I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 23 July 2019

9.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Deputy Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Hopkins

 

 

Murray Kay

 

 

Niko Kloeten

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise  Gunn

Democracy Advisor - Franklin

 

17 July 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 237 1310

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Clevedon A&P Association                                                           5

8.2     Deputation - Franklin A&P Society                                                                    6

8.3     Deputation - Life Education Trust Counties Manukau                                     6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Allocation of the Franklin Local Board's Transport Community Safety Fund       9

12        Auckland Transport monthly update to the Franklin Local Board - July 2019    19

13        Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter 3 performance report                                  27

14        Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery                       35

15        New road names in the subdivision at 425 Clarks Beach Road, Waiau Pa by Orepunga Farm Limited                                                                                              59

16        Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar                                  67

17        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                  71  

18        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 25 June 2019, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Clevedon A&P Association

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Danielle Wright, Show Manager for the Clevedon A&P Association, will be in attendance to address the board on recent activities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Clevedon A&P Association wish to address the board on their recent activities and forward plans.

3.       Danielle Wright, Show Manager for the association, will be in attendance to address the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Danielle Wright, Show Manager for the Clevedon A&P Association, and thank her for her attendance.

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Franklin A&P Society

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Richard Holst, president of the Franklin Agricultural and Pastoral Society, and Craig Follett, past president of the society, will be in attendance to present to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The president of the Franklin Agricultural and Pastoral Society will provide an update to the board on the society’s past activities and future plans.

3.       Craig Follett, past president of the society, will also be in attendance.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Richard Holst, president of the Franklin Agricultural and Pastoral Society, and Craig Follett, past president, for their presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Lincoln Jefferson will be in attendance to address the board on Life Education Trust Counties Manukau.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Lincoln Jefferson from Life Education Trust Counties Manukau will be in attendance to present on the trust’s activities over the past year.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Lincoln Jefferson from Life Education Trust Counties Manukau and thank him for his attendance.

 

 


 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 

Allocation of the Franklin Local Board's Transport Community Safety Fund

File No.: CP2019/13318

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the Franklin Local Board to allocate its share of the Transport Community Safety Fund to road safety projects in its area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan allocated $20 million for Financial Year 2019/2020 and Financial Year 2020/2021 for local initiatives in road safety as a Community Safety Fund.

3.       The objective is to accelerate local community-initiated safety projects in the local board which are currently not being delivered by Auckland Transport (AT).

4.       The Franklin Local Board has put forward potential projects to be delivered with Community Safety Funding. These projects have been assessed, scoped and an estimated cost developed, which is attached to this report as Attachment A.

5.       The scoped and costed list of projects was discussed in a workshop with the local board on 16 July 2019 and a prioritised list developed.

6.       This report is intended to formalize the local board’s direction on projects to be funded from the local board funding allocation.

7.       Should there be a shortfall in funding for board approved projects, AT will return to the board to seek further direction on alternative ‘top up’ funding e.g. from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund or for further prioritisation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the delivery of the Priority 1 projects listed in Attachment A, to be funded by the Community Safety Fund.

b)        maximise the use of the Community Safety Fund by authorising a top-up from the board’s Local Board Transport Capital Fund, if required, to meet any shortfall in funding for the final project to be implemented; and that any top-up will be drawn based on prior discussion and resolution by the Franklin Local Board.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan allocated $20 million for Financial Year 2019/2020 and Financial Year 2020/2021 for local initiatives in road safety ($5 million in Financial Year 2019/2020 and $15 million in Financial Year 2020/2021).  To promote safety at the local community level, the fund is apportioned to each local board area based on a formula that focuses on the numbers of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) in that area.

9.       The objective is to accelerate local community-initiated safety projects around identified high-risk locations and local schools. Local boards were invited to submit proposals for projects addressing safety issues their communities have identified.

10.     The Franklin Local Board share of the Community Safety Fund is $1,699,483 over the two years.

11.     Criteria for the fund includes physical measures raised by the local community to prevent, control or mitigate identified local road and street safety hazards which expose people using any form of road and street transport to demonstratable hazards which may result in death or serious harm. Individual project cost is to be no greater than $1 million.  Projects must consist of best practice components, conform to AT standards and comply with New Zealand law.

12.     The fund does not cover the following:

·        Projects with an unacceptably high maintenance cost.

·        Projects that clash with other planned public projects.

·        Complex projects that may take greater than 2 years to deliver including but not limited to projects requiring significant engineered structures, complex resource consents and complex traffic modelling. 

·        Projects containing unconventional or unproven components including new trials or pilot projects.

·        Projects or components of projects that have no demonstratable safety benefit unless they are integral with a safety project.

13.     The Franklin Local Board developed a list of projects from workshops in April and June 2019.

14.     That list of projects was assessed and costed by Auckland Transport. If this costing is more than the budget allocated to the particular local board under this funding, then it has the option of using any of its available Local Board Transport Capital Fund to top up the project budget.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The projects that were put forward for assessment and estimates are attached to this report as Attachment A.

16.     The assessments were workshopped with the local board on 16 July 2019.

17.     The local board prioritised this list, taking into consideration the purpose and scope of the Transport Community Safety fund and funding criteria.

18.     The board indicated that budget be allocated to Priority 1 projects, with any balance applied to progressing Priority 2 projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is/are confined to AT and do/does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The Franklin Local Board nominated projects for assessment and have subsequently prioritised them based on Transport Community Safety fund criteria.

21.     The projects allocated funding in this report will improve the road safety environment in the communities within the Franklin Local Board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The Franklin Local Board Transport Community Safety Fund allocation is $1,699,483.00.

24.     Nominated projects that ‘pass’ fund criteria are costed at a total of $2,145,000.00.

25.     Projects assessed by the local board at its July 16 workshop as priority 1 total $1,755,000.00

26.     The Franklin Local Board allocation of the Community Safety Fund is fully allocated with a projected $55,517 shortfall.

27.     AT will return to the board to seek further direction on alternative ‘top up’ funding e.g. from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund or for further prioritization as detailed costings become available.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Design and construction of approved list of projects.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Community Safety Fund Priorities

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly update to the Franklin Local Board - July 2019

File No.: CP2019/11121

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board (FLB) about transport related matters in its area including Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The report contains information about the following matters:

·        update on rural roading conditions

·        responses to local board resolutions

·        development of an Auckland Vision Zero Road Safety Strategy and Action Plan

·        Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects.

3.       Decisions on prioritising the allocation of its Transport Community Safety Fund are addressed via a separate report.

4.       No decisions are required in response to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport update to the Franklin Local Board July 2019’.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area and includes information on the progress of the LBTCF projects.

6.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting supports the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities on transport matters.

7.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

8.       Through Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan 2018-2028, LBTCF funding has been increased to a total of $20.8 million per annum across all 21 local boards.

9.       The allocation for the FLB has also increased, with the updated figures for the remainder of this electoral term reflected in Table 1 below:

            Table 1: FLB Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,856,450

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,855,965

Unallocated budget

$485.00

 

10.     Table 2 below shows the status of projects to which LBTCF has already been committed.

Table 2: Status update on current Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

Project

Description

Current status

Status change

Funds allocated

Upgrade of Beachlands town centre gardens

 

 

 

Completed

No

$263,063

First View Avenue, Beachlands

Installation of new kerb and channel between Sunkist Bay and Wakelin Roads (both sides)

 

Completed

No

$315,339

Second View Avenue, Beachlands

 

Installation of new kerb and channel between Puriri and Cherrie Roads (north side)

 

Completed

No

$331,265

Station Road parking and pedestrian improvements

A project to formalise and improve parking on Station and Birch Roads, and improve pedestrian safety by providing new footpath on Station Road, Pukekohe.

On 25 September 2018, the FLB approved $181,104

A firm order of costs has been completed and presented to the local board, identifying a funding shortfall. The local board requested that AT seek alternative funding to complete this project.

funding.

AT proposes accessing the Transport Community Safety Fund to cover the shortfall, to be confirmed via separate report.

No

$181,104

Beachlands Kerb and Channel

 

Improvements

Project to install kerb and channel in Beachlands on following roads:

· Shelley Bay Road

· Karaka Road

· First View Ave

· Second View Ave

The local board approved project ROC estimate up to $1.18m to progress to detailed design. A

Project manager has been appointed, and the procurement of services process has commenced.

A consultant commenced design for the 4 sites with 75% of the topographical survey completed. 

Yes

$1.18m

Tourist Road-Monument Road intersection electronic warning signage

 

Installation of electronic warning signage on each and smart studs on the Tourist Road.

The local board approved a ROC estimate up to $80,000 to progress this project.

NZTA have advised that their trial is not accepting new sites. This project is on hold until the results of the trial , at which time the proposal will be revisited

No

$80,000

 

Responses to resolutions

11.     At the FLB April 2019 business meeting the local board passed the following resolution

Resolution number FR/2019/50

            That the Franklin Local Board:

b)    request that AT investigate options for partnership approach to funding the Station Road parking and pedestrian safety improvements project noting the community safety outcomes anticipated.

12.     This project was initially funded via the LBTCF but has since then been identified to have a funding shortfall. The current estimate to complete the project is now $440,000, a shortfall of $260,000

13.     As requested by the local board, further investigation has been undertaken to seek partnership funding. Two options have been identified which are specified below:

·        Funding shortfall to be met by Panuku Development Auckland as part of the ‘Unlock Pukekohe’ project regeneration programme.

·        Funding shortfall to be met by local board’s Transport Community Safety Fund, as one of the local board’s priority projects.

14.     In another report this month, the local board have the option of allocating funding via its Community Safety Fund allocation to complete this project with funding of $1,699,483 available to the board.

15.     At this time, Panuku Development Auckland is still reviewing its programme for Unlock Pukekohe and has not yet confirmed this project as part of its programme, therefore funding has not yet been allocated at this time.

16.     Ongoing discussions with Panuku are still on progress with staff from Panuku currently reviewing details of this project. An update will be provided in next month’s report regarding progress.

Local projects issues

Rural road conditions

17.     Winter conditions provide a higher level of erosion and damage to the road seal than in drier weather.

18.     This winter is no different, with an influx of service requests related to potholes and damage to the road received by AT via our various communications channels.

19.     AT is working closely with our contractors to ensure that these requests are responded to urgently and made safe as soon as practically possible.

20.     We continue to encourage the community to report these issues/ items and will continue to work with the elected members and community improve services where we can.

Self-Explaining Rural Roads project (SERR)

21.     The Self-Explaining Rural Roads (SERR) project covers approximately 130km of roads within the South East area of Auckland, namely Clevedon, Maraetai and Whitford areas.

22.     The aims of the SERR project is to create a consistent look and feel for the design of the road so that it matches its intended function and is appropriate for the type of vehicles using it.  The result of this will then improve road safety by promoting better driver behaviour.

23.     To achieve these aims, the project includes the implementation of the following:

•        rationalise the existing signs and signing of destinations

•        improve the signing of curves

•        improve road markings including the introduction of a wide centre line where feasible

•        consistent gateway treatments at approaches to Whitford, Clevedon and Maraetai     villages

•        shape correction on Brookby Road

•        safety barrier at a few locations.

24.     The signs and road marking improvements were scheduled to be completed by the end of June 2019.

25.     Glenbrook Road is the third SERR package and was scheduled to start in June and completed in the new financial year.

Rural Delineation Programme (RDP)

26.     The Rural Delineation Programme aims to provide road users with a consistent series of messages about the severity of approaching bends and other hazards on the rural road network so that they can negotiate these hazards in a safer manner.

27.     Initial implementation of these works has previously been undertaken in the Franklin area and the current package of works was intended to be completed by the end of June 2019.

28.     There may be some additional road marking requirements to re-mark existing road markings scheduled for the current financial year, and this will be aligned with the road maintenance programme to minimise the potential for conflict with the maintenance programme.

29.     Upon completion of the RDP works we have arranged for a monitoring tool to track the effectiveness of the projects.

30.     At this stage, there is not enough data to report on the monitoring of previous schemes. Once we have a robust post-construction monitoring result from the projects within the Franklin Local Board area, the project team will be able to provide this information to the local board as requested.

Regional projects and activities

Community Safety Fund

31.     The 2018 RLTP allocated $20m for local initiatives in road safety; $5m in FY19/20 and $15m in FY20/21. It was apportioned to local board areas by formula based on numbers of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI).

32.     The Franklin Local Board has been allocated $1,699,483 over the two years.

33.     The remaining Local Board Transport Capital Fund may be used to supplement any shortfall in funding for the final project, to maximise the utilisation of the Community Safety Fund.

34.     The Franklin local board proposed 21 different projects, at workshops in 9 April and 19 May workshops,  which were reviewed and prioritised by the local board members at the 16 July workshop.

35.     Their prioritised list of projects is to be reported on in another report on this agenda.

Development of an Auckland Vision Zero Road Safety Strategy and Action Plan

36.     In 2018, 54 people died and 595 were seriously injured using Auckland’s transport network.

37.     Vision Zero is a paradigm shift in thinking about road safety, it mandates that no death or serious injury on our roads is acceptable. To achieve this requires the prioritisation of safety over speed or convenience.

38.     Assuring the safety of all road users in Auckland is vital to meeting the objectives of the Auckland Plan 2050, the Government Policy Statement and the soon to be released National Road Safety Strategy 2030.

39.     Auckland currently has a commitment to a 60% reduction in road crash deaths and serious injuries by 2028 (from a 2017 baseline), reducing annual deaths to 25, and annual serious injuries to 300.

40.     Auckland Transport is the lead agency responsible for delivery of these objectives as part of the strategy. Implementing the strategy will be integral to achieving these objectives. It will require transformational shifts in policy and practice within AT and across its partnerships and stakeholder relationships.

41.     The strategy must be built on strong partnerships and stakeholder relationships across core government agencies, mana whenua, road user groups, communities, industry and business.

42.     To ensure this outcome the Tāmaki Makaurau Road Safety Governance Group has been tasked with assisting in the development of the Strategy. Members of the Tāmaki Makaurau Road Safety Governance Group will also be accountable for actions within the Strategy.

43.     This group is led by Auckland Transport and includes the NZ Police, NZTA, Accident Compensation Corporation, Ministry of Transport, Auckland Council and Auckland Region Public Health Service.

44.     A road safety stakeholder reference group has been established which includes NGO’s, Road User groups and business. The Tāmaki Makaurau Road Safety Governance Group will also partner with Mana Whenua, engage with Elected Members and communities.


 

45.     The timeline for the development process is as follows:

Table 4: Timeline for development of Auckland Vision Zero Road Safety Strategy

When

Step

March – June

Engagement with Tāmaki Makaurau Road Safety Group partners and stakeholders.

June

Tāmaki Makaurau Road Safety Governance Group members endorsed the draft strategy and their individual component of the action plan are now taking this through their internal approval processes.

Mid-August

Subject to AT Board review: final approvals from Tāmaki Makaurau Road Safety Group partner organisations.

Late August

Final strategy presented to AT Board for endorsement.

 

46.     Once the strategy is endorsed by the Auckland Transport Board it will be adopted by Auckland Transport.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

Local Board consultations

48.     Auckland Transport provides the Franklin Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

49.     The local board’s views on any proposed schemes are taken into account during consultation on those proposals.

50.     In the reporting period from May/ June 2019, one proposals put forward for comment by the local board. The local board transport representative’s views and ongoing communication are recorded in the table below.

            Table 3: Local Board Consultations

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

Traffic and Parking Resolution - Drury South

Significant number of traffic controls, streetscapes, shared paths and removal of existing roads.

1. Generally comfortable with scheme plan as part of overall project. Their queries and responses from the consultants are documented below:

2.         Would like to see and understand communication plan for locals who will encounter significant changes both permanent and temporary so the surprise factor is mitigated including proposed time frames for coming changes.

Response: Both permanent changes have been communicated to the public via the Project Open Day (Thursday 25 October 2018, over 200 people attended the open day). Temporary changes to the roading layout are being communicated to the public via contractor letter drops to surrounding properties and local residents before the temporary changes to the roading layout are undertaken.

DSL’s website (www.drurysouthcrossing.co.nz) also provides the opportunity for the public to ask questions regarding the development and we will post updates here. A further Open Day for the public is being planned for October 2019.

 3.        Would like AT to advise what investigation / plans has been done / planned in regard to the probable impact on existing roads and intersections outside the project boundary that are likely to be impacted by these changes?  Looking at the overall concept plan I am concerned about the intersection of Ararimu and Davies Road (Davies looks like it could become the “rat run” route for those coming from Ararimu wanting to head to Drury Village and Papakura) and also intersection of Willow / Davies (with western end of Willow stopped).

Response: Willow Road will be stopped in 2019/20 and Davis Road will be maintained but as local street servicing the immediate residents. Several initiatives will be implemented to ensure that Davis Road is an unattractive option for heavy vehicles, this includes the closure of Willow Road and design changes where the road meets the structure plan. This was a key outcome from the Transport Assessment and Council hearings in relation to the Industrial Precinct plan change, in terms of reducing the traffic (particularly heavy trucks) using Davies Road. Upgrades have been constructed at the Ramarama Interchange and will also be occurring on Fitzgerald Road, Quarry Road and Great South Road.

Traffic and Parking Resolution - Drury South

Proposed bus stop and shelters and pedestrian crossings.

This was circulated to the FLB transport representatives on the 26 April. The local board reps have concerns about the proposed bus stop on Maraetai Drive and objected to its location. The reps are concerned about maintaining existing parking which is used by cars and trailers who use the nearby boat ramp and requested that the bus stop be relocated.

A response is still being considered and will be included in next month’s August report to the local board.

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

51.     Traffic Control Committee decisions within the Franklin Local Board area are reported on a monthly basis. The decisions within the local board area in the period of June 2019 were not provided in time to be included in this month’s report and therefore will be included in the August report to the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.     The proposed decision of receiving the report or requesting cost estimates has no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     AT will provide another update report to the board at the next monthly meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter 3 performance report

File No.: CP2019/13338

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Regional Facilities Quarter 3 performance report to the Franklin Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Regional Facilities Quarter 3 performance report is provided as Attachment A to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Regional Facilities Quarter 3 Performance Report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter 3 performance report

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Judy Lawley Manager Local Board Engagement, Regional Facilities

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 



Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 

Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery

File No.: CP2019/12320

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery has been developed to ensure Auckland is better prepared to recover from a disaster.

3.       The planning framework sets out in the document:

·        identifies community values and priorities

·        sets a vision for recovery

·        focuses on the consequences to be addressed in recovery

·        focuses on building capacity and capability and addressing barriers

·        identifies actions to build momentum.

4.       It has been developed with local board engagement over 2018 and local board feedback is now sought particularly on:

·        community values

·        community priorities

·        the vision

·        the way we will work in recovery

·        the work to be done to be better prepared for recovery.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      review and provide feedback on the draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Following the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes, the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 was amended and new guidelines were issued requiring better preparation for, and implementation of, recovery from a disaster.

6.       Auckland Emergency Management began development of the Resilient Recovery Strategy to ensure Auckland is better prepared. This included:

·        workshops on recovery with local boards between 24 May and 12 July 2018

·        reporting back on the workshops in September 2018

·        presentations to local board cluster meetings in March and November 2018

·        updating local boards on the development of the Resilient Recovery Strategy in November 2018 and advising that a draft would go the Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee in February 2019.

7.       At the beginning of this year, the Resilient Recovery Strategy was renamed ‘Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework to Recovery’ (refer Attachment A) as it better described the document’s intent and contents.

8.       The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee approved the draft pathways document for targeted engagement in February 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The development of Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery followed the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management’s ‘Strategic Planning for Recovery’ guidelines [issued by the Ministry of Civil Defence Emergency Management, DGL 20/17].

10.     The pathways document is structured around this process, as illustrated in the components of Figure 1 on page 3 of the document:

i)       Identifying community values and priorities

The planning framework set out in the pathways document is described as community centric. Community values and priorities guide us in our preparations enabling recovery to be set up and implemented in a way that helps to meet community needs and aspirations.

An initial set of community values and priorities was derived from workshops with local boards and advisory panels. They will be refined through community engagement as a part of actions to build a better understanding of recovery.

ii)      Setting the recovery vision

The pathways document sets the vision whereby ‘Auckland’s people, communities, businesses and infrastructure are well-placed to recover from a disaster.’

Being well placed means being well-prepared.

iii)     Anticipation of consequences and opportunities of Auckland hazards and risks

Anticipating potential consequences and opportunities from the impacts of Auckland’s hazards and risks provides insight into what might be required of a recovery. Auckland’s hazards and risks are identified in the Group Plan and some are the focus of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan. Building on previous work is part of the work programme resulting from the planning framework under the pathways document.

iv)     Building capacity and capability, addressing barriers to recovery

Another way in which the planning framework is community centric is in the way we will work in a recovery. Taking a collaborative, partnership approach means structuring and implementing recovery in a way that maintains its focus on community outcomes.

A significant recovery will require ‘big government’ structures and processes to effectively mobilise resources and coordinate large scale effort. Such approaches can seem remote from local communities. Effort is required to ensure good communication and community engagement are effectively maintained.

v)     Identifying actions to build momentum

Another significant focus is the work to be done to be better prepared. There are 43 actions identified under five focus areas: Recovery is communicated; Recovery is understood; Capacity and Capability is available; Collaboration is supported; and progress is monitored and evaluated.

The actions will form a work programme to be implemented in the lead-up to the review of the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan which is due by October 2021, unless delayed by events.

11.     Against this background, comments and views on the pathways document strategy is particularly required on:

·        community values

·        community priorities

·        the vision

·        the way we will work in recovery

·        the work to be done to be better prepared for recovery.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     Many parts of the Auckland Council group potentially become involved in responding to a disaster and subsequent recovery. The planning framework in the pathway’s document seeks to provide clarity about what will be required to support effective collaboration across the council group in recovery.

13.     Views from across the council group are being sought during targeted engagement through June and July 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     Auckland’s hazards and risks may give rise to events with local, sub-regional or region-wide impacts. Their consequences will be influenced by the circumstances of the time and place in which the event took place.

15.     Local board views on their community’s values and priorities are important in determining the way we will work together collaboratively in recovering from a disaster.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     Recovery addresses the consequences of an emergency and their impacts across the natural, social, built and economic environments. The goals, objectives and execution of recovery holds implications for iwi, environmental guardianship, Māori communities (iwi, hapu and mataawaka), marae, assets and the Māori economy.

17.     Building relationships amongst Auckland’s Māori communities to develop a deeper understanding of our potential collaboration across reduction, readiness, response, resilience and recovery, is a goal of Auckland Emergency Management. It is also part of the work plan arising from the planning framework set out in the pathways document.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications arising out of this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery and the work programme it will establish are intended to address the risk of Auckland being unprepared to recover from a disaster.

20.     Recovering from a disaster is complex, lengthy and costly. An absence or lack of preparation can:

·        delay commencement of recovery efforts and lengthen the time taken to complete recovery

·        inhibit multi-agency collaboration

·        lead to increased costs, disruption and distress for affected communities and individuals.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Local board feedback will be collated and considered for reporting to the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee and incorporation into the final iteration of the pathways document.

22.     The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee will receive the final iteration of Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery for approval in August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pathways to Preparedness: A  Planning Framework for Recovery

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Wayne Brown - Principal Recovery Advisor

Authorisers

Jennifer Rose, Response and Recovery Manager

Sarah Sinclair, General Manager, Auckland Emergency Management

Louise Mason, General Manager, Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 

New road names in the subdivision at 425 Clarks Beach Road, Waiau Pa by Orepunga Farm Limited

File No.: CP2019/12288

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board for the name of a new road to be created in a subdivision at 425 Clarks Beach Road, Waiau Pa by Orepunga Farm Limited. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The applicants, Orepunga Farm Limited, have submitted the following names for consideration for a new road name at 425 Clarks Beach Road, Waiau Pa:

Table 1: Orepunga Farm Proposed Road Names

Proposed Road Names

Preferred name 

Orepunga

Way

First alternative

Dingle Dell

Lane

Second alternative 

Repo

Way

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)   approve road name ‘Orepunga Way’ for the new road name in the subdivision at 425 Clarks Beach Road, Waiau Pa, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       The subdivision at 425 Clarks Beach Road, Waiau Pa (SUB60303760) will create nine lots (Lots 1-9) and one cul-de-sac road to vest (Lot 10).  The road will serve eight lots (Lots 1–8).  Balance lot 9 will have its own road frontage onto Clarks Beach Road.

5.       The road is required to be named in accordance with the national addressing standard as it serves more than 5 lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·         A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·         A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·         An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

7.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

8.       The applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new road created as part of the subdivision at 425 Clarks Beach Road, Waiau Pa.

 

Proposed Road Name

Meaning

Orepunga Way (Applicant Preferred and supported by iwi)

Orepunga is the area that the applicant’s family farmed in the Waikato for over a hundred years and is the company name of the current ownership of this farm.

Dingle Dell Lane

(First Alternative not supported by iwi)

A dell is a small glen or valley, namely with reference to the wetland area within the development.

 

Repo Way

(suggested by iwi)

Wetland’ Way to reflect the wetland within the development.

 

9.       Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that the above names are acceptable to use although pointed out that Dingle Dell Lane would be ‘a stones throw away’ from Dell Road. 

10.     The proposed suffix of ‘Way’ or ‘Lane’ is deemed acceptable as it accurately describes the characteristics of the road.

11.     The name proposed by the Applicant is deemed to meet the road naming guidelines.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     The applicant has consulted with local iwi and one response has been received from Ngati Te Ata.  Ngati Te Ata support the name “Orepunga Way”, or instead of “Dingle Dell Way”, “Repo Way” (wetland way).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site locality plan

63

b

Attachment B - Scheme Plan

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lesley Wood, Subdivision Advisor - South

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2019/08792

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the monthly update of the Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report provides an update on the Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar. A schedule of key decisions that will come before the board at business meetings over the next year is attached (Attachment A).

3.       The calendar aims to support the local board’s governance role by:

i)          Ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)         Clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)         Clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be regularly updated to ensure that formal reporting milestones for new projects are added to the schedule. Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar is a less formal but more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.

5.       At its business meeting on 6 June 2017, Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar would be reported monthly to enable greater public transparency on forthcoming local board key decision timescales (Resolution number FR/2017/82).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the July 2019 update of the Franklin governance forward work calendar (Attachment A to the report entitled ‘Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar).

 

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The governance forward work calendar brings together reporting on all of Franklin Local Board’s projects and activities previously approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes governing body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response. Inclusion on a formal business meeting agenda will allow greater transparency for the public.

7.       Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar is a more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.

8.       The forward work calendar is arranged in three columns: ‘Topic’, ‘Purpose’ and ‘Governance Role’:

i.)         Topic describes the items and may indicate how they fit in with broader processes such as the annual plan.

ii.)        Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates.

iii.)        Governance role is a high-level categorisation of the work of local boards.

9.       At its business meeting on 6 June 2017, Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar would be reported monthly to enable greater public transparency on forthcoming local board key decision timescales (Resolution number FR/2017/82).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     This report is an information report providing the governance forward work programme for the next six months.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     All local boards have been receiving governance forward work calendars on their business meeting agendas. This will support more effective management of the local board’s governance work.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The projects and processes referred to in the governance forward work calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     There are no financial implications relating to this report.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     This report is a point in time of the governance forward work calendar. It is a living document and updated month to month.  It minimises the risk of the board being unaware of planned topics for their consideration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     Staff will review the calendar each month and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

69

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

 

File No.: CP2019/08793

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 18 and 25 June, and for 2 July 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 18 and 25 June, and for 2 July 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 18 and 25 June, and for 2 July 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board workshop record 18 June 2019

73

b

Franklin Local Board workshop record 25 June 2019

75

c

Franklin Local Board workshop record 2 July 2019

77

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 July 2019