I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 27 June 2019

5.15pm

Local Board Office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Paul Walden

 

Members

Shirin Brown

 

 

John Meeuwsen

 

 

Bob Upchurch

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Safia Cockerell

Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

 

19 June 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 283 8212

Email: safia.cockerell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Waiheke Extinction Rebellion Group - Robyn Bailey                                      5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Councillor's update                                                                                                       7

12        Waiheke Quick Response, Round Three 2018/2019 grant allocations                    9

13        Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update June 2019                               55

14        Recommendations from the Waiheke Transport Forum                                         59

15        Approval of the Waiheke Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme 2019/2022                                                                                                                      97

16        Approval of the Waiheke Local Board Plans and Places Draft Work Programme 2019/20: Waiheke Area Plan                                                                                     117

17        Approval of the Waiheke Local Board Community Services 2019/2020 work programme                                                                                                                 123

18        Landowner approval to grant a temporary concession over Tawaipareira Reserve for a bicycle service workshop                                                                                139

19        New community lease to Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated situated at Waiheke Island Artworks, 2 Korora Road, Oneroa, Waiheke Island                   145

20        New community lease to Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated situated at Ostend Domain, 43 Causeway Road, Waiheke                                                                    153

21        New community lease to Scout Association of New Zealand situated at Putiki Reserve, 14 Shelly Beach Road, Waiheke Island                                                   161

22        Manuēsina sculpture estimate of costs                                                                  169

23        Changes to Local Board Standing Orders                                                              175

24        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update from 1 November 2018 to 30 April 2019                                                                                                 181

25        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 187

26        Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings                                      193

27        Governance Forward Work Programme                                                                 207

28        List of resource consents                                                                                         213  

29        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal)  - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring the calm, bring all things good, bring peace….good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meetings, held on Thursday, 23 May 2019 and on Thursday, 6 June 2019, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Waiheke Extinction Rebellion Group - Robyn Bailey

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Robyn Bailey and the Waiheke Extinction Rebellion Group will be in attendance to request that the board declare a climate emergency.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank Robyn Bailey for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Councillor's update

File No.: CP2019/09788

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         note the verbal update from the Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Waiheke Quick Response, Round Three 2018/2019 grant allocations

File No.: CP2019/10275

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Waiheke Local Board Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Waiheke Local Board Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019 (refer to Attachment B).

3.       The Waiheke Local Board adopted the Waiheke Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 26 April 2018 (refer to Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Waiheke Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $70,244.50 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $65,533.08 has been allocated in previous grant rounds.

5.       In addition, the Waiheke Local Board resolved to reallocate a further $19,300 from the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational funding from the community response fund walking and cycling and civic events budgets (WHK/2019/108) and $2,000 from the Strategic Events Fund budget (WHK/2018/222) to the community grants budget. This would provide a total budget of $26,011.42 for quick response round three.

6.       Eleven applications were received for Waiheke Local Board Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019, requesting a total of $35,831.00.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)   agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Waiheke Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019, listed in table one below.  

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1918-301

Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of new audio systems including labour, cables, speakers, an amplifier and microphone.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1918-304

Ethno Oceania

Arts and culture

Towards accommodation and ferry costs for the "Ethno New Zealand" festival at the Piritahi Marae in January 2020.

$2,600.00

Eligible

QR1918-310

The Artworks Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the "Korora mural project" costs including kaumatua and artist's fees, materials and venue hire.

$3,700.00

Eligible

QR1918-303

Waiheke Health Trust

Community

Towards support worker wages and social workers supervision fees from August 2019 to July 2020.

$5,000.00

Eligible

QR1918-311

Waiheke Island Toy Library Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of a container to be placed in the Surfdale Hall car park.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1918-317

Awaawaroa Bay Limited

Environment

Towards pest rodent and feral pig control in native bush adjacent to Te Ara Hura walkway, including rat poison and ammunition.

$1,680.00

Eligible

QR1918-307

Lyndal Jefferies

under the umbrella of Community Networks Waiheke

Events

Towards the "Oneroa Sunday Market" costs including landowner and council market fees, entertainment and advertising from October 2019 to April 2020.

$3,903.00

Eligible

QR1918-308

George Kahi

under the umbrella of Community Networks Waiheke

Events

Towards Matariki closing ceremony costs including fireworks and soup.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1918-315

Waiheke Island Dirt Track Club Incorporated

Events

Towards Waiheke Dirt Track Club annual outdoor firework display on Friday 8th November 2019.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR1918-313

Waiheke Mountain Bike Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the annual "Round Rangihoua Race" costs including advertising, race plates, food, event permit and prizes.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1918-319

Waiheke Island Rugby Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards ferry travel costs for the under 13 and seven “all girl” rugby teams to travel to competitions between July and August 2019.

$1,448.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$35,831.00

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities;

·        lower priorities for funding;

·        exclusions;

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close; and

any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Waiheke Local Board adopted the Waiheke Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 26 April 2018 (refer to Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11.     Eleven applications were received for Waiheke Local Board Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019, requesting a total of $35,831.00

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage. Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waiheke Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16.     The board is requested to note that Section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states:
‘We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

17.     A summary of each application received through Waiheke Quick Response, Round Three 2018/2019 is provided (refer to Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes. Four organisations applying in this round have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The allocation of grants to community groups or individuals is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

20.     The Waiheke Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $70,244.50 for the 2018/2019 financial year. A total of $65,533.08 has been allocated in previous grant rounds.

21.     In addition, the May 2019 Waiheke Local Board business meeting reallocated $19,300 from the local board Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget to the community grants budget line (WHK/2019/108) as follows:

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter three 2018/2019

b)      reallocate the following budgets to the community grants budget for allocation          during the next quick response grant round:

·   Community response LDI FY19                         $8800

·   Walking and cycling LDI FY19                           $7500

·   Civic events LDI FY19                                        $3000

22.     Furthermore the Waiheke Local Board resolved to reallocate the remaining $2,000 in the Strategic Events Fund to the contestable grants budget (WHK/2018/222). This provides a total community grants budget of $26,011.42 for quick response round three.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Following the Waiheke Local Board allocating funding for quick response round three, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board Grants Programme 2018/2019

15

b

Waiheke Quick Response Round Three 2018/2019 grant applications

19

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Agus Castro Pons - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Shane King - Head of Service Support

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update June 2019

File No.: CP2019/09791

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board on transport related matters in their area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The report focuses several current issues:

·    An update on the state of mitigation measures being put in place to ensure the smooth operation of the ferry terminal during the renewals project at Kennedy Point.

·    Ratification of 10 Year Transport Plan for consultation.

·    New bus shelter designs for Waiheke’s new bus network.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update June 2019.

b)      approve the draft 10 Year Transport Plan for consultation.

c)      endorse the bus shelter design as shown in the tabled drawings, accepting that the the graphics will be Waiheke specific and are still to be confirmed.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report addresses transport related matters on Waiheke and includes information on the status of the LBTCF.

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. They report monthly to local boards, as set out in their Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    be safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       A summary of the LBTCF is contained in the below.

Waiheke Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$1,214,794

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$153,274

Remaining Budget left

$1,061,520

Ten Year Transport Plan

7.       The draft 10 Year Transport Plan for Waiheke Island, a key aspect of the new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed between the Waiheke Local Board and Auckland Transport, has been completed to a draft for consultation stage.

8.       This draft plan is the culmination of many months of concerted work by the Waiheke Local Board, Auckland Transport, the Waiheke Transport Forum and members of the Waiheke community. While much of the draft plan is currently unfunded it provides a clear view of what transport initiatives need undertaking on the island. The public consultation will enable determination of the final priority of projects and is an opportunity to add any projects that generate strong public support but are not currently covered by the draft plan. The results of the consultation and proposed changes to the draft plan will be reported to the local board for its approval.

9.       At the time of writing this report and following the final board feedback session, the plan document was still having minor amendments and design elements being incorporated. The final draft plan document is therefore tabled at this meeting. Auckland Transport seeks the board’s approval of the draft plan for public consultation.

Bus shelters for Waiheke New Network

10.     Auckland Transport has workshopped several options for a new Waiheke centric bus shelter design. This would utilise the same components as the modular mainland shelters but have unique Waiheke motifs on the glass paneling and incorporated into some of the other components of the shelters. The Waiheke Local Board have worked through the design issues with Auckland Transport and settled on a format for the shelter that will provide; shelter from the weather, safety and good visibility.

11.     While the initial purchase cost of the new shelters will be higher than the traditional timber Waiheke shelters, the ‘whole of life’ cost of the shelters should be lower.

12.     A mock-up of the final design of the basic shelter structure is tabled for the Waiheke Local Board’s approval.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report are confined to AT and do not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Te Werewero sculpture

14.     The Waiheke Community are purchasing the Te Werowero sculpture currently situated at the Mātiatia Ferry Terminal. To this end a ‘Give a Little’ page was set up by a local arts benefactor and raised $25,000 towards the purchase price. Auckland Transport has also agreed to contribute the balance of the purchase price out of the capital funds it has for building and fitting out transport facilities.

15.     Auckland Transport has approved a site for Te Werowero in front of the Mātiatia Ferry Terminal.

Renewal works at Kennedy Point

16.     Upgrade work at Kennedy Point is progressing well but the work has necessitated some changes in the way things operate. These changes have caused some confusion about what is required. To this end several changes are underway to assist users and ferry staff.

17.     Disability drop-off area

·    This area now has construction signage (non-regulatory), identifying it as a disability pick-up/drop-off area – (This area will remain coned off and the cones will be cleared by AT’s traffic management operator when required.)

·    AT has arranged traffic management operator coverage for the full time of ferry operations, not just when work on the wharf is being carried out.

18.     Car park and footpath to the ferry

·    Temporary signage explaining the way things need to operate has been installed.

·    Suitable warning equipment on the road preceding the blind corner leading to the car park is being investigated and a resolution is expected shortly.

·    At the time of writing this report the central light standard in the carpark was still not working due to issues with the electricity supply. Auckland Transport’s contractors are working to establish a new supply for this light and this should be installed by the end of the week ending 29 June and the lights will then be working again.

·    Temporary lighting is also in the process of being sourced and these units should also be installed by June 29.

·    New lighting has been installed along the footpath down to ferry.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Interactions with mana whenua is done on a project specific basis. There is no direct impact because of this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications by receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board in July 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Recommendations from the Waiheke Transport Forum

File No.: CP2019/10269

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the recommendations from the Waiheke Transport Forum meeting held 30 May 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting of 30 May 2019, the Waiheke Transport Forum resolved as follows:

 

12

Transport Forum Feedback on Proposed Community Road Safety Projects

Resolution Number WAI/2019/21

That the Waiheke Transport Forum:

(a)  provide feedback to the Waiheke Local Board on the prioritisation of the proposed community road safety projects as follows:

1.   Speed and safety modifications at Donald Bruce Road roundabout

2.   Installation of cycleways in the Surfdale retail area

3.   The Causeway westbound cycleway

 

13

Update on the New Waiheke Public Bus Network

Resolution Number WAI/2019/22

That the Waiheke Transport Forum:

(a)  note the feedback on the proposed public bus stop location on Waiheke Island.

 

14

Options for Replacement of Forum Member Ison

Resolution Number WAI/2019/23

That the Waiheke Transport Forum:

(a)  thank Member Andrew Ison for his service to the Waiheke Transport Forum and to the Waiheke Community.

(b)  recommend the Waiheke Local Board appoint the new Fullers Operations and Transport Manager to replace Andrew Ison on the Waiheke Transport Forum.

 

3.       The original reports, attachments and minutes from the 30 May 2019 Waiheke Transport Forum meeting are attached for reference.

4.       Attachment A outlines feedback on items 12 and 13 from the Transport Forum members.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      accept the resolutions of the Waiheke Transport Forum, namely:

i)        feedback to the Waiheke Local Board on the prioritisation of the proposed community road safety projects as follows:

1.      Speed and safety modifications at Donald Bruce Road roundabout – first priority (with a pedestrian crossing)

2.      Installation of cycleways in the Surfdale retail area – second priority

3.      The Causeway westbound cycleway – third priority

ii)       note the feedback on the proposed public bus stop locations on Waiheke Island as per Attachment A.

iii)      thank Member Andrew Ison for his service to the Waiheke Transport Forum and to the Waiheke Community.

iv)      recommend the Waiheke Local Board appoint the new Fullers Operations and Transport Manager to replace Andrew Ison on the Waiheke Transport Forum.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Transport Forum Feedback on Items 12 (Community Road Safety Projects) and 13 (New Waiheke Public Bus Network)

61

b

Transport Forum Minutes for meeting held 30 May 2019

63

c

Item 12 - Report and Attachment - Transport Forum Feedback on Proposed Community Road Safety Projects

69

d

Item 13 - Report and Attachment - Update on the New Waiheke Public Bus Network

81

e

Item 14 - Report - Options for Replacement of Forum Member Ison

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lisa Young - Local Board PA Liaison

Authoriser

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Waiheke Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme 2019/2022

File No.: CP2019/10421

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2022 Community Facilities Work Programme for the Waiheke Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing of all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

3.       The Waiheke Local Board 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme was developed through a series of iterative workshops between key staff and local boards since October 2018. The projects identified in the work programme have been prioritised for investment based on a combination of local board feedback, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input.

4.       The work programme provided in Attachments A and B to this report reflect the projects that were presented in the last local board workshop with modifications based on feedback from the local board, and with the inclusion of projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes.

5.       This report recommends that the local board approves the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme and associated budget in full for projects commencing in the first year of the programme and in principle for subsequent two years.

6.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes, including local and sports field development (growth), coastal and slips prevention programmes. Inclusion of these projects in the local board work programme is subject to approval by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

7.       It is recommended that the local board approve the inclusion of these projects in the work programme and provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee.

8.       A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects. These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year.

9.       Approval is sought for staff to commence work on these projects in the 2019/2020 year so that they can be delivered early in the event that other approved projects are delayed for any reason.

10.     In order to expedite delivery of the work programme, and to manage changes that may be required in a timely way, staff recommend that the local board delegate decision making for amendments to the approved programme to the chair.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report. 

b)      approve in principle the 2020 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme (years two and three) as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report.

c)      approve the risk adjusted programme (RAP) projects identified in Attachment A to the agenda report as projects that may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year, if required to meet expected financial expenditure for the 2019/2020 financial year.

d)      note that approval of budget allocation in the 2019/2020 year for multi-year projects may commit the local board to the allocation of subsequent years budgets.

e)      note that the inclusion in the work programme of projects that are funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets are subject to approval of the identified budget allocation by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

f)       provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee in relation to the projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets.

g)      note that budget allocation for all projects in the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme are best current estimates, and amendments may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs as the year progresses.

h)      delegate to the chair authority to approve minor amendments to the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, following receipt of written advice from staff.

i)        delegate to the Manager Community Leases authority to use the agreed streamlined renewal process for lease renewals without variations.

j)        delegate authority to the chair to approve minor capital works projects up to $5000 on consensus of board members and following receipt of written officer advice, in accordance with work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 3205 activity name Parks LDI quick response fund - Waiheke FY20, noting approved projects will be included within the next quarterly report to the board.

k)      note the cancellation of Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) capex for work programme activity ‘Rangihoua / Onetangi Reserve - Golf Club - renew driveway and culvert’, resolved in the 2018/2019 financial year (Resolution WHK/2018/158) as the required renewal works are to be funded with Asset Based Services (ABS) capex renewals. Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) capex funding of $18,000 to be returned for reallocation within the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of Auckland. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

12.     Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. The 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, detailed in the attachments, contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance.

13.     Staff have engaged with the local board in the development of the work programme through a number of workshops, including:

·    8 November 2018 where the local board discussed their priorities for the future work programme

·    21 March 2019 where the local board reviewed the first draft work programme and provided feedback

·    2 May 2019 where staff provided any further information requested in workshop two and reviewed the revised draft work programme.

14.     This year’s work programme is a three year programme to clearly demonstrate the phasing of project delivery and to enable the organisation to prepare for delivery. The work programme is subject to a rolling review and each year the local board will be asked to approve a new three year work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Capital works programme

15.     Investment in the capital works programme will ensure that council facilities and open spaces in Waiheke Local Board remain valuable and well-maintained community assets.

16.     The overall capital works programme includes projects for which the local board has discretion to allocate budget, referred to as the local programme, and projects from regional programmes. 

17.     Specific projects within the work programme may have budget allocated from two or more budget sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

18.     Projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets are listed below:

·    Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets

Onetangi Domain - install lighting & upgrade to sand carpet on field 3 - upgrade of the existing field number 3 to a sand carpet construction with sports lighting to provide for the 15 hour shortfall in provision. Refer work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 2075.

·    Coastal Renewals

Onetangi Beach remediate erosion - Preventing coastal erosion and ensuring the preservation of public recreational areas. Refer work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 2921.

Onetangi Beach renew beach access – Renewal of beach access structures in the coastal environment due to identified health and safety concerns. Refer work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 2538.

·    Slips Prevention

Church Bay - purchase and stabilization of adjacent land. Refer work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 2340.

Esslin Road, Picnic Bay – Installation of stormwater system to ensure the area remains stable and fit for purpose during storm events. Refer work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 3189.

Pohutukawa Reserve, Waiheke - Install fencing, pathway and planting to ensure future stability to the landslide area. Refer work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 3320.

Te Whau Esplanade Reserve - renew Hitapa track. Renew the Hitapa track at Te Whau Esplanade Reserve which has sustained damage due to a land slip. Refer work programme item SharePoint identification number SPID 3201.

19.     The work programme includes both new projects and existing projects that have been continued from the previous financial year where those projects require multiple years for delivery (multi-year projects).

20.     Any projects that have budget approved in the current 2018/2019 financial year, but are unable to be delivered this year, will be deferred. Deferred budgets will be added to the work programme at a later date.

 

Local Programme

21.     The local programme includes those projects that the local board is funding from its discretionary capex budgets, including:

·    Renewals

The local board can allocate its renewals budget towards the renewal of any council owned asset.

·    Locally Driven Initiative (LDI)

The local board has the discretion to allocate its LDI budget to any projects that deliver a council asset or as a capital grant to a third party to deliver an asset made available for public use.

22.     In preparing recommendations for the local programme a number of matters have been considered, including:

·    strategic documents (e.g. local board plan)

·    service assessment input from Community Services

·    asset condition assessments

·    input from operational maintenance teams and staff working within facilities

·    budget availability.

 

23.     The Community Facilities work programme supports the achievement of the following 2017 Waiheke Local Board Plan priorities:

·    Inclusive planning and placemaking

·    A sustainable economy and positive visitor experience

·    Waiheke's environment is treasured

·    Thriving, strong and engaged communities

·    Vibrant places for people

·    Transport and infrastructure

 

24.     Other strategic documents of particular relevance have included

·    Essentially Waiheke 2015

·    Waiheke Paths Plan 2019

·    Te Ara Hura walkway development and promotion

Concept and Action plans:

·    Tawaipareira Masterplan and Skate Park concept plan

·    Little Oneroa Action Plan

·    Little Oneroa Concept Plan

·    Alison Park concept plan

25.     These have influenced recommendations in the work programme by providing strategic guidance for the prioritisation of the programme planning and delivery.

26.     Some of the key projects to be accommodated in the work programme include:

·    Waiheke toilets renewals programme - medium term FY19/20 work programme

Prepare a business case, undertake design and seek necessary consents for new toilets for Oneroa Village (or other identified priority locations).

Comprehensive toilet provision analysis to guide long term needs and inform what projects need to go through business cases.

Investigate feasibility and business case for boat pump out facility at Matiatia Wharf.

·    Rakino Hall and seawall

Relocation of the Rakino Hall and seawall is being investigated to address increasing coastal inundation challenges and to establish the service requirements for an onsite community facility. A report will be taken back to the local board with findings to seek direction on the next stage.

 

·    Onetangi Beach - renew beach access structures

Due to health and safety concerns, three sets of access stairs and one of four ramps to the beach were removed. New stairs and sand ladders have been installed. In 2019/2020 design, building and resource consents will be undertaken to ensure a timely delivery of the wooden stairs that will enable pedestrian access in replacement of the dingy ramp (opposite Sixth Avenue carpark).

 

·    Onetangi Sports Park

Upgrade of field number three to a sand carpet with sports lighting.

Renew the passive area between buildings and fields to alleviate ponding.

Sports building roof fastenings renewal.

 

·    Tin Boat Reserve - amenity improvements

Provision of shade over the existing tin boat play structure, install rotating net, remove and reinstall swing set.

 

27.     The phasing of projects over various years is recommended to meet budget requirements. In this regard careful consideration has been given to the delivery timing of the renewal of tracks across Waiheke Island. An investigation is underway to review all the tracks on the island. A report will then come back to the local board with the current conditions of all tracks in the open space, with recommendations as to the prioritised delivery of those required track renewals to be phased in later years.

28.     Of particular note in the work programme is:

·    Tawaipareira Reserve – replacement of the skate ramp and renewal of skate park.       A draft concept plan has been prepared and is underway with a public and stakeholder engagement stage. The concept plan will set the future vision for the skatepark which is funded through renewals. There is opportunity for a level of service increase through the use of discretionary capital budget to develop a new play space area and flying fox.

·    Rangihoua / Onetangi Sports Park – upgrading of the existing field number three to a sand carpet construction with sports lighting to provide for the identified fifteen hour shortfall in provision. Improvement of these facilities will improve the local community’s health and wellbeing by providing quality recreational facilities.

29.     The proposed work programme in Attachment A contains:

·    Number of projects excluding leases and contract lines over three years: 29

·    Indicative cost for proposed projects in the 2019/2020 financial year: $1,773,000

 

Regional Programme

30.     The Long-Term Plan 2018 – 2028 includes budgets which support the delivery of regional programmes. These budgets are allocated to specific projects within a regional programme by the governing body.

31.     Where budget is allocated to a project in the regional programme that falls within a local board decision making allocation (e.g. a local park), that project is included in the local board work programme. The local board then has decision making responsibility for that project, within the parameters set by the governing body, namely location, scope and budget.

32.     Regional budgets include:

·    Local parks and sports field development (growth)

·    Coastal renewals

·    Slips prevention and remediation.

33.     Projects in these regional programmes are identified and prioritised based on consideration of a number of factors.

34.     For the local parks and sports field development programme, this includes:

·    Extent to which residential growth is generating demand for the project

·    Current levels of provision

·    Available budget.

35.     For coastal renewals and slips prevention and remediation this includes:

·    Asset condition

·    Relative hazard and risk

·    Available budget

36.     The allocation of budget to specific projects will be approved by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

37.     The local board has an opportunity to provide formal feedback, through resolution to this report, for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee prior to approval of the regional programmes.

 

Capital Programme Delivery

Cost estimates subject to change

38.     Budget allocations within the work programme are best estimates only. Project costings are subject to change and refinement as projects progress through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined around the specific work required and the cost of delivery of that work once the details are defined.

39.     The delivery of individual projects is managed within the overall work programme budget for each local board. Where significant changes to project budgets may need to be considered, or if new projects are added to the work programme, changes may be required to the programme to accommodate final project costs as the year progresses.

 

Risk adjusted programme

40.     A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects.

41.     These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year (i.e. year two of the three-year programme). Staff propose to commence work in the 2019/2020 year on the delivery of these risk adjusted projects.

42.     By progressing these identified projects alongside the 2019/2020 projects in the programme, it is intended that, should projects identified for delivery in year one of the work programme be delayed for any reason, staff will be able to proceed with agreed alternative projects to ensure that the full annual budget is delivered each year.

43.     Approval is sought from the local board for staff to commence work on those projects identified in the work programme as risk adjusted programme projects in the 2019/2020 year.

 

Delegation for approval of changes to the work programme

44.     The delivery of the proposed work programme in an efficient and timely manner may require amendments to be made to the agreed work programme during the course of the year. Such amendments could include:

·    changes to project scope, budgets, timing

·    addition of new projects within available budget

·    cancelling or putting approved projects on hold.

45.     Any changes to the approved work programme require approval from the local board. Approval will normally be sought through resolution at a business meeting.

46.     Local boards are also able to delegate authority to approve some or all amendments to the work programme to the chair, to another member of the local board, or to staff. Such delegation would allow changes to be made without the timeframes required to provide formal reports and would support the efficient delivery of the work programme.

47.     Should the local board choose to delegate authority to approve changes to the work programme, it is anticipated that any changes would be workshopped with the local board prior to any delegated decision being taken. Any changes made under delegation would be reported back to the local board in their quarterly report.

 

Leasing work programme

48.     Community leases, commonly on public parks and reserves, are a valuable way in which the council provides support to community organisations across the region. These groups provide a wide range of community activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities and are a key part of the mosaic of community activity and infrastructure in Auckland.

49.     Attachment B – Community Leases provides a detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2019/2020 financial year. Following approval of the work programme staff will proceed with review and renewal of these leases and licences as appropriate during the course of the financial year.

50.     Two additional project lines include those leases and licences proposed to be progressed in the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years respectively. It also includes the additional leases and licences that will be deferred from the 2018/2019 financial year to the 2019/2020 financial year.

51.     Straight forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations with a written memo to the local board providing the opportunity for the local board to request further information or a formal report. More complex community leases will be reported to the local board at a business meeting.

 

Operational maintenance work programme

52.     The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

·    Increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets

·    Improving the safety of Community Facilities assets

·    Ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users.

53.     In the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, there are three-line items dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area:

·    Full Facilities Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, coastal management and storm damage response. From 1 July 2019 council is responsible for streetscapes maintenance from Auckland Transport

·    Arboriculture Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all tree management and maintenance

·    Ecological Restoration Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include pest plant management within ecologically significant areas and animal pest management across all parks and reserves.

54.     Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly report. Community Facilities is also providing additional weekly updates to all elected members on contractor performance.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The 2019 - 2022 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

56.     In particular Community Services, Asset Management Information Services, Investigation and  Design and Operational Maintenance teams are partnering to establish a current state of all tracks across Waiheke Island. The tracks will be investigated as to their condition, visually mapped and reported back to the local board with a recommended strategic prioritised delivery plan that will be phased over financial years. 

57.     The council’s Community Services, Community Facilities Landscape Design, Investigation Design and ACE (Arts Community Events) are partnering in development of and public engagement stages for a number of key concept and actions plans, which set the future strategic vision for these open spaces. These align with the principles of Essentially Waiheke, ensuring the character of Waiheke is protected and enhanced. These include for:

·    Tawaipereira skatepark – full replacement of the skate ramp, skatepark and development of a new play space.

·    Little Oneroa Reserve – play space, car park redevelopment, open space amenity improvements.

58.     The Infrastructure and Environmental Services department Biosecurity team have played an integral role throughout the process of Kauri Die Back mitigation across Waiheke Island where there have been infected trees identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     The Community Facilities Work Programme has been created through a combination of local board feedback, asset condition assessments and agreed levels of service.

60.     The 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2018 to May 2019. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programmes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

62.     Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

63.     Staff are also attending mana whenua forum’s monthly to receive feedback on specific projects within the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     Table 1 below summarises the relevant budgets, proposed allocation and the balance of unallocated budget available.

Local Budgets

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

Renewals - Budget

$1,530,000

$1,040,065

$1,286,155

Renewals - Proposed Allocation

$1,275,000

$1,040,065

$1,020,000

Renewals - Unallocated budget

$255,000

$0

$266,155

 

 

 

 

Growth and Development - Allocation

$0

$242,500

$700,000

Coastal Renewals - Allocation

$270,000

$0

$0

Slips Prevention – Allocation

$170,000

$80,000

$220,000

 

 

 

 

LDI Capex - Proposed Allocation

$58,000

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Opex - Proposed Allocation

$0

$0

$0

 

65.     The proposed work programme can be accommodated within the available local board budgets. Approval of the work programme does not have significant financial implications, unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend.

66.     Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the local board. These updates will identify progress of all projects and potential amendments to the approved programme including changes to budget allocation and timing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity. The risk adjusted programme (RAP) will be used to progress those projects identified as ready to proceed under the RAP.

68.     If the proposed Community Facilities work programme is not approved at the business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

69.     Once approved, delivery of activities identified in the Community Facilities work programme will commence from 1 July 2019.

70.     The work programmes identify if further decisions are required for each activity. These will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

71.     Progress and updates on work programmes will be reported to the local board for each quarter of the financial year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Community Facilities BMR Work Programme 19_22

107

b

Waiheke Community Leases Work Programme 19_20

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katrina Morgan - Senior Project Manager

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Waiheke Local Board Plans and Places Draft Work Programme 2019/20: Waiheke Area Plan

File No.: CP2019/09748

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the board of the continued work led by the Plans and Places department to prepare an area plan for Waiheke during 2019/20.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Plans and Places department commenced work in late2018 on the preparation of an area plan for Waiheke. This was in accordance with a Planning Committee resolution in June 2018, endorsing the preparation of the Waiheke Area Plan as the first step in a plan change to bring the district plan provisions of the Hauraki Gulf Islands within the ambit of the Auckland Unitary Plan.

3.       Area plan preparation has always been anticipated over part of the 2018/19 and 2019/20 years.

4.       The project is funded by the Plans and Places and other contributing departments’ budgets.

5.       Local board members will continue to form part of the working party overseeing preparation of the Waiheke Area Plan, and the local board is responsible for final adoption of the plan in late 2019/early 2020.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the continuation of the preparation of the Waiheke Area Plan by the Plans and Places department into the 2019/20 financial year.

b)      continue its involvement in the working party established by the Planning Committee to oversee preparation of the Waiheke Area Plan, and to consider the Waiheke Area Plan for adoption in due course.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Hauraki Gulf Islands are outside the District Plan level provisions in the Auckland Unitary Plan, operative in part. This is because the Hauraki Gulf Island section of the Auckland Council District Plan was only made operative in 2013 as the Auckland Unitary Plan was going through its initial statutory steps and the council considered there was no need to relitigate the issues dealt with.

7.       After the Auckland Unitary Plan was made operative in part, the council’s Planning Committee considered how to incorporate the Hauraki Gulf Islands into the Auckland Unitary Plan’s district plan provisions.

8.       At its 5 June 2018 meeting, the Planning Committee approved a two-stage approach to incorporating the Hauraki Gulf Islands into the Auckland Unitary Plan, being:

i.        Stage 1: the development of area plans for Waiheke island and Aotea Great Barrier Island.

ii.       Stage 2: a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (operative in part).

9.       The committee also established a working party for each of the two area plans, consisting of the local board members, the ward councillor and a member of the Independent Maori Statutory Board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The structure planning process commenced in late 2018 and the programme always anticipated a process that ran from the 2018/19 year into the 2019/20 year.

11.     The working party has had a number of workshops addressing key issues and that process will continue, and ultimately the Waiheke Local Board will have responsibility for final adoption of the Waiheke Area Plan in late 2019/early 2020.

12.     The costs of preparation of the Waiheke Area Plan are being borne by the Plans and Places department along with the other contributing departments of the council.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The project supports the local board’s work to achieve the outcomes set out in the local board plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     Specific Council-Controlled Organisations (CCOs) such as Watercare, Auckland Transport and ATEED have been part of the project team for the Waiheke Area Plan and have contributed views and information accordingly.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     The Waiheke Area Plan process incorporates direct consultation with relevant Iwi. This process is ongoing and is a factor in the current timing of the Waiheke Area Plan production.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The project is funded in the Plans and Places budget and those of contributing departments for 2019/20. No direct local board contribution is required.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     The potential risks to the project are the following:

i.    The forthcoming local body elections affecting the timing of the delivery of the Waiheke Area Plan.

ii.    The ability of stakeholders to participate in the development of the plan.

18.     In terms of the first risk, any delay of short duration to accommodate the election process will not materially affect the process to complete the Waiheke Area Plan.

19.     In terms of the second risk, a specific consultation process tailored to the circumstances of the population on Waiheke is being developed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     The Waiheke Area Plan preparation process is ongoing and will continue until an area plan is adopted by the local board.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Plans and Places Work Programme 19_20

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Peter Vari - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 



Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the Waiheke Local Board Community Services 2019/2020 work programme

File No.: CP2019/10934

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 community services work programme (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each financial year, a work programme is developed that details the activities to be delivered in the local board area. The development process is supported by a series of workshops with the local board.

3.       To prepare for the 2019/2020 work programme staff representing relevant operational council departments worked together to ensure an integrated approach.

4.       This report presents the draft 2019/2020 community services work programme, which responds to Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes and reflects the priorities that have been agreed by departments across council.

5.       Delivery of new activities in the work programme will commence from 1 July 2019. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery progress, highlights, potential delays and budget implications.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 community services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board decides which activities to allocate its annual work programme budget to in order to achieve the outcomes set out in its 2017 local board plan.

7.       The development of the 2019/2020 work programme has built on the approach piloted for 2018/2019, which enabled staff to work in a more integrated way across departments to improve local outcomes.

8.       In preparation for the 2019/2020 work programme process, an overview group was created from the following council departments to develop an agreed approach to achieve improved integration:

· Arts, Community and Events

· Community Facilities

· Libraries

· Infrastructure and Environmental Services

· Parks, Sports and Recreation

· Community Services - Service, Strategy and Integration.

9.       Teams made up of representatives from these departments were established to explore shared priorities and objectives for each local board area, and to develop the work programme in a collaborative way in response to local board plan outcomes.

10.     Table one shows the business objectives and strategic alignment for community services departments.

Table 1: Adopted community-based strategies and plans

Department

Business objectives

Strategies and plans

Arts, Community and Events

Provision of services, programmes, events and facilities that strengthen and connect communities and create a sense of belonging and pride

·  Hire Fee Framework

·  Events Policy

·  Toi Whītiki

·  Thriving Communities

Libraries

Provision of library services and programmes that support Aucklanders with reading and literacy, and opportunities to participate in community and civic life

·  Te Kauroa

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Provision of services to actively engage Aucklanders to lead healthy lives, connect with nature and value our cultural identity

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

·  Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

·  Auckland Growing greener framework

·  Urban Ngāhere Strategy

Service, Strategy and Integration

Provision of service and asset planning advice and support more integrated delivery of community outcomes

·  Community Facilities Network Plan

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The local board provided feedback on proposed activities for the new financial year at a series of workshops between September 2018 and May 2019.

12.     Initial workshops were an opportunity for the local board to communicate to staff its strategic direction. At subsequent workshops, the local board discussed its priorities for budget allocation and requested further scoping for existing and new activities.

13.     The activities in the work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in its 2017 local board plan.

14.     The work programme is made up of approved activities from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board.

15.     Budget is allocated to activities for the 2019/2020 financial year. If zero-dollars is shown this reflects that the project is able to be delivered in-house with no additional external technical advice and support.

16.     Table two shows activities and allocated budget that are new in 2019/2020 or are significantly different to the 2018/2019 work programme.

Table 2: New and significant changes activities

Line number

Activity

Activity description

2018/2019 budget

2019/2020 budget

Local board plan outcome:  Vibrant places for people

754

 

Waiheke Island strategic response fund

Develop a service assessment guiding management and development of the public space at Onetangi and Oneroa Beaches over the next ten years.

This has increased due to a change in scope.  

$7,000

$20,000

Local board plan outcome: Inclusive planning and place-making

827

 

Matiatia parks: Implementing a parks related Matiatia Gateway Masterplan

Parks related projects to be planned and delivered in the Matiatia area.  

This is a continuation from 2018/2019 and is the amount required for this financial year.  

 

$50,000

$40,000

 

17.     The way in which Community Places activities are presented in the work programme has changed for 2019/2020. Work related to the operation of venues for hire, community centres, houses, hubs and rural halls will now be reported by the following levels of service: Access, Activation and Intervention Programming.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The work programme has been developed by a collective of operational council departments.

19.     The interdepartmental connections made throughout the process will enable an integrated approach to delivery of the activities and allow for further collaboration throughout the year. These working relationships will also support an integrated approach to work programme development in future years.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The local board provided direction and feedback on the draft work programme at a series of workshops.  

21.     These workshops provided an opportunity for staff to gain an understanding of local board strategic direction and priorities. Budget allocation, activity content and scoping were discussed and refined.

22.     The activities in the final work programme support achieving local board plan outcomes and objectives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Community services and Community Facilities have developed Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai!, a relationship approach which guides staff to deliver on agreed work programme activities and support the local board to achieve outcomes in its local board plan.

24.     The approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori.

25.     Table three outlines the activities in the 2019/2020 work programme where Māori responsiveness is the primary outcome.

Table 3: Māori impact of proposed activities

Line number

Activity

Māori impact

167

Māori responsiveness

Work with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify, and ensure responsiveness to, key aspirations and priorities for Māori.

921

Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori 

Celebrating te ao Māori with events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes:

·      Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Māori Language Week

·      engaging with Iwi and Māori organisations

·      Whakatipu i te reo Māori - champion and embed te reo Māori in our libraries and communities. 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     Activities are funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: Asset Based Services (ABS) Opex; Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) Capex and Opex.

27.     Each activity line has a budget allocation, which covers the delivery for the 2019/2020 period. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects that the implementation costs are met through staff salary or other funding sources.

28.     The community services LDI budget for the local board for the 2019/2020 financial year is $662,120.

29.     Where activities are cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or to create a new activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The key risks for activities that are managed through the work programme are non-delivery, time delays and budget overrun. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery including highlighting any potential delays and budget implications.

31.     As the work programme includes ongoing activity and annually occurring events or projects, the associated risks have been identified and managed in previous years. Additional risk management for these activities is ongoing and can be reported quarterly.

32.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board through quarterly reporting when required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Delivery of approved activities will commence at the beginning of the financial year, 1 July 2019 and progress will be reported to the local board for each quarter.

34.     The work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke community services 2019/2020 work programme

129

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 



Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

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27 June 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

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27 June 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Landowner approval to grant a temporary concession over Tawaipareira Reserve for a bicycle service workshop

File No.: CP2019/10573

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek landowner approval to grant Cycle Action Waiheke a temporary concession to occupy Tawaipareira Reserve for one year to operate a bicycle service workshop.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Cycle Action Waiheke proposes to locate a bicycle service workshop at Tawaipareira Reserve for 12 months. The purpose of the proposal is to promote better use of bicycles on Waiheke, aimed at children and youth, by incorporating bicycle repair and service skills through the workshop. The workshop will be operated from a temporary container mostly on weekends and during school holidays.

3.       The Waiheke Local Board delegated its powers and functions under the Reserves Act 1977 over the Tawaipareira Reserve to a co-management committee; the Rangihoua and Tawaipareira Management Committee. This committee has not yet been constituted due to a Ngāti Pāoa mandate issue currently being resolved by the Māori Land Court. In the interests of progressing Cycle Action Waiheke’s application, the local board may resolve to withdraw its delegation to the Rangihoua and Tawaipareira Management Committee for this particular decision.

4.       Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust and Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board have been consulted on the application and its effects as well as the proposal to withdraw the delegation to the Rangihoua and Tawaipareira Management Committee for this decision. Both entities expressed support and approval for Cycle Action Waiheke’s proposal to progress as co-governors in the interim.

5.       Staff recommend that the local board withdraws its delegation made on 23 November 2017 [Resolution WHK/2017/195] and approves the landowner approval application for the bicycle workshop proposal. If approved, Cycle Action Waiheke will be able to apply for funding to enable the proposal. The occupation period of twelve months will commence from the date that Cycle Action Waiheke locate the container on Tawaipareira Reserve as indicated in the proposal.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      withdraw the delegation made on 23 November 2017 [Resolution number WHK/2017/195] to the Rangihoua and Tawaipareira Management Committee in respect of this decision on the application for Cycle Action Waiheke to temporarily occupy Tawaipareira Reserve for 12 months to operate a bicycle service workshop

b)      approve the landowner application for Cycle Action Waiheke to temporarily occupy Tawaipareira Reserve for 12 months for the operation of a bicycle service workshop by way of a concession granted subject to Section 59A of the Reserves Act 1977 in accordance with Part 3B of the Conservation Act 1987.

 

Horopaki

Context

Tawaipareira Reserve (management background)

6.       Tawaipareira Reserve, being the part legally described as Lot 2 DP 207850 (the reserve), is owned by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as a classified recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977. By notice in the New Zealand Gazette, the Department of Conservation appointed Ngāti Paoa Whanau Trust Board and the legacy Auckland City Council to jointly control and manage this reserve for recreation purposes. As such, the Waiheke Local Board and Ngāti Paoa must jointly decide on any landowner approval application seeking to undertake an activity on the reserve.

7.       By resolution number WHK/2017/195, the Waiheke Local Board established the Rangihoua and Tawaipareira Management Committee (the committee) and delegated their co-management powers to this committee. Three members of the Waiheke Local Board were appointed to serve the committee under this same resolution, however, to date the committee has not been able to constitute due to a Ngāti Pāoa mandate issue currently being resolved by the Māori Land Court. Until a time that the full committee can meet, any decision over the reserve must be made in conjunction with both the Waiheke Local Board and representatives of Ngāti Paoa, including Ngāti Paoa Trust Board and Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust. This will require the Waiheke Local Board to withdraw their delegation to the committee for the upcoming decision concerning the reserve.

Bicycle Service Workshop Proposal

8.       Staff received an application from Xan Hamilton, on behalf of Cycle Action Waiheke, seeking landowner approval to locate a container on Tawaipareira Reserve. The container is proposed to facilitate a bicycle workshop and aims to specifically encourage children and youth to ride bicycles as well as teach bicycle service skills. The exterior of the container is proposed to be colourful with design input from local children and youth. The operating hours of the workshop will mostly occur on weekends and during school holidays. The recommended term of approval is one year from the date the container is installed on the reserve.

Type of approval

9.       As the reserve is owned by the Crown and co-managed by a local authority, approval for any activity shall be granted by way of a concession issued in accordance with the provisions of Part 3B of the Conservation Act 1987. This power is permitted pursuant to Section 59A of the Reserves Act 1977 which authorises the Minister for the Department of Conservation to grant concessions over reserves vested in the Crown including those reserves which are controlled and managed by local authorities, as is the governance structure of Tawaipareira Reserve. Tier 3 managers in Auckland Council are delegated by the Department of Conservation to grant Ministerial consent for concessions of this category following approval from the local board as a landowner.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Assessment of proposed bicycle activity

10.     Staff have assessed the purpose of the reserve and advise that the proposed activity, being bicycle riding and service skills, is consistent with the recreational status. There are currently a skate ramp and track on the reserve which are frequently used by both children and youth. The proposed bicycle workshop is expected to contribute to the existing public recreational use of the reserve by teaching service and riding skills as well as promoting bicycle use.

11.     Staff consulted the following specialists on the proposed bicycle workshop:

·    Parks and Places Specialist – Waiheke, Parks Services

·    Senior Maintenance Delivery Coordinator – Waiheke, Community Facilities

·    Programme Manager - Waiheke and Gulf Islands, Auckland Council Governance

·    Solicitor – Property, Legal Services

·    Kaiwhakahaere Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua, Parks Sport and Recreation.

12.     All specialists were supportive of the proposal, as it provides the opportunity to enable the promotion of bicycle use on Waiheke as an alternative to using motorized vehicles. Specialist support was also provided on the proposed one-year term of concession for the following reasons:

·    the length of concession will not require public notification due to being temporary in duration and operating infrequently i.e. weekends and school holidays

·    the activity is unlikely to affect the public’s use of the remainder the reserve

·    the activity is consistent with the classification status of the reserve and

·    the proposed timeframe is an opportunity to assess whether the activity could be supported again subject to a long-term approval.

13.     All specialist advice is subject to joint approval from representatives of Ngāti Paoa, which was confirmed by both entities by 30 May 2019.

Assessment on use of container

14.     Containers on parks and reserves in Auckland should be considered on a discretionary basis and only permitted if the container can be shown to positively contribute to the aesthetics or recreational use of the public space.

15.     Staff support a container being permitted on the reserve as requested in this proposal because the container will accommodate an activity that is consistent with the existing skate park facilities onsite.

16.     Staff consider that the benefits of recreation and education which will be created by the activity outweigh any impacts upon the visual aesthetics of the reserve. The appearance of the container can be mitigated through design and positioning to ensure the appearance is in keeping with the skate park facilities. Furthermore, the proposed period that the container will be located on the reserve is short. 

17.     A condition of landowner approval being granted for the subject concession is that the container must be decorated or designed in a manner that minimises the visual sight of its industrial purpose. The container must also reflect the visual aesthetics and amenities of the reserve in a pleasing manner by including features that alter its industrial style to imply the structure is a workshop rather than an ex-shipping container.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Consideration has been given to Healthy Waters and the resolutions made by the Waiheke Local Board [Resolution numbers WHK/2019/27 and WHK/2019/28} in relation to the upcoming stormwater works at Tawaipareira Reserve. The approved stormwater works will not occur on the same parcel of land that the bicycle workshop intends to occupy, however, it is likely the timings of both projects will overlap.

19.     Specialists from Healthy Waters have confirmed that the proposed location of the container will not impact upon its stormwater project based upon the current plans. In the unlikely event Healthy Waters must revise its planned route to access Tawaipareira Reserve so that the container may be affected, Healthy Waters staff will seek landowner approval, which will require assessment by staff and approval from both the local board and Ngāti Paoa entities.

20.     No other groups in Auckland Council or council-controlled organisations have been identified as affected parties as a result of granting approval for Cycle Action Waiheke’s application.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Staff consider this proposal to be consistent with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 Outcome 5: Vibrant places for people, as the bicycle workshop is targeted to improve as well as teach bicycle skills to the public, specifically youth and children, who are visiting Tawaipareira Reserve.

22.     The bicycle workshop will require a footprint of approximately 24 square metres (more or less) which will not detract from the remainder of the green open space at the reserve. Approving an activity which is consistent with the recreational use of the reserve is expected to further contribute to the reserve’s vibrant nature, especially the public’s use of the skate park and its facilities.

23.     Staff attended a workshop with the Waiheke Local Board on 30 May 2019 to provide an assessment of Cycle Action Waiheke’s proposal for a bicycle workshop on Tawaipareira Reserve. The local board and staff discussed:

·    all consultation between council staff with Ngāti Paoa to date on the proposal

·    staff advice regarding the most appropriate location for the container

·    the local board’s requirement to withdraw the delegation to the committee for this particular decision.

24.     The local board were supportive of the bicycle workshop proposal and directed staff to submit a report recommending that:

·    Resolution number WHKLB/2017/195 be withdrawn for this particular decision

·    the application for Cycle Action Waiheke’s proposal be approved by way of a concession.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

Consultation with Ngāti Paoa as joint manager

25.     Until a decision is made to confirm which entity is the governing authority for Ngāti Paoa, the council must consult both Ngāti Paoa Trust Board and Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust. Parks Services staff notified Ngāti Paoa Trust Board and Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust on 7 January 2019 in writing to advise of the landowner approval application received from Cycle Action Waiheke. Staff also sought that each trust confirm whether they approved the bicycle workshop proposal. Ngāti Paoa Trust Board (the trust board) responded to this notification by requesting that the trust board and council staff conduct a site visit at the reserve.

26.     On 7 February 2019, staff and a representative of the trust board undertook a site visit at the reserve; the representative in attendance is mandated as a consultant and ranger for the trust board. Council staff and the representative observed more than a dozen children using the skate park and ramp at the time of the visit as well families enjoying the reserve facilities.

27.     The representative and council staff assessed that the most practical and safe location for the proposed container is on the eastern side of the reserve, as indicated by the red square marked on the aerial photo below. Reasons in support of this location include the container being:

·    in an open space that does not create an opportunity for hiding spaces, which is consistent with Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles

·    not in proximity to the existing skate park, ramp and tracks, which is intended to mitigate the risk of riders colliding with the container

·    outside the designated car parking area on the reserve side of the bollards, which mitigates the risk of interference with traffic

·    in proximity to an existing pathway that ends in green space: the positioning of the container at the end of this pathway will provide a purpose and destination for its use.

28.     On 11 February 2019, the representative of the trust board confirmed in writing that Ngāti Paoa Trust Board members were supportive of the proposed bicycle workshop activity on the reserve.

29.     Land use staff notified Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust (the iwi trust) in writing on 15 March 2019 advising on the requirement for the Waiheke Local Board to withdraw its delegation to the committee on this particular decision. Following further attempts to consult the iwi trust on 8 and 16 April 2019, then on 30 May 2019, the iwi trust replied to formally confirm that it supports the proposed bicycle workshop on the reserve as well as was in agreement with the Waiheke Local Board withdrawing Resolution number WHKLB/2017/195 for this particular decision.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The bicycle workshop proposal by Cycle Action Waiheke is self-funded as well as initiated, therefore it is not a recipient of any funding from Community Facilities’ projects. Cycle Action Waiheke has indicated that it will be require sponsorship to operate the proposal and is welcome to apply for grants from multiple institutions, including those offered by the local board or council in separate budgets.

31.     Cycle Action Waiheke will be responsible for all costs to install, maintain and remove the container as well as reinstate the reserve following completion of the proposed occupation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The proposed placement of the container on the reserve has been carefully considered by both Auckland Council staff and the representative of the trust board. The chosen location is in an open area not in proximity to other structures on the reserve. This is intended to mitigate any risk of crime and vandalism by limiting hiding places on the site. The container will also be located on the reserve side of the existing bollards, also reducing the risk of interference with the adjacent car park and subsequent traffic hazards.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     If approved, Cycle Action Waiheke will be able to apply for funding from multiple institutions to enable the bicycle workshop proposal. Following receipt of funding and the grant of any building or resource consent that may be required for the workshop, Cycle Action Waiheke will locate the container on the reserve. The approved occupation period of 12 months will commence from the first date that the container is installed on the reserve as indicated in the proposal.

34.     Ngāti Paoa, including both trust entities, will be kept informed and involved with the proposal as it develops. The trust board has also expressed interest in working directly with Cycle Action Waiheke on the proposed design of the container.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bianka Lee - Community Facilities Graduate

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

New community lease to Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated situated at Waiheke Island Artworks, 2 Korora Road, Oneroa, Waiheke Island

File No.: CP2019/08930

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to the Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated at Waiheke Island Artworks, 2 Korora Road, Oneroa, Waiheke Island.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated holds an operative community lease for part of the council-owned facility known as Waiheke Island Artworks situated at 2 Korora Road, Oneroa, Waiheke Island.

3.       The lease commenced on 1 July 2004, with two rights of renewal affecting final expiry on 30 June 2019.

4.       After assessing the art gallery’s new lease application, staff are satisfied that the requirements under Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 have been met.

5.       This report recommends that the Waiheke Local Board grant a new community lease to Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated. The recommendations within this report aligns with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Thriving, strong and engaged communities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      take note of the public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a lease to Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated.

b)      delegate to the Waiheke Local Board Chairperson, following public notification, the authority to appoint a hearings panel to consider submissions and objections, and to make a decision.

c)      grant, subject to any objections being resolved, a new community lease to Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated for part of the council-owned building comprising 100m2 (more or less), situated at Waiheke Island Artworks, delineated in red and marked A on Attachment A on the land described as Lot 182 Deposited Plan 24643 and Lot 191 Deposited Plan 22848, subject to the following terms:

i.    term – five (5) years commencing on 1 July 2019, with one five (5) year right of renewal

ii.    rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii.   operational charge – $2,500.00 plus GST per annum

iv.  all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

d)      delegate to the Waiheke Local Board Chairperson, in consultation with the local board members, the authority to approve the Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated’s Community Outcomes Plan, which will be appended to the lease.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report considers the new community lease to Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated for part of the council-owned building at Waiheke Island Artworks.

7.       The Waiheke Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Land, Buildings and Lease

8.       Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated holds an operative community lease for part of the Waiheke Island Artworks building, situated 2 Korora Road, Waiheke Island, and described as Lot 182 Deposited Plan 24643 and Lot 191 Deposited Plan 22848, held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

9.       The art gallery has historically leased part of the Waiheke Island Artworks building and there is no significant departure from the current land use.

Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated

10.     Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated was established in 1995 and champions artistic endeavours, supports arts and culture on Waiheke and promotes art-based recreation, enjoyment and education.

11.     The art gallery’s activities revolve around “bringing the best of New Zealand to Waiheke and taking the best of Waiheke to the world”. Around 30 exhibitions are presented annually across its three exhibition spaces.

12.     In addition to promoting the arts, the art gallery also runs a Diploma in Ceramics course on behalf of the Dunedin School of Art.

13.     Some of the art gallery’s activities include:

i.    Artist in Residence Programme

ii.    Biennial Sculpture on the Gulf

iii.   Annual major community exhibitions

iv.  The annual Waiheke Art Map publication.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     After assessing the lease application and meeting with the art gallery, staff have determined that it qualifies for a new community lease by virtue of the following:

i.    The activity of the art gallery supports the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Thriving, strong and engaged communities

ii.    Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated is not in breach of the current occupancy agreement

iii.   The art gallery’s financial accounts have sufficient reserves to cover its operating costs with no declared contingent liabilities

iv.  The art gallery sustains its activities predominantly through membership fees, sale of goods and services and charitable grants

v.   The premises meets the needs of the art gallery although more space would be welcomed.

15.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the criteria for community occupancy agreements.

16.     The procedure for a new lease of a council-owned building is to call for expressions of interest from community groups. This allows an assessment of proposals to ensure the best community outcomes are delivered.

17.     Local boards, however, have the discretion to forego seeking expressions of interest where suitable tenants are identified. Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated satisfies the requirements specified in the Community Occupancy Guidelines in the following ways:

i.    it is a registered incorporated society

ii.    it has complied with the terms of the operative lease

iii.   it has a history of delivering quality arts-based recreational facilities to the local community

iv.  the art gallery has provided a copy of its financial accounts, which indicate that its funds are sufficient to meets its liabilities, and that it possesses adequate financial reserves and is well managed.

18.     The area proposed to be leased to the art gallery consists of approximately 100m2 which forms parts of the council-owned building and outlined in Attachment A.

19.     As the lease is for part of a council-owned facility, the art gallery will be charged an operational fee of $25.00 per square meter per annum (plus GST) for associated shared overheads, maintenance and building insurance costs, for their exclusive portion of the premises. The operational fee does not cover the tenant’s misuse or neglect of the leased area.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Staff obtained feedback from Arts and Culture regarding the proposed new lease to Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated. No concerns regarding the new lease was raised.

21.     The art gallery is governed by a Local Board Funding Agreement which will form the basis of the community outcomes plan, together with the objectives captured in the Toi Whitiki Arts Strategy. The art gallery is currently meeting all performance indicators.

22.     These indicators revolve mainly around making the arts accessible to all of Auckland, and setting out the type and number of exhibitions to be presented.  The indicators will also specify to which Auckland Plan Directive the performance measures relate to.

23.     The art gallery reports annually and the following has been recorded for the 2018/2019 financial year:

   i.          92 performances

   ii.          137 programmes facilitated

   iii.         7,965 attendees

   iv.        2,477 programme participants

   v          474 Volunteer hours

24.     The proposed new lease has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     This is an approved item on the Community Facilities Work Programme for 2018/2019 adopted on 28 June 2018 (resolution number WHK/2018/136).  The local board has expressed its support for the new lease through local board services feedback dated 22 January 2019.

26.     The proposed new lease to the Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated supports the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Thriving, strong and engaged communities

27.     The art gallery has historically been situated at the Waiheke Island Artworks facility, consequently, staff do not foresee that there will be any significant local impact by its continued occupation.

28.     Under section 138 of the Local Government Act 2002, all leases longer than six months require public notification and engagement with iwi. An advertisement about the proposed new lease to the Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated will be published on Auckland Council’s website and in local newspapers on or before Friday 7 June 2019.

29.     The public will have four weeks within which to provide submissions or objections to the proposed lease. Should any objections be received, a hearings panel will need to be convened to hear the submissions and objections and come to a decision.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

31.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Waiheke Local Board area.

32.     Section 81 of the Local Government Act 2002 requires engagement with iwi. Mana Whenua engagement on the proposed lease took place from 4 April 2019 to 4 May 2019. Two responses were received indicating that iwi representatives are content to defer their interests to other iwi groups regarding the proposed new lease.

33.     There are no changes to the use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     The cost of the public notification of the intention to lease, and any cost associated with the preparation of the lease document, will be borne by council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     If the Waiheke Local Board resolve not to grant the new lease to Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated, the art gallery’s ability to undertake its core activities will be materially affected, which in turn will have a negative impact on the desired local board outcomes. Additionally, the community will likely lose access to the activities undertaken by the art gallery.

36.     As there is no significant departure from the current land use or change in activities there are no identified risks in granting the lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Subject to the local board granting a new community lease, council’s community leasing staff will work with the art gallery to formalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Site Plan Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated

151

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gert van Staden - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

New community lease to Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated situated at Ostend Domain, 43 Causeway Road, Waiheke

File No.: CP2019/10877

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to the Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated at Ostend Domain, 43 Causeway Road, Waiheke.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated holds an operative community lease for part of the land located at Ostend Domain, 43 Causeway Road, Waiheke Island.

3.       The initial lease commenced on 1 March 2003 and expired on 28 February 2018; the lease remains operative on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       After assessing the sports club’s new lease application, staff are satisfied that the requirements under Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 have been met.

5.       This report recommends that the Waiheke Local Board grant a new community lease to Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated. The recommendations within this report aligns with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Vibrant places for people.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note of the public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated.

b)      delegate to the Waiheke Local Board Chairperson, following public notification, the authority to appoint a hearings panel to consider submissions and objections, and to make a decision.

c)      grant, subject to any objections being resolved, a new community lease to Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated over the land and improvements situated at Ostend Domain, consisting of approximately 2220m2 and delineated in red and marked A on Attachment A on the land described as Part Lot 278 Deposited Plan 11378, Allotment 128 Parish of Waiheke and Lot 277 Deposited Plan 11378, subject to the following terms:

i.    term – 10 (ten) years commencing 1 July 2019, with one 10 (ten) year right of renewal

ii.    rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii.   all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

d)      delegate to the Waiheke Local Board Chairperson, in consultation with the local board members, the authority to approve the Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated’s Community Outcomes Plan, which will be appended to the lease.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report considers the new community lease to Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated for the land and club-owned improvements situated at Ostend Domain, 43 Causeway Road, Waiheke Island.

7.       The Waiheke Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Land, Buildings and Lease

8.       Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated holds an operative community lease for part of Ostend Domain, situated at 43 Causeway Road, Waiheke Island, and described as Part Lot 278 Deposited Plan 11378, Allotment 128 Parish of Waiheke and Lot 277 Deposited Plan 11378, held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation and vested in council, in trust for recreational purposes.

9.       All three land parcels are classified recreation reserve. There is no reserve management plan for Ostend Domain, so the proposed lease will require iwi engagement and public notification.

10.     The sports club has historically leased part of Ostend Domain and there is no significant departure from the current land use.

11.     The clubrooms, changing facilities and courts are owned and maintained by the sports club. The netball and tennis courts were resurfaced in 2015 and recently the fence surrounding the courts was painted. Overall, the facilities are well presented.

Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated

12.     Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated has leased part of Ostend Domain from the council since 1975.

13.     Initially, the premises was utilised by netball, rugby, pool and darts. Currently, the sports club’s major users are rugby league, softball, senior and junior touch rugby and netball.

14.     The premises is well utilised and cater to a wide user base, the major users include:

i.    Waiheke Dolphins (netball), currently 10 teams with 100 players

ii.    Waiheke Rams Rugby League, currently four teams with 75 players

iii.   Waiheke Junior and Senior Touch, consisting of 240 players

iv.  Twilight Netball, currently six teams with 60 players

v.   Waka Ama Club, consisting of 40 junior members.

15.     The sports club endeavours to maintain quality recreation facilities which can also be used by the community. Other, regular users include:

i.    Waiheke Wharf to Wharf committee

ii.    Waiheke Junior Women Soccer Team

iii.   Waiheke Swimming Club

iv.  A local dance group

v.   Various community fundraisers.

16.     In addition to the above, the sports club is also used for other one-off events and celebrations such as the Motorcycle Show, King of the Bay annual fishing contest, after game venue for Waiheke Women’s Football and New Zealand’s Vodafone Warrior’s “have a go” day.

17.     After assessing the lease application and meeting with the sports club, staff have determined that it qualifies for a new community lease by virtue of the following:

i.    The activity of the sports club supports the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Vibrant places for people.

ii.    Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated is not in breach of the current occupancy agreement.

iii.   The sports club’s financial accounts indicate that it operated at a loss during 2018, mainly due to expenditure of $43,000.00 for building maintenance, which included a replacement floor, new benches and cabinets in the kitchen and bar area. Some of the maintenance work was achieved through working bees and utilised the skills of the sports club’s existing membership with most being tradesmen. The sports club has sufficient funds in reserve to cover its operational costs, evidence of a sound management structure.

iv.  The sports club sustains its activities through membership fees, café sales and paper routes.

v.   The premises meets the needs of the club and general users.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements.

19.     Under the guidelines, the sports club has an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of its occupancy term, a right which it is exercising. It is recommended that a new lease be granted to the sports club for a term of 10 years with one right of renewal for a further term of 10 years, in line with the guidelines.

20.     Local boards have discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. The guidelines suggest that where a term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

21.     Staff have determined that Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated satisfies the requirements specified in the Community Occupancy Guidelines in the following ways:

i.    it is a registered incorporated society.

ii.    it has complied with the terms of the operative lease.

iii.   it has a history of delivering quality recreational facilities to the local community.

iv.  the sports club has provided a copy of its financial accounts, which indicate that it possesses adequate financial reserves with no declared contingent liabilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Staff obtained feedback from Parks and Places, Parks, Sports and Recreation as well as Service Strategy and Integration and no concerns were raised regarding the proposed lease.

23.     The proposed new lease has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     This is an approved item on the Community Facilities Work Programme for 2018/2019 adopted by the local board on 28 June 2018 (resolution number WHK/2018/136). The local board has expressed its support for the new lease through local board services feedback dated 9 April 2019.

25.     The local board also provided input about ongoing building maintenance, to this end staff will include an asset management plan as a requirement under the community outcomes plan to be appended to the deed of lease.

26.     The proposed new lease to the Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated supports the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Vibrant places for people.

27.     The sports club has historically occupied part of Ostend Domain, staff do not foresee that there will be any significant local impact by its continued occupation.

28.     As there is no adopted reserve management plan for this land parcel, the lease will be publicly notified in the local Waiheke paper.

29.     The public will have four weeks within which to provide submissions or objections to the proposed lease. Should any objections be received, a hearings panel will need to be convened to hear the submissions and objections and come to a decision.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

31.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Waiheke Local Board area.

32.     Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 requires council to complete Mana Whenua engagement on the lease. Engagement on the proposed lease commenced on 21 May 2019 and will conclude on 18 June 2019. Verbal feedback on iwi engagement will be provided to the local board at the business meeting scheduled for 27 June 2019

33.     There are no changes to the use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     The cost of the public notification of the intention to lease, and any cost associated with the preparation of the lease document, will be borne by council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     If the Waiheke Local Board resolves not to grant the new lease to Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated, the sports club ability to undertake its core activities will be materially affected, which in turn will have a negative impact on the desired local board outcomes. Additionally, the community will likely lose access to the activities supported by the sports club.

36.     As there is no significant departure from the current land use or change in activities there are no identified risks in granting the lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Subject to the local board granting a new community lease, council’s community leasing staff will work with the Waiheke Sports Club to formalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Site Plan Waiheke Sports Club Inc

159

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gert van Staden - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

New community lease to Scout Association of New Zealand situated at Putiki Reserve, 14 Shelly Beach Road, Waiheke Island

File No.: CP2019/11107

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Scout Association of New Zealand for its building situated at Putiki Reserve, 14 Shelly Beach Road, Waiheke Island.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Scout Association of New Zealand operates from Putiki Reserve as the 1st Waiheke Sea Scouts.

3.       The Scout Association holds an operative community lease for the footprint of its building located at Putiki Reserve, 14 Shelly Beach Road, Waiheke Island.

4.       The lease commenced on 19 July 2007, with two five-year rights of renewal affecting final expiry on 18 July 2022.

5.       However, the current lease was granted contrary to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977, due to the reserve being unclassified at the time that the lease was granted.

6.       This was recently remedied by a notice published in the New Zealand Gazette, on 12 October 2017, declaring the land to be a classified recreation reserve.

7.       The Scout Association’s occupation can now be validated by issuing a new community occupancy agreement, compliant with the Reserves Act 1977.

8.       After assessing the Scout Association’s new lease application, staff are satisfied that the requirements under Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 have been met.

9.       This report recommends that the Waiheke Local Board grant a new community lease to Scout Association of New Zealand. The recommendations within this report aligns with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Thriving, strong and engaged communities and vibrant places for people.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      take note of the public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a lease to Scout Association of New Zealand.

b)      delegate to the Waiheke Local Board Chairperson, following public notification, the authority to appoint a hearings panel to consider submissions and objections, and to make a decision.

c)      grant, subject to any objections being resolved, a new community lease to Scout Association of New Zealand for the footprint of their building, consisting of approximately 150m2, situated at Putiki Reserve, delineated in red and marked A on Attachment A on the land described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 29734, subject to the following terms:

i.    term – 10 (ten) years commencing on 1 July 2019, with one 10 (ten) year right of renewal

ii.    rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii.   all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977

 

d)      approve the contemporaneous surrender of the current lease to Scout Association of New Zealand, effective from 1 July 2019.

e)      delegate to the Waiheke Local Board Chairperson, in consultation with the local board members, the authority to approve the Scout Association of New Zealand’s Community Outcomes Plan, which will be appended to the lease.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     This report considers the new community lease to Scout Association of New Zealand for the footprint of their building situated at Putiki Reserve.

11.     The Waiheke Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Land, Buildings and Lease

12.     Scout Association of New Zealand holds an operative community lease over part of Putiki Reserve, situated 14 Shelly Beach Road, Waiheke Island, and described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 29734, held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation and vested in council, in trust.

13.     Putiki Reserve consists of approximately 9611m2 and was previously held as an unclassified recreation reserve, under the management of the Waiheke County Council.

14.     With classification now complete in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, Putiki Reserve has automatically vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for recreation purposes by virtue of Section 26A (1) and (2) of the Act.

15.     The proposed lease to the Scout Association is for the footprint of its building, consisting of approximately 150m2 as shown by Attachment A, delineated in red and marked A.

16.     There is no adopted reserve management plan at this stage for Putiki Reserve and the proposed lease therefore requires public notification and iwi engagement.

Scout Association of New Zealand (1st Waiheke Sea Scouts)

17.     Scout Association of New Zealand is a community group which provides comprehensive outdoors-based programmes to educate boys and girls, aged predominantly five to 26, with life skills relating to problem-solving, teamwork, citizenship and healthy living.

18.     The Scout Movement is aimed at the physical, emotional, spiritual and mental development of our young people, in a safe environment where they are encouraged to be themselves, work together and thrive.

19.     The 1st Waiheke Sea Scouts is one of 350 scout groups making up part of the Scout Movement, educating more than 15,000 young people per annum. The 1st Waiheke Sea Scouts has 80 local members aged four to over 51 years old. Their building on the reserve is referred to as ‘The Ship’.

20.     Some of the 1st Waiheke Sea Scouts activities include:

i.   Seamanship theory and sailing

ii.   Rowing, kayaking and other water-based activities

iii.  Camping, tramping and cycling

iv. Other marine and adventure focussed activities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Surrendering the current community lease

21.     Scout Association of New Zealand’s current lease was granted in contravention of the Reserves Act 1977. To validate the continued occupation of the reserve, the current lease will have to be surrendered and a new lease granted, in compliance with the Reserves Act of 1977.

22.     The contemporaneous surrender of the operative lease and grant of a new lease will provide Auckland Council and the Scout Association with certainty and allow for the continuity of tenure.

The new community lease to the Scout Association of the New Zealand

23.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements

24.     Under the guidelines, the Scout Association has an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of its occupancy term, a right which it is exercising. It is recommended that a new lease be granted to the Scout Association for a term of 10 years with one right of renewal for a further term of 10 years, in line with the guidelines.

25.     Local boards have discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. The guidelines suggest that where a term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

26.     The Scout Association of New Zealand is a registered charitable entity under the Charities Act 2005 and incorporated under the Scout Association of New Zealand Act 1956.

27.     After assessing the lease application and meeting with 1st Waiheke Sea Scouts, staff have determined that it qualifies for a new community lease by virtue of the following:

i.        The activities of the Scout Movement supports the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Thriving, strong and engaged communities as well as vibrant places for people

ii.       Scout Association of New Zealand is not in breach of the current occupancy agreement

iii.      The Scout Association’s financial accounts have sufficient reserves to cover its operating costs with no declared contingent liabilities

iv.      The Scout Association sustains its activities predominantly through membership fees, income from events and donations

v.       The building meets the needs of the Scout Association, but a more sophisticated access and booking system will greatly benefit community users. It is proposed that the viability of a new, digital access system be explored as part of the Scout Association’s community outcomes plan, to encourage greater community use of the facility.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Staff obtained feedback from Parks and Places, Parks, Sports and Recreation, Operational Management and Maintenance as well as Service Strategy and Integration and no concerns were raised regarding the proposed lease.

29.     Specific feedback regarding the use of council’s ablution facilities for storage was received from Operational Management and Maintenance. No concerns were raised, and the Scout Association will be allowed to use part of this council-owned building on an informal basis.

30.     Community Leasing are working collaboratively with Parks, Sports and Recreation to develop a targeted community outcomes plan to guide the Scout Association to achieve specified local board outcomes and deliver community benefit.

31.     The proposed new lease has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     This is an approved item on the Community Facilities Work Programme for 2018/2019 adopted on 28 June 2018 (resolution number WHK/2018/136).  This item was brought to the local board’s attention as part of a general update through local board services dated 22 May 2019, no concerns were raised.

33.     The proposed new lease to the Scout Association of New Zealand Incorporated supports the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: Thriving, strong and engaged communities and vibrant places for people.

34.     The Scout Association has historically been situated at Putiki Reserve, consequently, staff do not foresee that there will be any significant local impact by its continued occupation.

35.     An advertisement regarding the proposed new lease to the Scout Association of New Zealand will be published on Auckland Council’s website and in local newspapers.

36.     The public will have four weeks within which to provide submissions or objections to the proposed lease. Should any objections be received, a hearings panel will need to be convened to hear the submissions and objections and come to a decision.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

38.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Waiheke Local Board area.

39.     Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 requires engagement with iwi. Mana Whenua engagement on the proposed lease took place during 2017 as part of the land classification stage managed by the council’s Land Use team. Iwi representatives indicated their preference for a treaty clause to be inserted into the agreement. This will be inserted as part of the council’s standard terms and conditions in the proposed lease agreement.

40.     There are no changes to the use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The cost of the public notification of the intention to lease, and any cost associated with the preparation of the lease document, will be borne by the council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     If the Waiheke Local Board resolve not to grant the new lease to Scout Association of New Zealand, the Scout Association’s ability to undertake its core activities will be materially affected, which in turn will have a negative impact on the desired local board outcomes. Additionally, the community will likely lose access to the activities undertaken by the Scout Association.

43.     As there is no significant departure from the current land use or change in activities there are no identified risks in granting the lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Subject to the local board granting a new community lease, the council’s community leasing staff will work with Scout Association of New Zealand to formalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Site Plan Scout Association of New Zealand

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gert van Staden - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Manuēsina sculpture estimate of costs

File No.: CP2019/09772

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the acceptance, location and funding for the installation of a sculpture - Manuēsina.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Headland Sculpture on the Gulf Trust have proposed a partnership with the Waiheke Local Board where they will gift a sculpture - Manuēsina (White Bird and White Angel) by Tongan artist Semisi Potauaine, for installation on public land.

3.       Following a public survey, the board requested cost estimates be developed for two sites: Alison Park and Church Bay Esplanade Reserve on Nick Johnstone Drive.

4.       High level installation cost estimates are $27,800 for Church Bay Esplanade Reserve on Nick Johnstone Drive and $42,300 for Alison Park. This does not include a contribution from Sculpture on the Gulf for holding costs and installation.

5.       This report provides cost estimates and seeks board approval of the preferred site and funding for the installation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      accept the gift of Manuēsina from Sculpture on the Gulf and confirm the preferred location at Alison Park or at Church Bay Esplanade Reserve on Nick Johnstone Drive.

b)      approve Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) capital funding of up to $27,800 (for Church Bay Esplanade Reserve on Nick Johnstone Drive) or $42,300 (for Alison Park) to install the Manuēsina sculpture.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       In May 2017 the board received an offer from Headland Sculpture on the Gulf Trust of two sculptures for installation on public land - Te Rerenga Wai o Tikapa Mo by Chris Bailey and Manuēsina (White Bird and White Angel) by Semisi Potauaine.

7.       The trust proposed a partnership with the Waiheke Local Board.  The trust will gift two sculptures purchased from the 2017 Sculpture on the Gulf exhibition to the Waiheke Local Board (Auckland Council) on the basis that the board will:

·    facilitate the relevant consents and fund the relocation and installation of the artwork in an agreed public location; and

·    take responsibility for the long-term maintenance of the artwork.

8.       Te Rerenga Wai o Takapa was installed at McKenzie Reserve in March 2018.

9.       The board requested staff work with the trust to identify two or three potential locations for Manuesina.  The Parks and Places specialist looked at five locations but had to rule out the majority for various reasons.

10.     Following community consultation, the Waiheke Local Board and the trustees have agreed support for two locations – in Church Bay Esplanade Reserve on Nick Johnstone Drive and at Alison Park.

11.     This report provides a summary of survey feedback and cost estimates for the two sites.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The Sculpture

12.     Manuēsina (White Bird and White Angel) by Tongan Artist, Semisi Potauaine, resonates across cultures, seeking to bring new light to issues of environmental, psychological and social conflicts in our everyday lives.

13.     Manuēsina reflects the vital role of Tāmaki Makaurau in the Pacific and echoes aspects of its knowledge, thinking, and practice.

14.     It is based on a traditional Tongan design which represents two birds flying.

15.     The trustees have worked collaboratively with the Waiheke Local Board to identify a location for the Manuēsina sculpture which is

·        coastal and/or visible from the sea

·        accessible to visitors in the western end of the island

·        a prominent public space to maximise local and visitor access

·        a place that is appropriate for the artwork.

16.     Some benefits from this proposal include:

·    enhancing the visitor experience to, and around, the island

·    building on Waiheke’s reputation for art installation

·    providing a long-term home for an iconic art piece

·    creating a point of difference on Waiheke.

 

Consultation

17.     A public survey was carried out between 22 November and 7 December 2018. The survey asked for feedback on two locations; Church Bay Esplanade Reserve on Nick Johnstone Drive or Alison Park. There was also an option of not locating the sculpture on public land or to suggest an alternative site.

18.     From the 103 responses received 39 per cent chose Alison Park, 34 per cent chose Nick Johnston Drive, 17 per cent suggested another location and ten per cent did not want the sculpture on public land.

19.     Results were discussed with board members at a workshop in February 2019 and members requested staff to provide cost estimates for installation at the two sites.

 

Church Bay Esplanade Reserve on Nick Johnstone Drive

20.     Sculpture site of the 2017 Sculpture on the Gulf event

 

Alison Park location

21.     No specific location has been confirmed within Alison Park but the two circled areas have been discussed as feasible options. Alison Park is already a site for public art and the concept plan envisages the location of further public art in the park.

Installation and costs

22.     The 14-metre-high artwork has been engineered for Waiheke Island’s high-wind conditions and was displayed at the 2017 Sculpture on the Gulf event at the Nick Johnston Drive lookout. Due to materials used, once it is installed on an engineered concrete footing, it is not expected to require significant ongoing maintenance.

23.     Sculpture on the Gulf Trust will cover transportation and a portion of installation cost, which includes a structural engineer, geotechnical input, design work and a plaque.

24.     The local board’s contribution would cover consent and foundation costs.

25.     Any installation will be conditional on consent requirements (including iwi consultation) and landowner approval.

26.     Community Facilities have worked with the trust to provide high level cost estimates for installation:

·    $27,800 for Church Bay Esplanade Reserve on Nick Johnstone Drive

·    $42,300 for Alison Park.

27.     This excludes a contribution from Sculpture on the Gulf Trust for holding costs and installation as below. Installation costs for Alison Park are substantially more as a new platform will be required.

 

 

 

NJD

ALISON PARK

Holding costs Incurred to date

SOTG

$7,622

$7,700

Installation Costs Contribution

(Includes for PM, Transport of sculpture, signage, engineering & design fees, contingency)

SOTG

$11,500

 

SOTG

$19,122

$7,700

 

 

 

 

Consents – Building and resource consent

(Nb: PS certifications are not required as this is a public work)

Local board

$10,000

$10,000

PM Fees (managed under FM contract for H&S purposes)

 

$1,500

$1,500

Site engineering design fees

Local board

$3,800

$6,000

Installation Platform

Local board

$10,000

$21,000*

Contingency 10 per cent

Local board

$2,500

$3,800

 

 

*High level estimate

Local board

$27,800

$42,300

 

 

 

 

Public art policy

28.     Auckland Council’s local boards are supported by the council’s Arts and Culture unit in the planning and operational delivery of public art programmes and projects and in the care and maintenance of the public art collection.  In line with the Public Art Policy process, gifts are considered within a regional programme context and assessed against policy objectives.   The policy generally involves commissioning site specific works rather than existing works. In this case the piece did not meet the criteria for regional public artwork

29.     The board have the option to accept the works as a Parks asset in the understanding the sculpture will be owned, maintained, and managed as a Parks asset as will be the case for this proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     The proposed decision has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     The Waiheke Local Board acknowledges the role of art in the community and the 2017 Local Board Plan includes an objective to support Waiheke’s recognition as an arts destination and includes the following initiative:

“Develop an Art Strategy to inform future public art acquisition and location and to support the arts community to enhance their contribution to a unique visitor experience.”

32.     Arts, Community and Events staff have supported sessions with Waiheke arts practitioners over the last six months to consider how best to progress a community arts strategy. This will be reported back to the board as part of the 2019-2020 work programme discussions.

33.     This particular report outlines cost estimates for two sculpture locations following a request from the board at a workshop in February 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Parks and heritage are of fundamental importance to tangata whenua, their culture and traditions established through whakapapa. Should the recommendations within this report be approved, iwi consultation will be progressed as detailed within the project plan and consenting requirements.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     Following approval of the FY20 work programme (including indicative Tawaipareira allocations) there will be $93,000 remaining within the Waiheke Local Board locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital budget for allocation before 30 June 2021.

36.     This includes $200,000 for Paths (Greenways) Plan implementation and $180,000 for the Little Oneroa concept plan implementation.

37.     No opex requirements have been identified for this project.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     Public consultation showed a degree of support for both sites and public art has been known to generate discussion.  Not progressing this project could damage the relationship between Sculpture on the Gulf Trust and the local board. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Once the location and budget are approved, the installation will be progressed by the council’s Community Facilities project team who will manage consenting and delivery, in partnership with Sculpture on the Gulf Trust.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor Waiheke

Authoriser

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Changes to Local Board Standing Orders

File No.: CP2019/09806

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide information about the implications of the Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 and to recommend changes to the Waiheke Local Board’s standing orders to align with the change in the legislation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 (LGRSAA) makes changes to various statutes, including the Local Government 2002 Act (LGA), Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA), the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Dog Control Act 1996, the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 and the Rates Rebate Act 1973.

3.       Prior to the legislation change, the LGA provided for an extraordinary meeting where:

(a)  It could be called by resolution, or by requisition by the mayor or one third of the members

(b)  The notice period was three days (unless it was called by resolution in which case the notice period could be not less than 24 hours)

(c)  If it needed to be called earlier it could be called by the mayor, or, if the mayor was unavailable, the chief executive. The notice period could be not less than 24 hours.

4.       As a result of the change, the meeting called under (c) above is referred to as an ‘emergency meeting’ rather than an’ extraordinary meeting’.

5.       There is a change to the definition of public notice – which requires notification on a council’s website in addition to a newspaper.

6.       There is a change to the definition of ‘working day’ to exclude a province’s anniversary.

7.       Staff are taking the opportunity, while considering changes to standing orders, to propose an unrelated change to the current standing orders regarding attendance by electronic link. The current standing order requires a member seeking to attend by electronic link to be representing the council and unable to attend. The proposed change removes the requirement to be representing the council.

8.       As detailed in LGA Schedule 7 clause 27 (3), a change to standing orders requires a 75 percent majority vote. The Waiheke Local Board’s standing orders need to be changed to reflect the changes in the law.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the new statutory responsibility of the chief executive:

facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

b)      amend standing order 2.3.3 by replacing:

Calling an extraordinary meeting at earlier time

The chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call a meeting for an earlier time if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

with:

Calling an emergency meeting

The chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call an emergency meeting for an earlier time than is provided in Standing Order 2.3.2 if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

c)      amend standing order 7.2.3 by replacing:

Notification of extraordinary meetings

Where the council calls an extraordinary meeting but cannot give public notice to the extent required in Standing Order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting.

with:

Notification of extraordinary / emergency meetings

Where the council calls an extraordinary or emergency meeting but cannot give public notice to the extent required in Standing Order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting. If it is not practicable to publish a notice in newspapers before the meeting, the council must publicly notify the meeting as soon as practicable on the council’s website and in any other manner that is reasonable in the circumstances.

d)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

with:

Emergency meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22A of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

e)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Meeting means:

(a)  any first or ordinary or extraordinary meeting of the local board

with:

Meeting means:

(a) any first or ordinary or extraordinary or emergency meeting of the local board

f)       amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Publicly notified means notified to members of the public by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

with:

Publicly notified means made known to members of the public by a notice on the council’s website, until any opportunity for review or appeal has lapsed, and by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

g)      amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

(a)  Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

(b)  a day in the period commencing with 25 December in any year and ending with 15 January in the following year.

with:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

(a)  Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

(b)  Where Waitangi Day or ANZAC Day falls on a weekend, the following Monday

(c)  Auckland Anniversary Day

(d)  a day in the period commencing with 20 December in any year and ending with 10 January in the following year.

h)      amend the following standing orders:

i)        SO 2.3:

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

ii)       SO 7.2.4

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

iii)      SOs 1.1.3, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 7.3.2:

replace the words “extraordinary meeting” with “extraordinary or emergency meeting”

i)        amend standing order 3.3.3 to remove the requirement to be representing the council:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)   in emergencies.

                        The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the                   vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in                         which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the                   vote.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The LGRSAA came into force on 21 March 2019.  The Act is an omnibus Act in that it makes minor amendments to several pieces of legislation.

10.       The LGRSAA amends the Local Electoral Act 2001 to include a new principle for “representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls”, and imposes a new responsibility on the Chief Executive of the council by amending the Chief Executive’s responsibilities in the LGA s 42(2)(d):

(da)   facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

11.     It amends the definition of “public notice” and “publicly notified” under the LGA and the LGOIMA to require notification both on the council’s website and in newspapers.

12.     It creates a new category of council meeting called an “emergency meeting”, separate from “extraordinary meeting”.  Previously, extraordinary meetings had two types of notice requirements.  Where the more urgent form of notice is used, the meeting is now referred to as an emergency meeting.  This applies to giving notice to members under the LGA and to public notices under LGOIMA.

13.     It amends the definition of working day under the LGA and LGOIMA to exclude a province’s anniversary day being counted as a “working day”.

14.     It makes minor amendments to The Dog Control Act 996, the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Rates Rebates Act 1973 and makes changes to the LGA by specifying timeframes for making certain documents publicly available. These legislative changes are minor in nature and do not impact on local board standing orders.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The changes made by the LGRSAA are minor in nature, nevertheless it is necessary to amend the Waiheke Local Board’s standing orders to align the language to reflect current legislation.

16.     The Waiheke Local Board may also wish to consider a change to standing orders which is not related to LGRSAA.   Standing order 3.3.3 provides conditions for attending a meeting by electronic link:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)   in emergencies.

The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

17.     This standing order was adopted in 2015.  Since that time the technology has improved, and remote attendance to most local board business meetings is now possible. However, the conditions in the standing order are very limiting and do not allow attendance by a member who is out of Auckland for non-council reasons. 

18.     Staff recommend amending the standing order by removing the requirement to represent the council in SO 3.3.3 (a):

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The changes to the standing orders do not impact on the wider council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     This is a report to 21 local boards. All local boards need to make changes to align their standing orders to LGRSAA.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The changes to standing orders brought about through the LGRSAA do not impact on the Māori community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications to making these changes to standing orders.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     LGA Schedule 7 clause 27 (2) states that the standing orders of a local authority must not contravene the LGA or any other Act. If local board standing orders are not aligned to changes in the legislation, there is a risk that the local board may act inconsistently with the legislation by relying on standing orders that are not up to date.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Following the WaihekeLocal Board resolution to amend the standing orders, staff will make the appropriate changes and recirculate the updated standing orders.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Polly Kenrick - Business Process Manager

Authorisers

Kerri Foote - Operations and Improvements Manager, Local Board Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update from 1 November 2018 to 30 April 2019

File No.: CP2019/10244

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Waiheke Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area for the six months from 1 November 2018 to 30 April 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Panuku is charged with balancing financial and non-financial outcomes in order to create and manage sustainable and resilient places where people want to live, work, invest, learn and visit. The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·        redevelopment of urban locations, leveraging off council owned land assets, mostly within existing suburbs

·        review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property

·        management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure

·        other property related services such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function, strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

3.       Panuku currently manages 14 commercial and no residential interests in the Waiheke Local Board area.

4.       There is one property that is currently under review as part of our rationalisation process.

5.       One property was purchased, and no properties were sold in the Waiheke Local Board area during the last six months.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 November             2018 to 30 April 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

7.       The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world class city. Panuku will play a significant role in achieving the Homes and Places and Belonging and Participation outcomes.

8.       Panuku is leading urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Papatoetoe, Ormiston and Flat Bush, Panmure, Pukekohe, City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

9.       Panuku manages around $2 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

10.     As at 30 December 2018, the property portfolio comprises 1636 properties, containing 1062 leases. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Properties managed in the Waiheke Local Board Area

11.     Panuku currently manages 14 commercial and no residential interests within the local board area.

Business interests

12.     Panuku also manages the commercial return from business interests on the council’s behalf. This includes two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

13.    There are currently no managed business interests in the Waiheke local board area.

14.    The 2018-2028 Long-term Plan (LTP) reflects a desire of council to materially reduce or slow down expenditure and unlock value from assets no longer required, or which are sub-optimal for service purposes. In response to this, ACPL developed a new method of dealing with service property called ‘optimisation’, prior to the establishment of Panuku. 

15.     Optimisation is a development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets. The process is a tri-party agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and Local Boards. It is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

16.     Using optimisation as a redevelopment and funding tool, the Local Board can maximise efficiencies from service assets while maintaining levels of service through the release of some or all of that property for sale or development.

17.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

 

Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

Overview

18.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing review of council’s property assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that are no longer required for council service purposes and may be suitable for other public works and/or potential sale, and development if appropriate. Panuku has a particular focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the 2018-2028 LTP and the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

 Performance

19.     Panuku works closely with council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

 

 

July 2018 to June 2019 Target

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio Review

$30m disposal recommendations.

$9.3 million as at 30 April 2019.

 

Process

20.     Once identified as potentially no longer required for council service purposes, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and Mana Whenua. This is followed by Panuku Board approval, engagement with the local ward councillor(s) and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision

Under review

21.     Properties currently under review in the Waiheke Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body.

 

Property

Details

7 Waitai Road, Waiheke

A commercial site acquired by the former Waiheke Road District in 1958 for the purpose of a works depot.

Council’s Community & Social Policy department requested 7 Waitai Road, Waiheke, to progress through the rationalisation process to enable a full review of future use options.

The Board does not support disposal and requested that the site be retained for housing purposes or for a community swimming pool.

Council currently does not have a policy to provide council owned land at low or no cost for housing purposes. Following Panuku’s advice, the Board commissioned a business case to inform a sustainable social housing development that would use the site. 

Council’s Recreation Services department has submitted an expression of interest requesting additional time to undertake an assessment of the subject site for a proposed swimming pool.

 

 

Acquisitions and disposals

22.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

 

Acquisitions

23.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

24.     Panuku has so far purchased 11 properties for open space across Auckland in the 2018-19 financial year at a cost of $35.3 million and bought one property for stormwater use at a value of $188,000.

25.     One property has been purchased in the Waiheke Local Board area during the reporting period

26.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 

Disposals

27.     In the current financial year to the end of May, the Panuku disposals team has entered into twenty-three sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $38.1 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

28.     As part of the Northern Corridor Improvements, Auckland Council has agreed to transfer various parcels of land to NZTA to facilitate the works. The compensation amount totals $6.5 million, of which $1.554 million is advance compensation for required land at Rook Reserve with the final compensation amount still to be agreed.

29.     Panuku 2018/19 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

30.     No properties have been sold in the Waiheke Local Board area during the reporting period

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

33.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries relating to a property in the local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Panuku work collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

35.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.         

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The next six-monthly update is scheduled for December 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sa Va'aelua - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Lisa Gooding - Senior Engagement Advisor

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2019/09795

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the report from Chairperson Cath Handley.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair's report June 2019

189

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings

File No.: CP2019/09796

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached is a copy of the record of proceedings of the Waiheke Local Board workshop held on 16 May, 23 May, 30 May, 6 June and 13 June 2019.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings of the Waiheke Local Board workshop held on 16 May, 23 May, 30 May, 6 June and 13 June 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20190516 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

195

b

20190523 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

197

c

20190530 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

199

d

20190606 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

201

e

20190613 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

205

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/09799

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.         Attached is a copy of the Governance Forward Work Programme for Waiheke which is a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Programme.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

List of resource consents

File No.: CP2019/09801

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.         Attached are the lists of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 12 to 18 May, 19 to 25 May. 26 May to 1 June, 2 to 8 June and 9 to 15 June 2019.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the lists of resource consents lodged related to Waiheke Island from 12 to 18 May, 19 to 25 May. 26 May to 1 June, 2 to 8 June and 9 to 15 June 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resource consent applications received from 12 to 18 May 2019

215

b

Resource consent applications received from 19 to 25 May 2019

217

c

Resource consent applications received from 26 May to 1 June 2019

219

d

Resource consent applications received from 2 to 8 June 2019

221

e

Resource consent applications received from 9 to 15 June 2019

223

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 June 2019