the chair.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report

b)      approve in principle the 2020 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme (years 2 and 3) as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report.

c)      approve the risk adjusted programme (RAP) projects identified in Attachment A to the agenda report as projects that may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year, if required to meet expected financial expenditure for the 2019/2020 financial year.

d)      note that approval of budget allocation in the 2019/2020 year for multi-year projects may commit the board to the allocation of subsequent years budgets.

e)      note that the inclusion in the work programme of projects that are funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets are subject to approval of the identified budget allocation by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

f)       provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee in relation to the projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets.

g)      note that budget allocation for all projects in the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme are best current estimates, and amendments may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs as the year progresses.

h)      delegate to the chairperson authority to approve minor amendments to the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, following receipt of written advice from staff.

i)        delegate to the Manager Community Leases authority to use the agreed streamlined renewal process for lease renewals without variations.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of Auckland. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

12.     Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. The 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, detailed in the attachments, contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance.

13.     Staff have engaged with the board in the development of the work programme through a number of workshops, including:

·    10 October 2018 where the board discussed their priorities for the future work programme

·    13 March 2019 where the board reviewed the first draft work programme and provided feedback

·    8 May 2019 where staff provided any further information requested in the 13 March 2019 workshop and reviewed the revised draft work programme.

14.     This year’s work programme is a three-year programme to clearly demonstrate the phasing of project delivery and to enable the organisation to prepare for delivery.  The work programme is subject to a rolling review and each year the local board will be asked to approve a new three-year work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Investment in the capital works programme will ensure that council facilities and open spaces in the Kaipātiki Local Board area remain valuable and well-maintained community assets.

16.     The overall capital works programme includes projects for which the board has discretion to allocate budget, referred to as the local programme, and projects from regional programmes. 

17.     Specific projects within the work programme may have budget allocated from two or more budget sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

18.     The work programme includes both new projects and existing projects that have been continued from the previous financial year where those projects require multiple years for delivery (multi-year projects).

19.     Any projects that have budget approved in the current 2018/2019 financial year, but are unable to be delivered this year, will be deferred. Deferred budgets will be added to the work programme at a later date.

Local Programme

20.     The local programme includes those projects that the board is funding from its discretionary capital expenditure (capex) budgets, including:

·    Renewals
The board can allocate its renewals budget towards the renewal of any council owned asset.

·    Locally Driven Initiative (LDI)
The board has the discretion to allocate its LDI budget to any projects that deliver a council asset or as a capital grant to a third party to deliver an asset made available for public use.

21.     In preparing recommendations for the local programme a number of matters have been considered, including:

·    strategic documents (e.g. local board plan)

·    service assessment input from Community Services

·    asset condition assessments

·    input from operational maintenance teams and staff working within facilities

·    budget availability.

22.     The Community Facilities work programme supports the achievement of the following 2017 Kaipātiki Local Board Plan priorities:

·      Our people identify Kaipātiki as their kāinga (home) / He kāinga a Kaipatiki ki tō tātou iwi o reira

·      Our people are active and healthy / He ngangahau he ora tonu ō tātou iwi

·      Getting to and around Kaipātiki is easy / He māmā te haere atu me te haereere noa i Kaipātiki

·      Our community facilities and infrastructure are high quality and well managed / He rangatira, he tōtika te arataki i ō tātou urunga hapori me ōna kaupapa whakahaere.

23.     Other strategic documents of particular relevance have included Kaipātiki Play and Sunsmart Provision Audit 2018, Kaipātiki - Auckland Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy, Kaipātiki Connections Network Plan, Kaipātiki Nature Spaces and Trails Feasibility Assessment 2018. These have informed recommendations in the programme through identifying projects to help inform the local board of potential priorities for future projects, identifying project phasing and to enable the organisation to prepare for delivery.

24.     Some of the key projects to be accommodated in the work programme include:

·    Birkenhead War Memorial – deliver the master plan (One Local Initiative), the local board are awaiting the final masterplan to inform future work and funding opportunities.

·    Tuff Crater – renew track and signage – the local board is considering consenting all stages of the project and prioritise funding throughout the next few years.

·    Birkdale Community Hall and Birkdale Kauri Kids facilities – resolving these building issues has been identified as one of the top priorities of the Kaipātiki Local Board within the next three years. 

·    The Service, Strategy and Investigation (SS&I) department are currently completing a service assessment to inform the local board and provide good quality advice and guidance on options for future development. This project is identified as a RAP project if assessment work is completed earlier than anticipated.

·    Kauri dieback projects that identify tracks for renewal utilising ABS: Capex Renewals and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) funds

·    Hilders Park – remedial works to wharf structure and ensuring that heritage factors are taken into consideration on providing a safe wharf for the community.

·    The Kaipātiki Play and Sunsmart provision audit identified the following play facilities for renewal Windy Ridge Reserve, Camelot Reserve and Vandeleur Reserve.

25.     The phasing of projects over various years has been required to meet budget requirements. Particular consideration has been given to the delivery timing of active recreation projects within the pools and leisure centres in the Kaipātiki Local Board area. These facilities are currently undergoing a strategic assessment with the Service Strategy and Integration team to assess service requirements and a needs assessment within the local board area. This has meant that all active recreation projects will be phased in later years.

26.     Of particular note in the work programme is the reduction in funding required for the Glenfield Library and Service Centre Building - 'remediation roof and air conditioning’. This project initially had $2,800,000 identified as a renewal. Due to a current service assessment the project delivery team have identified a solution to provide a further five years of service before the roof will need to be totally replaced. This has enabled a number of other initiatives such as playground renewals and walkways to be bought forward within the three-year work programme.

27.     The proposed work programme in Attachment A contains:

·    Number of projects excluding leases and contract lines over three years: 83

·    Indicative cost for proposed projects in the 2019/2020 financial year: $9,724,928.

Regional Programme

28.     The Long-term Plan 2018 - 2028 includes budgets which support the delivery of regional programmes. These budgets are allocated to specific projects within a regional programme by the governing body.

29.     Where budget is allocated to a project in the regional programme that falls within a local board decision making allocation (e.g. a local park), that project is included in the local board work programme. The local board then has decision making responsibility for that project, within the parameters set by the governing body, namely location, scope and budget.

30.     Regional budgets include:

·    Local parks and sports field development (growth)

·    Coastal renewals

·    Slips prevention and remediation.

31.     Projects in these regional programmes are identified and prioritised based on consideration of a number of factors.

32.     For the local parks and sports field development programme, this includes:

·    Extent to which residential growth is generating demand for the project

·    Current levels of provision

·    Available budget.

33.     For coastal renewals and slips prevention and remediation this includes:

·    Asset condition

·    Relative hazard and risk

·    Available budget

34.     The allocation of budget to specific projects will be approved by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

35.     The board has an opportunity to provide formal feedback, through resolution to this report, for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee prior to approval of the regional programmes.

Capital Programme Delivery

Cost estimates subject to change

36.     Budget allocations within the work programme are best estimates only. Project costings are subject to change and refinement as projects progress through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined around the specific work required and the cost of delivery of that work once the details are defined.

37.     The delivery of individual projects is managed within the overall work programme budget for each local board. Where significant changes to project budgets may need to be considered, or if new projects are added to the work programme, changes may be required to the programme to accommodate final project costs as the year progresses.

Risk adjusted programme

38.     A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects.

39.     These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year (i.e. year two of the three-year programme). Staff propose to commence work in the 2019/2020 year on the delivery of these risk adjusted projects.

40.     By progressing these identified projects alongside the 2019/2020 projects in the programme, it is intended that, should projects identified for delivery in year one of the work programme be delayed for any reason, staff will be able to proceed with agreed alternative projects to ensure that the full annual budget is delivered each year.

41.     Approval is sought from the board for staff to commence work on those projects identified in the work programme as risk adjusted programme projects in the 2019/2020 year.

Delegation for approval of changes to the work programme

42.     The delivery of the proposed work programme in an efficient and timely manner may require amendments to be made to the agreed work programme during the course of the year. Such amendments could include:

·    changes to project scope, budgets, timing

·    addition of new projects within available budget

·    cancelling or putting approved projects on hold.

43.     Any changes to the approved work programme require approval from the board. Approval will normally be sought through resolution at a business meeting.

44.     Local boards are also able to delegate authority to approve some or all amendments to the work programme to the chair, to another member of the board, or to staff. Such delegation would allow changes to be made without the timeframes required to provide formal reports and would support the efficient delivery of the work programme.

45.     Should the board choose to delegate authority to approve changes to the work programme, it is anticipated that any changes would be workshopped with the board prior to any delegated decision being taken. Any changes made under delegation would be reported back to the board in their quarterly report.

Leasing work programme

46.     Community leases, commonly on public parks and reserves, are a valuable way in which the council provides support to community organisations across the region. These groups provide a wide range of community activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities and are a key part of the mosaic of community activity and infrastructure in Auckland.

47.     Attachment B – Community Leases provides a detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2019/2020 financial year. Following approval of the work programme staff will proceed with review and renewal of these leases and licences as appropriate during the course of the financial year.

48.     Two additional project lines include those leases and licences proposed to be progressed in the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years respectively. It also includes the additional leases and licences that will be deferred from the 2018/2019 financial year to the 2019/2020 financial year.

49.     Straight forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations with a written memo to the board providing the opportunity for the board to request further information or a formal report. More complex community leases will be reported to the board at a business meeting.

Operational maintenance work programme

50.     The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

·    increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets

·    improving the safety of Community Facilities assets

·    ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users.

51.     In the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, there are three line items dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area:

·    Full Facilities Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, coastal management and storm damage response. From 1 July 2019 council is responsible for streetscapes maintenance from Auckland Transport.

·    Arboriculture Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all tree management and maintenance

·    Ecological Restoration Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include pest plant management within ecologically significant areas and animal pest management across all parks and reserves

52.     Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly report. Community Facilities is also providing additional weekly updates to all elected members on contractor performance.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     The 2019 - 2022 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

54.     In particular, the council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department were involved in the development of the Kaipātiki - Auckland Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy – knowing phase, Naturalisation of park reserves within Kaipātiki and the Kaipātiki Play and Sunsmart Provision Audit all of which informed the 3-year work programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

55.     The Community Facilities Work Programme has been created through a combination of local board feedback, asset condition assessments and agreed levels of service.

56.     The 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2018 to May 2019. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programmes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     The 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

58.     Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

59.     Staff are also attending mana whenua forum’s monthly to receive feedback on specific projects within the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme.

60.     Activities in the work programmes that are specific to Māori outcomes include:

·    Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places)

·    Auckland Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy

·    Birkenhead War Memorial Park – deliver master plan (One Local Initiative)

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

61.     Table 1 below summarises the relevant budgets, proposed allocation and the balance of unallocated budget available.

Local Budgets

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

Renewals - Budget

$8,439,928

$7,797,419

$5,879,022

Renewals - Proposed Allocation

$8,439,928

$7,797,419

$5,879,022

Renewals - Unallocated budget

$0

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

Growth and Development - Allocation

 

$3,000,000

 

Coastal Renewals - Allocation

$235,000

$550,000

$0

Slips Prevention - Allocation

$80,000

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Capex - Proposed Allocation

$970,000

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Opex - Proposed Allocation

$0

$0

$0

 

62.     The proposed work programme can be accommodated within the available local board budgets. Approval of the work programme does not have significant financial implications, unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend.

63.     Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the board. These updates will identify progress of all projects and potential amendments to the approved programme including changes to budget allocation and timing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity. The risk adjusted programme (RAP) will be used to progress those projects identified as ready to proceed under the RAP.

65.     If the proposed Community Facilities work programme is not approved at the business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     Once approved, delivery of activities identified in the Community Facilities work programme will commence from 1 July 2019.

67.     The work programmes identify if further decisions are required for each activity. These will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

68.     Progress and updates on work programmes will be reported to the local board for each quarter of the financial year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Kaipatiki Local Board Community Facilities 2019 - 2022 Work Programme - Build, Maintain, Renew

229

b

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board  Business Meeting - Kaipatiki Local Board Community Facilities 2019 - 2022 Work Programme - Leases

241

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Leigh Radovan - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator



Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Changes to Kaipātiki Local Board standing orders

File No.: CP2019/10786

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide information about the implications of the Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019, and to recommend changes to the Kaipātiki Local Board’s standing orders to align with the change in the legislation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 (LGRSAA) makes changes to various statutes, including the Local Government 2002 Act (LGA), the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA), the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Dog Control Act 1996, the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 and the Rates Rebate Act 1973.

3.       Prior to the legislation change, the LGA provided for an extraordinary meeting where:

a)      it could be called by resolution, or by requisition by the mayor or one third of the members

b)      the notice period was three days (unless it was called by resolution in which case, the notice period could be not less than 24 hours)

c)      if it needed to be called earlier, it could be called by the mayor or, if the mayor was unavailable, the chief executive. The notice period could be not less than 24 hours.

4.       As a result of the change, a meeting called in accordance with c) above is now referred to as an ‘emergency meeting’ rather than an’ extraordinary meeting’.

5.       There is a change to the definition of public notice, which requires notification on a council’s website in addition to a newspaper.

6.       There is a change to the definition of ‘working day’ to exclude a province’s anniversary.

7.       Staff are taking the opportunity, while considering changes to standing orders, to propose an unrelated change to the current standing orders regarding attendance by electronic link. The current standing order requires a member seeking to attend by electronic link to be representing the council and unable to attend. The proposed change removes the requirement to be representing the council.

8.       As detailed in LGA Schedule 7 clause 27 (3), a change to standing orders requires a 75 per cent majority vote. The Kaipātiki Local Board’s standing orders need to be changed to reflect the changes in the law.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the new statutory responsibility of the chief executive:

facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001.

b)      amend standing order 2.3.3 by replacing:

Calling an extraordinary meeting at earlier time

The mayor or chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call a meeting for an earlier time if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member, and the chief executive, notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

with:

Calling an emergency meeting

The mayor or chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call an emergency meeting for an earlier time than is provided in standing order 2.3.2, if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member, and the chief executive, notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

c)      amend standing order 7.2.3 by replacing:

Notification of extraordinary meetings

Where any extraordinary meeting of the local board or a committee is called, and notice of that meeting cannot be given in the manner required or permitted (by Standing Order 7.2.1 as appropriate), Auckland Council shall publicly notify or otherwise advertise that meeting and the general nature of business to be transacted at the meeting as soon as practicable before the meeting is to be held, as is reasonable in the circumstances.

with:

Notification of extraordinary / emergency meetings

Where the council calls an extraordinary or emergency meeting but cannot give public notice to the extent required in standing order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting. If it is not practicable to publish a notice in newspapers before the meeting, the council must publicly notify the meeting as soon as practicable on the council’s website and in any other manner that is reasonable in the circumstances.

d)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

with:

Emergency meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22A of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

e)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Meeting means:

a)      any first or ordinary or extraordinary meeting of the local board

with:

Meeting means:

b)      any first or ordinary or extraordinary or emergency meeting of the local board.

f)       amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Publicly notified means notified to members of the public by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

with:

Publicly notified means made known to members of the public by a notice on the council’s website, until any opportunity for review or appeal has lapsed, and by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

g)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

a)      Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

b)      a day in the period commencing with 25 December in any year and ending with 15 January in the following year.

c)      a day in the period commencing with 25 December in any year and ending with 15 January in the following year.

with:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

a)      Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

b)      where Waitangi Day or ANZAC Day falls on a weekend, the following Monday

c)      Auckland Anniversary Day

d)      a day in the period commencing with 20 December in any year and ending with 10 January in the following year.

h)      amend the following standing orders:

i)        standing order 2.3:

replace the heading ‘Extraordinary meetings’ with ‘Extraordinary and emergency meetings’

ii)       standing order 7.2.4:

replace the heading ‘Extraordinary meetings’ with ‘Extraordinary and emergency meetings’

iii)      standing orders 1.1.3, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.3.2:

replace the words ‘extraordinary meeting’ with ‘extraordinary or emergency meeting’.

i)        amend standing order 3.3.3 to remove the requirement to be representing the council:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)      where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)      to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)      in emergencies

d)      in any other circumstances the local board deems appropriate.

The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The LGRSAA came into force on 21 March 2019. The act is an omnibus act in that it makes minor amendments to several pieces of legislation.

10.       The LGRSAA amends the Local Electoral Act 2001 to include a new principle for ‘representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls’, and imposes a new responsibility on the chief executive of the council by amending the chief executive’s responsibilities in the LGA section 42(2)(d):

(da)   facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001.

11.     It amends the definition of ‘public notice’ and ‘publicly notified’ under the LGA and the LGOIMA to require notification, both on the council’s website and in newspapers.

12.     It creates a new category of council meeting called an ‘emergency meeting’, separate from ‘extraordinary meeting’. Previously, extraordinary meetings had two types of notice requirements. Where the more urgent form of notice is used, the meeting is now referred to as an ‘emergency meeting’. This applies to giving notice to members under the LGA and to public notices under LGOIMA.

13.     It amends the definition of ‘working day’ under the LGA and LGOIMA to exclude a province’s anniversary day being counted as a ‘working day’ and alters the dates of the Christmas non-working days period from 25 December to 25 January, to 20 December to 10 January.

14.     It makes minor amendments to the Dog Control Act 1996, the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Rates Rebates Act 1973 and makes changes to the LGA by specifying timeframes for making certain documents publicly available. These legislative changes are minor in nature and do not impact on local board standing orders.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The changes made by the LGRSAA are minor in nature, nevertheless it is necessary to amend the Kaipātiki Local Board’s standing orders to align the language to reflect current legislation.

16.     The Kaipātiki Local Board may also wish to consider a change to standing orders which is not related to LGRSAA. Standing order 3.3.3 provides conditions for attending a meeting by electronic link:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)      where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)      to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)      in emergencies

d)      in any other circumstances the local board deems appropriate.

The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

17.     This standing order was adopted in 2015. Since that time, technology has improved and remote attendance to most local board business meetings is now possible. However, the conditions in the standing order are very limiting and do not allow attendance by a member who is out of Auckland for non-council reasons.

18.     Staff recommend amending the standing order by removing the requirement to represent the council in standing order 3.3.3 a):

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The changes to the standing orders do not impact on the wider council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     This is a report to 21 local boards. All local boards need to make changes to align their standing orders to LGRSAA. Changes to standing orders require a vote of not less than 75 per cent of the members present.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The changes to standing orders brought about through the LGRSAA do not impact on the Māori community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications to making these changes to standing orders.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     LGA Schedule 7 clause 27 (2) states that the standing orders of a local authority must not contravene the LGA or any other act. If local board standing orders are not aligned to changes in the legislation, there is a risk that the local board may act inconsistently with the legislation by relying on standing orders that are not up to date.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Following the Kaipātiki Local Board resolution to amend the standing orders, staff will make the appropriate changes and recirculate the updated standing orders.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Polly Kenrick - Business Process Manager

Authorisers

Kerri Foote, Operations and Improvements Manager

Louise Mason – GM Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2019/02089

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to update members on recent activities, projects and issues since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2019/02150

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note any verbal reports of members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update

File No.: CP2019/02082

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members to update the board on Governing Body or Independent Maori Statutory Board issues, or issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members’ verbal updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - May 2019

File No.: CP2019/08617

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 1 May, Wednesday 8 May, Wednesday 22 May and Wednesday 29 May 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 1 May 2019, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·    Existing Service Levels Report/Governance Framework Review Service Levels

·    Northcote Redevelopment Update

-     Greenslade Reserve Masterplan

-     Development in Northcote.

·    Grants

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 8 May 2019, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·    Parks Sport and Recreation

-     Northcote Play Strategy

·    Northcote Redevelopment

-     Concept plan for pocket park along Richardson Avenue

·    Community Facilities

·    Local Board Work Programme – Draft Work Programme

-     Arts, Community and Events

-     Community Facilities

-     Infrastructure and Environmental Services

-     Parks Sport and Recreation

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 22 May, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·    Community Facilities

-     Community Leases: Chelsea Pony Club, Fernglen Native Gardens

-     Community Outcomes Plan

-     Proposed demolition of 18 Denby Lane, Northcote Point

-     Rewi Alley Reserve Renewal Project

·      Engagement session

5.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 29 May, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·    Local Board Agreement Workshop 4

·    Plans and Places

-     Glenfield Plan – scoping phase

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services

-     Akoranga Stormwater Treatment

·    Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the record for the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 1 May, Wednesday 8 May, Wednesday 22 May and Wednesday 29 May 2019. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Wednesday 1 May 2019 Workshop Record

257

b

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Wednesday 8 May 2019 Workshop Record

259

c

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Wednesday 22 May 2019 Workshop Record

263

d

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Wednesday 29 May 2019 Workshop Record

265

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/02663

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2019 and an overview of workshops scheduled for the month ahead.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local board’s governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The July to August 2019 governance forward work calendar for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       The June - July 2019 workshop forward work plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B to the agenda report. Scheduled items may change at short notice depending on the urgency of matters presented to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Kaipātiki Local Board July – August 2019 governance forward work calendar and June – July 2019 workshop forward work plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Governance Forward Work Calendar July - August 2019

269

b

19 June 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Workshop Forward Work Plan June - July 2019

271

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator

     

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

19 June 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Kaipātiki Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Service property optimisation - Bartley Street Toilets

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

commercial negotiations

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.