I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 27 June 2019

6.00pm

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Office
39 Glenmall Place
Glen Eden

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Greg Presland

 

Deputy Chairperson

Saffron Toms

 

Members

Sandra Coney, QSO

 

 

Neil Henderson

 

 

Steve Tollestrup

 

 

Ken Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Brenda  Railey

Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

 

19 June 2019

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21 820 781

Email: brenda.railey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - rebuilding Waitakere Primary School garden beds, Ger Tew  5

8.2     Deputation - rollout of 5G wireless, Laurie Ross                                             6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Waitākere Ward Councillor Update                                                                             9

12        2018/2019 Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round Three                               11

13        Approval of the 2019-2022 Community Facilities work programme                   119

14        Approval of the 2019/2020 Local Environment work programme                        139

15        Approval of the 2019/2020 Youth Connection work programme                         159

16        Approval of the 2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme                           165

17        Approval of the 2019/2020 Community Services work programme                    171

18        Responding to flood safety risk in Piha                                                                  193

19        Changes to Local Board Standing Orders                                                              249

20        Governance Forward Work Programme                                                                 255

21        Confirmation of Workshop Records                                                                        259  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

Chairperson Greg Presland will open the meeting and welcome those present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 6 June 2019, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - rebuilding Waitakere Primary School garden beds, Ger Tew

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Ger Tew on behalf of the Sustainability Group from Waitakere Primary School.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ger Tew will provide a presentation on rebuilding the Waitakere Primary School garden beds that have been washed away by poor onsite drainage.

 

3.       The school hopes to implement the Garden to Table programme with a Te Reo flavour from 2019.  Waitakere Primary School is currently a Bronze Enviro School.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on rebuilding the Waitakere Primary School garden beds and thank Ger Tew for her attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - rollout of 5G wireless, Laurie Ross

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Laurie Ross on the rollout of 5G Wireless.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Laurie Ross, on behalf of Concerned Citizens for 5G FREE West Auckland, will be in attendance to present on the proposed rollout in Auckland 2020 of 5B Wireless and concerns that the 5G electromagnetic frequencies pose a threat to health of the community and environment.

3.       Request support from the local board to prevent rollout of 5 wireless technology in west Auckland.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on the rollout of 5G wireless and thank Laurie Ross, on behalf of Concerned Citizens for 5G Free West Auckland, for her attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Waitākere Ward Councillor Update

 

File No.: CP2019/10210

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the Waitākere Ward Councillors to verbally update the Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      thank Waitākere Ward Councillors Linda Cooper and Penny Hulse for their update.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

2018/2019 Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round Three

File No.: CP2019/10240

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Waitākere Ranges Quick Response Grants, Round Three 2018/2019, Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019 and Waitākere Ranges Multi-Board Local Grants Round Two 2018/2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round Three 2018/2019 (refer to Attachment B) and one multi-board application (refer to attachment C)

3.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board adopted the Waitākere Ranges Local Grants Programme 2018/2019 on 26th April 2018 (refer to Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $75,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year. The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has also approved the allocation of an additional $21,242, to be taken from Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) budget lines that are partially unspent or unallocated. A total of $96,242 has been allocated in two local grant rounds and two quick response rounds.

5.       In addition, the Waitākere Ranges Local Board May 2019 business meeting resolved (WTK/2019/65) that any underspends in the LDI budgets will be reallocated to the local grants process for the final quick response round.

6.       Twenty-three applications were received for Waitākere Ranges Local Board Quick Response Grants, Round Three 2018/2019, requesting a total of $27,074. One additional multi-board application was received, requesting a total of $4,059.94 and two applications were deferred from local grants round two requesting a total of $2,151.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Waitākere Ranges Quick Response Grants, Round Three 2018/2019, Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019 and Waitākere Ranges Multi-board Local Grants Round Two 2018/201, listed in table one below.

Table One: Applications for Waitākere Ranges Quick Response Grants, Round Three 2018/2019, Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019 and Waitākere Ranges Multi-Board Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019.

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR1919-301

Matuku Reserve Trust Board

Environment

Towards taxidermied animals for education purposes.

$1,100.00

Eligible

QR1919-303

Birdsong Opanuku

Environment

Towards costs of possum traps, mustelid traps and bait for pest control project.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1919-304

Glen Eden Residents Association

under the umbrella of Glen Eden Community House Incorporated

Community

Towards cleaning materials, petrol vouchers and rubbish tags for the volunteer pātaka hosts.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-306

Bay Bee Club

Environment

Towards a learning apiary at Woodlands Park School.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-307

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

Community

Towards new toys and resources for the Titirangi playgroup.

$800.00

Eligible

QR1919-309

Royal Forest and Bird Protection of NZ - Waitakere Branch

Environment

Towards pest traps for “Habitat Te Henga” project.

$1,443.00

Eligible

QR1919-310

Glen Eden Community House Incorporated

Community

Towards tutor costs for the brain gym workshop series.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-311

Show Me Shorts Film Festival Trust

Arts and culture

Towards print and design, advertising and programming costs of staging Show Me Shorts at Lopdell House.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-312

Bishop Stream Neighbourhood Garden

Community

Towards replacement of logs on raised garden beds.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1919-313

Ann Ross

Environment

Towards maintenance of the Forest Ridge Animal Pest Control project including bait station and trap installation and maintenance.

$1,485.00

Eligible

QR1919-315

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards costs of the Blue Light Rainbows End Funday event

$1,890.00

Eligible

QR1919-316

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards training costs for volunteer counsellors.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-317

West Auckland Kiribati Association Inc

Community

Towards costs of the Kiribati 40th Independence anniversary event.

$1,467.00

Eligible

QR1919-318

Waitakere Japanese Supplementary School (WJSS)

Community

Towards the WJSS after-school programme.

$780.00

Eligible

QR1919-320

The Titirangi Community House Society Incorporated

Community

Towards a white board for use in the community house.

$389.00

Eligible

QR1919-321

Euphoria Entertainment

Arts and culture, Community

Towards venue hire of the Playhouse Theatre.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-322

Empowerment Trust

Community

Towards the facilitation and delivery costs of Kidpower programme and resource kits.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-323

Piha Surf Life Saving Club Incorporated

Community

Towards a fingertip pulse oximeter for first aid responses.

$495.00

Eligible

QR1919-324

Asian Community Theatre

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire of the Playhouse Theatre.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-327

Stephanie Tong

Environment

Towards costs for the Piha Nature Connection and Bushcraft School Holiday Programme.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR1919-328

New Zealand Eid Day Trust

Events

Towards costs of New Zealand EId Day 2019

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR1919-329

Trevor Pollard

Arts and culture

Towards printing, choir and musician costs for the Carols by Candlelight event.

$725.00

Eligible

LG1919-211

Oratia District Ratepayers and Residents Association Incorporated

Environment

Towards the purchase of materials for the construction of the tunnel traps.

$751.00

Eligible

LG1919-222

Nicole Otte

Community

Towards venue hire for the homeschooling whanau in west Auckland project.

$1,400.00

Eligible

MB1819-220

Project Litefoot Trust

Environment

Towards a contribution for the overall costs of the project, including salaries, materials installed at the club, administration costs, travel costs, and promotion.

$4,059.94

Eligible

Total

$33,284.94

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

 

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. Waitākere Ranges Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2018/2019 on 26th April 2018 and will operate three quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities;

·     lower priorities for funding;

·     exclusions;

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close; and

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department, will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

12.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Waitākere Ranges Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme (refer to attachment A)

14.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

15.     A summary of each application received is provided (refer to Attachment B and C).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes. Five organisations applying in this round have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     The allocation of grants to community groups or individuals is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

18.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $75,000 for the 2018/2019 financial year. The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has also approved the allocation of an additional $21,242 to be taken from LDI budget lines, that are partially unspent or unallocated. A total of $96,242 has been allocated in two local grant rounds and two quick response rounds.

19.     In addition, the Waitākere Ranges Local Board May 2019 business meeting resolved (WTK/2019/65) that any underspends in the LDI budgets will be reallocated to the local grants process for the final quick response round.

20.     Twenty three applications were received for Waitākere Ranges Local Board Quick Response Grants, Round Three 2018/2019, requesting a total of $27,074. One Multi-Board Local Grants Round Two application was received, requesting a total of $4,059.94 and two applications were deferred from Local Grants, Round Two 2018/2019 requesting a total of $2,151.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Following the Waitākere Ranges Local Board allocating funding for round three quick response, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Grants Programme 2018-2019

19

b

Waitākere Ranges Quick Response Grants, Round Three Application Summary

23

c

Project Litefoot Multi-board Local Grant Round Two 2018/2019 application

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Robert Walsh - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Shane King - Head of Service Support

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


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27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the 2019-2022 Community Facilities work programme

File No.: CP2019/09489

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo                                                                   

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019–2022 Community Facilities Work Programme for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing of all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

3.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme was developed through a series of iterative workshops between key staff and local boards since October 2018. The projects identified in the work programme have been prioritised for investment based on a combination of local board feedback, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input.

4.       The work programme provided in Attachments A and B to this report reflect the projects that were presented in the last local board workshop with modifications based on feedback from the board, and with the inclusion of projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes.

5.       This report recommends that the board approves the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme and associated budget in full for projects commencing in the first year of the programme and in principle for subsequent two years.

6.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes, including local and sports field development (growth), coastal and slips prevention programmes. Inclusion of these projects in the local board work programme is subject to approval by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

7.       It is recommended that the local board approve the inclusion of these projects in the work programme and provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee.

8.       A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects. These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year.

9.       Approval is sought for staff to commence work on these projects in the 2019/2020 year so that they can be delivered early in the event that other approved projects are delayed for any reason.

10.     In order to expedite delivery of the work programme, and to manage changes that may be required in a timely way, staff recommend that the board delegate decision making for amendments to the approved programme to the chair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report

b)      approve in principle the 2019–2022 Community Facilities Work Programme (years 2 and 3) as detailed in Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report.

c)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) projects identified in Attachment A to the agenda report as projects that may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year, if required to meet expected financial expenditure for the 2019/2020 financial year.

d)      note that approval of budget allocation in the 2019/2020 year for multi-year projects may commit the board to the allocation of subsequent years budgets.

e)      note that the inclusion in the work programme of projects that are funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets are subject to approval of the identified budget allocation by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

f)       provide feedback for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee in relation to the projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets.

g)      note that budget allocation for all projects in the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme are best current estimates, and amendments may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs as the year progresses.

h)      delegate to the chairperson authority to approve minor amendments to the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, following receipt of written advice from staff.

i)        delegate to the Manager Community Leases authority to use the agreed streamlined renewal process for lease renewals without variations.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of Auckland. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

12.     Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. The 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, detailed in the attachments, contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance.

13.     Staff have engaged with the board in the development of the work programme through a number of workshops, including:

a)    8 November 2018 where the board discussed their priorities for the future work programme

b)    21 March 2019 where the board reviewed the first draft work programme and provided feedback

c)    9 May 2019 where staff provided any further information requested in workshop 2 and reviewed the revised draft work programme.

14.     This year’s work programme is a three year programme to clearly demonstrate the phasing of project delivery and to enable the organisation to prepare for delivery.  The work programme is subject to a rolling review and each year the local board will be asked to approve a new three year work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Capital works programme

15.     Investment in the capital works programme will ensure that council facilities and open spaces in Waitākere Ranges Local Board remain valuable and well-maintained community assets.

16.     The overall capital works programme includes projects for which the board has discretion to allocate budget, referred to as the local programme, and projects from regional programmes. 

17.     Specific projects within the work programme may have budget allocated from two or more budget sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

18.     The work programme includes both new projects and existing projects that have been continued from the previous financial year where those projects require multiple years for delivery (multi-year projects).

19.     Any projects that have budget approved in the current 2018/2019 financial year, but are unable to be delivered this year, will be deferred. Deferred budgets will be added to the work programme at a later date.

Local Programme

20.     The local programme includes those projects that the board is funding from its discretionary capex budgets, including:

a)    Renewals

       The board can allocate its renewals budget towards the renewal of any council owned asset.

b)    Locally Driven Initiative (LDI)

The board has the discretion to allocate its LDI budget to any projects that deliver a council asset or as a capital grant to a third party to deliver an asset made available for public use.

21.     In preparing recommendations for the local programme a number of matters have been considered, including:

a)    strategic documents (e.g. local board plan)

b)    service assessment input from Community Services

c)    asset condition assessments

d)    input from operational maintenance teams and staff working within facilities

e)    budget availability.

22.     The Community Facilities work programme supports the achievement of the following 2017 Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan priorities:

a)   “Local communities feel good about where they live”

b)   “People experience local arts and culture, and recognise our heritage”

c)   “Our urban centres are enjoyable places to be”

d)   “Our community spaces, parks, sports and recreation facilities meet local needs and are easy to get to”

23.     Other strategic documents of particular relevance have included The Muddy Creeks Plan and the Te Henga Local Area Plan. These have influenced recommendations in the work programme through consideration for future development of the open space network.

24.     Some of the key projects to be accommodated in the work programme include:

a)    Oratia Village Green -development - stage one

b)    Pennihana Park - develop site

c)    Shadbolt House - refurbish house to safe level

d)    Takaranga Reserve - upgrade playground and park furniture

e)    Titirangi Beach Reserve - replace play items

f)     Waitākere Ranges - small park improvements - phase two.

25.    Waitākere Ranges Local Board projects proposed to be funded through the boards Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) CAPEX are:

a)    Glen Eden Community and Recreation Centre War Memorial Hall – design and install heritage signage

b)    Oratia Village Green – development – stage one

c)    Waitākere Ranges – Heritage Area Gateways

d)    Waitākere Ranges – relocate movable pump track (OPEX)

e)    Waitākere Ranges – small park improvements – phase two.

26.     The proposed work programme in Attachment A contains:

a)    Number of projects excluding leases and contract lines over three years: 59

 

b)    Indicative cost for proposed projects in 2019/2020 is: $2,850,422.

Regional Programme

27.     The Long-Term Plan 2018 - 2028 includes budgets which support the delivery of regional programmes. These budgets are allocated to specific projects within a regional programme by the governing body.

28.     Where budget is allocated to a project in the regional programme that falls within a local board decision making allocation (e.g. a local park), that project is included in the local board work programme. The local board then has decision making responsibility for that project, within the parameters set by the governing body, namely location, scope and budget.

29.     Regional budgets include:

a)   Local parks and sports field development (growth)

b)   Coastal renewals

c)   Slips prevention and remediation.

30.    Projects in these regional programmes are identified and prioritised based on consideration of a number of factors.

31.    For the local parks and sports field development programme, this includes:

a)   Extent to which residential growth is generating demand for the project

b)   Current levels of provision

c)   Available budget.

32.    For coastal renewals and slips prevention and remediation this includes:

a)    Asset condition

b)    Relative hazard and risk

c)    Available budget.

33.    Waitākere Ranges Local Board projects proposed to be funded through these regional programmes are:

a)    Pennihana Park – develop site

b)    Waitākere Ranges – investigate options for sports lighting and sports field upgrades

c)    Withers Reserve – replace pedestrian bridge and widen connecting pathways.

34.     The allocation of budget to specific projects will be approved by the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

35.     The board has an opportunity to provide formal feedback, through resolution to this report, for consideration by the Environment and Community Committee prior to approval of the regional programmes.

Capital Programme Delivery

Cost estimates subject to change

36.    Budget allocations within the work programme are best estimates only. Project costings are subject to change and refinement as projects progress through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined around the specific work required and the cost of delivery of that work once the details are defined.

37.    The delivery of individual projects is managed within the overall work programme budget for each local board. Where significant changes to project budgets may need to be considered, or if new projects are added to the work programme, changes may be required to the programme to accommodate final project costs as the year progresses.

Risk adjusted programme

38.    A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects.

39.    These are projects that have budget allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year (i.e. year two of the three year programme). Staff propose to commence work in the 2019/2020 year on the delivery of these risk adjusted projects.

40.    By progressing these identified projects alongside the 2019/2020 projects in the programme, it is intended that, should projects identified for delivery in year one of the work programme be delayed for any reason, staff will be able to proceed with agreed alternative projects to ensure that the full annual budget is delivered each year.

41.    Approval is sought from the board for staff to commence work on those projects identified in the work programme as risk adjusted programme projects in the 2019/2020 year.

Delegation for approval of changes to the work programme

42.    The delivery of the proposed work programme in an efficient and timely manner may require amendments to be made to the agreed work programme during the course of the year. Such amendments could include:

a)    changes to project scope, budgets, timing

b)    addition of new projects within available budget

c)    cancelling or putting approved projects on hold.

43.     Any changes to the approved work programme require approval from the board. Approval will normally be sought through resolution at a business meeting.

44.     Local boards are also able to delegate authority to approve some or all amendments to the work programme to the chair, to another member of the board, or to staff. Such delegation would allow changes to be made without the timeframes required to provide formal reports and would support the efficient delivery of the work programme.

45.     Should the board choose to delegate authority to approve changes to the work programme, it is anticipated that any changes would be workshopped with the board prior to any delegated decision being taken. Any changes made under delegation would be reported back to the board in their quarterly report.

Leasing work programme

46.     Community leases, commonly on public parks and reserves, are a valuable way in which the council provides support to community organisations across the region. These groups provide a wide range of community activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities and are a key part of the mosaic of community activity and infrastructure in Auckland.

47.     Attachment B – Community Leases provides a detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2019/2020 financial year. Following approval of the work programme staff will proceed with review and renewal of these leases and licences as appropriate during the course of the financial year.

48.     Two additional project lines include those leases and licences proposed to be progressed in the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years respectively. It also includes the additional leases and licences that will be deferred from the 2018/2019 financial year to the 2019/2020 financial year.

49.    Straight forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations with a written memo to the board providing the opportunity for the board to request further information or a formal report. More complex community leases will be reported to the board at a business meeting.

Operational maintenance work programme

50.    The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

a)    increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets

b)    improving the safety of Community Facilities assets

c)    ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users.

51.    In the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, there are three line items dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area:

a)    Full Facilities Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, coastal management and storm damage response. From 1 July 2019 council is responsible for streetscapes maintenance from Auckland Transport.

b)    Arboriculture Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all tree management and maintenance

c)    Ecological Restoration Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include pest plant management within ecologically significant areas and animal pest management across all parks and reserves

52.     Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly report. Community Facilities is also providing additional weekly updates to all elected members on contractor performance.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     The 2019 - 2022 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

54.     In particular, the council’s Parks Services and Community Empowerment departments will continue to be involved in the development of the , Oratia Villiage Green development, Pennihana Park development and Small Park Improvements project scopes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

55.     The Community Facilities Work Programme has been created through a combination of local board feedback, asset condition assessments and agreed levels of service.

56.     The 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2018 to May 2019. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programmes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     The 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

58.     Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

59.     Staff are also attending mana whenua forum’s monthly to receive feedback on specific projects within the 2019 - 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme.

60.     Activities in the work programmes that are specific to Māori outcomes include:

a)    Signage renewal across the local park network involves Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

61.     Table 1 below summarises the relevant budgets, proposed allocation and the balance of unallocated budget available:

Local Budgets

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

Renewals - Budget

$1,246,793

$1,404,606

$1,714,219

Renewals - Proposed Allocation

$1,246,793

$1,404,606

$1,714,219

Renewals - Unallocated budget

$0

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

Growth and Development - Allocation

$596,129

$220,000

$1,000,000

Coastal Renewals - Allocation

$800,000

$0

$0

Slips Prevention - Allocation

$80,000

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Capex - Proposed Allocation

$124,000

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Opex - Proposed Allocation

$3,500

$0

$0

62.     The proposed work programme can be accommodated within the available local board budgets. Approval of the work programme does not have significant financial implications, unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend.

63.     Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the board. These updates will identify progress of all projects and potential amendments to the approved programme including changes to budget allocation and timing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.  The risk adjusted programme (RAP) will be used to progress those projects identified as ready to proceed under the RAP.

65.     If the proposed Community Facilities work programme is not approved at the business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     Once approved, delivery of activities identified in the Community Facilities work programme will commence from 1 July 2019.

67.     The work programmes identify if further decisions are required for each activity. These will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

68.     Progress and updates on work programmes will be reported to the local board for each quarter of the financial year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Community Facilities 2019-2022 Work Programme - Build, Maintain, Renew

127

b

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Community Facilities 2019-2022 Work Programme - Leases

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Helen Biffin - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the 2019/2020 Local Environment work programme

File No.: CP2019/10559

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Local Environment work programme for Waitākere Ranges Local Board, totaling $308,400 of locally driven initiatives operational expenditure, and $80,000 of asset-based services operational expenditure from the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act budget.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board identified an aspiration in its 2017 local board plan to achieve a ‘our unique natural habitats are protected and enhanced’.

3.       To give effect to this aspiration, staff developed 14 options for projects for the board to consider supporting in the 2019/2020 financial year.

4.       The board provided feedback to council staff regarding which of these projects it would like to fund at its 21 March 2019 workshop. The board declined to fund one project and indicated support for the remaining 13 projects.

5.       The 13 projects supported by the board, which have a total budget of $308,400, are focused on biodiversity, weed control, improving water quality and promoting low carbon living. These projects are outlined in the recommendations below and in the draft work programme in Attachment A.

6.       At the 22 June 2017 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting, the board approved a three year funding agreement with the EcoMatters Environment Trust, noting that EcoMatters would receive $103,000 per annum until 30 June 2020 to deliver environmental projects in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area (resolution WTK/2017/77). Eight projects are proposed for delivery by EcoMatters in the 2019/2020 financial year, as part of this funding agreement budget allocation. The budget allocation has been adjusted for inflation and the total budget for EcoMatters projects in 2019/2020 is now $106,900. The proposed EcoMatters projects are detailed in Attachment A.

7.       The board also has $745,400 of asset based services operational budget, funded by a targeted rate, for the continuation of the septic tank pumpout programme.

8.       Two projects, community weed bins and long-tailed bat projects, both delivered by Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff, are funded from the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area asset based services operational budget. The board has indicated its support towards the continuation of these initiatives in 2019/2020.

9.       Staff recommend that the board approve this local environment work programme and associated budgets for delivery within the 2019/2020 financial year (see Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of $308,400 for environmental projects to be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate in 2019/2020 as summarised in the table below:

Project

Budget

Waitākere Weed Action Project (Our Backyard)

$100,000

Coastal and marine project

$15,000

Manukau Harbour Forum

$8,000

New project: Co-ordination of community-led ecological restoration in the Waitākere Ranges

$75,000

New project: Kerbside recycling collection for commercial premises in Piha

$3,500

EcoMatters Environment Trust funding

$106,900

Total

$308,400

b)      note that with the funding of $106,900, EcoMatters Environment Trust will deliver the following projects in the 2019/2020 financial year:

i)     EcoMatters Environment Centre and Sustainability Hub - $36,300

ii)    Love Your Neighbourhood - $10,400

iii)    Love Your Place Awards - $5,200

iv)   Pop up bike hub - $5,200

v)    EcoWest Festival - $10,400

vi)   War on Weeds - $23,850

vii)  Community nurseries - $10,350

viii)  Project HomeWise - $5,200.

c)      approve the allocation of $10,000 towards the long-tailed bat research, protection and recovery programme as part of the 2019/2020 Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area work programme

d)      approve the allocation of $70,000 towards community weed bins programme as part of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area work programme

e)      note the allocation of $745,400 of asset based services operational expenditure for the septic tank pumpout programme.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     In late 2018, in alignment to its local board plan outcomes, the Waitākere Ranges Local Board provided strategic direction to staff in regard to the projects it would like to fund in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board noted its strong commitment to the environment, and in particular noted it:

a)    would like to better empower community groups to actively protect the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area

b)    supports working with landowners to manage weeds on private property

c)    supports projects with a sustainability focus

d)    would like to take a leading role in the protection of the coastal and marine environment.

11.     In response to the direction set by the board, Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff provided a draft local environment work programme for the board’s feedback at a workshop on 21 March 2019.

12.     The local board indicated its support in principle of 13 locally driven initiative-funded projects which are proposed to be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate as part of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme. The draft work programme has been included as Attachment A to this report.

13.     The board did not support the proposed Pest Free South Titirangi project budget of $30,000. As part of the project delivery in 2018/2019 a strategy for the Pest Free South Titirangi project will be developed by the end of June 2019. The specific deliverables for 2019/2020 could not be identified until this strategy has been finalised, and the local board did not want to support the project without confirmation of these deliverables.

14.     Two projects to be funded through the 2019/2020 Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act budget were also supported by the board: a community weed bin project and a long-tailed bat project, with budgets of $70,000 and $10,000 asset-based services operational expenditure respectively.

15.     In addition to this, $745,400 of asset based services operational budget will be allocated towards the continuation of the septic tank pumpout programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     A brief description of each of the proposed projects for delivery as part of the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme is provided below. Further detail on these projects is provided in Attachment A.

Waitākere weed action project (Our Backyard) – $100,000

17.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘animal pests and weeds are controlled long-term’, the board has indicated that it would like to continue to fund the Waitākere weed action project (Our Backyard) in the 2019/2020 financial year. Our Backyard is a Waitākere Local Board-initiated weed management project with a focus on control of climbing asparagus on privately-owned properties in Huia, Karekare and Piha.

18.     The board provided $46,000 towards this project in 2014/2015, $104,000 in 2015/2016, and $100,000 in the 2016/2017, 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 financial years. The natural environment targeted rate allocated an additional $85,000 to this programme in 2018/2019.

19.     It is recommended that the board allocate $100,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards the continuation of this project in 2019/2020. Regional funding will match this up to the value of an additional $100,000.

20.     This project aims to reduce the volume and spread specifically of climbing asparagus in ecologically significant areas of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. It also contributes towards a behaviour change where all of the community understands that they have a shared responsibility to manage environmental weeds in the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area.

21.     The adopted Regional Pest Management Plan contains a parks buffer programme which includes regional funding towards initial control by council of climbing and bushy asparagus at priority sites. If the Regional Pest Management Plan is made operative as projected with regional funding of climbing and bushy asparagus control, it is proposed that the budget of $100,000 for 2019/2020 will instead focus on ginger control.

22.     If there are delays beyond December 2019 in the implementation of the Regional Pest Management Plan or changes to regional funding of climbing and bushy asparagus, then it is proposed that climbing asparagus remains the focus of the project for 2019/2020.

23.     The programme for the 2019/2020 financial year will continue within the current areas (Huia, Karekare and Piha), and engagement will commence in either Anawhata or Cornwallis.

Coastal and marine project - $15,000

24.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our marine and coastal environments are protected’, the board has indicated that it would like to fund a coastal and marine project in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board provided $50,000 towards the development of the Big Blue Waitākere report in the 2016/2017 financial year. This is an information report setting out the current state of the Waitākere Ranges marine and coastal environments.

25.     For the 2018/2019 financial year, $30,000 was allocated to address some of the issues outlined in the report. In December 2018 the board resolved to allocate this budget towards shorebird and seadbird surveys to better understand the bird populations in the local board area (resolution WTK/2018/175).

26.     It is recommended that the board allocate $15,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards a coastal and marine project in the 2019/2020 financial year. This budget will be used to continue the seabird and shorebird survey undertaken in 2018/2019. The continued surveying will ensure a representative area of both the seabird and shorebird habitat has been surveyed and that breeding success can be monitoring for at least one full season.

27.     Staff recommend follow-up surveys are undertaken over the next three to five years. Full survey work will provide valuable insights into where potentially important coastal bird areas are as well as what management interventions may be taken to improve the birds’ conservation statuses.

New project: Co-ordination of community-led ecological restoration in the Waitākere Ranges – $75,000

28.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘animal pests and weeds are controlled long-term, and the fight against kauri dieback continued’, the board has indicated that it would like to fund a new Waitākere Ranges community-based ecological restoration coordinator project in the 2019/2020 financial year.

29.     The coordinator role will be focused on supporting, resourcing and connecting community ecological restoration for all of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. The role will be contracted to work in support of existing community projects and networks as well as growing new and existing interest. 

30.     Building on existing work, the coordinator will complete a stocktake of the groups that are undertaking restoration work, what they are doing, and how they operate, strengths, resourcing needs and challenges. The coordinator will then focus on the resourcing, aligning and connecting of community-powered ecological restoration across the Waitākere Ranges. This will include working with staff in Environmental Services, Community Facilities and Community Services to help align council and community restoration activities.

31.     This project will provide the following benefits in the 2019/2020 financial year:

a)    community groups, landowners and schools supported and enabled to lead and undertake ecological restoration action

b)    people taking action to protect their local native biodiversity – controlling pest animals and weeds

c)    people taking action to enhance native habitat (such as planting native trees to provide food for wildlife, planting native shrubs to add structure and resilience to coastal native forest)

d)    local native ecosystems protected and enhanced – providing safe and connected refuge for native wildlife.

New project: Kerbside recycling collection for commercial premises in Piha - $3,500

32.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our visitors and residents make everyday sustainable living choices’, the board has indicated that it would like to fund kerbside recycling collection for commercial hospitality premises in Piha for the 2019/2020 financial year.

33.     There are currently no private recycling collection services available to businesses and commercial sites in Piha. Each property is entitled to two 240 litre bins as provided by the council. This project will cover an annual cost of extra recycling bins for businesses in the Piha area. The additional recycling bins currently have a lease cost of $65.14 per bin, per year.

34.     This budget will ensure that the business community of Piha have access to a recycling service that meets their volume needs. This increases waste minimisation as plastics, glass and paper are diverted from landfills.

 Manukau Harbour Forum - $8,000

35.     To achieve the local board plan objective ‘our marine and coastal environments are protected’, the board has indicated that it would like to continue to fund the Manukau Harbour Forum in the 2019/2020 financial year. The board is one of nine local boards who make up the Manukau Harbour Forum (Franklin, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Papakura, Puketāpapa, Waitākere Ranges, and Whau Local Boards).

36.     The board provided $10,000 towards the Manukau Harbour Forum’s work programme in the 2018/2019 financial year. It is recommended that the board allocate $8,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards the Manukau Harbour Forum in the 2019/2020 financial year. This budget will deliver several initiatives as will be recommended by the forum and detailed below. In February 2018 the forum provided direction to staff to host a symposium every second year as opposed to annually. Staff have recommended a slightly reduced budget for 2019/2020 as funding for that activity is not needed next year.

37.     At a workshop in May 2019, the forum indicated it would like to consider supporting the following initiatives in 2019/2020:

a)    youth leadership programme

b)    industry education programme

c)    communications campaign

d)    mana whenua engagement and support programme

e)    a part-time community and stakeholder liaison resource.

38.     Detailed project options are being investigated by staff and will be presented to the forum for consideration early in the 2019/2020 financial year.

39.     The forum funded a governance and management support review as part of its 2018/2019 work programme. At the time of writing this report, the review was still underway with findings due to be presented to the forum in July 2019. The findings of the review are expected to assist in making the forum’s work programme more strategic and governance-oriented. These recommendations will have implications for the types of projects and initiatives to be funded by the member local boards in future financial years.

EcoMatters Environment Trust funding $106,900

40.     A key objective in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan is ‘our visitors and residents make everyday sustainable living choices’. At the board’s June 2017 business meeting, the board approved a three-year funding agreement with EcoMatters to 30 June 2020 to deliver environmental initiatives to be agreed as part of the board’s annual local environment work programmes (resolution WTK/2017/77).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

41.     A brief description of each of the projects proposed for delivery by EcoMatters in the 2019/2020 financial year is provided in Table 1 below:

Table 1. Key deliverables for Waitākere Ranges projects delivered by EcoMatters

Description of project

Deliverables

EcoMatters Environment Centre and Sustainability Hub ($36,300)

Funding will support the operation of EcoMatters Environment Centre, including staffing and associated education programmes.

 

·    The environment centre will be open for at least 30 hours per week

·    Up-to-date advice, information and support will be available via phone, email, website and visits

·    Promotion of the centre will be targeted to, and the users of the centre represent, the diversity and distribution of the population

·    The Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s support will be acknowledged at public events, in press releases, on signage and flyers, in accordance with the council’s media policy and brand and style guidelines.

Love Your Neighbourhood ($10,400)

Rapid response assistance of up to $500 in value to support volunteer-driven practical environmental initiatives (such as clean-ups, restoration, community planting and food growing). Not-for-profit preschools can also apply for this assistance.

·    The mechanism for requesting assistance will be published on the Ecomatters website from July 2019

·    Love Your Neighbourhood assistance will be promoted in conjunction with EcoWest Festival (February to April 2020)

·    The Waitākere Ranges Local Board support will be acknowledged in the provision of the rapid response assistance.

 

Love your place awards ($5,200)

Funding to support biennial environmental champion recognition awards that will specifically be for board constituents. The awards will recognise volunteer work in the environment.

·    Award finalists and winners will be selected in July and August 2019, ahead of the awards event will be held in September 2019

·    Local board support will be acknowledged in press releases, on signage and flyers, in accordance with council’s brand and style guidelines.

Pop up bike hub ($5,200)

New project – funding to support the development and operation of a pop up repair centre for bikes at selected events.

·    Bicycle skill programmes will be delivered via the pop up bike hub, and users will be educated about active transport

·    The pop up bike hub service will be provided at two events during the 2019/2020 financial year

·    The Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s support will be acknowledged through signage at pop up bike hub events.

EcoWest Festival ($10,400)

Funding to support the running of EcoWest festival which will run from March-April 2020.

·    The EcoWest festival events will be delivered by May 2020 across the Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges and Whau Local Board areas

·    A minimum of 30 events will be held in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area

·    Sustainability practices will be demonstrated in all aspects of the organisation and delivery of the festival

·    Local board and council support will be acknowledged at public events, in press releases, on signage and flyers, in accordance with the council’s brand and style guidelines.

War on Weeds ($23,850)

A campaign to be run during the month of March 2020, where jumbo bins are provided at key sites in the local board area for community disposal of weeds.

·    Weed bins continuously available at locations in Waitākere Ranges Local Board throughout March 2020

·    The removal of environmental weeds and pest plants from private property in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area will be supported, and awareness will be raised around weed issues in the area.

Community nurseries ($10,350)

Establishment of community nurseries is supported and advice is provided to the community on how best to establish and maintain these.

·    A minimum of 2,500 native plants will be germinated and potted for future planting

·    A minimum of 2,000 native plants will be available for community planting projects within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area (plants generated from this initiative in the 2017/2018 financial year)

·    Provision of nursery advice to community groups and interested parties to assist projects to establish new nurseries.

Project HomeWise ($5,200)

Workshops delivered across the local board area, and particularly targeted at ethnic communities and vulnerable households, to be provided on topics such as:

·    waste minimisation

·    water saving

·    energy efficiency

·    sustainable living

·    A minimum of three workshops will be delivered in the 2019/2020 financial year

·    Ethnic communities and vulnerable households within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area will have the skills, knowledge and resources to make positive sustainable living choices.

 

 

Long-tailed bat research, protection and recovery - $10,000 (Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area asset based services operational budget)

42.     The board has supported long-tailed bat research, protection and recovery project for seven years. For 2019/2020, it is proposed that $10,000 be funded for this through the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area asset based services operational budget.

43.     This budget will support Community Waitākere to run an education and awareness programme into long-tailed bat roost use in the Waitākere Ranges. Delivery of this project includes open community events, targeted community events, and educational resource promotion.

44.     Benefits of this supporting this project will include:

a)    increasing awareness and action around long-tailed bats and how this relates to the North-West Wildlink and Pest Free Auckland

b)    building stronger relationships and networks across community groups and individual landowners

c)    growing community capacity.

Community weed bins - $70,000 (Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area asset based services operational budget)

45.     For 2019/2020 it is proposed that $70,000 be allocated to the community weed bin project from the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area asset based services operational budget. An additional $61,000 will be allocated to this project from the natural environmental targeted rate.

46.     The Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area is unique environment that provides many values to the people of Auckland and visitors. The weedbin service was introduced to reduce the illegal dumping of weeds and to encourage landowners to control pest plants on their property.

47.     EcoMatters will continue to be the contractor of this service until 30 November 2019. From December 2019 community groups will run the permanent bins and a new contractor will be sought for the weekend (temporary) bins.

Septic tank pumpout programme ($745,400 asset based services operational expenditure)

48.     This programme manages the triennial pump-out of septic tanks within the former Waitākere City Council area. Within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area, 3,510 households pay a targeted rate for maintenance of rural sewerage systems. These households are visited every three years to have their tanks pumped out and cleaned.

49.     In the 2018/2019 financial year, $632,766 was received for this programme, and in the 2019/2020 financial year, $745,400 will be received for this programme.

50.     In May 2019, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to retain the septic tank pumpout scheme and associated targeted rate until June 2021 as part of their decision making on the Annual Plan 2019/2020. They also resolved that staff should ‘report back on options for integrating the septic tank pump out service with the new monitoring regime including advice on the cost of the options, appropriate level of rate, and the area the service should apply to’ (FIN/2019/55).

51.     The local board will be consulted on any proposed changes to the scheme before staff report back to a committee of council on the topics outlined above.

Additional project option (not supported): Pest Free South Titirangi strategy - $30,000

52.     To achieve the local board plan objective to ‘enable community-based weed and animal pest control on public and private property’, staff proposed continuation of the Pest Free South Titirangi project in the 2019/2020 financial year.

53.     The board supported a new Pest Free South Titirangi strategy in the 2018/2019 financial year with a budget of $30,000. The funding for 2018/2019 is being used to develop a facilitated strategy to achieve Pest Free South Titirangi as agreed by community and agency stakeholders. It was proposed that the 2019/2020 budget be used to fund the recommendations in the strategy.

54.     The specific deliverables for 2019/2020 could not be identified until this strategy has been finalised, and the local board did not want to support the project without confirmation of these deliverables.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The draft 2019/2020 work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments as part of the council’s integrated local board work programme approach. This approach aimed to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

56.     In particular, the council’s Parks, Sport and Recreation department were involved in the development of the scope for the co-ordination of community-led ecological restoration in the Waitākere Ranges project. If approved, they will contribute towards the delivery of the project in the 2019/2020 financial year.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local impacts

57.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s 2019/2020 local environment work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2019/2020 work programme include the Manukau Harbour, South Titirangi, Piha, Huia, Karekare, and the wider Waitākere Ranges Heritage area.

Local board views

58.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘our unique natural habitats are protected and enhanced’, and enable the board to deliver on this commitment.

59.     The proposed local environment work programme was discussed with the board at workshop on 21 March 2019. At this workshop, the local board indicated its support in principle for the proposed projects outlined in this report, but requested further information on the new co-ordination of community-led ecological restoration in the Waitākere Ranges proposal. The scope of this project has been updated in this report from feedback from the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     It is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

61.     Table 2 below outlines how each of the projects contributes towards Māori outcomes.

Table 2: Māori impact assessment of proposed projects for inclusion in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s local environment work programme

Project

Māori impact assessment

Waitākere Weed Action project (Our Backyard)

Specific consultation and engagement with mana whenua has not been carried out for this project. However, it is recognised that management of weeds in the Waitākere Ranges is of significance to mana whenua in their role as kaitiaki of natural environments.

Coastal and marine project

It is recognised that improving the health and mauri of marine and coastal areas is of key importance to mana whenua in their role as kaitiaki of Auckland’s natural environment. While there is no direct engagement with mana whenua planned these projects, the results of the surveys will be provided to mana whenua once available.

Manukau Harbour Forum

Mana whenua have expressed particular interest in improving the Manukau Harbour. In May 2019, the Manukau Harbour Forum indicated that it would like to fund a potential mana whenua engagement and support project to be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year. This is being investigated by staff as part of the development of project options to be considered by the forum in early 2019/2020.

New project: Co-ordination of community-led ecological restoration in the Waitākere Ranges

Mana whenua will be included in the coordination aspects of this work and invited to contribute as they see fit with the facilitation.

The coordinator will also seek opportunities to incorporate matauranga Māori into the messaging and education programme, and will work alongside mana whenua to deliver aspects of the coordinator’s work programme where possible.

New project: Kerbside recycling collection for commercial premises in Piha

Consultation was undertaken with mana whenua and mataawaka for the 2018 Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, and this proposal is in line with feedback and guidance given throughout this process.

EcoMatters Environment Trust funding

The funding provided by the local board to EcoMatters has an impact on Māori wellbeing and building capacity for Māori. EcoMatters regularly hold traditional Māori weaving workshops as part of their seminar and workshop education programme.

There is potential for Project HomeWise to contribute to Māori well-being through educating Māori groups about energy, water and waste, which may result in financial savings and home livability improvements.

EcoMatters provides support to build the capacity of other organisations involved in developing and delivering environmental initiatives. This includes engaging with Hoani Waititi Marae on opportunities for collaboration.

With the Love Your Neighbourhood assistance, EcoMatters provide support for community environmental action, which has the potential to contribute to the development of Māori capacity through supporting applications for this assistance from Māori organisations.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

62.     The proposed 2019/2020 local environment work programme requires the allocation of $308,400 of the board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget and $80,000 of asset-based services operational expenditure from the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act budget. These amounts can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2019/2020. As such, the board’s approval will not have significant financial implications unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend. Regular quarterly updates on projects will be provided to the board tracking expenditure and identifying any projects at risk of non-delivery, over or underspend.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

63.     If the proposed local environment work programme is not approved at the board’s June 2019 business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be able to be delivered within the 2019/2020 financial year.

64.     The risks and proposed mitigation measures associated with each of the proposed projects have been outlined in Attachment B to this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     Subject to the board’s approval, the delivery of this work programme will commence in the new financial year (1 July 2019). Regular reporting on project delivery will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2019/2020 local environment work programme

151

b

Risks and proposed mitigation measures for proposed projects

157

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nick FitzHerbert - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the 2019/2020 Youth Connection work programme

File No.: CP2019/10818

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Youth Connection work programme for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report introduces the proposed 2019/2020 financial year Youth Connection work programme for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board as set out in attachment A.

3.       The total value of the Youth Connection programme is $20,000

4.       The board is being asked to approve the 2019/2020 Youth Connection programme.

5.       Staff report to the local board on work programme activities quarterly to provide an update on progress and highlight risks. Along with any insights and learnings at the end of the programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of $20,000 for the 2019-2020 Youth Connections work programme (Attachment A).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report provides the local board with the proposed Youth Connection work programme for the coming financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The 2019/2020 Youth Connection work programme has been developed having regard to the local board’s priorities set out in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2017, in particular:

a)    Develop the leadership and job skills of young people.

b)    Support youth-led community projects.

c)    Enable young people to contribute to decision-making.

d)    Develop relationships and agree shared goals with Te Kawerau a Maki and other mana whenua, Hoani Waititi Marae, and other key Māori organisations and local Māori residents.

8.       The 2019/2020 Youth Connection work programme has been developed also by taking into account Waitākere ki tua put together by the all three of the Local Boards in West Auckland in June 2019. We have ensured to take in to account all four focus areas identified in Waitākere ki tua, which are:

a)    Whakawhanaungatanga – Grow respectful and reciprocal relationships;

b)    Rangatiratanga – Enhancing leadership and participation;

c)    Taonga tuku iho – Ancestral Māori culture and practices;

d)    Rangatira mō āpōpō – Ensuring sustainable futures.

9.       The West Worx (TWW) staff have been engaging with the local community groups, businesses and the support and connections provided by the Southern Initiative (TSI) in identifying work programmes that will benefit the young people in Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

10.     The development of draft work programmes was supported by a workshop with the local board. Workshop provided strategic direction and identified priority activities to support that direction. Further decisions required for allocation of funding by The West Worx (TWW) will be brought to the local board in August/September 2019. Some of the options that have been discussed include:

Option One:

Commission quantitative research about young people in Waitākere Ranges Local Board areas to help make decisions based on actual research on your local board area – BERL.

Options Two:

Vocational pathways programme for Young People leaving school. This is an extention on their current (2018/19) Youth Connection funded programme.

Options Three:

Mentoring Vocational Placement Programme (“MVPP”) into quality employment.

Option Four:

          Youth Employment Support Service (YESS) is a programme that supports our most at risk youth age 16 to 24 into employment and education.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The West Worx (TWW) have worked with the Community Empowerment unit to ensure the smooth transition and effective on-going delivery.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

12.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘A thriving local economy that supports quality of life’.

13.     The proposed work programme was workshopped with the local board on Thursday, 16 May 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     The 2019-2020 Youth Connections work programme has been developed taking into account strategic objectives set by the local board.

15.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2017 identifies a priority around developing relationships and agree shared goals with Te Kawerau a Maki and other mana whenua, Hoani Waititi Marae, and other key Māori organisations and local Māori residents.

16.     Waitākere ki Tua adopted by the three Local Boards in west Auckland in March 2019 also identifies a focus on rangitahi and youth development.

17.     The West Worx have developed strong relationships with local Māori community organizations and kura. All our programmes will include Māori community to provide training, quality employment outcomes and wellbeing.

18.     Some of the Youth Connections funding will be directed to Māori organisations/kura to improve Māori outcomes in terms of education and employment.

19.     We are prototyping models for engagement with the Māori community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The proposed 2019/2020 Youth Connections work programme will see the allocation of $20,000 directly to the community organsiations to deliver youth outcomes.

21.     The Youth Connection work programme progress will be reported directly to the local board as part of the quarterly local board work programme report produced by Local Board Services.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     There is a risk that the activities in the work programme will not be delivered within indicative timeframes and budget. Where unforeseen delays occur, this will be communicated to the local board through quarterly reporting and where appropriate emails, memos or meetings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Following approval by the local board the West Worx team will come back to the Local Board as agreed in August/September 2019 to finalise and confirm the detail of this work programmes with the local community groups.

24.     Quarterly reports will be provided to the local boards as well as regular updates and insights as the programmes progresses.

25.     At the end of the programme delivery learnings and insights gained from the programme will be shared to the local board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2019/2020 Youth Connections work programme

163

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Dhaya Haran, Specialist Advisor – Youth Employment

Authorisers

Sue Travaglia, Manager – Shared Prosperity, The Southern Initiative/West Worx

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the 2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme

File No.: CP2019/09700

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Waitākere Ranges Local Board 2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. They outline the local activities to be delivered in each local board area for the next financial year.  This report presents six items in the draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board 2019/2020 Plans and Places work programme (refer to Attachment A), namely:

a)      Dark Sky accreditation

b)      Visitor impact assessment

c)      Heritage interpretation signage

d)      Weed buffer zone

e)      Landscape unit re-appraisal

f)       Thrive magazine.

3.       The timing of these projects will be to complete the dark sky accreditation, visitor impact assessment, heritage interpretation signage and landscape unit re-appraisal in the 2019/20 year.  The weed buffer zone and thrive are multi-year projects that will continue. 

4.       Staff will report to the local board on these work programme activities when appropriate to update the Board about progress and highlight any risks (should there be any).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of $5,000 for the Plans and Places Department to progress the Dark Sky accreditation for the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area

b)      approve the allocation of $10,000 for the Plans and Places Department to coordinate the visitor impact assessment for the west coast beaches

c)      approve the allocation of $10,000 for the Plans and Places Department to coordinate the development of material for heritage interpretation signage

d)      approve the allocation of $50,000 for the Plans and Places Department to progress the weed buffer zone project

e)      note that the Plans and Places Department will review the re-appraisal of landscape units to begin the preparation of the third State of the Environment report for the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area

f)       approve the allocation of $8,000 for the Thrive magazine.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. They outline the local activities to be delivered in each local board area for the next financial year.

6.       The items in the draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plans and Places work programme include new items and the continuation of multi-year items (the Weed Buffer Zone and Thrive).  Plans and Places staff will work with relevant staff from Council to progress these various projects. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The projects will contribute towards achieving the Local Board Plan 2017’s outcomes that “People actively protect the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area” and “Our unique natural habitats are protected and enhanced”. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       The projects will be undertaken in close liaison with key council stakeholders and council-controlled organisations. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       The projects support the Local Board’s work to achieve the outcomes in the Local Board Plan 2017. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     Inclusion of these projects in the board’s work programme does not generate a particular impact for Māori.  Plans and Places will consider potential impacts for Māori at the project formulation stage and as each project progresses.  Consultation with iwi occurs on a project by project basis. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     All projects will be funded from the 2019/2020 regional budget. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     There is a risk that staff resource may be diverted into other priorities during the financial year that could lead to projects not being completed. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

13.     Delivery of these projects will begin and continue in an integrated manner with other projects in the heritage area. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Plans and Places Work Programme 19-20

169

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Eryn Shields - Team Leader Planning - North West

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Approval of the 2019/2020 Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2019/10945

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2019/2020 Community Services work programme (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each financial year, a work programme is developed that details the activities to be delivered in the local board area. The development process is supported by a series of workshops with the local board.

3.       To prepare for the 2019/2020 work programme staff representing relevant operational council departments worked together to ensure an integrated approach.

4.       This report presents the draft 2019/2020 community services work programme, which responds to Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes and reflects the priorities that have been agreed by departments across council.

5.       Delivery of new activities in the work programme will commence from 1 July 2019. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery progress, highlights, potential delays and budget implications.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve the 2019/2020 Community Services work programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board decides which activities to allocate its annual work programme budget to in order to achieve the outcomes set out in its 2017 local board plan.

7.       The development of the 2019/2020 work programme has built on the approach piloted for 2018/2019, which enabled staff to work in a more integrated way across departments to improve local outcomes.

8.       In preparation for the 2019/2020 work programme process, an overview group was created from the following council departments to develop an agreed approach to achieve improved integration:

a)      Arts, Community and Events

b)      Community Facilities

c)      Libraries

d)      Infrastructure and Environmental Services

e)      Parks, Sports and Recreation

f)       Community Services - Service, Strategy and Integration.

9.       Teams made up of representatives from these departments were established to explore shared priorities and objectives for each local board area, and to develop the work programme in a collaborative way in response to local board plan outcomes.

10.     Table one shows the business objectives and strategic alignment for community services departments.

Table 1: Adopted community-based strategies and plans

Department

Business objectives

Strategies and plans

Arts, Community and Events

Provision of services, programmes, events and facilities that strengthen and connect communities and create a sense of belonging and pride

·  Hire Fee Framework

·  Events Policy

·  Toi Whītiki

·  Thriving Communities

Libraries

Provision of library services and programmes that support Aucklanders with reading and literacy, and opportunities to participate in community and civic life

·  Te Kauroa

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Provision of services to actively engage Aucklanders to lead healthy lives, connect with nature and value our cultural identity

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

·  Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

·  Auckland Growing Greener Framework

·  Urban Ngāhere Strategy

Service, Strategy and Integration

Provision of service and asset planning advice and support more integrated delivery of community outcomes

·  Community Facilities Network Plan

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The local board provided feedback on proposed activities for the new financial year at a series of workshops between September 2018 and May 2019.

12.     Initial workshops were an opportunity for the local board to communicate to staff its strategic direction. At subsequent workshops, the local board discussed its priorities for budget allocation and requested further scoping for existing and new activities.

13.     The activities in the work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in its 2017 local board plan.

14.     The work programme is made up of approved activities from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board.

15.     Budget is allocated to activities for the 2019/2020 financial year. If zero-dollars is shown this reflects that the project is able to be delivered in-house with no additional external technical advice and support.

16.     Table two shows activities and allocated budget that are new in 2019/2020 or are significantly different to the 2018/2019 work programme.

Table 2: New and significant changes activities

Line number

Activity

Activity description

FY19 budget

FY20 budget

Local board plan outcome:  Our community spaces, parks, sports and recreation facilities meet local needs and are easy to get to

612

(new)

Huia Domain service assessment

Complete a service assessment and outcomes plan for the future development of Huia Domain.

$0

$12,000

1287

(new)

Top up for funding agreement - Glen Eden and Titirangi Community House

Glen Eden Community House ($12,500) Titirangi Community House ($3,500)

$0

$16,000

1298

(new)

42 Seaview Road Outcomes Plan

Assess service needs at Seaview Road Reserve.

$0

$13,000

1299

(new)

Heritage Area Local Plans parks actions prioritisation

Review the Waitākere Ranges Area Plans to identify activities that take place on local parks.

$0

$0

1301

(new)

Additional support for volunteer libraries

Piha Library Trust to receive additional top up to existing regional funding for library building insurance purposes.

$0

$2,800

1302

(new)

Support communities running volunteer rural libraries in Piha and Waiatarua

Budget allocations from Libraries regional funding to each of these libraries. In addition, Auckland Libraries continues to provide bulk loans of materials, professional and other advice and help.

$0

$0

3101

(new)

Waitākere Ranges small urban park improvements

Complete a service assessment work programme for small park improvements to address the local board plan initiative of improving the attractiveness of small urban parks.

$0

$0

3069

(new)

Support customer and community connection and local place making

Provide local community-based interest groups with free bookings for the Glen Eden Library meeting room including subsidise community bookings room hire rate

$0

$4,000

Local board plan outcome: People experience local arts and culture and recognise our heritage

317

(new)

Social and Historic Heritage Events

Funding to support community led programmes and events with a social and heritage basis.

$18,000 Heritage Conference

$5,000 New event to be scoped.

$0

$23,000

1156

(new)

McCahon's Auckland

To partner with McCahon house on the McCahon's centennial year to trial a bespoke tour connecting Auckland Art Gallery with the House and Waitākere.

$0

$10,000

Local board plan outcome:  Local communities feel good about where they live

1044

(new)

Community-led placemaking – Glen Eden activation programme

Deliver and/or fund, in collaboration with community providers and local stakeholders, a suite of projects aimed at making Glen Eden a more welcoming town centre for all residents.

$0

$35,000

17.     The way in which Community Places activities are presented in the work programme has changed for 2019/2020. Work related to the operation of venues for hire, community centres, houses, hubs and rural halls will now be reported by the following levels of service: Access, Activation and Intervention Programming.

18.     Service, Strategy and Integration does not have any activities in the 2019/2020 work programme for the Waitākere Ranges area.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The work programme has been developed by a collective of operational council departments.

20.     The interdepartmental connections made throughout the process will enable an integrated approach to delivery of the activities and allow for further collaboration throughout the year. These working relationships will also support an integrated approach to work programme development in future years.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The local board provided direction and feedback on the draft work programme at a series of workshops.  

22.     These workshops provided an opportunity for staff to gain an understanding of local board strategic direction and priorities. Budget allocation, activity content and scoping were discussed and refined.

23.     The activities in the final work programme support achieving local board plan outcomes and objectives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Community services and Community Facilities have developed Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai!, a relationship approach which guides staff to deliver on agreed work programme activities and support the local board to achieve outcomes in its local board plan.

25.     The approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori.

26.     Table three outlines the activities in the 2019/2020 work programme where Māori responsiveness is the primary outcome.

Table 3: Māori impact of proposed activities

Line number

Activity

Māori impact

179

Māori responsiveness

Partner with mana whenua and matāwaka organisations to support collaborative projects that respond to Māori aspirations. 

This includes providing funding to support:

- engagement with mana whenua ($5,000)

- the implementation of Waitākere Ki Tua - Māori Responsiveness Guide for local boards ($15,000)

368

Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places)

Māori naming (and associated story telling) of parks and places in partnership with mana whenua to value and promote Auckland’s Māori identity and use of te reo Māori.

1024

Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori

Celebrating te ao Māori with events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes:

·      Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Māori Language Week

·      engaging with Iwi and Māori organisations

·      Whakatipu i te reo Māori - champion and embed te reo Māori in our libraries and communities. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Activities are funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: Asset Based Services (ABS) Opex; Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) Capex and Opex.

28.     Each activity line has a budget allocation, which covers the delivery for the 2019/2020 period. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects that the implementation costs are met through staff salary or other funding sources.

29.     The community services LDI budget for the local board for the 2019/2020 financial year is $1,015,500.

30.     Where activities are cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or to create a new activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The key risks for activities that are managed through the work programme are non-delivery, time delays and budget overrun. The local board will be updated quarterly on delivery including highlighting any potential delays and budget implications.

32.     As the work programme includes ongoing activity and annually occurring events or projects, the associated risks have been identified and managed in previous years. Additional risk management for these activities is ongoing and can be reported quarterly.

33.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board through quarterly reporting when required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Delivery of approved activities will commence at the beginning of the financial year, 1 July 2019 and progress will be reported to the local board for each quarter.

35.     The work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges community services 2019/2020 work programme

177

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

PDF Creator



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Responding to flood safety risk in Piha

File No.: CP2019/10452

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the local board to endorse a preferred option in response to flood safety risk in Piha for reporting to the Environment and Community Committee on 10 July 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Extreme rainfall events on 3 February and 28 April 2018 caused significant flooding at Piha.

2.       On 12 March 2019 public engagement on eight options to mitigate flood safety risk in Piha was approved. These options mitigate flood safety risk collectively to residents, the wider Piha community and visitors. They draw from an independent assessment of the Piha flood problem, risk, its causes and mitigation options.

3.       The options respond to the problem: in the future Piha stream will be subject to flash flooding, and unsafe flooding may occur frequently. A high flood safety risk for a small number of properties and people in certain locations during extreme rainfall events in Piha.

4.       Staff recommend an intervention package of initiatives, combined from option one - three as:

2.       Current situation to keep people away from flooding

·    Option one: Local responses to minimise the impact of storm events (status quo)

3.       Enhancing readiness and response to flooding

·    Option two: Increase flood warning time

·    Option three: Enhance ways of warning people

5.       This suite of options, respond to mitigating flood safety risk, have a positive impact on the community and are cost effective. Option one: status quo scored highest against assessment criteria. Option two and three also score favourably.

6.       Public feedback supported options one - three to enhance readiness and response to flooding. Fifty-seven per cent of submitters supported Option one: Status Quo.

7.       Overall the community, mana whenua and local board members did not support significant engineering works, particularly options four, five, six, seven and eight. They all score poorly against assessment criteria terms of their achievability in the short-term and impact on the natural environment.

8.       The preferred intervention package contributes to mitigating risk to life and injury by helping to keep people away from and enhance their readiness and responsiveness to flooding events.

9.       There is a low reputational risk that some residents may be concerned that the options do not go far enough to mitigate the flood safety risk and that council should do more. This can be mitigated by clear communication and support about the reasons for the preferred options and initiatives planned and underway.

10.     The key trade-off between the recommend intervention package, combining Options one - three and Options five - eight is: the preferred approach will not significantly reduce the volume or velocity of flood waters in an extreme rainfall event so do not mitigate flood safety risk as effectively.

11.     The next steps are for staff to report back to the Environment and Community Committee on 10 July 2019. The report will include the views received from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      endorse a combined intervention package of initiatives from options one – three outlined in Table 1 below and as detailed in Attachment A to this report:

Table 1: Combined intervention package of initiatives

4.       Current situation to keep people away from flooding

·    Option one: Local responses to minimise the impact of storm events (status quo)

5.       Enhancing readiness and response to flooding

·    Option two: Increase flood warning time

·    Option three: Enhance ways of warning people

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       On 3 February and 28 April 2018, extreme rainfall events in Piha caused significant flooding.

7.       On both occasions high water depths and velocities resulted in emergency evacuations and flooding of residential properties on Glenesk, Seaview and Beach Valley Roads. Access along Glenesk Road was also cut-off by flooding.

8.       After these events Auckland Council undertook flood modelling. It also carried out floor level surveys and inspections of affected properties to confirm the level of flood risk. 

9.       Tonkin and Taylor produced an independent assessment of the Piha area to further understand the flood risk and its causes. They also developed a range of practicable options to mitigate flood risk.

10.     These analyses concluded that the Piha stream is subject to flash flooding, and that unsafe flooding may occur frequently.

11.     On 28 February 2019, a joint workshop of the Environment and Community Committee and the Waitākere Ranges Local Board was held to explain the Tonkin and Taylor findings (released publicly as part of the minutes to the workshop).

12.     On 12 March 2019 the Environment and Community Committee approved [CP2019/02333 Refers] public engagement on a long list of eight options. The options were developed to enable discussion with the Piha community about flooding readiness, response and physical protection options.

13.     A detailed analysis to respond to Piha flood risk is contained in Attachment A. It provides a detailed description of the flooding problem, options and public views. It is the basis for the advice provided in this report. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Problem Definition

Flooding is a natural hazard that occurs frequently across Auckland

14.     According to current estimates, ten per cent of all buildings in Auckland lie within areas that will flood during a 100-year rainstorm. Approximately 15,000 buildings are predicted to flood in such an event.

15.     Extreme rainfall is variable across the region. This means that we can expect localised flooding somewhere in Auckland once every three to five years from a 100-year event.

Piha differs from the region in its flood safety risk and flooding frequency

16.     Piha differs from other parts of the region in terms of the flood safety risk and the frequency of flooding.

17.     Piha stream is subject to flash flooding. The high frequency of events, fast catchment response time (40-50 minutes) and locations of buildings, bridges and roads in the floodplain means that there is a high flood safety risk in certain areas.

18.     Glenesk Road is likely to flood on an annual basis. Overtopping of some access bridges can be expected every other year. Flooding of approximately 10 buildings is likely in a five-year event, increasing to approximately 21 buildings in a 100-year event. Of these the residents of five habitable buildings have the highest likelihood of physical contact with flood waters.

There are four groups of people that may have a flood safety risk:

·      residents with habitable floors within the floodplain

·      residents whose access is restricted by flooding in Glenesk Road

·      members of the wider Piha community

·      visitors to Piha.

19.     The risk of drowning or injury is likely to be associated with people who come in contact with fast flowing, deep waters, such as when driving or wading through floodwaters. The risk profile of these groups of people varies based on their vulnerability, behaviour during the flood and the physical characteristics of the flood at their location.

20.     The level of risk is likely greater at night when people may be asleep or unprepared to evacuate their homes at short notice. Darkness may make it more difficult for people to safely evacuate.

21.     There are increased risks for children, elderly people and people with disabilities.

Options

22.     A range of options respond to the problem definition and help mitigate flooding risk to the Piha community. A long list of possible options was developed (see Table 1 below).

23.     Four of the options entail major physical flood protection and control works in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002.

Table 1: Long list of options

Current situation to keep people away from flooding

·    Option 1: Local responses to minimise the impact of storm events (status quo)

Enhancing readiness and response to flooding

·    Option 2: Increase flood warning time

·    Option 3: Enhance ways of warning people

·    Option 4: Raise Glenesk Road

 

 

Physical protection works to help keep flooding away from people

·    Option 5: Build a dam(s) to contain flood water

·    Option 6: Build a tunnel to divert flood water

·    Option 7: Widen the stream to increase water flows

·    Option 8: Clear/dredge the stream from Seaview Road Bridge to the sea to increase water flows

 

24.     The scope of the options focuses on flood safety risk to people and not on the other impacts such as property damage, costs of evacuation, or disruptions to infrastructure.

25.     The options do not impinge on private property rights or responsibilities.

26.     Implementing most of the options will be difficult. They will come at a cost to either individuals, the community or the region. The trade-offs are financial, social and environmental.

Public engagement on options

27.     Engagement on the options took place between Friday 29 March and Tuesday 30 April 2019. A range of engagement activities were undertaken including public submissions, a public meeting and workshop with Waitākere Ranges Local Board members. Mana whenua were contacted. Individual meetings were held with a small number of the most affected homeowners.

28.     In response, the council received the following community feedback:

·      35 public submissions

·      local board member views

·      mana whenua views

·      views from approximately 45 residents at the public meeting

·      individual homeowner views from some of the most at-risk residents.

Fifty-seven per cent favoured the status quo represented in Option one

29.     Feedback on the eight options presented for consideration by the community preferred Option one: local responses to minimise the impact of storm events. Slightly more than half of the submitters, fifty-seven per cent favoured the status quo as shown in Table 2 below.

 


Table 2: Feedback on options presented for community consideration

 

30.     Most who supported option one: local responses to minimise the impact of storm events also wanted:

·      option two: increase flood warning time and option three: enhance ways of warning people, to progress as well

·      seen as most practical, least invasive and cost-effective options

·      mentioned that effectiveness relies in council maintenance of the stream.

31.     Feedback indicated that many felt that these options were a proportional response to the flood risk problem that would have a positive impact in the community.

Significant engineering solutions received less support

32.     The engineering solutions were less favoured. Thirty-four per cent, selected one of more of the options four to eight. Submitters generally wanted to keep the impact on the current environment to a minimum. This view was also favoured in the public meeting.

33.     Submitters suggested that these options were an overreaction to the problem, would have other unintended consequences, a negative environmental impact and would likely not gain consent.

 

The effectiveness of option 1 (status quo) depends on ongoing commitment to stream inspections, CCTV and road/drainage maintenance.

 

There should be an audible warning system in the valley with a 30-minute warning given once sensors have determined a flood is imminent.

The critical option is to improve Mobile Phone signal.

 

Options 4 – 8, we do not support any of these options, which in our view are completely unrealistic.

 

Personally, no appetite to fund the major infrastructure options - 4/5/6 - through rate levies.

 

I think that the best outcome would be for the council to purchase the homes of those affected.

Sample of verbatim quotes from submissions

 

Forty per cent of submitters want more consultation, support, and more options put forward

34.     In addition to the options provided, around four in ten people – forty per cent of those who gave feedback would like more consultation, more support, and more options than put forward. They generally thought more could be done to manage flood risks. Other option included:

·      clearing waterways

·      increase stop banks

·      heighten waterways

·      pipes

·      making sure the stream in clear

·      creating a wetland.

35.     Staff suggest that council response is to continue to proactively:

·      support the Piha community and visitors to understand and plan for flood safety risk to avoid known dangers.

·      informing and supporting the community to engage in the range of key initiatives like the environmental restoration work programme for Piha stream that responds to the range of other suggested options from submitters, already planned or underway (status quo)

·      progressing data collection, information sharing, education, engineering and environmental restoration options across the region and within the Piha community to respond to adverse natural weather events.

Twenty-nine per cent of submitters suggested the option to acquire properties

36.     Ten submitters, twenty-nine per cent suggested the option to acquire properties. Concern was expressed that the long list of options would not adequately address the flood risk problem. They suggested purchasing the most at-risk properties should be considered.

37.     Staff suggest that the council response is to:

·      acknowledge the damage flooding events pose to their property and the stress and hardship this can impose on individuals and the community

·      balance its statutory responsibilities with the rights and responsibilities of property owners. It does not have current services or a statutory role to pay for private property damage from increasingly adverse weather events.

·      consider any future private property acquisition services due to adverse weather events in the context of the region wide implications and costs

·      agree that action is needed to start developing its regional policy position to respond to the risks and issues of adverse weather events including:

­  taking a short, medium and long-term approach to a wide range of possible options for response, the triggers for responses, roles, responsibilities and costs

­  identifying what actions might need to be undertaken in the public realm collectively by Auckland Council and the government and what actions might need to be undertaken by individuals and insurers.


 

Option assessment

38.     Staff developed assessment criteria to enable the comparison of all options. These criteria are unweighted and allow for objective assessment.  A summary is provided in Table 3:

Table 3: Option assessment table

Assessment Criteria
•	Effective: provides an effective response to the flood safety risk
•	Achievable: is able to be implemented in the short to medium-term
•	Environment: helps preserve and protect the natural environment
•	Social: supports a resilient Piha community
•	Cost: is cost effective for council, landowners and the Piha community given their roles and responsibilities in response to flooding.


 

 

 

 


Option

Effectiveness

Achievability

Environmental

Social

Cost

Option 1: Local responses to minimise the impact of storm events (status quo)

CheckmarkCheckmarkCheckmark

CheckmarkCheckmark

CheckmarkCheckmark

Option 2: Increase flood warning time

No impact

 

Option 3: Enhance ways of warning people

No impact

 

Option 4: Raise Glenesk Road

X

X

 

Option 5: Build a dam(s) to contain flood water

XXX

XXX

XXX

Option 6: Build a tunnel to divert flood water

XXX

XXX

XXX

Option 7: Widen the stream to increase water flows

 

XX

XX

XXX

Option 8: Clear the stream from Seaview Road Bridge to the sea to increase water flows

Slight change

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Staff recommend an intervention package combined from options one-three

39.     Staff recommend an intervention package of initiative combined from option one-three as follows:

Current situation to keep people away from flooding

·    Option one: Local responses to minimise the impact of storm events (status quo)

Enhancing readiness and response to flooding

·    Option two: Increase flood warning time

·    Option three: Enhance ways of warning people

40.     Option one: status quo scores highest against the assessment criteria. Option two: and three also score favourably.

41.     This suite of options responds to mitigating flood safety risk, have a positive impact on the community and are cost effective. All three of the recommended package of options were the most supported during engagement with the community, and the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

42.     All three options partially mitigate risk to life and injury by helping to keep people away from and enhance their readiness and responsiveness to flooding events. They do not eliminate risk and they all rely of the awareness and behaviour of people to mitigate flood safety risk. The technology components of options two and three still require trialling and feasibility testing.

43.     Collectively they will not reduce the volume or velocity of flood waters in an extreme rainfall event.

44.     All options (five – eight) that required major physical protection works scored highest against the assessment criteria for their impact on reducing flood safety risk.

45.     They all score poorly in terms of the achievability in the short-term and impact on the natural environment. The Environment criteria is particularly important to the Piha community and Mana Whenua.

46.     It recognises the national, regional, and local significance of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area. Te Runānga o Ngati Whatua were concerned about these options. This was due to the likely detrimental impact these options would have on the environment and the cultural heritage of the Waitākere Ranges.

47.     The key trade-off between the recommend intervention package of options (one- three) and options five-eight is that preferred approach will not significantly reduce the volume or velocity of flood waters in an extreme rainfall event, so do not mitigate flood safety risk as effectively.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

48.     The council group is working collaboratively to best manage this flood risk and support the outcome of a resilient Piha.  This includes working on the implementation of activities to increase the understanding and management of the flood risk such as through depth markers, signage and regular refreshment of road markings to ensure residents and visitors are aware of the flood risk.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     On 18 April 2019 staff held a workshop with the members of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This workshop provided the members with an opportunity to provide their views on the long list of options and update them on community facilities impacted by the floods.

50.     The members supported a combination of options one, two and three and the environmental stream restoration work programme. The members did not support the engineering solution in options four to eight.

51.     The views of the local board were closely aligned to the messages that were received from the community during the engagement process.

52.     The local board members also emphasised how the history of Piha over the last 50 years has caused changes in Piha Stream and the surrounding area that are contributing factors in a flood event. They encouraged further work to clean and restore the stream and surrounds where possible.

53.     This Waitākere Ranges Local Board formal view on Piha flooding mitigation options is being sought at this meeting. It will be presented at the next Environment and Community Committee meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     Staff contacted Te Kawerau ā Maki and the three Ngāti Whātua iwi organisations on the long list of options.

55.     Te Runānga o Ngāti Whātua supported the long list of options but noted that they would seek further engagement if any of options 4 to 8 were to proceed. This was due to the likely detrimental impact these options would have on the environment and the cultural heritage of the Waitākere Ranges.

56.     Te Kawerau ā Maki did not formally respond on the long list of flood options. They have however previously been involved in the environmental restoration work programme for the Piha stream and the development of the Piha Watercourse Assessment report which include a series of recommendations. Te Kawerau ā Maki supported its recommendations and emphasised that land has mauri, so any river soil or material removed from the stream needs to be relocated and/or reused within the Piha area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     The implementation of the recommended intervention package of options (options, one-three) will be met from existing budgets. Staff are undertaking studies to assess feasibility of option three: enhanced warning system. Depending on the total cost and any consenting requirements and current budgets a future decision on funding arrangement may be required. 

58.     If any of the options four to eight are also preferred, they will require unbudgeted expenditure ranging between $1.2 million - $49 million. Funding decisions can be made within the Annual Plan and/or the Long-term Plan processes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Key risks associated with the recommended intervention package, combining options one-three are:

 

Type

Risk

Mitigation

Reputational

There is a low risk that some residents may be concerned that the options do not go far enough to mitigate the flood safety risk and that council should do more.

Clear communication and support to residents and the Piha community on the positive impact expected from the recommended options, continue to implement initiatives, monitor and gather information on flood risk levels in the area.

Operational

There is a low risk implementation of some of the options will experience delays as they provide new services that council will learn more about as they operate for the first time.

 

Robust project management to ensure the development of the new services is as smooth as possible. The options will be implemented as a package rather than individually.

Technology

There is a low risk the technology used in an enhanced warning system may provide false warnings of flood events that diminish trust in it.

Staff will work with experts to determine who should receive potential warnings and the appropriate level these should be activated at.

Implementation / consents

There is a risk of delay to implementation of some of the options due to resource consent, landowner approval processes and stakeholder engagement

Early consultation and appropriate feasibility assessments to minimise delays will be undertaken.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.     The next steps are for staff to report back to the Environment and Community Committee on 10 July 2019. The report will include the views received from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

60.     A report closing the loop on feedback received from the Piha community and the council decision on options will be developed from the document in Attachment A. It is anticipated that this will be provided to the community after council decision-making on 10 July 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Responding to Piha Flood Risk:Detailed Analysis

203

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Adam Eggleton - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Changes to Local Board Standing Orders

File No.: CP2019/10029

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide information about the implications of the Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 and to recommend changes to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s standing orders to align with the change in the legislation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 makes changes to various statutes, including the Local Government Act 2002, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Dog Control Act 1996, the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 and the Rates Rebate Act 1973.

3.       Prior to the legislation change, the Local Government Act provided for an extraordinary meeting where:

a)      it could be called by resolution, or by requisition by the mayor or one third of the members

b)      the notice period was three days (unless it was called by resolution in which case the notice period could be not less than 24 hours)

c)      if it needed to be called earlier it could be called by the mayor, or, if the mayor was unavailable, the chief executive. The notice period could be not less than 24 hours.

4.       As a result of the change, the meeting called under c) above is referred to as an ‘emergency meeting’ rather than an’ extraordinary meeting’.

5.       There is a change to the definition of public notice – which requires notification on a council’s website in addition to a newspaper.

6.       There is a change to the definition of ‘working day’ to exclude a province’s anniversary.

7.       Staff are taking the opportunity, while considering changes to standing orders, to propose an unrelated change to the current standing orders regarding attendance by electronic link. The current standing order requires a member seeking to attend by electronic link to be representing the council and unable to attend. The proposed change removes the requirement to be representing the council.

8.       As detailed in the Local Government Act 2002 Schedule 7 clause 27 (3), a change to standing orders requires a 75 percent majority vote. The Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s standing orders need to be changed to reflect the changes in the law.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      note the new statutory responsibility of the chief executive:

facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

b)      amend standing order 2.3.3 by replacing:

Calling an extraordinary meeting at earlier time

The mayor or chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call a meeting for an earlier time if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

with:

Calling an emergency meeting

The mayor or chairperson, or if they are unavailable, the chief executive, may call an emergency meeting for an earlier time than is provided in Standing Order 2.3.2 if this is necessary to deal with the business.

The person calling such a meeting must give each member and the chief executive notice of the time and place of the meeting and the matters in respect of which the meeting is being called, by whatever means is reasonable in the circumstances, at least 24 hours before the meeting.

c)      Amend standing order 7.2.3 by replacing:

Notification of extraordinary meetings

Where the council calls an extraordinary meeting but cannot give public notice to the extent required in Standing Order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting.

with:

Notification of extraordinary / emergency meetings

Where the council calls an extraordinary or emergency meeting but cannot give public notice to the extent required in Standing Order 7.2.1, the council must publicly notify the meeting, and the general nature of business to be considered at it, as soon as reasonably practicable before the meeting. If it is not practicable to publish a notice in newspapers before the meeting, the council must publicly notify the meeting as soon as practicable on the council’s website and in any other manner that is reasonable in the circumstances.

d)      Amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

with:

Emergency meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22A of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Extraordinary meeting has the meaning defined in clause 22 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

e)      Amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Meeting means:

(a)  any first or ordinary or extraordinary meeting of the local board

with:

Meeting means:

(a) any first or ordinary or extraordinary or emergency meeting of the local board

f)       Amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Publicly notified means notified to members of the public by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

with:

Publicly notified means made known to members of the public by a notice on the council’s website, until any opportunity for review or appeal has lapsed, and by a notice printed in appropriate newspapers circulating in the Auckland region.

g)      Amend standing order 9.4 (Definitions) by replacing:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

(a)  Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

(b)  a day in the period commencing with 25 December in any year and ending with 15 January in the following year.

with:

Working day means any day of the week other than:

(a)  Saturday, Sunday, Waitangi Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, ANZAC Day, the sovereign’s birthday and Labour Day

(b)  Where Waitangi Day or ANZAC Day falls on a weekend, the following Monday

(c)  Auckland Anniversary Day

(d)  a day in the period commencing with 20 December in any year and ending with 10 January in the following year.

h)      Amend the following standing orders:

i)        SO 2.3:

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

ii)       SO 7.2.4:

replace the heading “Extraordinary meetings” with “Extraordinary and emergency meetings”

iii)      SOs 1.1.3, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 7.3.2:

replace the words “extraordinary meeting” with “extraordinary or emergency meeting”

i)        Amend standing order 3.3.3 to remove the requirement to be representing the council:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)   in emergencies.

d)   The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Local Government Regulatory Systems Amendment Act 2019 (LGRSAA) came into force on 21 March 2019.  The LGRSAA is an omnibus Act in that it makes minor amendments to several pieces of legislation.

10.       The LGRSAA amends the Local Electoral Act 2001 to include a new principle for “representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls”, and imposes a new responsibility on the Chief Executive of the council by amending the Chief Executive’s responsibilities in the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) section 42(2)(d):

(d)     facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001;

11.     It amends the definition of “public notice” and “publicly notified” under the LGA and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) to require notification both on the council’s website and in newspapers.

12.     It creates a new category of council meeting called an “emergency meeting”, separate from “extraordinary meeting”.  Previously, extraordinary meetings had two types of notice requirements.  Where the more urgent form of notice is used, the meeting is now referred to as an emergency meeting.  This applies to giving notice to members under the LGA and to public notices under LGOIMA.

13.     It amends the definition of working day under the LGA and LGOIMA to exclude a province’s anniversary day being counted as a “working day”.

14.     It makes minor amendments to The Dog Control Act 1996, the Local Electoral Act 2001, the Rates Rebates Act 1973 and makes changes to the LGA by specifying timeframes for making certain documents publicly available. These legislative changes are minor in nature and do not impact on local board standing orders.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The changes made by the LGRSAA are minor in nature, nevertheless it is necessary to amend the Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s standing orders to align the language to reflect current legislation.

16.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board may also wish to consider a change to standing orders which is not related to LGRSAA.   Standing order 3.3.3 provides conditions for attending a meeting by electronic link:

Conditions for attending by electronic link

The local board or its committees may give approval for a member to attend meetings by electronic link, either generally or for a specific meeting. Situations where approval can be given are: 

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

b)   to accommodate the member’s illness or infirmity

c)   in emergencies.

The member who is seeking to attend by electronic link may not take part in the vote to give approval. The only exception is where there is an emergency, in which case the member seeking to attend by electronic link can take part in the vote.

17.     This standing order was adopted in 2015.  Since that time the technology has improved, and remote attendance to most local board business meetings is now possible. However, the conditions in the standing order are very limiting and do not allow attendance by a member who is out of Auckland for non-council reasons. 

18.     Staff recommend amending the standing order by removing the requirement to represent the council in SO 3.3.3 (a):

a)   where the member is representing the council at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The changes to the standing orders do not impact on the wider council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     This is a report to 21 local boards. All local boards need to make changes to align their standing orders to LGRSAA.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The changes to standing orders brought about through the LGRSAA do not impact on the Māori community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications to making these changes to standing orders.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     LGA Schedule 7 clause 27 (2) states that the standing orders of a local authority must not contravene the LGA or any other Act. If local board standing orders are not aligned to changes in the legislation, there is a risk that the local board may act inconsistently with the legislation by relying on standing orders that are not up to date.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Following the Waitākere Ranges Local Board resolution to amend the standing orders, staff will make the appropriate changes and recirculate the updated standing orders.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Polly Kenrick - Business Process Manager

Authorisers

Louise Mason, General Manager, Local Board Services

Kerri Foote, Operations and Improvements Manager, Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/07007

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar is part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work programme calendar for June 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work programme calendar - June 2019

257

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2019/10208

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops held in May 2019 by the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshop held are as follows:

          9 May 2019:

Finalise LDI capex allocation for CF WP and discuss Risk Adjusted Programme process

          16 May 2019:

Youth Connections work programme 2019-2020

Natural Environment Targeted Rate Update

Election year policies

Existing Service Levels Report /Governance Framework Review – Service Levels and Funding.

Local grants round two

23 May 2019:

Waitakere Community Weedbins

Glen Eden HUB

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop records for 9, 16 and 23 May 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop records for 9,16 and 23 May 2019

261

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

27 June 2019