I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday 20 June 2019

2.00pm

Council Chamber
Orewa Service Centre
50 Centreway Road
Orewa

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Deputy Chairperson

Phelan Pirrie

 

Members

Brent Bailey

 

 

Tessa Berger

 

 

Cameron Brewer

 

 

Louise Johnston

 

 

Allison Roe, MBE

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

Brenda Steele

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Robyn Joynes

Democracy Advisor - Rodney

 

14 June 2019

 

Contact Telephone: +64 212447174

Email: robyn.joynes@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

Kaipara College Board of Trustees

Member

Parent Representative

Tessa Berger

 

 

Mahurangi Action Incorporated Mahurangi

Coastal Trail Trust

The Merchandise Collective

Friends of Regional Parks

Matakana Coast Trail Trust

 

Crimson Education

 

President

Chairperson

Founder/Director

Committee Member

Member Forum representative

Director

Cameron Brewer

Riverhead Residents & Ratepayers Association

Cameron Brewer Communications Limited

Spire Investments Limited

Member

 

Director

Shareholder

Beth Houlbrooke

Kawau Island Boat Club

ACT New Zealand

Member

Vice President

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Phelan Pirrie

Muriwai Volunteer Fire Brigade

Best Berries (NZ) Ltd 

Grow West Ltd

North West Country Incorporated

Officer in Charge

Director/Shareholder

Director

Manager

Allison Roe

Waitemata District Health Board

Matakana Coast Trail Trust

Elected Member

Chairperson

Colin Smith

 

 

Brenda Steele

 

Te Uri o Hau Incorporation

Beacon Pathway

Secretary/Beneficiary

Board member


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Warkworth Stories - Audio Stories Tour                                                           5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Development of Open Space Land - Huapai Triangle, Huapai                                 7

12        Warkworth Town Square - proposed landscaping                                                  15

13        Warkworth Showgrounds to Kowhai Park Reserve walkway                                21

14        Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan                                                           41

15        Indicative Business Case: Local indoor court facility Kumeu-Huapai                  45

16        Changes to Local Board Standing Orders                                                                67

17        Rodney Local Board - 2019-2022 Community Facilities Work Programme          73

18        Approval of the 2019/2020 Rodney local environment work programme             99

19        Approval of the Rodney Local Board community services 2019/2020 work programme                                                                                                                 109

20        Rodney Local Board Chairperson's report                                                             125

21        Deputations and public forum update                                                                     129

22        Rodney Local Board workshop records                                                                 133

23        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        137

24        Rodney Ward Councillor update                                                                              143  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               145

C1       Acquisition of land for open space - Helensville                                                   145

C2       Acquisition of land for open space - Warkworth                                                   145  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

An apology from Member P Pirrie has been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meetings, held on Thursday 16 May 2019 and Thursday 6 June 2019 as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Warkworth Stories - Audio Stories Tour

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Claire McDonald has requested a deputation to talk about the Warkworth Stories – Audio Stories Tour.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Ms McDonald for her presentation.

 


 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Development of Open Space Land - Huapai Triangle, Huapai

File No.: CP2019/08909

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the proposed development of the new park at 32 Schoolside Road in Huapai by Cabra who have developed the Huapai Triangle subdivision.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Development of the Schoolside Road park will be carried out by Cabra at their cost and vested in Auckland Council.

3.       Cabra have engaged Park and Playground Solutions to design a playspace for the Schoolside Road park. The concept design has been refined through consultation with the local board at a local board workshop on 8 November 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve Auckland Council entering into an infrastructure funding agreement for the Schoolside Road Park within the Huapai Triangle Special Housing Area

b)      delegate to the General Manager, Parks Sports and Recreation authority to negotiate the infrastructure funding agreement on terms acceptable to Council’s Infrastructure Funding team

c)      approve the design for the playspace for the Schoolside Road Park Proposed Concept Plan dated 26 October 2018 being attachment B to the agenda report and approve that the asset be taken on by Council upon practical completion.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Council was approached by the developer of the Huapai Triangle development, Cabra to install a playground at their cost within the new park at their development.

5.       A need has been identified for a new children’s play space in Huapai, Kumeu, and Kaukapakapa, and a strategic assessment was undertaken in late 2017 for possible locations. The play space feasibility study was done as a response to growth in the Huapai and Kumeu areas. The sites assessed as part of this review didn’t include the new park at the Oraha Road subdivision site or the new parks in the Huapai Triangle subdivision as the assets hadn’t been handed over to council yet.

6.       The Parks and Places Specialist advised that as the park at the Huapai Triangle development hadn’t been included in the playspace strategic assessment for Huapai, that it would complement planned playground developments and would likely be used by the adjacent local community.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The park at 32 Schoolside Road is part of the wider park that includes a drainage reserve of 1.4ha in size, the location of which can be seen in the location plan (Attachment A to the agenda report). Cabra has worked with the consultant Tina Dyer from Park Central to develop a concept design that is intended for play for pre-schoolers and younger children 0-8 years.

8.       A concept package was presented to the local board at a workshop on 8 November 2018.

9.       Following a workshop with the local board and consultation with Community Facilities the Proposed Concept Plan (Attachment B to the agenda report) was finalised.

10.     The original concept plan presented to the local board hasn’t changed, but the developer has confirmed the following:

·     Keep earth on site following earthworks to create mounds

·     Low pool style fencing will be provided along the boundary close to the road

·     Two wide footpath will be provided

·     One Portland seat with seat back and armrests will be provided, the other two will not have a seat back and armrests

·     The use of some areas of wetpour instead of cushionfall to enhance accessibility

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     Community Facilities staff have provided input into how the playground will be constructed and maintenance items including recommendations around protecting root zones of trees during construction, protection of landscaping in planting beds during construction by the use of warratahs, insertion of a concrete nib/timber edge around the playground, and the footings under footpaths.

12.     Community Facilities have also provided estimates for annual maintenance costs for the financial implications section of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The local board has delegated decision making responsibility for the development of local parks within the Rodney Local Board area. The local board’s views and approval are sought on the proposed development of the Schoolside Road Park.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     No direct impacts on Māori arising from this development have been identified.

15.     The Special Housing Area plan variation was sent to mana whenua whose rohe is in the Rodney Local Board area and Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara provided a cultural impact assessment. 

16.     The cultural impact assessment requires for all Reserves that they shall identify Ngati Whatua o Kaipara as kaitiaki.

17.     Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara indicated that “the impact on the cultural landscape can be partially mitigated and enhanced through naming of the new streets in collaboration with Kaipara, planting native vegetation, and establishing design components or artworks in public spaces such as parks”.

18.     The cultural impact assessment also requested the planting of eco-sourced vegetation. This will be given regard to at the engineering plan stage where detailed plans will be provided with species lists for the planting beds.

19.     When the park is officially named then mana whenua will be consulted during that process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The local board has decision making responsibility for the development and management of Schoolside Road Park as the asset has been vested to Council. A high level assessment of the consequential opex per annum has been estimated by Community Facilities to be approximately $4858 ex GST subject to detailed design. The consequential opex per annum is estimated to fall within a range between $3,431 ex GST (low) up to $8,650 ex GST (high) and is expected to commence following practical completion in accordance with an Infrastructure Funding Agreement that will be agreed. Practical completion is expected to be in the 2019/2020 financial year. It is anticipated that with local board support this playspace will be added to Council’s asset register and Council will be expected to commence maintenance of the playground in the financial year 2019/2020. If approved annual maintenance will be paid for by the consequential opex budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     Risks for the delivery of the playground are cost escalation, and inadequate handover. These items will be managed via an infrastructure funding agreement that will be signed by both the developer’s representative and council to ensure that proper handover of all documents, warrantees, as-builts and producer statements occurs. Landowner approval will also be required before construction commencement. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     The developer wishes to develop the Schoolside Road Park as soon as possible, once the local board’s approval is obtained. Parks staff have not been sent engineering details of the proposed park developments but when received, will review these to ensure the proposal meets Council’s park construction standards.

23.     It is recommended that Parks Planning and Community Facilities staff review engineering detail once received.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed Playground location

11

b

Proposed Concept Plan

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maylene Barrett - Senior Parks Planner

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Warkworth Town Square - proposed landscaping

File No.: CP2019/10638

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the landscaping plan for the Warkworth Town Square at 9 Queen Street.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The developer of The Oaks retirement village and retail development in Warkworth, has offered to develop the town square in front of the historic tavern and has provided a landscaping plan for approval. There are two options for consideration: option A with a grassed area, and option B without a grassed area.

3.       The Investigation and Design team in Community Facilities has reviewed the plans and has approved them subject to the appropriate low light and water species of plants being used under the shade of existing trees and that adequate provision is made for the roots of the existing trees to grow over time. These and other details such as treatment of timber elements may be dealt with in an agreement with the developer.

4.       The proposed landscape design compliments the concept design for the Warkworth town centre revitalisation of the community space near the library.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve EITHER option A with a grassed area OR option B without the grassed area as set out in the landscaping plan prepared by Thresher Urban Design and Landscape Architecture (Attachment A to this report), for the town square to be developed at 9 Queen Street, Warkworth.

Horopaki

Context

5.       Rodney District Council sold the large block of land at 9 Queen Street, Warkworth in 2010 for development.

6.       The block contained the historic tavern and provision was made in the agreement for sale and purchase for the land in front of the tavern fronting Queen Street to be transferred back to the council upon the expiry of the tavern operator’s lease, which occurs in September 2019. The land had been earmarked for a town square by the former council.

7.       The developer subsequently requested a reduction in the land to be transferred back to the council reducing the area by 29 square metres (from 345 to 316 square metres) to allow a 1.5m strip to be retained across the front of the tavern for legal access.

8.       The Rodney Local Board consented to the reduction in area in 2014, and in consideration for the land to be retained the developer has offered to develop the town square at the developer’s cost.

9.       The landscape plan presents two similar options but option A indicates larger grassed areas with random seating. Option B has less grassed areas but more formal planting/seating. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The cost of the town square development is estimated to be in excess of the value of the land to be retained by the developer. The Investigation and Design team confirm that the development cost as proposed by the developer would be over $100,000. Based on rating valuations of adjacent land, and allowing for time, the value of the land to be retained is (pro-rata) in the vicinity of $40,000 to $60,000. The offer from the developer therefore represents good value for the council.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     There is no perceived impact on other members of the council group. The views of Investigation and Design staff have been sought given the subject matter.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

12.     The original proposed plan was workshopped with the local board in August 2016. The views of the Warkworth subdivision members was sought at the time and informed the current draft plan. The plan has not changed substantially in that time.

13.     The local board has previously expressed its approval to take ownership of this space as a local park. The local board’s view on the final proposed landscape plan for the future town square is being sought by this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     The proposed landscape plan and development of the town square as part of the overall town centre revitalisation concept plan is intended to benefit all people.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The cost of the town square development is to be met by developer.

16.     Operating expenses would be similar for both options proposed. The estimated range is $10,000 to $20,000 per annum.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     There are no perceived risks to the proposal requiring a decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Terms and conditions regarding the development and landscaping of the town square (including any requirements of the Rodney Local Board as a result of the decision being sought) will be included in an agreement with the developer and to be signed by the appropriate officer delegate, prior to the commencement of any landscaping works.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Tavern Plaza Warkworth landscape concept options

19

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Allan Walton - Principal Property Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 



Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Warkworth Showgrounds to Kowhai Park Reserve walkway

File No.: CP2019/10223

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to proceed with the design of a walkway/cycleway linking Warkworth Showgrounds with Kowhai Park Reserve, Warkworth, and to progress the project to procurement, resource consent application and construction.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board has a work programme item in financial year 2018/2019 to develop a new walkway/cycleway that links Warkworth Showgrounds with Kowhai Park Reserve.

3.       A preferred location for the walkway was identified in 2017 that provided the most direct route. The route proposed crossing a parcel of land that is jointly owned by three landowners and Auckland Council (council) and has a Queen Elizabeth II Trust covenant on it. The land is predominantly native vegetation. Landowners indicated support of the route in 2017.

4.       A concept design was developed that included a suspension bridge and connecting boardwalk, and was supported by the local board as the preferred option.

5.       Staff and local board members have sought support from all landowners for the suspension bridge and preferred route, but have been unable to obtain formal landowner support.

6.       Three alternative routes have been investigated. All are able to be constructed entirely within council owned reserve land. The options were discussed with the local board at a workshop in May 2019.

7.       This report seeks approval to progress with the design, consenting and construction of a walkway/cycleway route within the southern part of the reserves, through the former Atlas site (concept 4). The suspension bridge concept and route will no longer be considered at this point in time.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the design and construction of concept 4, consisting of a walkway/cycleway route through the former Atlas site, linking Warkworth Showgrounds and Kowhai Park Reserve.

Horopaki

Context

Background

8.       Reserve management plans for Warkworth Show Grounds Park and the adjoining Kowhai Park Reserve include objectives to provide for public pedestrian and cycle access from Warkworth and within the reserves. Linkages to the Warkworth township through the Atlas site and to the Melwood subdivision (of which Heritage Lane is a part of) were specifically highlighted.

9.       The Rodney Greenways – Paths and Trails Plan, Puhoi to Pakiri, was completed in May 2017 following public consultation, and the Warkworth Showgrounds to Kowhai Park Reserve route was identified as a priority for the area.

10.     In 2016 the walkway connection was identified by the Rodney Local Board as a priority project within the Rodney Recreational Walkways and Bike Trails programme of work. The aim is to provide improved access to both parks, to increase recreational walking and fitness activities and to provide for possible future commuter requirements in the area.

11.     Local park volunteers support the idea of a walkway and in 2017 met with council staff and consultant engineers on site to discuss possible route locations. Options were challenging due to the steep bush-clad terrain and the desire for the route to be accessible for as many different park users as possible within the constraints of the site.

12.     The preferred and most direct route was identified in a location that proposed crossing a parcel of land jointly owned by Auckland Council and three private landowners. The land has a Queen Elizabeth II Trust covenant on it.  Initial discussions with the private landowners indicated openness to council investigating this route.

13.     A feasibility investigation was completed to help provide solutions for the walkway/cycleway, reflecting buildability, cost of construction and value for money. Concept plans and options were presented at a Rodney Local Board workshop in August 2017.

14.     The preferred option, identified at the workshop, was a seventy metre long suspension bridge linking the council reserves and spanning across the jointly owned covenanted land. (Figure 1) A suspension bridge was favoured by all landowners as the preferred option; the construction of the bridge would have the least impact on the jointly owned covenanted bush area, and would span the covenanted land. Supporting foundations would be located within the reserve land at either end of the bridge.

Figure 1: Proposed location of the suspension bridge


 

15.     Contact was made with the Queen Elizabeth II Trust in September 2017 to seek approval for the walkway to cross the covenanted land, and for covenant deed discussions to begin. The trust indicated support for the bridge and the location of it provided all landowners were in favour of the proposal. Staff and local board members sought support from all landowners in 2018 but were unable to obtain this formally.

16.     In order to progress the project, alternative routes that avoid crossing the jointly owned land were investigated in February 2019, and presented at a local board workshop in May 2019 for feedback. Board members indicated support for an alternative route.

Links to the local board plan

17.     The project aligns with the following Rodney Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes and objectives -

Outcome

Objective

We can get around easily and safely

Our communities are well connected by safe and healthy walkways, cycleways and bridleways

Parks and sports facilities that everyone can enjoy

Our local parks and sports facilities cater to a wide range of sporting and recreational interests. They are easily accessible, connecting our towns, villages and growth areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Investigation of alternative routes

18.     Alternative routes that avoid crossing the jointly owned covenanted land have been investigated for feasibility. Three routes have been identified and are outlined below and in Figures 2 and 3 along with the original concept (Concept 1).

Concept

Description

1

Original - 70 metre long suspension bridge at the original location

2

70 metre long suspension bridge at a new location

3

110 metre long suspension bridge at a new location

4

15 metre long timber bridge and 450 metres of concrete pathway

 

Figure 2: Location of concepts 1-4

19.     The concept options were presented for discussion at a local board workshop on 9 May 2019. An assessment of each option was tabled, and the opportunities, constraints and risks, and estimated cost outlined.

20.     The cost to construct a suspension bridge in an alternative location (concepts 2 and 3) is estimated to be greater than the original design, and would involve either the potential loss of open field space within the rodeo area of the park (concept 2) or a more visually obtrusive structure (concept 3). A summary of the options assessment is outlined in Attachment A. The full concept evaluation report prepared by Stellar Projects Limited is attached as Attachment B.

Preferred option

21.     Local board members indicated a preference for concept 4, for a new concrete pathway through the former Atlas site, and a timber bridge of approximately fifteen metres crossing the stream. The route is shown in Figure 3.

 

Figure 3: Location of concept 4 (concrete pathway and 15 metre timber bridge across the stream)

22.     The route is estimated to be achievable for a comparable cost to the original concept and will have the least impact on the surrounding ecological area. It will also provide linkages with a Park and Ride facility proposed within the Atlas site, and to the wider Warkworth Showgrounds area, and Kowhai Park and Kowhai Park Scenic reserves.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Council staff from within the Community Services team have been consulted with, and are supportive of concept 4, if concept 1 is not achievable. The overall benefits sought from the proposal of providing improved access to both parks, increasing recreational walking and fitness activities and providing for possible future commuter requirements in the area are still achievable.

24.     Collaboration with staff within Community Facilities will be ongoing to ensure that any future plans for the development of the Atlas site are cognisant of the walkway/cycleway location and design, and are complimentary.

25.     Consultation with Healthy Waters and Auckland Transport will occur if required, as the design is progressed.

26.     Advice from council staff within Engineering and Technical Services will be sought prior to the design phase to identify any potential risks associated with the former use of the Atlas site, such as land contamination.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The benefits to the community of providing a new greenway and linkages through the reserves are able to be achieved with all concept options.

28.     The views of the private land owners who have a joint share in the adjacent covenanted land have been taken into consideration by local board members when considering the concept options at the workshop in May 2019.

29.     The construction of a suspension bridge in the original location (concept 1) could be considered again in the future if land owner approval is able to be obtained. This would provide additional linkages within the reserve and a circular route.

30.     The impact of routing the walkway/cycleway through the rodeo area of the reserve was considered by local board members, and concept 2 was not favoured for this reason.

31.     Opportunities exist to educate the local community on the history and ecology of the site through educational and interpretative signage.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Engagement with mana whenua on the Rodney Greenways – Paths and Trails Plan, Puhoi to Pakiri (2017) was undertaken as part of the consultation process.

33.     Further engagement with iwi on the future development of a Warkworth Showgrounds to Kowhai Park Reserve greenway route was discussed with iwi at the Mana Whenua North West Forum in October 2017. An update will be provided to iwi on the project when the specific route to progress with has been agreed. Interest in future involvement in the project will also be sought.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     High level indicative cost estimates for the design and construction of each concept were included in the concept evaluation report (Attachment B – Kowhai Park Walkway – Concept Evaluation Report (Stellar Projects). Two of the routes are estimated to cost more than the original proposed concept design (concept 1). The current alternative proposal (concept 4) is estimated to be achievable for a comparable budget to concept 1.

35.     The Rodney Recreational Walkways – Kowhai Park Reserve – develop walkway/cycleway project has a budget of $95,000 allocated to it. This funding is Long Term Plan Capex and has enabled the initial site investigation work and concept design work to be completed. Funding for the detailed design and construction of the walkway has been included within the region-wide Growth programme. This funding is subject to approval by the Environment and Community Committee.

Funding source

Financial Years
2017 & 2018

Financial Year
2018/19

Financial Year
2019/20

Financial Year
2020/21

Funding allocated

Long Term Plan (LTP) Capex

$49,775

$45,225

 

 

$95,000

Growth

 

 

$270,000*

$365,000*

$635,000

            * Funding to be resolved by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019


 

36.     If Growth funding is confirmed, each of the four options will be achievable within the budget. The budget allows for community engagement, specialist reports, internal project management, signage and contingency. These items are on top of the estimated costs provided in Table 1 and within Attachment B – Kowhai Park Walkway – Concept Evaluation Report (Stellar Projects).

37.     Although all options are achievable within the proposed budget, local board members have a duty to be cognisant of achieving the best value for money combined with the benefits to the community, when finalising the preferred option. Funding not required for this project will be reallocated through the region-wide Growth programme to other projects within the Auckland region.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There is a risk that the funding sought through the Growth programme will be reallocated to other projects within the Auckland region if a suitable route concept cannot be agreed upon.

39.     Engagement with the community will be undertaken as part of the design and consenting phase. There is a risk that individuals within the community may not be in support. This may delay the project and result in additional costs through the resource consent and engagement stages. There are no residential houses in close proximity to the proposed walkway/cycleway route (concept 4) so the likelihood of the community not supporting the proposed development is low. Sports clubrooms and other community group buildings associated with Warkworth Showgrounds are also located further away from the proposed walkway.

40.     Resource consent is required and the preparation and processing of the consent may have an impact on the time frame for construction.

41.     The Atlas site and the reserve land surrounding the hardstand area may be contaminated due to past activities associated with businesses previously occupying the site. There is a risk that contaminated land or materials used as fill on the site may need to be removed prior to construction of the walkway/cycleway. Soil and geotechnical investigations will be undertaken as part of the initial site investigation and design phase. If remediation is required, this may have an impact on the time frame for construction and the budget.

42.     Development of the Atlas site into a Park and Ride facility is proposed and the timing of this is to be confirmed. The walkway may be dependent on any site development occurring first.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     Approval is sought from the Rodney Local Board to progress with investigation, design, consenting and construction for walkway/cycleway concept 4, linking Warkworth Showgrounds and Kowhai Park Reserve. Local board members have previously indicated support for concept 4.

44.     Following approval, site investigation works and design for the walkway/cycleway will be progressed in financial year 2019/2020. The local board will be updated throughout the concept design phase, through local board workshops and quarterly project reporting.

45.     Community engagement will be undertaken with the local community, Warkworth Showgrounds sports clubs, and local community groups as part of the concept design phase.

46.     Collaboration with iwi on aspects of the design for the walkway and any interpretive markers or signage, will be undertaken as the project progresses.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Options Assessment

29

b

WWSG to Kowhai Park walkway options

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Susan Quinn - Stakeholder Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan

File No.: CP2019/08433

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan - June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A five-phase project programme, including internal and external consultation, has been completed to develop a greenways plan for west Rodney. 

3.       The drafting of the plan, included in the Parks, Sport and Recreation 2017/2018 Work Programme, was approved by the Rodney Local Board on 15 June 2017 (RODPC/2017/13).  During the course of the project, regular engagement took place with the Rodney Local Board Parks and Recreation Committee, ensuring adherence to the overall project programme.

4.       The overall consultation included workshops with local board members, Mana Whenua North/West forum, internal and external stakeholders, targeted (specific interest groups) and wider open public consultation sessions.  In addition, traditional and social media and the Auckland Council ‘Have your say’ website were utilised to stimulate and gather feedback.

5.       The Rodney west area, particularly Dairy Flat and Wainui, are evolving and therefore subject to significant planning and development changes.  The drafting of the greenways plan has taken into account the latest available information.

6.       A final draft of the Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan - June 2019 is attached (Attachment A to the agenda report) for adoption.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      adopt the Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan - June 2019 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Horopaki

Context

7.       The the Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan is the fourth plan developed for the Rodney Local Board area.  This plan is strategically important, as it connects with several other adopted greenways plans within and beyond the Rodney Local Board area.

8.       The project programme is delviered through the following five key phases:

i)     Research (desk and ground based), including GIS mapping and researching neighbouring greenways plans;

ii)    Local board member, internal, external agency stakeholders and Iwi engagement;

iii)    Targeted consultation with identified interested external stakeholders, including follow up investigation into viability;

iv)   Open consultation - a wider consultation exercise, extending beyond interested stakeholders; including follow up investigation into viability.

v)    Rodney Local Board adoption of the greenways plan. 

9.       Phases one to four have been completed and the project team are now seeking local board adoption of the Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan (attachment A to the agenda report).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The attached final draft Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan provides background information on the consultation and engagement process, as well as detailed analysis, route viability and priorities, including potential delivery partners funders.

11.     Staff are recommending that the local board resolves to adopt the Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan, to improve and maintain existing and inform future greenway routes, within the west Rodney area.

12.     As greenway routes and associated projects are progressed, through investigation and design, further opportunities will arise to undertake community consultation and shape community aspirations within detailed design, including engagement with Rodney Local Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     As part of phase two of the project programme and through to finalisation of the draft, engagement with internal partners, including Auckland Transport, took place to assist with drafting of the plan content.  Council group impacts and views have been included in the final plan.

14.     Although the latest planning and development information has been considered in the drafting of the greenways plan, the Rodney west area, particularly the eastern section, is evolving at pace.  The principles and approach in determining a greenway remain the same and the plan will provide assistance to Auckland Council and Auckland Transport planners and other staff and organisations involved in development proposals.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The plan aligns to the following Rodney Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes:

·    We can get around easily and safely

·    Parks and sports facilities that everyone can enjoy

·    Our harbours, waterways and environment are cared for, protected and healthy.

16.     The greenways plans for Rodney are supported through the Rodney Local Board Plan, local board agreement and Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) funding for the 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years. The Parks Sport and Recreation (PSR) 2017/18 Work Programme was approved by the Rodney Local Board on 15 June 2017 (RODPC/2017/13).  A greenways plan for west Rodney was included in the programme.

17.     During the course of the project, Rodney Local Board members have been consulted on project methodology, key milestones and engagement approach for the greenways plans. Members have attended internal stakeholder and targeted consultation engagement sessions.

18.     Greenways plans positively inform private and public developments of the local board aspirations for greenway routes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The PSR 2017/18 Work Programme was presented to the Parks Sport and Recreation North-Western area Mana Whenua hui on 2 September 2017.

20.     The work undertaken in the Parks and Places Team work programme has been designed to enable meaningful engagement with iwi, by outlining the potential project and the how it will deliver on the outcomes identified in the Local Board Plan. The intention is to provide enough information for iwi to efficiently provide input into the direction of the project before the design process begins.

21.     Iwi engagement with representatives from Mana Whenua North/West forum was held on 2 May 2018, following initial research and GIS mapping, local board member, internal and external agency stakeholder workshops.  Several iwi representatives noted their interest in early engagement as and when priority routes are put forward for feasibility, investigation and design.  Worthy of note is the ownership of two significant land parcels within the greenways plan study area:

i)    Woodhill Forest – Ngati Whatua O Kaipara

ii)   Riverhead Forest – Te Kawerau ā Maki

22.     The process of developing this plan from aspirational to planning and design to physical implementation requires the support of Mana Whenua, through working relationships and strengthened regular engagement i.e. ‘Mana Whenua Northern Iwi Forum’, including liaison with local marae.  Resourcing of iwi engagement will be achieved through the setting of work programme budgets and delivered through Auckland Council’s project framework.

23.     Environmental, cultural and social outcomes of Mana Whenua are aligned in the greenways plan under Section 4.4, page 30.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The priority routes defined within the plan identify at a strategic level requirements for implementation.  These priority routes can be delivered in any order, as and when funding and other opportunities arise through local board, Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, community support and developer/ planning requirements and initiatives.

25.     To initiate projects based on activities in Community Parks and Places work programme further LDI investment may be required. If recommended outcomes are agreed, staff will work with the local board to identify possible opportunities for funding as part of the proposed Community Facilities work programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There is an inherent risk in investing in investigation and design to initiate a project when there is no capital funding identified to deliver the physical work components.

27.     The investigation and design phase of the project delivery may identify issues that require the feasibility of routes to be reassessed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     The greenways plan identifies desired outcomes for existing and new greenways routes. Detail on the activities that will deliver on the agreed outcomes will require investigation, design and community engagement.

29.     The adopted greenways plan will be used to identify candidate projects for inclusion in the Community Facilities future work programmes to be delivered through investigation and design.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Rodney West Local Paths (Greenways) Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Don Lawson - Parks Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Bowater - Manager Parks

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Indicative Business Case: Local indoor court facility Kumeu-Huapai

File No.: CP2019/09839

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement of the indicative business case for the development of a local indoor court facility in Kumeu-Huapai.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Development of a local indoor court facility was selected by the Rodney Local Board as their One Local Initiative for funding as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028. Funding of $22.4 million was earmarked for the project, following indicative and detailed business case processes.

3.       Staff have developed an indicative business case to inform decision-making on future community investment. Preparation of the business case entailed an investigation of community need, an assessment of strategic alignment and an economic analysis.

4.       The needs assessment demonstrates a current and future community need.

5.       The strategic assessment shows strong alignment with council plans, strategies and resolutions.

6.       The economic case identified two options that deliver community benefits above the capital and operational costs

7.       Three options were also assessed:

·     Option one: indoor court provision of one-to-two courts in Rodney by 2026 (status-quo)

·     Option two: two full-sized indoor courts with indoor cricket nets and squash courts in Kumeu-Huapai (One Local Board Initiative)

·     Option three: two full-sized indoor courts in Kumeu-Huapai.

8.       Growth is projected in and around Kumeu-Huapai. This will create demand for new sport and recreation facilities. There is a current and growing gap in indoor court provision in the area. Provision of a local facility with two full-sized indoor courts by 2021 would respond to projected demand and aligns with the Community Facilities Network Plan.

9.       Options two and three feature critical success factors and meet Auckland Council’s investment objectives. Both options also deliver confirmed health and social benefits to the community. A cost-benefit analysis indicates the benefits are at least 1.6 times the costs.

10.     Staff recommend the development of a detailed business case based on options two and three rather than a single preferred option. There is a robust strategic case for change and a sound economic case.

11.     There is a medium partnership risk that the Kumeu Squash Club may choose not to invest in the proposed local indoor court facility. This is mitigated by assessing both options two and three in the detailed business case.

12.     The next steps are for staff to report to the Environment and Community Committee on 10 July 2019. The report will include resolutions from the Rodney Local Board.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      endorse the findings of an indicative business case for the development of a local indoor court facility in Kumeu-Huapai, which found that:

i)      there is significant growth projected in the Kumeu-Huapai area of Rodney Local Board, which will create demand for new sport and recreation facilities

ii)     there is a current gap of one indoor court growing to two by at least 2021 in the Kumeu-Huapai area

iii)    provision of a local facility with two full-sized indoor courts from 2021 would respond to the projected demand and aligns with the Community Facilities Network Plan

iv)    Kumeu-Huapai is an optimal location to respond to the projected population growth and to fill the future gap in the network

v)    the provision of indoor courts aligns with Auckland Plan outcomes

vi)    the quantifiable benefits of providing a local facility with two full-sized indoor courts exceed the capital and operational costs required to develop the facility.

b)      endorse that there is a robust strategic and economic case for investment in the development of a two-court indoor facility in Kumeu-Huapai.

c)      endorse the development of a detailed business case for indoor courts, commencing in 2019/2020 based on:

i)      an indicative funding investment of $22.4 million earmarked as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

ii)     two preferred options, option two: two full-sized indoor courts with indoor cricket nets and squash courts in Kumeu-Huapai and option three: two full-sized indoor courts in Kumeu-Huapai.

d)      endorse that the development of a detailed business case for indoor courts in Kumeu-Huapai be included as a priority action in the Community Facilities Action Plan.

Horopaki

Context

Development of a local indoor court facility is a priority for the Rodney Local Board

13.     Development of a local indoor court facility was selected by the Rodney Local Board as their One Local Initiative for funding as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

14.     The local board proposed two full-sized indoor courts with provision for indoor cricket nets and squash courts. The proposed multi-use facility could cater for a wider variety of sporting codes such as netball, badminton and futsal.

15.     The proposed site at Huapai Domain was identified in a feasibility study commissioned by Rodney Local Board. It is council-owned open space. No additional land is required to deliver the project. 

16.     The Finance and Performance Committee approved provisional funding for One Local Initiative projects [FIN/2018/85 refers].

17.     A total of $80,000 was allocated to the Rodney Local Board for a business case. The business case is developed in two parts - indicative and detailed business cases.

18.     Funding of $22.4 million was earmarked for the local indoor court facility to service Kumeu-Huapai, following the indicative and detailed business case processes.

Indicative business cases are a tool to support decision-making

19.     Auckland Council uses a three-stage process to investigate large-scale capital projects and new investment in community services or facilities. This approach is based on the Business Case model developed by the Treasury.

20.     The first phase begins with a needs assessment. This entails:

·     research into the profile of the community, including projected growth data

·     a summary of recent social research and any relevant community engagement surveys

·     a community facility stocktake (both council and non-council facilities)

·     a gap analysis which assesses current provision against council policy.

21.     An indictive business case considers the merits of a proposed investment. It considers strategic alignment with council objectives. It includes an economic case which considers the costs and benefits of various options that may achieve council’s investment goals.

22.     A detailed business case can be built upon:

·     a needs assessment which demonstrates a robust case for change

·     a strategic assessment which shows alignment with council objectives

·     an economic case that identifies a preferred option(s) that delivers community benefits and value for money. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     The key findings of the indicative business case for a local indoor court facility are outlined below (Attachment A to the agenda report provides a more detailed overview).

24.     There is significant growth projected in the Kumeu-Huapai area, which will create demand for new sport and recreation facilities.

·     The local population is projected to grow 35 per cent from 16,880 to 22,908 people between 2016 and 2031

·     Sport preferences are changing with an increase of 4300 indoor court users forecast by 2033. This is in addition to increased demand driven by population growth.

25.     There is a current gap of one indoor court growing to two from 2021.

·     Population data suggest that there is a current gap in indoor court provision in the study area, growing to two-courts by 2021.

·     There are no multi-sport indoor court facilities available to the public in the study area

·     Provision is being met by an active population in undersized community facilities. This confirms the need for fit-for-purpose indoor courts.

26.     Provision of a local facility from 2021 would respond to the projected demand and aligns with the Community Facilities Network Plan.

·     The plan notes that a leisure facility can provide services to a population of approximately 18,000. The study area population is projected to be 17,902 by 2021

·     The plan proposes that two indoor courts serve a five-kilometre urban catchment. Currently there are no public indoor courts in study area

·     The plan also proposes that an indoor court facility within a 30-minute drive, or roughly one indoor court per 9000 people in rural areas. There is currently no rural provision.

27.     Kumeu-Huapai is an optimal location to respond to the projected population growth and to fill the future gap in the network.

·     The proposed facility will service both the rural and urban populations of the area as defined by the Community Facilities Network Plan. There are no fit-for-purpose multi-sport indoor court facilities available to the public in the study area

·     Kumeu-Huapai is zoned as future urban zone in the Unitary Plan.

·     The proposed facility would be able to serve rural communities such as Muriwai and Helensville

·     Kumeu-Huapai and rural residents are travelling to Massey-Leisure centre for indoor-court provision. This facility is nearing capacity and was intended to serve a different catchment.

28.     The provision of indoor courts aligns with Auckland Plan outcomes, see Table 1 below.

Table 1: Alignment with Auckland Plan 2050

Outcome

Direction or focus area

Alignment

Outcome 1: Belonging and participating

Direction 2: improve health and wellbeing of all Aucklanders by reducing harm and disparities in opportunities

Aligns through providing sport and recreation facilities for under serviced and rural communities

Focus area 2:  provide accessible services and social and cultural infrastructure that are responsive in meeting peoples evolving needs

Aligns through providing a multi-purpose facility that can change in response to our changing population

Focus area 6: focus investment to address disparities and serve communities of greatest need

Aligns through providing the facility where there is an identified community need

Focus area 7: recognise the value of arts, culture, sports and recreation to quality of life.

Aligns through quantifying the benefits to the community of the facility

There is a robust case for change for the proposed facility

29.     The needs assessment demonstrates a current and future community need.

30.     The strategic assessment shows strong alignment with council plans, strategies and resolutions.

31.     The economic case identified two options that deliver community benefits above the capital and operational costs. Both options align with council’s investment objectives and critical success factors.

 

A screenshot of a cell phone

Description automatically generated

A screenshot of a cell phone

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Staff assessed three options, but only two options address the identified provision gap

32.     Staff assessed three options as a part of the investigation:

·    Option one: Indoor court provision of one-to-two courts in Rodney by 2026 (status-quo)

·    Option two: Two full-sized indoor courts with indoor cricket nets and squash courts in Kumeu-Huapai (One Local Board Initiative)

·    Option three: Two full-sized indoor courts in Kumeu-Huapai.

Option one: Indoor court provision of one-to-two courts in Rodney by 2026 (status quo)

33.     The status quo entails the development of key moves to address a future gap in recreation and leisure, with the provision of one-to-two courts in the Rodney area by 2026.

34.     This is in accordance with the findings of the North-West Community Facility Provision Investigation approved by the Environment and Community Committee on 16 October 2018 [ENV/2018/131 refers].

35.     This option has been discounted because a more recent assessment, with a different catchment area, found both a need and a provision gap centered around Kumeu-Huapai. A key difference was that the scope of the North-West Community Facility Provision Investigation did not include the wider rural population in this part of Rodney.

36.     The facility proposed under options two and three will service both the rural population and the urban Kumeu-Huapai area.

Option two: Two full-sized indoor courts with indoor cricket nets and squash courts in Kumeu-Huapai (One Local Board Initiative)

37.     Option two was developed by the Rodney Local Board as their One Local Initiative. It entails two full-sized indoor courts with provision for indoor cricket nets and squash courts.

38.     This option has strong strategic alignment. It also provides a broad range of sport and recreation opportunities. However, there are higher costs with this proposal.

Option three: Two full-sized indoor courts in Kumeu-Huapai

39.     This option consists of a standard local indoor court facility with two full-sized indoor courts.

40.     The benefits of this option are lower costs that respond directly to the identified need.

41.     It would deliver fewer community benefits than option two.

Options two and three align with investment objectives and deliver community benefits

42.     Options two and three align with critical success factors and council’s investment objectives:

·   enable our communities: fulfil Auckland Plan outcomes through increased participation in indoor sports by enhancing the current network of facilities.

·   fit-for-purpose: provide greater efficiencies through investing in multi-use facilities rather that single codes. This will support our diverse communities and provide greater efficiencies.

·   reduce inequities: reduce inequities between communities through providing facilities where the greatest need exists. This will address disparities in sport and recreation outcomes and ensure a robust network of facilities across Auckland.

·   do more with less: provide greater value for dollar spend by leveraging partnerships.

·   evidence based: prioritise indoor court facilities that will have the greatest impact based on evidence backed investment, shifting from an ad-hoc mentality.

43.     Both options deliver positive economic returns to the community.

44.     The net benefits of options two and three are over $13 million in present day terms. The ratio of benefits to costs are at least 1.6 showing that for every dollar of cost the community gets $1.60 in benefit.

45.     The primary benefits are improved physical and mental health outcomes to users. These exceed $23 million for options two and three.

46.     Other benefits included improved productivity, reduced unemployment and decreased crime.

47.     The main costs come from the high capital costs of the facility ($15 million).

48.     Sensitivity analysis which increased capital costs by 30 per cent still showed a net benefit of at least $8.9 million.

Staff recommend the development of a detailed business case based on options two and three

49.     Staff recommend the development of a detailed business case based on options two and three. There is a robust strategic case for change and a sound economic case.

50.     There is a medium partnership risk that the Kumeu Squash Club may choose not to invest in the proposed local indoor court facility. This is mitigated by assessing both options two and three in the detailed business case.

51.     The detailed business case will determine which of the options is: (1) viable (the financial case); affordable (the commercial case); and (3) achievable (the management case).

There are some limitations with the data, but these are not material

52.     Population growth is based on projections. There is a risk of growth being significantly lower than forecasted. This would result in underutilisation of the facility.

53.     The cost-benefit analysis required the use of some assumptions. A key assumption was that demand was a mixture of new demand, current demand increased through closer service provision and current demand switching from other facilities. Only the first two provide quantifiable benefits to council.

54.     Other assumptions were made on inflation, the deadweight loss of council investment and consumer surplus. If these assumptions are incorrect it could weaken the economic case for investment. This financial risk has been mitigated by sensitivity analysis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     If approved council staff will have to undertake the detailed business case.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

56.     Development of a local indoor court facility will enhance sport and recreational opportunities in Kumeu-Huapai and neighbouring areas.

57.     People in Kumeu-Huapai and neighbouring areas are highly active when compared to all Aucklanders suggesting any facility will have high usage.

58.     The Rodney Local Board selected the development of a local indoor court facility as their One Local Initiative and has previously shown support for multi-sport facilities [RD/2019/6].

59.     The views of the local board on the findings of the indicative business case are sought through this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     The Māori population in the study area is low at only seven per cent of the population. The population will be relatively stable, only growing to eight per cent by 2038.

61.     Māori participation in sport and recreation for the study area is 80 per cent. This is slightly lower than the rate of 82 percent for the study area over-all.

62.     Māori will benefit from the proposed facility alongside other ethnicities in the area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

63.     Each local board identified one priority project through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 process. The Finance and Performance Committee then approved provisional funding for these local board projects [FIN/2018/85 refers].

64.     The Rodney Local Board proposed a local indoor court facility. A total of $0.080 million was allocated to develop the business case. A total of $0.063 million remains for the development of the detailed business case.

65.     Funding of $22.4 million was earmarked for the local indoor court facility to service Kumeu-Huapai, following the indicative and detailed business case process.

66.     There is sufficient One Local Initiative funding available to deliver the indoor court facility.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.     There are three main risk areas with options two and three as outlined in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Risk identification and mitigation

Type of risk

Risk Level

Mitigation

Partnership risk

IF the Kumeu Squash Club choose not to invest in the proposed local indoor court facility

THEN the costs to council will increase

 

Medium

 

This is mitigated by assessing both options two and three in the detailed business case

Financial risk

IF costs of the project exceed initial estimates

THEN the costs could exceed the benefits

 

Low

This risk can be mitigated by obtaining detailed costing from a quantity surveyor and assessment through sensitivity analysis

All council projects are subject to financial policy decisions on cost escalation and treatment of inflation

Delivery risk

IF projected growth rates slow and expected growth does not eventuate

THEN the facility may be underutilised

 

Low

 

Staff can update the business case when new growth modelling or new census information becomes available

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

68.     The next steps are outlined in Figure 1 below, subject to the decisions of the Environment and Community Committee.

69.     If approved, work will commence on the development of a detailed business case in 2019/2020. This will include site identification and the development of the financial, commercial and management cases.[1]

70.     Operational funding may need to be allocated for the development of the detailed business case. Other costs can be met within existing funding.

71.     The timeframe for delivering the new facilities will depend on a range of factors including:

·     how long it takes to develop and obtain approval for the detailed business case

·     the time required to negotiate any partnership or commercial development opportunities.

Figure 1: Project timing

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney local board business case presentation

55

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Francis Faessen - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Ruth Woodward - Manager Parks and Recreation Policy

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community and Social Policy

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Changes to Local Board Standing Orders

File No.: CP2019/09745

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide information about the implications of the Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 and to recommend changes to the Rodney Local Board’s standing orders to align with the change in the legislation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 makes changes to various statutes, including the Local Government 2002 Act, the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Dog Control Act 1996, the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 and the Rates Rebate Act 1973.

3.       Prior to the legislation change, the Local Government 2002 Act provided for an extraordinary meeting where:

a)    It could be called by resolution, or by requisition by the mayor or one third of the members

b)    The notice period was three days (unless it was called by resolution in which case the notice period could be not less than 24 hours)

c)    If it needed to be called earlier it could be called by the mayor, or, if the mayor was unavailable, the chief executive. The notice period could be not less than 24 hours.

4.       As a result of the change, the meeting called under (c) above is referred to as an ‘emergency meeting’ rather than an’ extraordinary meeting’.

5.       There is a change to the definition of public notice – which requires notification on a council’s website in addition to a newspaper.

6.       There is a change to the definition of ‘working day’ to exclude a province’s anniversary.

7.       Staff are taking the opportunity, while considering changes to standing orders, to propose an unrelated change to the current standing orders regarding attendance by electronic link. The current standing order requires a member seeking to attend by electronic link to be representing the council and unable to attend. The proposed change removes the requirement to be representing the council.

8.       As detailed in the Local Government 2002 Act Schedule 7 clause 27 (3), a change to standing orders requires a 75 percent majority vote. The Rodney Local Board’s standing orders need to be changed to reflect the changes in the law.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the new statutory responsibility of the chief executive:

facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

b)      amend standing order 2.3.3 by replacing:

Calling an extraordinary meeting at earlier time

The chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call a meeting for an earlier time if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

with:

Calling an emergency meeting

The chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call an emergency meeting for an earlier time than is provided in Standing Order 2.3.2 if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

c)      amend standing order 7.2.3 by replacing:

Public Notification of extraordinary meetings

Where any extraordinary meeting of the local board or committee is called, and notice of that meeting cannot be given in the manner required or permitted (by Standing Order 7.2.1 as appropriate), Auckland Council shall publicly notify or otherwise advertise that meeting and the general nature of business to be transacted at that meeting as soon as practicable before the meeting is to be held, as is reasonable in the circumstances.

with:

Notification of extraordinary / emergency meetings

Where the local board or committee calls an extraordinary or emergency meeting but cannot give public notice to the extent required in Standing Order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting. If it is not practicable to publish a notice in newspapers before the meeting, the council must publicly notify the meeting as soon as practicable on the council’s website and in any other manner that is reasonable in the circumstances.

d)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

with:

Emergency meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22A of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

e)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Meeting means:

(a)  any first or ordinary or extraordinary meeting of the local board

with:

Meeting means:

(a) any first or ordinary or extraordinary or emergency meeting of the local board

f)       amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Publicly notified means notified to members of the public by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

with:

Publicly notified means made known to members of the public by a notice on the council’s website, until any opportunity for review or appeal has lapsed, and by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

g)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

a)  Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC    Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day; and

b)  If Waitangi Day or ANZAC Day falls on a Saturday or a Sunday, the          following Monday; and

c)  a day in the period commencing with 25 December in any year and            ending with 15 January in the following year.

with:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

a)              Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday,                ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

      b)  Where Waitangi Day or ANZAC Day falls on a weekend, the following        Monday

      c)  Auckland Anniversary Day

      d)  a day in the period commencing with 20 December in any year and            ending with 10 January in the following year.

h)      amend the following standing orders:

i)        SO 2.3

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

ii)       SO 7.2.4

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

iii)      SOs 1.1.3, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.3.2:

replace the words “extraordinary meeting” with “extraordinary or emergency meeting”

i)        Amend standing order 3.3.3 to remove the requirement to be representing the council:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c) in emergencies.

the member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 (LGRSAA) came into force on 21 March 2019.  The Act is an omnibus Act in that it makes minor amendments to several pieces of legislation.

11.       The LGRSAA amends the Local Electoral Act 2001 to include a new principle for “representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls”, and imposes a new responsibility on the Chief Executive of the council by amending the Chief Executive’s responsibilities in the Local Government 2002 Act (LGA)s 42(2)(d):

(da)   facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

12.     It amends the definition of “public notice” and “publicly notified” under the LGA and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) to require notification both on the council’s website and in newspapers.

13.     It creates a new category of council meeting called an “emergency meeting”, separate from “extraordinary meeting”.  Previously, extraordinary meetings had two types of notice requirements.  Where the more urgent form of notice is used, the meeting is now referred to as an emergency meeting.  This applies to giving notice to members under the LGA and to public notices under LGOIMA.

14.     It amends the definition of working day under the LGA and LGOIMA to exclude a province’s anniversary day being counted as a “working day”.

15.     It makes minor amendments to The Dog Control Act 996, the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Rates Rebates Act 1973 and makes changes to the LGA by specifying timeframes for making certain documents publicly available. These legislative changes are minor in nature and do not impact on local board standing orders.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The changes made by the LGRSAA are minor in nature, nevertheless it is necessary to amend the Rodney Local Board’s standing orders to align the language to reflect current legislation.

17.     The Rodney Local Board may also wish to consider a change to standing orders which is not related to LGRSAA. Standing order 3.3.3 provides conditions for attending a meeting by electronic link:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)   in emergencies.

The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.


 

18.     This standing order was adopted in 2015.  Since that time the technology has improved, and remote attendance to most local board business meetings is now possible. However, the conditions in the standing order are very limiting and do not allow attendance by a member who is out of Auckland for non-council reasons. 

19.     Staff recommend amending the standing order by removing the requirement to represent the council in SO 3.3.3 (a):

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The changes to the standing orders do not impact on the wider council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This is a report to 21 local boards. All local boards need to make changes to align their standing orders to LGRSAA.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The changes to standing orders brought about through the LGRSAA do not impact on the Māori community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     There are no financial implications to making these changes to standing orders.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     LGA Schedule 7 clause 27 (2) states that the standing orders of a local authority must not contravene the LGA or any other Act. If local board standing orders are not aligned to changes in the legislation, there is a risk that the local board may act inconsistently with the legislation by relying on standing orders that are not up to date.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Rodney Local Board resolution to amend the standing orders, staff will make the appropriate changes and recirculate the updated standing orders.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kerri Foote, Operations and Improvements Manager, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Jonathan Hope – Acting ManagerRelationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Rodney Local Board - 2019-2022 Community Facilities Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/09817

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To approve the Rodney Local Board 2019–2022 Community Facilities Work Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing of all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

3.   The Rodney Local Board 2019-2020 Community Facilities Work Programme was developed through a series of iterative workshops between key staff and local boards since October 2018. The projects identified in the work programme have been prioritised for investment based on a combination of local board feedback, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input.

4.   The work programme provided in Attachments A and B to this report reflect the projects that were presented in the last local board workshop with modifications based on feedback from the board, and with the inclusion of projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes.

5.   This report recommends that the board approves the 2019-2022 Community Facilities Work Programme and associated budget in full for projects commencing in the first year of the programme and in principle for subsequent two years.

6.   The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes, including local and sports field development (growth), coastal and slips prevention programmes. Inclusion of these projects in the local board work programme is subject to approval by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

7.   It is recommended that the local board approve the inclusion of these projects in the work programme and provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee.

8.   A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme” projects. These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year.

9.   Approval is sought for staff to commence work on these projects in the 2019/2020 financial year so that they can be delivered early in the event that other approved projects are delayed for any reason.

10. In order to expedite delivery of the work programme, and to manage changes that may be required in a timely way, staff recommend that the board delegate decision making for amendments to the approved programme to the chairperson.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019-2020 Community Facilities Work Programme as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report

b)      approve in principle the 2020–2022 Community Facilities Work Programme (years two and three) as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report.

c)      approve the risk adjusted programme projects identified in Attachment A to the agenda report as projects that may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year, if required to meet expected financial expenditure for the 2019/2020 financial year.

d)      note that approval of budget allocation in the 2019/2020 financial year for multi-year projects may commit the board to the allocation of subsequent years budgets.

e)      note that the inclusion in the work programme of projects that are funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets are subject to approval of the identified budget allocation by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

f)       provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee in relation to the projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets.

g)      note that budget allocation for all projects in the 2019–2022 Community Facilities Work Programme are best current estimates, and amendments may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs as the year progresses.

h)      delegate to the chairperson authority to approve minor amendments to the 2019–2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, following receipt of written advice from staff.

i)        delegate to the Manager Community Leases authority to use the agreed streamlined renewal process for lease renewals without variations.

Horopaki

Context

11. Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of Auckland. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

12. Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. The 2019-2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, detailed in the attachments, contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance.

13. Staff have engaged with the local board in the development of the work programme through a number of workshops, including:

·    1 November 2018, where the local board discussed their priorities for the future work programme

·    7 March 2019, where the local board reviewed the first draft work programme and provided feedback

·    2 May 2019, where staff provided any further information requested in workshop 2 and reviewed the revised draft work programme.

14. This year’s work programme is a three-year programme to clearly demonstrate the phasing of project delivery and to enable the organisation to prepare for delivery.  The work programme is subject to a rolling review and each year the local board will be asked to approve a new three-year work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Capital works programme

15. Investment in the capital works programme will ensure that council facilities and open spaces in Rodney Local Board remain valuable and well-maintained community assets.

16. The overall capital works programme includes projects for which the board has discretion to allocate budget, referred to as the local programme, and projects from regional programmes. 

17. Specific projects within the work programme may have budget allocated from two or more budget sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

18. The work programme includes both new projects and existing projects that have been continued from the previous financial year where those projects require multiple years for delivery (multi-year projects).

19. Any projects that have budget approved in the current 2018/2019 financial year, but are unable to be delivered this year, will be deferred. Deferred budgets will be added to the work programme at a later date

Local Programme

20. The local programme includes those projects that the board is funding from its discretionary capex budgets, including:

·    Renewals - the local board can allocate its renewals budget towards the renewal of any council owned asset.

·    Locally Driven Initiative (LDI - the local board has the discretion to allocate its LDI budget to any projects that deliver a council asset or as a capital grant to a third party to deliver an asset made available for public use.

21. In preparing recommendations for the local programme a number of matters have been considered, including:

·    strategic documents (e.g. local board plan)

·    service assessment input from Community Services

·    asset condition assessments

·    input from operational maintenance teams and staff working within facilities

·    budget availability.

22. The Community Facilities work programme supports the achievement of the following  Rodney Local Board Plan 2017 priorities:

·      Communities are influential and empowered

·      Our harbours, waterways and environment are cared for, protected and healthy

·      Parks and sports facilities that everyone can enjoy

·      We can get around easily and safely

23. Other strategic documents of particular relevance have included:

·    Greenways Plans

·    The Auckland Plan 2050

·    Kumeu Huapai Centre Plan

·    Rodney Public Toilet Provision Study

·    Riverhead Playspace Study

·    Rodney Strategic Parks Provision Assessment

24. These have influenced recommendations in the work programme by guiding the prioritisation of the programme and defining the scope of works to ensure the sought outcome is achieved. 

25. The documents have provided staff estimated population growth information including community demographic forecasts, this informs provisional requirements when planning future developments across the Rodney area.

26. Some of the key projects to be accommodated in the work programme include:

·    Riverhead - develop playspace with walkways

The new subdivision in Riverhead has a proposed development of a new park with playspace and connecting walkways as provision for the 65 new homes in the immediate vicinity. 

·    Atlas Site - demolition of outbuildings

This project sees the second phase of the site development with the first being approval of the strategic assessment for the site.  Demolishing the redundant outbuildings will provide the open space intended for a temporary Park and Ride transport service.  This initiative forms part of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2017.

·    Wellsford, 118 Rodney Road - rebuild toilet block

The redevelopment of the Wellsford public toilet block is at concept design phase and is yet to be approved by the board to progress to the detailed design and consenting phase.  The facility has significant usage which has been the key driver to rebuild a facility fit for purpose to meet the high demand.

·    Rodney Recreational Walkways - Kowhai Park - develop walkway/cycleway

The detailed design has been approved by the local board and physical works are planned to commence in the 2019/2020 financial year subject to funding approval being granted by the Environment and Community Committee.  This shared pathway will bridge the new subdivision to the Warkworth Showgrounds allowing easy access to the town centre, temporary Park and Ride and other community facilities. 

·    Indoor multi-sport facility - development - Huapai

This development is the Rodney Local Board’s “one local initiative” proposed to the Governing Body to progress to the next stage of delivery.  The facility will address the provision gap identified in the Huapai/Kumeu area.  The sports hub is proposed to be built at Huapai Recreation Reserve, adjacent to the new special housing area and surrounding subdivisions.

·    Rodney Town Centre Revitalisation - Warkworth and Helensville

The approved designs for both town centres will progress into physical works phase. The outcome sought will optimise the under used open space areas providing passive community areas for events or recreational use.  The public engagement has been well received and feedback taken into consideration throughout the design phase.

27. The phasing of projects over various years is recommended to meet budget requirements.  In this regard careful consideration has been given to the delivery timing of various Rodney play spaces and public toilet blocks which has meant that some carparks with lower usage will be phased in later years.

28. Of particular note in the work programme is the Goodall Reserve Skate Ramp renewal which was reprioritised for immediate renewal to address health and safety concerns.  A review of the skate ramp design standards is anticipated and will inform future renewal

recommendations across the region.  The remediation works for this skate ramp will be a collaborative approach with external subject matter experts and the Parks, Sport and Recreation department.

29. The proposed work programme in Attachment A to the agenda report contains:

·    Number of projects excluding leases and contract lines over three years: 80

·    Indicative cost for proposed projects in the 2019/2020 financial year: $8,339,500

Regional Programme

30. The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 includes budgets which support the delivery of regional programmes. These budgets are allocated to specific projects within a regional programme by the governing body.

31. Where budget is allocated to a project in the regional programme that falls within a local board decision making allocation (e.g. a local park), that project is included in the local board work programme. The local board then has decision making responsibility for that project, within the parameters set by the Governing Body, namely location, scope and budget.

32. Regional budgets include:

·    Local parks and sports field development (growth)

·    Coastal renewals

·    Slips prevention and remediation.

33. Projects in these regional programmes are identified and prioritised based on consideration of a number of factors.

34. For the local parks and sports field development programme, this includes:

·    Extent to which residential growth is generating demand for the project

·    Current levels of provision

·    Available budget.

35. For coastal renewals and slips prevention and remediation this includes:

·    Asset condition

·    Relative hazard and risk

·    Available budget

36. The allocation of budget to specific projects will be approved by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

37. The local board has an opportunity to provide formal feedback, through resolution to this report, for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee prior to approval of the regional programmes.

Capital Programme Delivery

Cost estimates subject to change

38. Budget allocations within the work programme are best estimates only. Project costings are subject to change and refinement as projects progress through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined around the specific work required and the cost of delivery of that work once the details are defined.

39. The delivery of individual projects is managed within the overall work programme budget for each local board. Where significant changes to project budgets may need to be considered, or if new projects are added to the work programme, changes may be required to the programme to accommodate final project costs as the year progresses.

Risk adjusted programme

40. A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects.

41. These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year (i.e. year two of the three-year programme). Staff propose to commence work in the 2019/2020 year on the delivery of these risk adjusted projects.

42. By progressing these identified projects alongside the 2019/2020 projects in the programme, it is intended that, should projects identified for delivery in year one of the work programme be delayed for any reason, staff will be able to proceed with agreed alternative projects to ensure that the full annual budget is delivered each year.

43. Approval is sought from the local board for staff to commence work on those projects identified in the work programme as risk adjusted programme projects in the 2019/2020 year.

Delegation for approval of changes to the work programme

44. The delivery of the proposed work programme in an efficient and timely manner may require amendments to be made to the agreed work programme during the course of the year. Such amendments could include:

·    changes to project scope, budgets, timing

·    addition of new projects within available budget

·    cancelling or putting approved projects on hold.

45. Any changes to the approved work programme require approval from the board. Approval will normally be sought through resolution at a business meeting.

46. Local boards are also able to delegate authority to approve some or all amendments to the work programme to the chair, to another member of the local board, or to staff. Such delegation would allow changes to be made without the timeframes required to provide formal reports and would support the efficient delivery of the work programme.

47. Should the local board choose to delegate authority to approve changes to the work programme, it is anticipated that any changes would be workshopped with the local board prior to any delegated decision being taken. Any changes made under delegation would be reported back to the local board in their quarterly report.

Leasing work programme

48. Community leases, commonly on public parks and reserves, are a valuable way in which the council provides support to community organisations across the region. These groups provide a wide range of community activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities and are a key part of the mosaic of community activity and infrastructure in Auckland.

49. Attachment B – Community Leases provides a detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2019/2020 financial year. Following approval of the work programme staff will proceed with review and renewal of these leases and licences as appropriate during the course of the financial year.

50. Two additional project lines include those leases and licences proposed to be progressed in the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years respectively. It also includes the additional leases and licences that will be deferred from the 2018/2019 financial year to the 2019/2020 financial year.

51. Straight forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations with a written memo to the board providing the opportunity for the board to request further information or a formal report. More complex community leases will be reported to the board at a business meeting.

Operational maintenance work programme

52. The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

·    increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets

·    improving the safety of Community Facilities assets

·    ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users.

53. In the 2019-2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, there are three line items dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area:

·    Full Facilities Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, coastal management and storm damage response. From 1 July 2019 council is responsible for streetscapes maintenance from Auckland Transport.

·    Arboriculture Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all tree management and maintenance

·    Ecological Restoration Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include pest plant management within ecologically significant areas and animal pest management across all parks and reserves

54. Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly report. Community Facilities is also providing additional weekly updates to all elected members on contractor performance.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55. The 2019-2022 Community Facilities Work Programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

56. In particular, the council’s Parks Sport and Recreation department were involved in the development of the play space and toilet block renewal project scopes. The department provided recent provision assessments outlining the gaps in the Rodney areas. 

57. The Infrastructure and Environmental Services department biosecurity team have played an integral role throughout the process of kauri die back mitigation across the Rodney area where there has been infected trees identified. This feedback has guided renewal recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe / Local impacts and local board views

58. The Community Facilities Work Programme has been created through a combination of local board feedback, asset condition assessments and agreed levels of service.

59. The 2019-2022 Community Facilities Work Programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2018 to May 2019. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programmes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60. The 2019-2022 Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

61. Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

62. Staff are also attending mana whenua forum’s monthly to receive feedback on specific projects within the 2019-2022 Community Facilities Work Programme.

63. Activities in the work programmes that are specific to Māori outcomes include:

·    Rodney Recreational Walkways - Kowhai Park - develop walkway/cycleway

·    Green Road - develop site

·    Buckleton Beach Reserve - renew timber seawall

·    Point Wells Foreshore Reserve - renew seawall

·    Rainbows End Reserve - renew jetty and piles

·    Scotts Landing Wharf - renew seawall

·    Whangateau Reserve - renew seawall - stage 1 - campground

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64. Table 1 below summarises the relevant budgets, proposed allocation and the balance of unallocated budget available.

Local Budgets

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

Renewals - Budget

$5,304,680

$4,454,230

$2,439,480

Renewals - Proposed Allocation

$5,304,500

$4,454,000

$2,439,000

Renewals - Unallocated budget

$180

$230

$480

 

 

 

 

Growth and Development - Allocation

$415,000

$1,265,000

$950,000

Coastal Renewals - Allocation

$1,985,000

$170,000

$0

Slips Prevention - Allocation

$50,000

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Capex - Proposed Allocation

$0

$50,000

$1,000,000

 

 

 

 

LDI Opex - Proposed Allocation

$585,000

$0

$0

65. The proposed work programme can be accommodated within the available local board budgets. Approval of the work programme does not have significant financial implications, unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend.

66. Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the board. These updates will identify progress of all projects and potential amendments to the approved programme including changes to budget allocation and timing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67. Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.  The risk adjusted programme (RAP) will be used to progress those projects identified as ready to proceed under the RAP.

68. If the proposed Community Facilities work programme is not approved at the business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

69. Once approved, delivery of activities identified in the Community Facilities work programme will commence from 1 July 2019.

70. The work programmes identify if further decisions are required for each activity. These will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

71. Progress and updates on work programmes will be reported to the local board for each quarter of the financial year. 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board: Community Facilities 2019-2022 Work Programme: Build, Maintain, Renew

83

b

Rodney Local Board: Community Facilities 2019-2022 Work Programme: Leases

97

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Angie Bennett, Work Programme Lead, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 



Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the 2019/2020 Rodney local environment work programme

File No.: CP2019/09690

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Rodney Local Board local environment work programme, totaling $350,000 of locally driven initiatives operational expenditure, and $26,000 of asset-based services operational expenditure.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board identified an aspiration in its 2017 local board plan to ensure ‘our harbours, waterways and environment are cared for, protected and healthy’.

3.       To give effect to this aspiration, staff developed six options for projects for the local board to consider supporting in the 2019/2020 local environment work programme.

4.       The local board provided feedback to Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff regarding which of these projects it would like to fund at its 7 March 2019 workshop. The local board supported the following two projects to be funded with its locally driven initiatives operational expenditure budgets:

· Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund - $290,000

· Pest free management plans - $60,000.

5.       The local board did not support a new sediment-related water quality testing programme and a streamside awareness project in Warkworth, due to budgetary constraints and other environmental priorities.

6.       Staff also recommended a joint environmental project with Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust. The local board did not support this recommendation for inclusion in the 2019/2020 local environment work programme, however it would like possible projects with the trust to be proposed again for possible funding in the 2020/2021 financial year.

7.       The local board also has $26,000 of asset-based services operational budget for the Rodney drainage districts.

8.       This report recommends that the local board approve its local environment work programme and associated budgets for delivery within the 2019/2020 financial year (see Attachment A to the agenda report). The draft work programme has a total of $350,000 of locally driven initiatives operational expenditure, and $26,000 of asset-based services operational expenditure, which can be funded from within the local board’s draft budgets for the 2019/2020 financial year.

9.       The proposed budget represents a 12 per cent increase in the local board’s environmental expenditure from the 2018/2019 financial year.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the Infrastructure and Environmental Services 2019/2020 work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), which includes:

i)        the allocation of $350,000 of locally driven initiatives expenditure for environmental projects as summarised in the table below:

Project

Budget

Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund

$290,000

New project: Pest free management plans

$60,000

Total

$350,000

 

ii)      the allocation of $26,000 of asset-based services operational expenditure f     or waterway improvements in the three drainage districts.

Horopaki

Context

10.     In late 2018, in alignment to its local board plan outcomes, the Rodney Local Board provided strategic direction to staff regarding the projects it would like to fund in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board noted its strong commitment to the environment, and in particular noted its:

·     support for landowners to protect waterways through the Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund

·     support for animal and plant biodiversity through pest-free initiatives.

11.     In response to the direction set by the local board, Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff provided a draft local environment work programme for the local board’s feedback at a workshop on 7 March 2019.

12.     The local board indicated its support in principle for three of the proposed projects, but requested that staff defer one project with Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust, and remove two projects due to budget constraints and other environmental priorities for 2019/2020.

13.     Based on these workshop discussions, three local environmental projects are proposed to be funded from the local board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget and asset-based service operational budget. These will be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate as part of the local board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme. The draft work programme has been amended to reflect local board feedback and is included as Attachment A to this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The draft work programme presented to the local board in March 2019 included six options for projects with a total value of $400,000, funded by locally driven initiatives operational expenditure. Some of these continued established projects that the local board had funded in previous years (for example, the Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund), and other project options were new additions that were developed in response to local board direction in late 2018.

15.     A brief description of each of the proposed projects for delivery as part of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme is provided below. Further detail on the three projects supported by the local board for inclusion in their local environment work programme is provided in Attachment A to this agenda report.

Drainage Districts - $26,000 asset-based services operational expenditure

16.     The local board has $26,000 of asset-based services operational budget for the Rodney drainage districts in the 2019/2020 financial year. Undertaking repairs and maintenance in the drainage districts contributes towards the local board plan objective of ensuring ‘our harbours, waterways and environment are cared for, protected and healthy’.

17.     The funding for this project is allocated to maintenance and repairs in the three drainage districts within Rodney Local Board area: Okahukura, Te Arai, and Glorit.

18.     Asset assessment reports for the three districts were commissioned and completed in the 2017/2018 financial year. These reports identified maintenance requirements for the drainage systems in each district. These requirements have been prioritised and the additional maintenance works that extended beyond the normal Rodney Local Board funded maintenance will be implemented by Healthy Waters during the 2019/2020 financial year.

19.     Healthy Waters attended a Rodney Local Board workshop on 6 June 2019 to discuss how best to fund drainage districts in future years, following a meeting with the community and stakeholders in May 2019 to understand their concerns regarding the current management of the drainage districts and will report back to the local board with a further update at a later date.

Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund - $290,000

20.     To achieve the local board plan objective that ‘our harbours, waterways and environment are cared for, protected and healthy’, the local board has indicated it would like to continue funding the Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund in the 2019/2020 financial year.

21.     This will be the third year of local board support for the fund which provides landowners and community groups with financial assistance to protect and restore the riparian margins of waterways within the Rodney Local Board area. In both the 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 financial years, $290,000 was allocated toward this project (resolutions RODTP/2017/19 and RODTP/2018/23).

22.     Specific catchments will be selected across the Rodney region based on water quality and community engagement drivers. Areas within previously targeted catchments will be revived to create a larger fenced off riparian corridor within the catchments. The fund only covers work on private land and Māori land.

23.     This project will use external contractors who are managed by the waterways planning team within council to assist with the delivery of the fund. The contractor ensures commitments are delivered as per the funding agreement and grants will be paid once works are complete, invoices provided and works inspected.

24.     The cost is approximately $40,000 for the contractor to deliver these works and $250,000 for the fund.

New project: Pest free management plans - $60,000

25.     To achieve the local board plan initiative to ‘provide funding and support for community efforts to improve our environment, such as community-led volunteer initiatives focussed on pest-free areas, streamside restoration, weeding and planting’, the local board has indicated it would like to support the creation of a Pest Free Management Plan for Rodney in the 2019/2020 financial year.

26.     A budget of $60,000 will support the development of two or three co-designed community catchment pest and riparian management plans.

27.     These plans will be written through a facilitated, co-design process with landowners, community groups and mana whenua in the selected areas, and in conjunction with various council departments.

28.     Specific areas will be selected across the Rodney region in conjunction with mana whenua, community and council priorities (including consideration of catchments selected for the Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund).

Additional project (not supported): Sediment related water quality testing project - $25,000

29.     To achieve the local board plan objective to ensure ‘our harbours, waterways and environment are cared for, protected and healthy’, staff recommended that the local board support a sediment related water quality testing project.

30.     This project would involve water quality testing and analysis in stormwater pipes surrounding building developments deemed as permitted activities (not requiring a resource consent). This testing would be used gather evidence of what contaminants are discharging in to the waterways from small site development in the Rodney area.

31.     At the 7 March 2019 workshop the local board indicated that it did not support this project at this time, due to other environmental priorities during the 2019/2020 financial year. 

Additional project (not supported): Streamside Awareness Project - $5,000

32.     To achieve the local board plan objective to ensure ‘our harbours, waterways and environment are cared for, protected and healthy’, staff suggested the local board support a streamside awareness project in Rodney.

33.     A streamside awareness programme was proposed to be undertaken with residents living in a new sub-division in Rodney Local Board area. The area selected would be located adjacent to a waterway, where residents will be visited, and a survey undertaken to gather information about what kind of activities residents would like to be involved in to enhance water quality as well as providing basic educational material about their local stream.

34.     Following the survey, a report would be prepared for the local board summarising the findings of resident interests, so that the Rodney Local Board could make a decision about how best to support and further engage with the interested residents in future financial year.

35.     Following the workshop on 7 March 2019, the local board indicated that due to budgetary constraints and other environmental priorities, they would not support undertaking this project in the 2019/2020 financial year.

Additional project (not supported): Restoration works by Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust - $20,000

36.     This initiative was directly proposed by the Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust as an opportunity to have a positive impact on water quality and to further develop their kaitiaki role in the Rodney Local Board area.

37.     If supported, staff would work with Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust to identify a potential site for restoration in the Rodney Local Board area that would then be brought to the local board for approval.

38.     The budget requested would support the trust to develop a restoration plan for the selected area, identify and prioritise areas and species for weed control, suggest plant lists and areas for revegetation and implement the first year of restoration activities.

39.     The local board showed partial support for this project and requested that it be thoroughly scoped with a restoration area already identified for possible inclusion in the 2020/2021 local environment work programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The draft 2019/2020 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

41.     In particular, the Parks, Sport and Recreation department have been involved in the scoping of the pest free management plans. If approved, they will contribute towards the delivery of the project in the 2019/2020 financial year through engaging relevant community groups and stakeholders in the drafting of the plans, as well as ensuring alignment in the plans with planned Parks, Sport and Recreation activity in the chosen areas.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Rodney Local Board area. In particular, the healthy harbours fund will benefit catchments such as Makarau, Upper and Lower Kaipara and Rangitopuni, with the possibility to include further catchments.

43.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘our harbours, waterways and environment are cared for, protected and healthy’.

44.     The proposed local environment work programme was discussed with the local board at a workshop on 7 March 2019. The local board indicated its support of the proposed projects outlined in this report, as summarised above.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     It is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

46.     Table 1 below outlines how each of the projects contributes towards Māori outcomes.

Table 1. Māori impact assessment of proposed projects for inclusion in the Rodney Local Board’s local environment work programme

Project

Māori impact assessment

Drainage Districts

Local iwi have land interests in the Te Arai Point land development which connects to the lower part of the Te Arai drainage district. Engagement with mana whenua will be undertaken to develop long-term options for the district.   

Managing water resources and maintaining water quality are significant issues for Māori. The role of mana whenua as kaitiaki for the environment Is identified in The Schedule of Issues of Significance to Māori in Tamaki Makaurau.

Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund

Water quality has integral links with concepts of kaitiakitanga and Te Ao Māori, where people are closely connected to the land and nature. Engagement with Te Uri o Hau and the Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group is ongoing. Te Arai plant nursery have provided free eco sourced plants to landowners and, in conjunction with advice from Healthy Waters staff, continue to support the project by growing native plants suitable for riparian margins.  

New project: Pest free management plans

No specific engagement with mana whenua or Māori community groups has been undertaken as part of the scoping of this project. However, it is acknowledged that environmental protection and biodiversity values have integral links with concepts of kaitiakitanga.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     The proposed 2019/2020 local environment work programme requires the allocation of $350,000 of locally driven initiatives operational expenditure, and $26,000 of asset-based services operational expenditure.

48.     This amount can be accommodated within the local board’s total draft budget for 2019/2020. As such, the local board’s approval will not have significant financial implications unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend. Regular quarterly updates on projects will be provided to the local board tracking expenditure and identifying any projects at risk of non-delivery, over or underspend.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     If the proposed local environment work programme is not approved at the local board’s June 2019 business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be able to be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

50.     The risks and proposed mitigation measures associated with each of the proposed projects have been outlined in Attachment B to this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Subject to the localboard’s approval, the delivery of this work programme will commence in the new financial year (1 July 2019). Regular reporting on project delivery will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed 2019/2020 local environment work programme

105

b

Risks of proposed 2019/2020 local environmental projects

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Halliwell - Relationship Advisor

Jaimee Maha - Team Leader Relationship Advisory

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Rodney Local Board community services 2019/2020 work programme

File No.: CP2019/10376

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 community services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each financial year, a work programme is developed that details the activities to be delivered in the local board area. The development process is supported by a series of workshops with the local board.

3.       To prepare for the 2019/2020 work programme staff representing relevant operational council departments worked together to ensure an integrated approach.

4.       This report presents the draft 2019/2020 community services work programme, which responds to Rodney Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes and reflects the priorities that have been agreed by departments across council.

5.       Delivery of new activities in the work programme will commence from 1 July 2019. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery progress, highlights, potential delays and budget implications.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 community services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report). 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board decides which activities to allocate its annual work programme budget to in order to achieve the outcomes set out in its 2017 local board plan.

7.       The development of the 2019/2020 work programme has built on the approach piloted for 2018/2019, which enabled staff to work in a more integrated way across departments to improve local outcomes.

8.       In preparation for the 2019/2020 work programme process, an overview group was created from the following council departments to develop an agreed approach to achieve improved integration:

·     Arts, Community and Events

·     Community Facilities

·     Libraries

·     Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·     Parks, Sports and Recreation

·     Community Services - Service, Strategy and Integration.

9.       Teams made up of representatives from these departments were established to explore shared priorities and objectives for each local board area, and to develop the work programme in a collaborative way in response to local board plan outcomes.

10.     Table one shows the business objectives and strategic alignment for community services departments.

Table 1: Adopted community-based strategies and plans

Department

Business objectives

Strategies and plans

Arts, Community and Events

Provision of services, programmes, events and facilities that strengthen and connect communities and create a sense of belonging and pride

·  Hire Fee Framework

·  Events Policy

·  Toi Whītiki

·  Thriving Communities

Libraries

Provision of library services and programmes that support Aucklanders with reading and literacy, and opportunities to participate in community and civic life

·  Te Kauroa

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Provision of services to actively engage Aucklanders to lead healthy lives, connect with nature and value our cultural identity

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

·  Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

·  Auckland Growing Greener Framework

·  Urban Ngāhere Strategy

Service, Strategy and Integration

Provision of service and asset planning advice and support more integrated delivery of community outcomes

·  Community Facilities Network Plan

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The local board provided feedback on proposed activities for the new financial year at a series of workshops between September 2018 and May 2019.

12.     Initial workshops were an opportunity for the local board to communicate to staff its strategic direction. At subsequent workshops, the local board discussed its priorities for budget allocation and requested further scoping for existing and new activities.

13.     The activities in the work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in its 2017 local board plan.

14.     The work programme is made up of approved activities from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board.

15.     Budget is allocated to activities for the 2019/2020 financial year. If zero-dollars is shown this reflects that the project is able to be delivered in-house with no additional external technical advice and support.

16.     Table two shows activities and allocated budget that are new in 2019/2020 or are significantly different to the 2018/2019 work programme.

Table 2: New and significant changes activities

Line number

Activity

Activity description

2018/2019 budget

2019/2020 budget

Local board plan outcome:  Parks and sports facilities that everyone can enjoy

600

(new)

Wellsford Centennial Park Study

Investigate the provision of sport and recreation services at Wellsford Centennial Park.

$0

$30,000

615

(new)

Sandspit parking service assessment

Complete service assessment for open space provision to identify options to provide an improved parking service at Sandspit carpark.

$0

$10,000

666

(new)

South Kaipara Outdoor Recreation Network Assessment

Strategically assess the value of proposed investigations to understand the South Kaipara outdoor recreation network.

$0

$10,000

Local board plan outcome: We can get around easily and safely

659

(new)

Rodney - investigate options to deliver local paths

Investigate governance models to enable community groups to deliver Greenways (Local Paths). Prepare a service assessment of opportunities to support communities to deliver a sustainable and resilient local path network.

$0

$40,000

Local board plan outcome: Communities are influential and empowered

152

(new)

Responding to Māori aspirations

Work with local iwi to identify, scope and deliver projects that will support the iwi to better realise their aspirations in Rodney.

$0

$0

17.    The way in which Community Places activities are presented in the work programme has changed for 2019/2020. Work related to the operation of venues for hire, community centres, houses, hubs and rural halls will now be reported by the following levels of service: Access, Activation and Intervention Programming.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The work programme has been developed by a collective of operational council departments.

19.     The interdepartmental connections made throughout the process will enable an integrated approach to delivery of the activities and allow for further collaboration throughout the year. These working relationships will also support an integrated approach to work programme development in future years.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The local board provided direction and feedback on the draft work programme at a series of workshops.  

21.     These workshops provided an opportunity for staff to gain an understanding of local board strategic direction and priorities. Budget allocation, activity content and scoping were discussed and refined.

22.     The activities in the final work programme support achieving local board plan outcomes and objectives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Community services and Community Facilities have developed Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai!, a relationship approach which guides staff to deliver on agreed work programme activities and support the local board to achieve outcomes in its local board plan.

24.     The approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori.

25.     Table three outlines the activities in the 2019/2020 work programme where Māori responsiveness is the primary outcome.

Table 3: Māori impact of proposed activities

Line number

Activity

Māori impact

152

 

Responding to Māori aspirations

Iwi aspirations and culture are reflected in the look and feel of their areas.

972

Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori – Rodney

Celebrating te ao Māori with events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes:

·    Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Māori Language Week

·    engaging with Iwi and Māori organisations

·    Whakatipu i te reo Māori - champion and embed te reo Māori in our libraries and communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     Activities are funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: Asset Based Services (ABS) Opex; Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) Capex and Opex.

27.     Each activity line has a budget allocation, which covers the delivery for the 2019/2020 period. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects that the implementation costs are met through staff salary or other funding sources.

28.     The community services LDI budget for the local board for the 2019/2020 financial year is $634,404.

29.     Where activities are cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or to create a new activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The key risks for activities that are managed through the work programme are non-delivery, time delays and budget overrun. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery including highlighting any potential delays and budget implications.

31.     As the work programme includes ongoing activity and annually occurring events or projects, the associated risks have been identified and managed in previous years. Additional risk management for these activities is ongoing and can be reported quarterly.

32.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board through quarterly reporting when required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Delivery of approved activities will commence at the beginning of the financial year, 1 July 2019 and progress will be reported to the local board for each quarter.

34.     The work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney community services 2019/2020 work programme

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 



Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 



Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Rodney Local Board Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2019/00150

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached for members’ information is an update from the Rodney Local Board chairperson, Beth Houlbrooke, for June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board chairperson has provided a report on recent activities for the information of the members.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report for June 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson's report June 2019

127

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Jonathan  Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Deputations and public forum update

File No.: CP2019/00191

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       As part of its business meetings Rodney Local Board and its committees (Transport, Infrastructure and Environment, and Parks and Recreation) has a period of time set aside for deputations/presentations and public forum during which time members of the public can address the local board on matters within its delegated authority.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Orders there is provision for deputations/presentations to the local board. Applications for deputations/presentations must be in writing setting forth the subject and be received by the relationship manager at least seven working days before the meeting concerned, and subsequently have been approved by the chairperson.  Unless the meeting determines otherwise in any particular case, a limit of ten minutes is placed on the speaker making the presentation.

3.       Standing Orders allows three minutes for speakers in public forum.

4.       Requests, matters arising and actions from the deputations/presentations and public forum are recorded and updated accordingly.  The Rodney Local Board deputations/presentations and public forum update is attached as attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the deputation and public forum update for 16 May 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputation public forum update 16 May 2019

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Rodney Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2019/00157

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the Rodney Local Board workshop records for 6 June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board and its committees hold regular workshops.

3.       Attached for information is the records of the most recent workshop meeting of the Rodney Local Board. The workshop records for the Rodney Local Board’s Parks and Recreation Committee and the Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee will appear on the relevant agendas of those committees.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 6 June 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 6 June 2019

135

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2019/00172

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Rodney Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Rodney Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·      ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·      clarifying what advice is required and when

·      clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar as at June 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

139

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 


 


 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2019/00164

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Cr Sayers for his update on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

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Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

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Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Jonathan Hope – Acting Relationship Manager

      

 


Rodney Local Board

20 June 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Rodney Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

C1       Acquisition of land for open space - Helensville

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2       Acquisition of land for open space - Warkworth

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] One of the key objectives of the detailed business case will be to identify opportunities to deliver the facilities at lower cost to council. Opportunities to increase revenue, undertake partnerships or obtain sponsorship will be investigated.