I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 18 July 2019

3.00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kit Parkinson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Carmel Claridge

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Toni Millar, QSM, JP

 

 

Ros Rundle

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim  Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

10 July 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: Kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Kali Haenga - C3 Christmas Event                                          5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Regional Facilities Auckland Third Quarter Performance Report for the quarter ending 30 March 2019                                                                                                   7

12        Adopt the Ōrākei Local Paths (Greenways) Programme Plan                               17

13        Ōrākei Open Space Network Plan - Key Moves                                                       21

14        4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera Lessee Relocation                                                      27

15        Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery                       45

16        Auckland Transport July 2019 reports to the Ōrākei Local Board                        69

17        Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Notice of Motion - Auckland Transport Delegations to Local Boards                                                                                      99

18        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                105

19        Board Member Report - Carmel Claridge                                                                153

20        Board Member Report - Troy Churton                                                                    175

21        Board Member Report - Colin Davis                                                                        193

22        Board Member Report – Toni Millar                                                                         201

23        Board Member Report – Ros Rundle                                                                       203

24        Board Member Report – David Wong                                                                      209

25        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      233

26        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings                                                          239

27        Resolutions Pending Action                                                                                     251  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

An apology from Chairperson K Parkinson has been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the minutes of the Ōrākei Local Board held on Thursday, 20 June 2019 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Kali Haenga - C3 Christmas Event

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kali Haenga, Funding Coordinator from C3 will be in attendance to present to the Local Board on a proposed free Christmas event in Ellerslie.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Kali Haenga.

 

Attachments

a          Support information - C3 Proposed Christmas Event.................................. 259

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland Third Quarter Performance Report for the quarter ending 30 March 2019

File No.: CP2019/11851

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board on the performance of Regional Facilities Auckland for the quarter ending 30 March 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Regional Facilities Auckland Quarterly Performance Report for the quarter ending 30 March 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Facilities Auckland Quarterly Performance Report for quarter ending 30 March 2019

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Adopt the Ōrākei Local Paths (Greenways) Programme Plan

File No.: CP2019/10377

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the prioritised programme for implementation of the Ōrākei Local Paths (Greenways) Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ōrākei Local Paths Programme Plan provides a detailed breakdown of how to implement the 13 routes in the Ōrākei Greenways planning document 2016. It prioritises:

a)   routes for the Ōrākei Local Board to fund in the coming years

b)   key routes to start advocacy discussions and

c)   routes to align with Auckland Transport priorities from 2023 onwards.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the Ōrākei Local Paths Programme Plan 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The Ōrākei Greenways planning document was adopted in August 2016.  This document identified 13 aspirational greenway routes through the Ōrākei Local Board area. 

4.       The Ōrākei Local Board has set five linked outcomes to define a greenway in the local area:

·   safe and enjoyable walking and cycling connections

·   improve, restore and protect natural environments

·   connect communities to parks and the sea

·   improve links between schools, neighbourhoods and places of work

·   improve the ability for local streets to function as slow speed environments where the communities can gather for activity.

5.       Greenways generally consist of quiet streets and paths through parks.  In places they intersect with long-distance commuter paths on busy roads.

6.       More recently the term ‘Local Paths’ has replaced ‘Greenways’ within Auckland Council and Auckland Transport language and documents.  The meaning remains the same.

7.       The Ōrākei Local Paths Programme Plan identifies the work that is required to implement each of these routes.  The plan recommends priorities for implementation and priorities for advocacy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Each route is broken down into express path, local path, trail, on-street and open space categories.  Appendix B: Route Prioritisation Analysis describes each section of each route in detail.  Information includes:

·   who is responsible for delivering a section of path

·   estimated costs where they are currently available

·   whether funding is already allocated

·   benefits

·   descriptions of improvements

·   interdependencies and risks.

9.       The body of the report identifies three sets of priorities. 

10.     The first group of priorities are routes or parts of routes which are the Ōrākei Local Board’s responsibility to fund.  The Gowing Drive link is already funded as a partnership project which will be implemented by Auckland Transport.  Ōrākei Basin Walkways have recently been completed. 

11.     The second group of priorities are routes which require a high degree of collaboration with other agencies.  The Tāmaki Drive to Glen Innes route is partially complete.  Continued advocacy is needed to ensure all sections are funded and completed.  The remaining priorities are not yet planned or funded.  Advocacy is recommended to start initial discussions about how to implement these routes.

12.     The third group of priorities aligns with Auckland Transport’s priority areas for investment between 2023 and 2028.  Simultaneous investment in the open space sections of the route and on-street sections of the route will bring maximum benefits.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The report acknowledges many interdependencies between Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to deliver the full Ōrākei Local Paths network.  This is described in detail for each route.  Continued communication between Auckland Council and Auckland Transport during the planning and implementation of each route is critical.

14.     The report identifies ‘painted on street lanes’ as a means of defining some on road routes. Alternative design options to deliver the same outcome are now being considered by Auckland Transport. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2017 contains “outcome 3:  People can move around our area easily and safely”.  One objective is “Local shops, schools and community facilities are connected through safe walking and cycling paths”.  A key objective is to “Carry out the Ōrākei Local Paths Plan and other linkages to schools, transport hubs and local centres”.  The Ōrākei Local Paths Programme Plan is a tool that will assist in meeting this objective.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     Routes 11 and 13 cross the Whenua Rangatira/Takaparawha Park. Route 13 could also link to the Pourewa Creek Recreation Reserve.  Both areas of land are owned by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.    The Ōrākei Local Paths Programme Plan was prepared in consultation with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and references the Pourewa Creek Recreation Reserve Draft Reserve Management Plan.  A priority outcome of the plan is further collaboration with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei to progress these routes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     Implementation of all routes require funding.  There are a variety of budget sources from the New Zealand Transport Agency, Auckland Transport and Ōrākei Local Board which can be investigated.  The estimated costs for the on-road components of the Local Paths plan, provided on page 11 of the report, are high level only.  They are presented to provide a comparison between projects rather than representing definitive costs.  Detailed costs would form part of the detailed design for each route.

18.     Community Facilities are aware of the Ōrākei Local Paths Programme Plan.  They will consider this in future work programme discussions with the Ōrākei Local Board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     The main risk is implementing ad-hoc sections of routes which do not form a cohesive network.  Early collaboration between Auckland Transport and Auckland Council to align funding and work programmes will help to deliver local paths in an efficient and coordinated manner.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Secure funding from Auckland Council and Auckland Transport work programmes to implement the priorities in the Ōrākei Local Paths Programme Plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Ōrākei Local Path Programme Plan 21 March 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Hayley Dauben - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Ōrākei Open Space Network Plan - Key Moves

File No.: CP2019/12377

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the key moves to inform the development of the Ōrākei Local Board Open Space Network Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An open space network plan is being prepared for the Ōrākei Local Board area.

3.       The plan will assist decision-making and provide a framework for the development of parks and open space over the next 10 years.

4.       Staff recommend five key moves that focus on improving the quality of, and access to, open space in the local board area. These are:

·   protecting and enhancing our natural environment

·   recognising our culture and heritage

·   encouraging activation

·   improving connectivity

·   responding to growth.

5.       No additional funding is allocated to implement projects set out in the plan. The document can be used to advocate for new funding as part of the annual and long-term plan processes.

6.       A final plan will be presented to the local board for adoption in September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the following key moves to guide the development of the Ōrākei Local Board Open Space Network Plan:

i)        protecting and enhancing our natural environment

ii)       recognising our culture and heritage

iii)      encouraging activation

iv)      improving connectivity

v)      responding to growth.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       A 10-year open space network plan is being prepared for the Ōrākei local board area.

8.       This plan will inform local board decision-making and expenditure across the park network, as the area grows and changes over time.

9.       The plan will set out key moves for the development of the open space network. The key moves respond to findings from the current state analysis.

10.     The final document is presented in three key areas:

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Demographic data

11.     Staff have researched the growth projections and demographic data for the Ōrākei local board area. The key findings are:

·   the total population at 2015 was 86,400 (7th highest by local board area)

·   the area contains six per cent of the regional population

·   the ethnic composition is 77 per cent European, 18 per cent Asian, five per cent Māori and three per cent Pasifika (one of the lowest levels of ethnic diversity across the 21 local boards)

·   the projected population growth by the year 2033 is 109,100

·   the median age is 40.2 years (compared with 35.1 years for the region)

·   33 per cent of residents were born overseas.

Open space provision

12.     The current state of the open space network has been assessed by desk-top research, park-user surveys and discussions with specialist staff highlighting the following key facts:

·   the network includes 112 local parks and open spaces

·   there are eight swimming beaches, 20 kilometres of coastal walks and six volcanic features.

13.     There is good open space distribution across the Ōrākei local board area when assessed against the Open Space Provision Policy (2016), with some provision gaps in:

·   Ōrākei (west)

·   Kohimarama

·   St Heliers

·   Remuera

·   Ellerslie.

14.     Park-user research indicates that 89 per cent of respondents are “satisfied or very satisfied” with neighbourhood parks in the Ōrākei local board area.

 

The 2016 Ōrākei Greenways Plan identifies priority connections for the network

15.     The Greenways Plan identifies 13 aspirational routes which will create better connectivity for pedestrians and cyclists to schools, parks, train stations, community facilities and ecological areas.

16.     Two priority greenway routes are:

·   an east – west connection linking Tāmaki Drive to Glen Innes (through the Pourewa Valley)

·   a south – north connection linking Ellerslie to the sea.

Five key moves are proposed

17.     The key moves were developed to inform and analyse options and actions in the open space network plan. They respond to the current state and anticipated growth in the area.

18.     Staff engaged with the local board at two workshops to present the current state and formulate the key moves.

19.     Staff also engaged with mana whenua on the development of the open space network plan in June 2019.

20.     The 2017 Ōrākei Local Board Plan identifies five outcomes to guide work and to make the Ōrākei local board area a better community for all. The aspirational outcomes are set out in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Local board priorities

Ōrākei Local Board aspirations:

·   Our local parks and open space areas are valued and enjoyed

·   Our residents are proud of their community facilities and public places

·   People can move around our area easily and safely

·   The natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced by our communities

·   A thriving economy which supports local businesses and town centres.

21.     Staff recommend five key moves based on the current state analysis and feedback from the local board. The key moves are summarised in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Key moves and focus areas for action

Current state

Mana whenua feedback

Key move

Focus areas

•  The natural environment has been highly modified

•  Streams and wetlands have been drained and culverted

•  Development has occurred right up to the coastal edge

•  Many of the parks and open spaces have tracts of vegetation, waterways and coastal foreshore.

Reinstate native vegetation.

Stop the use of glyphosates.

Improve storm water management.

Restoration of mauri and wairua.

Natural Environment

Protecting and enhancing our network of parks and open spaces which embody many of the treasured aspects of our natural environment:

•  champion iwi and community-led environmental restoration projects

•  Improved biodiversity

•  Improved quality waterways

•  coastal protection by way of soft engineering initiatives.

 

Current state

Mana whenua feedback

Key move

Focus areas

•  There are many sites of significance to mana whenua and early Auckland

•  Some sites require more care, improved awareness and appreciation by user.

•  Protection of waahi tapu sites.

•  Place-naming.

•  Awareness of sites of significance.

•  Cultural narratives.

Culture and heritage

Protecting and enhancing our network of parks and open spaces which embody many of the treasured aspects of our culture and heritage:

•  te ao Māori (the Māori world view)

•  colonial heritage

•  emerging landscapes.

•  Walking, running and informal exercise are the most popular.

•  Park experiences are limited in some areas.

•  Provide recreational spaces aimed at the needs of Māori youth.

•  Create natural play spaces.

Activation

Responding to the evolving recreational needs of increasingly diverse communities:

•  recreation trends

•  community needs.

•  There is a good spread of public access-ways connecting the existing street and park network.

•  The city to coast access is good but with potential for more improvement.

•  Create cultural narratives which are more than just signage and wayfinding.

Connectivity

Developing walking, cycling and green corridor networks to connect and engage our communities:

•  walking, cycling and green corridors

•  signage

•  spatial planning

•  cultural design.

•  Population growth put pressure on the network

•  Provision levels are reasonably good but with some gaps

•  Optimisation of poor-quality pocket parks are an opportunity.

•  Protect the network for future generations by prioritising conservation and ecological outcomes in response to growth.

Responding to growth

Responding to urban intensification:

•  open space provision

•  open space quality.

 

22.     The key moves will inform the development of actions and their prioritisation within the final open space network plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     There are no council group impacts at this stage of the development of the network plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Improving the quality of open space will have a positive impact on all local board residents.

25.     The following workshops have been held with the Ōrākei Local Board:

·   February 2019 – to introduce the open space network plan and process

·   May 2019 – to discuss parks-user research, current state and key moves.

26.     Local board approval of the key moves is sought through this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Data from the 2013 Census shows that the Ōrākei local board area has a lower proportional Māori population (5 per cent) than the average population across Auckland (11 per cent).

28.     The provision of quality parks and open spaces will facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

29.     Sport New Zealand’s Active NZ 2017 participation study finds that Māori and Pasifika adults have lower than average weekly informal recreation participation but are more likely to participate in competitive sports and activities. However, Māori youth spend the most time, when compared with other ethnicities, in sport participation in any given week.

30.     Staff engaged with mana whenua in June 2019 to seek their views and values in relation to the open space network in the Ōrākei local board area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     There are no financial risks arising from the development of the network plan. The Parks and Recreation Policy unit is developing the plan within baselines.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The lack of funding to implement the plan could create a reputational risk. However, the local board can use the network plan to advocate for increased funding as part of the Annual Plan and Long-term Plan processes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Staff will prepare a draft open space network plan using the key moves. The key moves will inform the prioritisation of actions to be included in the final open space network plan.

34.     The open space network plan will be presented to the local board in September 2019 for adoption.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard Mann - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Emma Golightly - Team Leader - Parks and Recreation Policy

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera Lessee Relocation

File No.: CP2019/12322

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the relocation of the Remuera Citizens Advice Bureau from 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera to the Ōrākei Community Centre and to approve modifications to the Centre to accommodate the Bureau.

2.       To approve the lease variation for Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust to allow for three months’ notice to be given to vacate 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Ōrākei Local Board approved the sale of 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera on 19 July 2018 (OR/2018/145), with the proceeds from the sale being ring-fenced to support the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre.

4.       This decision requires the existing lessees of 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera to relocate their services prior to settlement.

5.       Several location options were explored to relocate Remuera Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB).  Of the options explored, Ōrākei Community Centre is the preferred location of both the council and the CAB.

6.       Modifications are required to Ōrākei Community Centre to support the relocation of the CAB.  Four options (attachment A) have been considered and assessed against a number of criteria including:

·   Strategic alignment

·   Impact on centre – current and future use

·   Impact on existing users

·   CAB use – areas available for shared or exclusive use.

7.       Option 1 which moves the kitchen to the centre office is considered the best option overall for strategic alignment, impact on the centre and existing users.  It is not the CAB’s preferred option. 

8.       Plunket expressed an interest in moving its services to the new Meadowbank Community Centre when it opens.  Plunket services will relocate to other local venues while Meadowbank Community Centre is being developed.  The current Plunket lease for 4 Victoria Avenue expires in 2025 and does not have a clause that allows the council to terminate the lease early.  A lease variation is required to introduce three months’ notice to terminate the lease and Plunket has agreed to the variation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the relocation of the Remuera Citizens Advice Bureau from 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera to Ōrākei Community Centre.

b)      approve modifications to Ōrākei Community Centre as shown in Ground Floor Plan – Option 1 dated 31 July 2018 at an estimated cost of $215,000 (to be funded from the proceeds of sale of 4 Victoria Avenue), subject to written agreement from Remuera Citizens Advice Bureau confirming its acceptance of the move to Ōrākei Community Centre.

c)      approve a Deed of Variation of Lease for 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera, Auckland between Auckland Council and Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust to allow for three months’ notice to be given to vacate 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera.

d)      approve the lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust being terminated in accordance with the three months’ notice to vacate in the Deed of Variation of Lease for 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera, Auckland between Auckland Council and Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust.

e)      delegate to the Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory to sign the Deed of Variation of Lease and to also sign and serve the termination notice to terminate the lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust in accordance with the right granted in the Deed of Variation of Lease upon being requested by Panuku Development Auckland Limited.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Ōrākei Local Board approved the sale of 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera on 19 July 2018 (OR/2018/145) as part of the optimisation project for Meadowbank Community Centre.  To settle the property with vacant possession, the current lessees will need to relocate their services.

10.     The CAB lease for 4 Victoria Avenue expires on 30 June 2020.  There are no clauses which allow for council to terminate the lease early.

11.     The Plunket lease for 4 Victoria Avenue expires in 2025 and there are no clauses which allow for council to terminate the lease early.

12.     Ōrākei Community Centre is part of the community places network.  The strategic direction for community places is to:

·   Optimise the council’s investment in its facilities

·   Realise the community benefits of co-locating services and activities

·   Fully activate facilities with locally relevant services.

The direction seeks to maximise the council’s investment in community facilities by providing as much shared space as possible.  The emphasis is on:

·   Access rather than occupation

·   Short term tenure, aligned to current local board planning

·   Shared use and commitment to facility or venue

·   Community or customer need rather than organisational need

·   Ability to add value to the operation of any facility or venue.

13.     There has been regional work undertaken on the allocation of funding to Citizens Advice Bureaux.  Ōrākei Local Board gave feedback to this process in March 2019 (OR/2019/35).  In relation to council facilities, the board indicated that it would like to see alternative business models that enable the CABx to be more agile in adapting their service provision, increased flexibility in how the CAB services are provided in the local board area and more flexible ways of working which allow for community space to be used by other groups when not used by the CAB.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Remuera Citizens Advice Bureau

14.     A number of options were considered in 2018 for the relocation of CAB services, as outlined in the table below.

Retail unit in Remuera

St Lukes Community Centre

Ōrākei Community Centre

Retail unit at Eastridge

Strategic alignment

No opportunity for co-location with other council services

Co-location with other services

Community led provision

Co-location with other services

No opportunity for co-location with other council services

Lease costs

$30,800 – $48,090 per annum incl OPEX

$9,600 per annum incl OPEX

-

No units available

Capital expenses

Fit out ~$56,000

TBD

$150,000 - $300,000

Location

Town centre

680m from Newmarket 1.5km from Remuera

700m from Eastridge

Shopping centre

Alignment with CAB preference

Good alignment

Close to volunteer base

May breach principle of universality e.g. some people may not use the service because of the church

Close to CAB location preference

Preferred location

Other

Potentially short term solution (lease costs likely to be unaffordable long term)

Loss of space at Centre for other uses

* Remuera Library and Bridge Club discounted as options due to lack of capacity

 

15.     Ōrākei Local Board gave direction at a workshop in May 2018 to continue discussions with the CAB to relocate to Ōrākei Community Centre.  A paper to the CAB board from June 2018 stated that Ōrākei Community Centre provides an opportunity to make the Remuera service more relevant and accessible to the local community and supported the move, subject to agreeing areas for the CAB use.

16.     Four options for modifications to Ōrākei Community Centre are considered below.  The concept plans are shown in attachment A.  The key principles for the modifications are to enhance the community centre for all users and ensure the relocation is cost effective. 

17.     Each option has been assessed against the below criteria:

·   Strategic alignment – whether the modification supports Community Places strategic direction and the Ōrākei Local Board feedback on the CAB funding allocation

·   Impact on the centre current and future use – the impact of modifications on the kitchen, entrance and foyer, community office, access to toilets and future flexibility

·   Impact on existing users – the impact of modifications on the existing users of the Community Centre.

·   CAB use – the areas available for exclusive or shared use assessed against information provided by the CAB on their requirements, specifically three exclusive use, lockable rooms within view of each other, access to a reception/waiting area and security of tenure.

18.     The following tables outline the criteria assessment of the four options.  A summary table is provided in paragraph 20.

Option 1 – Move kitchen to centre office

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

- Moderate

- Supports ACE direction

- Supports OLB feedback on the CAB funding allocation

Impact on centre – current and future use

Kitchen – improved connection with hall

Entrance and foyer – no change

Community office – no change

Access to toilets – no change

Future flexibility – limited change; front offices could be used for other community purposes

Impact on centre – current and future use

Centre office – removed; staff will need to share office space

Impact on existing users

- Limited impact

- Improved connection between kitchen and hall

Impact on existing users

- Shared foyer space

CAB use

CAB use

Two exclusive use rooms provided rather than three requested; access to whānau room and shared use of community office not within view of exclusive use rooms

Estimated cost $215,000

 

Option 2 – Move kitchen to community office

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

- Moderate

- Supports ACE direction and OLB feedback on CAB funding allocation

Impact on centre – current and future use

Centre office – no change

Entrance and foyer – no change

Access to toilets – no change

Impact on centre – current and future use

Kitchen – smaller, reduced functionality, less prominent location

Community office – removed

Future flexibility – limited impact but kitchen location not ideal

Impact on existing users

- No space to congregate outside kitchen

- Shared foyer space

- Transportation of food from kitchen could be a hazard due to lack of direct access to hall

CAB use

Centre office (shared use) within eyesight of exclusive use rooms

CAB use

Two exclusive use rooms provided rather than three requested; access to whānau room and shared use of centre office

Estimated cost $175,000

 

Option 3 – Construct new offices in foyer

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

Low

Limited support for ACE direction and OLB feedback on CAB funding allocation

Impact on centre – current and future use

Community office – no change

Impact on centre – current and future use

Kitchen – smaller, reduced functionality; tea and coffee only – not appropriate for capacity of hall

Centre office – removed; staff to share office space

Entrance and foyer – limited space for gathering; loss of wind lobby could make centre colder

Access to toilets – less direct with narrow corridor

Future flexibility – limited benefit if CAB moves

Impact on existing users

- Loss of kitchen space and functionality

- No space for informal gathering in foyer

- Potential to make centre feel less welcoming and accessible for users.

CAB use

Exclusive use of four offices including two new offices in foyer

All offices within view of each other

Estimated cost $293,000

 

Option 4 – Move kitchen to community office; modify centre office

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

- Low

- Limited support for ACE direction and OLB feedback on CAB funding allocation

Impact on centre – current and future use

Entrance and foyer – no change

Access to toilets – no change

Impact on centre – current and future use

Kitchen – smaller, reduced functionality, less prominent location but access to back of hall

Centre office – exclusive CAB use; staff to share other space

Community office – removed

Future flexibility – limited impact but kitchen location not ideal

Impact on existing users

- No space to congregate outside kitchen

- Shared foyer space

CAB use

Exclusive use of three front offices including the centre office

All offices within view of each other

Estimated cost $255,000

 

19.     The summary table of the criteria assessment across the four options is below.  A tick is positive or no change, a dash is neutral and a cross is negative change or impact.

Criteria

Option 1: Kitchen to centre office

Option 2: Kitchen to community office

Option 3: New offices in foyer

Option 4: Kitchen to community office, modified centre office

Strategic alignment

-

-

û

û

Impact on Community Centre current and future use

Kitchen

Centre office

Entrance and foyer

Community office

Access to toilets

Future flexibility

 

 

 

ü

û

ü

ü

ü

ü

 

 

 

-

ü

ü

û

ü

-

 

 

 

û

û

û

û

û

û

 

 

 

-

û

ü

û

ü

-

Impact on existing users

ü

-

û

-

CAB use

û

-

ü

ü

Cost

-

-

û

û

 

20.     Option 1 which moves the kitchen to the centre office is considered the best option overall for strategic alignment, impact on the centre and existing users.  It is not the CAB’s preferred option as it does not provide three exclusive use rooms within view of each other. 

21.     New doors from the back of the hall to the corridor with the toilets will be included in Option 1 provided the modifications remain within the cost estimate of $215,000. 

22.     No alterations will be made to Ōrākei Community Centre without written agreement from the CAB to relocate.  The CAB may choose to remain at 4 Victoria Avenue until its lease expires on 30 June 2020. Given there are no other council facilities that can accommodate the CAB in the Ōrākei Local Board area, the CAB will need to arrange its own accommodation if agreement on Ōrākei Community Centre is not reached.     

Plunket

23.     The Plunket lease for 4 Victoria Avenue expires in 2025 and there are no clauses which allow for council to terminate the lease early.  A lease variation is required to terminate the lease to sell 4 Victoria Avenue with vacant possession prior to 2025.

24.     Plunket has agreed to sign the deed of lease variation (Appendix B).  It introduces the right for Auckland Council to terminate the lease with Plunket on giving three months’ notice to vacate 4 Victoria Avenue.  To streamline the process, staff delegation is sought to serve the termination notice with three months’ notice.  This will be no later than 1 April 2020 to align with the CAB lease expiry date of 30 June 2020.

25.     Plunket services are being considered in the redeveloped Meadowbank Community Centre on a pack-in/pack-out basis. During the redevelopment, Plunket will operate its services from other local facilities.  Staff will work with Plunket to minimise disruption during the transition.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Moving CAB and Plunket services from 4 Victoria Avenue will have some impact on members of the community who use these services. Ōrākei Community Centre is 4.1 kilometres from 4 Victoria Avenue and is approximately 6 minutes’ drive or 22 minutes by bus. 

27.     Numbers from CAB provided in March 2019 show that over 70 people visit the branch each week.  A paper to the CAB board from June 2018 suggests that there is an opportunity to make the service more relevant and accessible to the local community and that there could be a significant increase in foot traffic for the branch at Ōrākei Community Centre.   

28.     The CAB relies on volunteers.  The move to Ōrākei Community Centre will impact on the 33 volunteers at Remuera CAB (as at March 2019) as they may need to travel further to Ōrākei Community Centre.  However, there is car parking available at the centre and the building is in better condition than 4 Victoria Avenue, so the impact could be positive. 

29.     Workshops have been held with Ōrākei Local Board in March and May 2019. 

30.     Ōrākei Local Board’s views on the CABx funding allocation model are consistent with Option 1 and 2 which have shared spaces as well as exclusive use spaces for the CAB.  This moves towards flexibility in service provision arrangements, working on a pack-in/pack-out basis, and enabling community space to be used by other groups when not needed by the CAB.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Mana whenua have been advised of the wider optimisation concept of which the sale of 4 Victoria Avenue is a part, and a framework for engagement has been agreed through the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei was consulted as part of the community needs assessment for Meadowbank, Remuera and Ōrākei. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The delivery of any of the options to modify the Ōrākei Community Centre to accommodate the Remuera CAB will be funded from the proceeds of sale of 4 Victoria Avenue. A cost estimate has been prepared for each of the four options and these are set out above.

33.     One of the key principles of the relocation of CAB is to ensure the modifications are cost effective.  Option 1 is a cost-effective option because it improves the connection between the kitchen and the hall which is beneficial to the centre overall.  Option 1 does not limit future use or flexibility of the centre and maintains current access to the entrance, foyer and toilets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The following table outlines identified risks and mitigations.

Risk

Mitigation

There is a risk that the council cannot reach agreement with CAB over the Ōrākei Community Centre modifications.

The CAB lease for 4 Victoria Avenue expires on 30 June 2020.  It is possible for the CAB to stay at 4 Victoria Avenue until its lease expires.  It will need to arrange its own accommodation at the expiry of its lease as there are no other council facilities that can accommodate them in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

Plunket may not agree to the lease variation which allows for Auckland Council to have a right upon three months’ notice to terminate the lease.  The Plunket lease does not expire until 2025 and without a variation, Plunket could refuse to vacate 4 Victoria Avenue which would delay the sale of 4 Victoria Avenue and the optimisation of Meadowbank Community Centre. 

Plunket has agreed to sign the lease variation and has expressed interest in moving to the new Meadowbank Community Centre.

Physical works on Ōrākei Community Centre could exceed the cost estimate; additional building works could be required due to unknown/unexpected building condition or infrastructure issues.

Quantity surveyors have provided cost estimates, including contingency, for all options. 

The Project Delivery team in Community Facilities has been engaged early on the project.

Timeframes do not align causing a delay in the delivery of the programme of work or loss of continuity of service for the CAB.

The project team will continue to monitor key dates and milestones in the programme.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Formal written agreement from the CAB is required for relocation to a modified Ōrākei Community Centre.  This needs to be received before 1 August 2019 to allow construction works at Ōrākei Community Centre to be planned for the Christmas holiday period when the centre is quieter.  If agreement is not reached by 29 November 2019, there is no guarantee that the CAB will be able to move to Ōrākei Community Centre before 30 June 2020 and may experience a disruption to its service.

36.     Following written agreement from CAB to relocate, the Community Facilities Project Delivery team will begin detailed design and consenting.  If there is no agreement to relocate, no further work will be undertaken.

37.     Community Facilities Community Leasing team will progress the variation to the Plunket lease to introduce three months’ notice to terminate.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Community Centre Modification Options

37

b

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust Deed of Variation of Lease

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nicola Terry - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

 

 


 

 

 


 

 

 


 

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery

File No.: CP2019/12205

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery has been developed to ensure Auckland is better prepared to recover from a disaster.

3.       The planning framework set out in the document:

·   identifies community values and priorities

·   sets a vision for recovery

·   focuses on the consequences to be addressed in recovery

·   focuses on building capacity and capability and addressing barriers

·   identifies actions to build momentum.

4.       It has been developed with local board engagement over 2018 and local board feedback is now sought particularly on:

·   community values

·   community priorities

·   the vision

·   the way we will work in recovery

·   the work to be done to be better prepared for recovery.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      review and provide feedback on the draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Following the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 was amended, and new guidelines were issued requiring better preparation for, and implementation of, recovery from a disaster.

6.       Auckland Emergency Management began development of the Resilient Recovery Strategy to ensure Auckland is better prepared. This included:

·   workshops on recovery with local boards between 24 May and 12 July 2018

·   reporting back on the workshops in September 2018

·   presentations to Local Board Cluster Meetings in March and November 2018

·   updating local boards on the development of the Resilient Recovery Strategy in November 2018 and advising that a draft would go the Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee in February 2019.

7.       At the beginning of this year the Resilient Recovery Strategy was renamed ‘Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework to Recovery’ (refer Attachment A) as it better described the document’s intent and contents.

8.       The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee approved the draft Pathways document for targeted engagement in February 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The development of Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery followed the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management’s ‘Strategic Planning for Recovery’ guidelines [DGL 20/17].

10.     The Pathways document is structured around this process as illustrated in the components of Figure 1 in the Pathways document (page 3):

i)       Identifying community values and priorities

The planning framework set out in the Pathways document is described as community centric. Community values and priorities guide us in our preparations enabling recovery to be set up and implemented in a way that helps to meet community needs and aspirations.

An initial set of community values and priorities was derived from workshops with local boards and advisory panels. They will be refined through community engagement as a part of actions to build a better understanding of recovery.

ii)      Setting the recovery vision

The Pathways document sets the vision whereby “Auckland’s people, communities, businesses and infrastructure are well-placed to recover from a disaster.”

Being well placed means being well-prepared.

iii)     Anticipation of consequences and opportunities of Auckland hazards and risks

Anticipating potential consequences and opportunities from the impacts of Auckland’s hazards and risks provides insight into what might be required of a recovery. Auckland’s hazards and risks are identified in our Group Plan and some are the focus of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan. Building on previous work is part of the work programme resulting from the planning framework under the Pathways document.

iv)     Building capacity and capability, addressing barriers to recovery

Another way in which the planning framework is community centric is in the way we will work in a recovery. Taking a collaborative, partnership approach means structuring and implementing recovery in a way that maintains its focus on community outcomes.

A significant recovery will require ‘big government’ structures and processes to effectively mobilise resources and coordinate large scale effort. Such approaches can seem remote from local communities. Effort is required to ensure good communication and community engagement are effectively maintained.

v)     Identifying actions to build momentum

Another significant focus is the work we need to do to be better prepared. There are 43 actions identified under 5 focus areas: Recovery is communicated, Recovery is understood, Capacity and Capability is available, Collaboration is supported, and progress is monitored and evaluated.

The actions will form a work programme to be implemented in the lead up to the review of the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan which is due by October 2021 unless delayed by events.

11.     Against this background comments and views on the Pathways to Preparation: A Planning Framework for Recovery strategy is particularly required on:

·   community values

·   community priorities

·   the vision

·   the way we will work in recovery

·   the work to be done to be better prepared for recovery.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     Many parts of the Auckland Council group potentially become involved in responding to a disaster and subsequent recovery. The planning framework in the Pathway’s document seeks to provide clarity about what will be required to support effective collaboration across the Council group in recovery.

13.     Views from across the Council group are being sought during targeted engagement through June and July 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     Auckland’s hazards and risks may give rise to events with local, sub-regional or region-wide impacts. Their consequences will be influenced by the circumstances of the time and place in which the event took place.

15.     Local board views on their community’s values and priorities are important in determining the way we will work together collaboratively in recovering from a disaster.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     Recovery addresses the consequences of an emergency and their impacts across the natural, social, built and economic environments. The goals, objectives and execution of recovery holds implications for iwi, environmental guardianship, Māori communities (iwi, hapu and mataawaka), marae, assets and the Māori economy.

17.     Building relationships amongst Auckland’s Māori communities to develop a deeper understanding of our potential collaboration across reduction, readiness, response, resilience and recovery is a goal of Auckland Emergency Management. It is also part of the workplan arising from the planning framework set out in the Pathways document.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications arising out of this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery and the work programme it will establish are intended to address the risk of Auckland being unprepared to recover from a disaster.

20.     Recovering from a disaster is complex, lengthy and costly. An absence or lack of preparation can:

·   delay commencement of recovery efforts and lengthen the time taken to complete recovery

·   inhibit multiagency collaboration

·   lead to increased costs, disruption and distress for affected communities and individuals.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Local board feedback will be collated and considered for reporting to the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee and incorporation into the final iteration of the Pathways document.

22.     The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee will receive the final iteration of Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery for approval in August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Pathway to Preparedness - A Planning Framework for Recovery

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Wayne Brown - Principal Recovery Advisor

Authorisers

Jennifer Rose - Head of Recovery

Sarah Sinclair - Chief Engineer

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport July 2019 reports to the Ōrākei Local Board

File No.: CP2019/12624

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport reports to the Ōrākei Local Board for July 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each month, Auckland Transport provides an update to the Ōrākei Local Board on transport-related matters and relevant consultations in its area, Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects and decisions of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee.

3.       The Auckland Transport update for July 2019 and Allocation of Ōrākei Local Board Safety Fund reports and the Community Safety Project Prioritised Proposals - Ōrākei Local Board July 2019 attachment are attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport July 2019 update report.

b)      agree the following prioritised list to utilise the Community Safety Fund allocated to the Ōrākei Local Board area:

Project

Description

RoC

Waiatarua Reserve/Abbotts Way crossing and path

Establish a crossing facility on Abbotts Way and complete a small section of footpath.

$50,000

Mt Carmel School

Establish a safe crossing point on Temple Street and other appropriate safety measures to support students accessing Mt Carmel School through Lucia Glade.

$300,000

Kohimarama School

Change the existing kea crossing on Rawhitiroa Road to a raised zebra and consider the use of colour/texture to highlight the crossing.

$260,000

Roberta Reserve playground crossing

A crossing to be established near the T intersection of Riddell Road and Roberta Avenue. This would service the school/kindergarten/rest home and the reserve area.

$260,000

Ōrākei School

A new crossing is requested as the school has closed its back entrance on Coates Avenue. The desire line for pedestrians has now altered and a new crossing point needs to be established.

$280,000

Churchill Park School

Warning signage and gateway treatment on Riddell Road requested to alert drivers of children entering and exiting from the back entrance of the school.

$50,000

Rangitoto Ave/Ranui Road intersection, Remuera

Concerns over speeding and careless driving in this area. Treatment suggested is splitter islands on the side roads to improve vehicle tracking.

$80,000

Mcfarland/Grand Drive Intersection

Request for speed calming measures on Grand Drive and/or crossing points on Grand Drive and Mcfarland Street.

$300,000

Kepa Road Pedestrian Facility

Request for a crossing point at approximately 110 Kepa Road where the footpath runs out. This needs further investigation of the recommended treatment due to the topography.

$260,000

Combes Road, Remuera

Treatment requested to help prevent careless driving and speeding in this street. Estimate includes chevrons, cats-eyes and roadmarking.

$25,000

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport monthly report - July 2019

71

b

Allocation of Ōrākei Local Board Safety Fund report

87

c

Community Safety Project Prioritised Proposals - Ōrākei Local Board July 2019

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Notice of Motion - Auckland Transport Delegations to Local Boards

File No.: CP2019/11991

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board’s Notice of Motion and resolutions in relation to Auckland Transport delegations to local boards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On Tuesday, 18 June 2019, Devonport-Takapuna Local Board resolved the following:

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson G Gillon, seconded by Member M Cohen: 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      request that Auckland Transport consider delegating the required local responsibilities, duties, functions, and powers to allow:

i)     landowner approval,

ii)    prioritisation of proposed projects, and

iii)   approval of related budgets.

b)      to the respective local board, where they affect roads or assets in the local street network, noting that this is allowed for under section 45 “Delegations” of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, in particular clauses (1) and (8).

c)      request that where any required responsibilities, duties, functions, or powers to give effect to resolution a) above are determined to be contrary to the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 or any other legislation, that an equivalent process is found (such as Auckland Transport formally adopting local board resolutions).

d)      note that local boards currently have the equivalent delegation as outlined in resolution a) above in regards to assets, projects and land administered by the Community Facilities department of Auckland Council, and this may be a suitable model for Auckland Transport to consider adopting.

e)      request that this Notice of Motion and subsequent resolutions are circulated to all local boards for their information and consideration.

CARRIED

3.       This report is to receive Devonport-Takapuna Local Board’s Notice of Motion and resolutions in relation to Auckland Transport delegations to local boards from its 18 June 2019 meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board’s Notice of Motion and resolutions from its 18 June 2019 business meeting in relation to Auckland Transport delegations to local boards.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Notice of Motion and supporting documentation - Auckland Transport

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2019/12979

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since last reported.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board formally endorse its feedback on the review of the Walking Access Act 2008 (Attachment B).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson's report - July 2019

107

b

Ōrākei Local Board Feedback - Review of the Walking Access Act

113

c

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board Minutes - 11 June 2019

115

d

Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority Hui 48 – 1 July Agenda and Minutes

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Board Member Report - Carmel Claridge

File No.: CP2019/12947

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board support Isaac Mercer’s request to Auckland Transport for his appointment to the Mission Bay and St Heliers Safety Improvement working groups as the Amplify Youth Representative for the Ōrākei Local Board area.

c)      That the Ōrākei Local Board request Community Facilities to remove all plastic bag dispensing units from all reserves in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

 

Portfolio Lead: Transport

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Parks and Reserves

Transport

Walking Access Act 2008

Part of the solution to our transport problems both locally and regionally is to support alternative modes of travel. Providing necessary links and infrastructure so that people who are able to travel by means other than a private motor vehicle can do so easily is an important part of our role as a local Board. The Board has provided a submission supporting the amendments to the Walking Access Act 2008 accordingly.

Bike Tāmaki Drive

I am meeting periodically with Bike Tāmaki Drive representatives to discuss their ongoing safety issue concerns and long-term aspirations for better on and off-road cycling capabilities on Tāmaki Drive. Matt Cole – a key member of the Bike Tāmaki Drive group is meeting directly with senior Auckland Transport representatives, with outcomes from that meeting to be brought to me as Transport Lead where Local Board decision making and funding is concerned. One of the key concerns for the group is that significant investment in cycling infrastructure has been pushed out to 2028, and that significant regional funding is key to many of the solutions sought. In the mean-time there are maintenance issues and smaller scale projects that can be delivered through Local Transport capital funding but need to be considered alongside other potential extant projects such as reviewed safety improvements plans for Mission Bay and St Heliers. It is also essential that the Bike Tāmaki Drive works alongside and has the support of the Bike Auckland group to ensure that what they proposed is mandated.

Temple Street / Lucia Glade

Local residents of Lucia Glade, members of the Parish of Our Lady of Fatima - including their priest Father Sam and Mt Carmel school continue to take a keen interest in finding a solution to the periodic hazardous traffic situation at this street entry point accessing the school. A resident who runs the Neighbourhood watch group has already very helpfully canvassed the views of residents. That preliminary feedback and a map of suggested layout of improvements has been provided to me and two meeting have now taken place with interested parties. I have passed the residents’ comments and designs on to Auckland Transport’s engineers working on the plans for the projects falling within the ambit of the Community Safety Funding initiative. An assurance has been received that the aspirations of the people directly affected will be taken into consideration when drawing up the draft plans. Whilst there is a minority viewpoint being expressed that there is not a problem in the street needing addressing it is fair to say that at this stage there is good community buy in already for making safety improvements in this area, notwithstanding this may involve the loss of some on street parking.

Gowing Drive Safety Proposals

It is somewhat disappointing that after being promised installation of the Board funded driver feedback signs within weeks after the public meeting in February we are still waiting for them in Gowing Drive. Community expectation was that they would be delivered promptly and managing expectation would have been easier if Auckland Transport had signalled a more realistic timeframe for delivery in the first place. The Gowing Drive community are eager to see the progression of the additional safety measures proposed through to consultation phase, and are currently waiting, as is the Board on the revised plans to be finalised by Auckland Transport.

Auckland Transport “Megastars” Awards

The Walking School Bus / Travelwise programme involves 380 buses, 162 schools, 4254 children and 1550 volunteers. The people involved, including teachers within schools acting as Leads, do so as volunteers – helping get our children to and from school safely and easing congestion on the roads during peak hours. On 14th Auckland Transport held an awards event at Ellerslie Events Centre to recognise these admirable individuals. Together with fellow Board member Ros Rundle, I attended as an elected representative to honour these men and women. It was heartening to see a big turnout from our own Ōrākei Local Board area with finalists for awards in the Central Area category – Kirsten Beggs – Kohimarama School, Kath Manning - Meadowbank School, and category winner Kathleen Lonergan - St Mary’s School, Ellerslie.  

Ballarat St Extension

The potential use of this currently unformed paper road as a walking/cycling connection continues to be a matter of wide interest in the Ellerslie community.

Road Works in Remuera

The Remuera business community continue to be frustrated with the number and frequency of road works negatively affecting their custom. The issue appears to be a lack of forewarning and by simply issuing a warning that essential works are to be carried out will make it possible for business owners to plan accordingly. Member Ros Rundle has been working closely with the Remuera Business Association to ensure their concerns are communication clearly to Auckland Transport.

 Bus Idling St Heliers

Café patrons and restaurant owners and visitors are reporting continuing problems with idling buses outside the stops on Tāmaki Drive by the eatery precinct block. I understand there is a petition circulating in the community requesting Auckland Transport move the bus stops.

 Felton Matthew Intersection

After an initial flurry of activity works on the signalisation and safety improvements to the Felton Matthew / St Johns Rd intersection seem to have ground to a halt. There has been no activity on site now for approximately two weeks. The project was scheduled for completion by the end of June but to date there has been no explanation for the hold up.

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Parks & Reserves

Tahapa Reserve Links/ Playground

Local residents are expressing concern that the works in Tahapa Reserve on development of the playground and new tracks for connection to the Glen Innes to Tāmaki Shared Path have ground to a halt. I have advised them about the discovery of the shell midden and the need for the temporary halt while this is properly investigated.

Waiatarua Reserve Bins

A bin at the pedestrian entrance to the Waiatarua Reserve 71-73 Grand Drive seems to have mysteriously disappeared. Unfortunately, some park users used to the bin being there are simply dropping their full doggy poop bags on the ground where the bin used to be. I am checking the site on my regular walks and collecting the inappropriately dumped bags, but this is not a long-term solution. I have contacted Community Facilities about this and have been advised that the bin was not removed by Council contractors. I have requested it be replaced asap.

Community Clean up Ellerslie

On Saturday 29th June MP for Maungakeikei Denise Lee hosted a clean-up day in the Ellerslie Town Centre which I attended. It was attended by approximately 35 people. Local businesses Bakers’ Delight and Ellerslie Four Square sponsored the event. A positive sign was that there was a good deal less rubbish collected than last year’s event, hopefully a sign that people are becoming more conscious of the need to dispose of their litter in a responsible way.

Amplify Youth Forum

The Meadowbank Community Centre was filled with youthful energy and potential when the young people involved in the Ōrākei Local Board’s “Amplify” youth programme gathered for the first time. Sharing their ideas, concerns, and how they want to see our community shaped the attendees provided useful and much appreciated input on the day. It was a pleasure to attend and give a brief power point presentation explaining the Local Board’s place in the governance of Auckland, and what is we do within the parameters of our own Local Board area. One of the areas of concern for our young people is transport. They tend to be higher users proportionally of public transport, walk more and ride bikes/ scooters. Their input into our decision making around transport initiatives is important. A forum attendee, and potential leader of the Amplify group Isaac Mercer has expressed his interest in attending the Auckland Transport Working Groups for the Mission Bay and St Heliers safety improvement proposals and it is my view that the Board should support him in that. A resolution to that effect has been sought accordingly.

TEEF Update

After a fairly lengthy process, with input from a number of Forum members, the Tāmaki Estuary Environment Forum has officially adopted their term of reference which are attached. The Forum continues to run its clean up events, work towards establishing dialogue with the plastics industry, supporting the Nurdle project and strengthening relationships with other community groups.  One objective is to search out and collate any available data on the sediment level build up and / or changes in the Tāmaki waterways.  Identifying the problem is the first necessary step and once that is properly established by reliable evidence solutions to the problems adversely affecting the ecosystem and destroying the health of our flora and fauna can be sought.

Forum meetings continue to attract good attendance, and a healthy level of engagement from interested organizations and individuals.

Plastics Free July

A plastic bag dispensing unit that is no longer being stocked remains in Waiatarua Reserve. This unit, and any others in our Reserves should be removed. It is incumbent on all responsible dog owners that when they walk their dogs in public spaces they must ensure they take their own bags, preferably biodegradable ones, to remove any waste discharged from their pet. There is currently a practice in Waiatarua Reserve for people to tie unwanted plastic bags to the fences at entrances. Another popular place is at the duck pond after feeding. Although the sentiment behind this is good – people kindly offering their bags for use by others – what happens is that the bags get blown around, deteriorate, and just look tacky and unsightly. It is preferable that dog owners exercise self -responsibility and take their own bags rather than there be an expectation that there will be bags available at our Reserves.


 

Activities: 10th June – 7th July

Date                           Activities

10th June                    Bike Tāmaki Drive meeting

11th June                    Barfoot & Thompson Stadium update

11th June                    Auckland Transport meeting

11th June                    Informal meet with Meadowbank Chair & committee members

11th June                    Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Assoc meeting

12th June                    Health & Wellbeing expo – St Heliers Library

13th June                    Ōrākei Local Board workshop

14th June                    Auckland Transport “Megastars” event attendance

16th June                    Glover Park Memorial Rededication Ceremony attendance

17th June                    Agenda run through

18th June                    Ōrākei Visual Framework Presentation @ OLB

19th June                    Meeting with Stonefields Residents’ Assoc Chair & Committee member

19th June                    Ōrākei Visual Framework Presentation – Ngāti Whātua @OCC

20th June                    Ōrākei Local Board business meeting

23rd June                    Newmarket Stream “From the Deck” Planting Day attendance

23rd June                    Meeting with Lucia Glade residents and Fr Sam Our Lady of Fatima

23rd June                    Meeting with Ellerslie resident Glen McCabe – Ballarat St

25th June                    Auckland Transport meeting

26th June                    Staff update on OBC

27th June                    Chairing Tāmaki Estuary Environment Forum meeting

27th June                    OLB Workshop

28th June                    Presentation to Amplify Workshop

28th June                    Meeting with Matt Cole – Bike Tāmaki Drive

29th June                    Waiata Reserve Community Planting Day attendance

29th June                    Ellerslie Town Centre Clean up attendance

30th June                    Ngāti Whātua Planting Day – Pourewa Valley. Attendance as Chair FPV

                                    Friends of Pourewa Valley

4th July                       OLB Workshop

5th July                       Meeting Rewiri Love – Smiley Campaign     

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Tāmaki Estuary Environment Forum Terms of Reference

159

b

Tāmaki Estuary Environment Forum minutes

167

c

Photographs - June 2019

171

     

Signatory

Author

Carmel Claridge - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 8 July 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Board Member Report - Troy Churton

 

File No.: CP2019/12935

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since the last meeting.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board endorse the feedback on Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill (attachment B).

c)      That the Ōrākei Local Board withdraw its support for the proposed amendments to the special character overlay and delegate the planning portfolio lead Troy Churton and deputies David Wong and Colin Davis to submit an updated statement raising concerns about the proposed plan change.

d)      That the Ōrākei Local Board recommend the Governing Body withdraw delegated decision-making as to notification for the proposal at 1-3 Purewa Road, Meadowbank, and that the Governing Body makes that notification decision itself after hearing any further advocacy regarding the matter.

e)      That the Ōrākei Local Board recommends to the Minister for the Environment that the Resource Management Act be reviewed to reintroduce greater powers for local councils to impose tree protection controls.

 

Portfolio Lead: Resource Consenting and Regulatory

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Heritage; Environment

Resource Consenting and Regulatory

Kaiinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill:

2.       The Ōrākei Local Board was asked to provide feedback on the Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill. The deadline to be appended to the Auckland Council submission was on 9 July 2019, with submissions closing on 11 July 2019.

3.       The Bill establishes Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities as a new Crown entity bringing together Housing New Zealand Corporation (HNZC), HLC (Homes. Land. Community.) and the KiwiBuild Unit of the Ministry for Housing and Urban Development.

4.       The intention is that the Bill will come into force on 1 October 2019.

5.       The Bill is the first of two pieces of legislation applying to the new entity. A further Bill is expected in the third quarter of this year which will sets out the powers that Kāinga Ora-Homes and Communities can assume to enable it to undertake urban development in specified development areas.

6.       I have suggested our feedback raises concern at the current Bill leaving a number of the new entity’s powers to be determined in a later Bill.

Proposed Plan Change integrating special character overlay

7.       Consultation with the public is currently happening on the Proposed Plan Change integrating special character overlay.

8.       Previously the Ōrākei Local Board took advice from staff and reached the following conclusions:

Overall the proposed plan change will enable amendments to the special character overlay to be read in conjunction with the plan itself in a way that brings consistency for planning assessments across all special character overlay areas.

Having discussed the proposed character overlay amendments with planning staff, we are satisfied that the changes will enable more thorough assessments by processing planners and do not believe the special character overlay areas of our Ward will be prejudiced by the changes.

Regarding proposals to delete rear yard requirements, we believe rear yard minimums should be preserved and not deleted. The intent of the overlay is greater than streetscape character protection. For some established character areas in our ward, retaining a rear yard minimum ensures ongoing residential amenity, spatial integrity between built forms, a stronger sense of sight line and visual permeability - all of which are common features of character development in many established residential areas of our Ward.

Regarding fencing height, we reiterate the above saying the maximum heights for fencing from a house to the rear yard should be retained at a 1.8m maximum not 2m.

9.       However, since that advice I have received information from Remuera Heritage, referring to Devonport and Grey Lynn Resident Group analysis – leads me to strongly believe the Board was not adequately briefed and there is actually a contrary understanding that the proposed plan change will actually NOT assist retention of character in single house zones.

10.     For example, - in Single House Zone areas that have a Special Character Areas Overlay in place, the rules for the Special Character Areas Overlay will REPLACE the rules in the underlying Single House Zone. In other words, the heritage protection (i.e. Special Character Areas Overlay) will not place additional restrictions on the underlying zone, it will REPLACE the rules for the underlying zone

11.     Bizarrely, the overlay rules are actually MORE PERMISSIVE in some cases. Yes, the heritage rules are more developer-friendly than the underlying Single House Zone rules!

12.     For example, the Special Character Areas overlay rules allow for a “larger building envelope” (e.g. a bigger extension in your neighbour’s backyard) among other things.

13.     Also, the council does not have to consider the effects on neighbours, which it does under the Single House Zone rules. The council has to consider the effects on the streetscape and character of the area, but not the neighbours

14.     For example - in relation to height to boundary: The Single House Zone limit is 2.5m +45 degrees.

15.     The limit in the Single House Zone with Special Character Areas Overlay is 3m +45 degrees (for houses with <15m front boundary, which is most villas).

16.     Council wants the more generous limit of 3m +45 degrees to apply in heritage areas. This means that in a heritage zone a developer can build 3m high adjacent to your boundary. In a non-heritage zone, they can only go to 2.5m.

https://www.greylynnresidents.org.nz/grey-lynn-heritage-zone-rule-change-wanted-by-auckland-council/

http://www.devonportheritage.net/news

17.     Accordingly, I have proposed changes to our statement to include the content in paragraphs 9 – 15 above.

79 College Road – St Johns

18.     This is a significant development to infill ex golf course land in St Johns, and I have liaised with local resident association members and staff about the following:

19.     I have read the AEE and some of the supporting report documents. Despite the pre-lodgement meetings and resulting (usual it seems across planner AEEs) rhetoric that effects are "less than minor", I strongly disagree that the actual or potential effects will be 'less than minor' given this irregular shaped land and its particular sandwiched location.

20.     Overall my strong view is this development should be publicly notified using Councils' general discretion under the RMA, or to use special circumstances provisions to do so.

21.     Ingress and egress for the new 81 detached, two and three storied, residential unit development is proposed to be absorbed through installing 4 driveway points ( see page 16 of the AEE)  for a bulk of the development along with 17 new vehicle crossings  (as described page 17 AEE and Appendix 8) along the already narrow 'Donnelly Street', a laneway type of street that I observe to be often parked out from the existing level of residential development along it.

22.     I do not agree with the optimism of the planner or the Traffic Assessment report regarding general manoeuvrability, ease of access for rubbish collections and other larger trucks etc given the intensity and design. The adverse effects will be more than minor. I think it is predicable also that many private residents will not use the double garaging or garaging in their units all the time or at all, a trait seen in many other intensive development sites where movement areas have been designed to facilitate tightly squeezed building intensity. Planners often refer to this effect as something that can be "absorbed by the surrounding road network". In my view there is no surrounding absorbing capability for this location and the effects cannot be mitigated without significant design changes.

23.     The potential effects for traffic congestion, parking conflict, pedestrian safety risk and safety at Ngahue Drive are all, in my view, far more than minor. (refer to Attachment A: Figure 2).

24.     Considerable visual and lighting effects will impact in ways more than minor on existing residents of Donnelly Street to the south and slightly lower down, for example, given the three-storied wall of development proposed as follows (refer to Attachment A: Block 6: Lots 51-61 insertion).

25.     The inconsistent evolution of advice as to the status of a stream through the site (para 3.1.2 AEE) is concerning, and the proposal to fill the gully of the site to enable more development in that context must be considered in conjunction with the bulk earthworks proposed AND the proposal to divert overland flow path. I note also that the owner of 29 Donnelly Street is directly affected by the potential to require its property for doing stormwater extension work. The potential effects on that owner justify limited notification in any event.

26.     There are several infringements of height and height in relation to boundary that concern. For example, more than 50 per cent of roof area of the development for units 60-62, 75, 76, 78-80 will exceed height standards by more than 1m. These are, cumulatively, more than minor and therefore a significant infringement that can be mitigated by less intensive design.

27.     Another standards area also pushing the envelope as to what is expected from the more generous UP. Impervious area infringes by around 5 per cent, landscaped area requirements are breached by around 5 per cent, outlook spaces are breached - all these matters raise concern.  However, it is more concerning that the applicant suggests that its inability to meet the standards for a National Environmental Standard - NES (in this case relating to contamination and preventing adverse effects on human health and the environment) are s not mentioned as a minor matter or not. The site is known for traces of heavy metal above the background levels anticipated (see para 5.3.11).

28.     The reality, in my view, is this sort of inability to fulfil the expectations of a NES means the proposal likely generates effects that are more than minor - and along with other matters identified above, justifies notification. I disagree with the conclusion offered by the planner and team of applicant reporters that the adverse effects will be no more than minor.

Westbourne Road, Remuera

29.     Proposal to demolish home at 10 Westbourne Road, Remuera - in character area – suggested notification and liaised with Remuera Heritage including the following insights passed to planners:

The most notable feature of the AEE Report is that it fails to mention that there is a scheduled property directly opposite 10 Westbourne Road. 11A Westbourne Road (owned by Christopher Parr) is on the historic heritage list of Auckland Council (No.2774) and Heritage New Zealand (2632) since 1981. https://www.heritage.org.nz/the-list/details/2632

Also, it fails to mention that 12 Westbourne Road is a vacant section where a house was demolished even though it was covered by a pre-1940 demolition control, so it is unknown what effect there will be on any new development.

No. 10 Westbourne Road has close proximity to Nos. 4, 6, 11, 11A, 14 and 18, all of which contribute significantly to the special character of the street.

The new building at no. 10 should better respect and contribute to that character and the objectives for that SCA-R overlay and the Single House Zone.  The proposed house appears to have a large rear and side development which will add visual bulk that will detract from the heritage and special character features of the area.

The AEE says the new dwelling “requires an average setback of 6705mm based on adjacent properties. The proposed dwelling infringes this setback as depicted on Sheet 02/07 = Restricted Discretionary Activity. “Sheet 02/07 is not included, and the actual infringement is not stated.

The AEE Report says - In determining the effects of an application under the Resource Management Act 1991 pursuant to Sections 95A to 95F, for consent to be considered on a non-notified basis, Council must conclude that the effects on the environment are no more than minor, that there are no special circumstances that warrant notification and that the written approval of any person deemed affected by the proposal, if ultimately considered to be affected, has given their written approval.

The AEE report says it will not detract from the special character of the area. However, the AEE report fails to mention the Historic Heritage listed property at 11A Westbourne Rd. This listing is a special circumstance which requires notification to at least all neighbours, if not the wider community.

12 Abbotts Way, Remuera

30.     Major development on one of the last very large undeveloped pieces of land in the area. We have suggested notification to planners – and the scope of what is proposed is far greater than historical indications, and some of our liaison with planners included:

This large undeveloped land holding has been ear-marked for development for many years and some of that history is reflected in the AEE. Previous proposals were for development half as intense as what is now proposed.

Overall this is a non-complying activity and it is my strong view that it is preferable to publicly notify the matter using general discretion under the RMA, or to use the 'special circumstances' provisions to do so.

31.     The site is mostly non-visible from the surrounding road networks. The surrounding residential area is intensively filled. However, the potential visual effects of the infill will be visible from parts of the surrounding street network and reserve and create more than minor character effects.

32.     The particular type of terrace housing will also be very different from the existing dominant pattern of housing around it and we disagree with the AEE (page 9) where it suggests this sort of development is "anticipated ". Intensity is anticipated - yes. This character or design for that intensity in this area however is not anticipated and clearly breaks dominant residential character.

33.     The site is bordered by very busy traffic networks: Ladies Mile and Abbots Way.

34.     A 53-lot development with 55 lots in total inclusive of 2 future development lots is a significant development. Staged development is proposed and generates cumulative effects that may be more than minor.

35.     The creation of a new road and effects on Abbotts Way are more than minor and will impact on users of the area and residents.

36.     Proposals for stormwater and connectivity to existing manhole infrastructure in Koraha reserve also potential effect surrounding properties and users in ways that are more than minor.

37.     The Koraha Reserve's downstream stormwater reticulation is already almost full given existing development in the area. The effects of this proposal will therefore be more than minor on stormwater reticulation.

Loss of quality street berm Puriri tree

38.     This is a quality public tree outside 97 Meadowbank Road – Planners have disagreed, and the duty commissioner has allowed this tree to be felled without notification.

39.     The Council arborist also clearly was not supportive of losing the tree and I supported that view. Mitigation planting is not an adequate option to fulfil the amenity value of this tree in its form as it is, of substantial street character and public interest, anytime in the next 30 years.

40.     This private owner could concede to other options, could concede to a design utilising the good available access it currently has without prejudicial restrictions on its use of its private property.

41.     The owner has chosen a design for its private property that required a closer assessment of the public space and the access issues.

42.     From what I saw the property had ample potential to merge its driveway with the existing one at 95 and shared 93 Meadowbank Road, making one single albeit wider driveway across the public space for serving adjacent properties in order to get driveway access on the south side with potential to retain the very attractive and maturing tree.

43.     The interests of the wider community and environment in retaining the tree were, in my view, greater reasons to notify this matter than the private owner’s unique land holding design aspirations to have the tree felled. The AEE said removal is proposed because of the proposed new vehicle crossing design on the south side of the property.

44.     Generally, OLB indicates that there is greater opportunity for development under the UP and applicants can design to meet standards more robustly, especially those relating to height.

45.     This is a very poor result for the local environment in my view and reiterates the need to amend the RMA to Councils can reinstate tree protection rules to help restore balance in development applications and help preserve public amenity values.

50 Selwyn Ave, Mission Bay

46.     This significant 14 unit 2- 3 storey development has height infringements. The concern is that many similar applications also have infringements and that the process planners, because of individual assessment, are allowing a cumulative adverse effect of infringing activity that is contrary to the generous standards in the UP.

47.     The surrounding area is low-intensity development mostly and this development in a block formation will have a strong bulk and dominance effect. The site is  flat yet the developer wishes to choose to infringe the generous UP height standards, mostly from rook design as far as I can ascertain.

48.     I disagreed with the AEE at para 6.1.4 where it suggests this proposal is a "slight change" from existing character. It is a dramatic change. Half the onsite parks are minimum space designs. The scope for negative effects on the surrounding roadway from overflow parking and service vehicle visits are more than minor. Delivery trucks will need to reverse into the street for example.

49.     While much of the proposal is complying, or arguably a restricted discretionary activity, we suggest at least limited notification or wider notification per s95B or D of the RMA. (Refer to Attachment A Figure 7: Tracking curves for medium-rigid/refuse trucks).

Development at 1- 3 Purewa Road, beside Ōrākei Basin

50.     This application’s notification status continues to be unresolved despite several months of further information gathering by the processing planner, and my ongoing scrutiny. His latest response states:

There has been a last-minute detail change, with information being worked through currently. However, I am hoping that information will be completed in the next couple of days.  From there looking to have information to the team leader and onto duty commissioner for a decision on notification in the next week.

51.     In recent emails the processing planner has indicated sending the notification matter he is meant to determine to a duty commissioner. These duplicates cost.

52.     This protocol of using a duty commissioner is usually only used when the planner disagrees with Board comment urging notification.

53.     I have asked the planner to clarify whether they are recommending that this be non-notified and should know at the time this report is being collated into the Agenda.

54.     If that is the case, such is the strong weight of information showing existing and potential adversity from the proposal, I will with councillor and board support, may look to seek GB takes back the delegation for deciding from planners on this matter.

55.     The planner's most recent note states they are working on a notification determination, hence the referral to a duty commissioner would not be necessary if he shared the OLB view.

56.     Overall, Council delegates decision-making authority for these matters to processing planners. Where Board reps and those planners disagree on a notification issue, the agreed protocol in that instance is to refer the matter to a duty commissioner.

57.     In almost all cases in my experience duty commissioners side with processing planners and there have been a few cases where affected parties have won judicial review against a decision to non-notify. 

58.     David, Colin and I have met with planning management on a few occasions regarding this protocol to use duty commissioners in conflict situations and understand that management prefers the use of duty commissioner determination to be reduced to save money.

59.     Overall, very few proposals come to OLB for comment and we do not accept there is a funding issue in our trying to assert a need for notification, or where we think Council can rightly exercise discretion to notify itself and not leave that to processing planners.

60.     For this matter, I do not have confidence in the matter being sent to a duty commissioner as the processing planner indicates. If the process planner cannot clarify a determination recommending notification, we believe Council should retain final decision-making as to notification for this particular proposal.

Donnelly Street, St Johns

61.     Attached to this report is a copy of a petition provided to me to present to Auckland Council Building and Consent staff on behalf of Donnelly Street residents regarding their concerns about a resource consent for a proposed 81-unit development on Donnelly Street.

Other matters:

62.     Feedback and / or portfolio meetings as to notification and effects regarding various other applications such as:

·   43 Hopkins Crescent, Kohimarama height infringements

·   Kohimarama Yacht Club proposals

·   2 Ronaki Road, Mission Bay

63.     Attending various community group meetings and events such as Meadowbank SJ Association, Waiata Reserve Planting day etc.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Supporting diagrams

183

b

Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities OLB submission

187

c

Petition: Donnelly Street, St Johns

189

     

Signatory

Author

Troy Churton - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 8 July 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Board Member Report - Colin Davis

File No.: CP2019/12929

 

  

 

Purpose

To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since last reported.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the unnamed local reserve at Whakatakataka Bay, Ngapipi Road, Ōrākei, be named Whakatakataka Reserve in accordance with the Board’s Parks and Reserves, Parks Features and Parks Facilities Naming Policy and Guidelines, and that signage be erected accordingly.

 

Portfolio Lead:  Parks and Reserves (joint); Arts and Libraries; Heritage

Alternate portfolio holder: Environment; Resource Consenting and Regulatory

Other - internal appointments: Mayor’s WWI Memorial Advisory Group; Quality Advice Political Advisory Group

Other - appointments to external community organisations: Stonefields Residents Association Inc. (Lead); St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association Inc. (Alternate); Auckland Netball Centre Inc. (Lead); Friends of Churchill Park (Lead); Ōrākei Basin Advisory Group (joint parks portfolio holder); St Heliers Bay Village Association (Alternate); Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee (Alternate).

Heritage

(1)     Tāmaki Drive Searchlights

I am pleased to report that the restoration project on all three emplacements has been completed. The handover by the project team to the Council’s maintenance team took place on-site on 28 June. The three emplacements look amazing and the finished project has received many positive comments. Congratulations to the project team.

 

Each of the emplacements is different with different types of shutters in keeping with those originally on them to protect the emplacements from inclement weather and to keep out rough sleepers. No. 1 has had new steel shutters of the type previously used (the originals had been missing for many years), and a new steel door installed. On no.3, the only emplacement which retained a lot of its original features, the restored steel folding shutters and a new steel door have been installed. On no. 2 the perforated artwork on new panels, showing an image of a soldier operating one of the searchlights from WWII, and a new steel door, have been installed. The art work has also drawn particular positive interest. All emplacements will have anti-graffiti treatment applied.

 

Working with Auckland Transport, it is intended to angle the existing lamps attached to the power poles, slightly sideways to caste light across the shutters of the emplacements to illuminate them at night to dramatic effect. These lights were originally donated by Mercury Energy for its centenary to light up the cliff face. Unfortunately, Auckland Transport was not able to do this before the scaffolding was removed from the emplacements.

Photographs are attached.

(2)     Heritage Plaques, Mission Bay

It is a mystery to me that while the significant above-mentioned complex heritage project was able to be completed within the estimated time, the two small plaques at the Millennium Bridge, Mission Bay, have not yet been installed. I am hoping they will be in the near future.

It is also important that the floor of the bridge is regularly cleaned to highlight the art work embedded in it, the meaning of which is recorded on one of the plaques.

(3)     Glover Road War Memorial Re-dedication

The successful free public ceremony to re-dedicate the avenue of 63 titoki trees originally planted in November 1953 in memory of those men from the local district who died in World Wars One and Two was held on Sunday 16 June at 11.30am. Wreaths were laid at the two original refurbished plaques. As well as specific invitations, a general invitation was extended to nearby residents by letter drop. Successors and family members of those in the original official party attended. Retired Anglican Bishop Rt. Rev. Peter Atkins recounted the special meaning the titoki tree has and how appropriate the titoki was chosen to be the remembrance tree. The trumpeter and piper were secondary school students and the principal speaker was the winner of the Board’s inaugural ANZAC Youth Public Speaking Award. The President of the Auckland RSA pledged on behalf of the Fields of Remembrance Trust a gift of 63 crosses for this Memorial.

Photographs are attached.

(4)     The Crimean War Trophy Gun

The Board has the responsibility for the Auckland Council-owned Crimean War trophy gun, presently in storage, and which had been put on display near the Royal Akarana Yacht Club’s premises. Originally manufactured in 1817 this rare heritage gun was captured at Sevastopol, Ukraine, following the Crimean War, in 1856. The markings on the gun makes it the oldest of the 10 guns sent to New Zealand and Australia. It and a near identical gun were gifted by the British Government to the Auckland Provincial Council in 1857 and were installed in Albert Park where they remained for many years before being eventually re-sited at Okahu Bay, in the care of the Royal Akarana Yacht Club. Exposure to the salt air on the ferrous metal caused some deterioration to the guns and 1979 the Army restored them. With the agreement of the Council one of the guns was given to the National Army Museum at Waiouru. The remaining gun was returned to The Landing and displayed outside the Club’s premises, until removed into storage while the Club’s new premises were constructed.

With the completion of the Club’s premises, it is appropriate for the Board to consider where the gun should be sited: either at The Landing or at another suitable location. Board Chairman Parkinson and I have been exploring suitable sites and will report further.

Parks and Reserves

Naming

At the Board’s business meeting on 18 October 2018, I recommended and the Board adopted this resolution: That the process be started for the naming of the unnamed local reserve at Whakatakataka Bay, Ngapipi Road, Ōrākei, in accordance with the Board’s Parks and Reserves, Parks Features and Parks Facilities Naming Policy and Guidelines, with the suggestion that it be named Whakatakataka Reserve.   

There is now some urgency to name this reserve given that the reserve is being positively considered as part of Stage 4 of the Glen Innes-Tāmaki Drive Shared Path.

This property is not part of the Ngapipi Reserve and was owned by Watercare before being transferred to the Auckland Council.

The name Whakatakataka Reserve was supported by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei kaumatua at the recent regular hui that Board members have with them. 

The Policy and Guidelines state that the appropriate staff team will report to the Board in a timely manner and that new parks will be named within twelve months of acquisition. Nearly nine months have elapsed since the resolution was passed and there has been no officer report. The Policy and Guidelines also state and that the final decision regarding the name rests with the Ōrākei Local Board.

Activities (since 9 June 2019)

As well as assisting with a range of citizens’ enquiries, attending meetings, and involvement with other community activities, I have also attended the following to date:

10 June a meeting of the Auckland Library Heritage Trust, of which I am Chairman.

10 June a meeting of the St Heliers Village Association.

11 June the transport portfolio briefing.

11 June a briefing on the proposed redevelopment of the Eastcliffe Retirement Village.

13 June the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

14 June the opening of the new Ōrākei Basin walkway, another milestone in implementing the Ōrākei Basin Management Plan.

16 June the re-dedication of the Glover Road War Memorial.

17 June a meeting with the Chairman regarding the agenda for the Board’s business meeting.

17 June a briefing for Board members and representatives of the Remuera Business and the Residents Associations, by Auckland Transport and Panuku Development Auckland regarding the future of the Clonbern Carpark site.

17 June a meeting of the St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association.

18 June the regular hui with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei kaumatua to discuss matters of mutual interest.

18 June a briefing on the forthcoming NACRA international yachting event to be held from The Landing.

18 June the Auckland Netball Association’s Board meeting.

19 June the on-site searchlight emplacements restoration progress meeting.

19 June the official Council farewell for George Farrant, a nationally recognised heritage expert, fittingly at the Civic theatre.

19 June the public meeting organised jointly by the St Heliers Village Association and the St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association at which the Mayor was the guest speaker.

20 June a briefing on progress of planning for the Glen Innes-Tāmaki Drive Shared Path.

20 June the Ōrākei Local Board business meeting.

25 June the transport portfolio briefing.

27 June the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

27 June the viewing of the two refurbished boats owned by TS Achilles, towards which work the Board gave a grant.  

28 June the handover of the searchlights project to Council’s maintenance staff.

28 June a meeting of local representatives regarding Auckland Transport’s proposals for St Heliers.

1 July a meeting of the St Heliers Village Association.

3 July a talk at the Auckland Central Library.

4 July editing with staff for the second edition, the book: Heritage Sites of Significance and Public Artwork in the Ōrākei Local Board Area.

4 July the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

 


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Photographs

197

     

Signatory

Author

Colin Davis – Member, Ōrākei Local Board of the Auckland Council

Date: 9 June 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – Toni Millar

File No.: CP2019/12925

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendation

a)      That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead: Environment

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Arts and Libraries; Transport (Joint)

Activities

6 June                         OLB Workshop

                                    OLB Extra-Ordinary Business Meeting to adopt Annual Budget 2019/2020

10 June                       OLB update maintenance

11 June                       OLB update Barfoot & Thompson Stadium

                                    OLB update Transport

                                    PLB Placeholder meeting

13 June                       OLB Workshop

14 June                       Opening Ōrākei Basin Walkway

                                    Mega Stars Dinner for Walking School Bus Volunteers & Travelwise Lead Teachers at Ellerslie Event Centre

16 June                       Glover Road War Memorial Re-dedication

17 June                       OLB meeting AT/Panuku/Remuera Business Assoc & Remuera Resident’s Assoc

                                    St Heliers/Glendowie Resident’s Assoc Meeting – St Heliers Community Centre

19 June                       Meeting with Mayor Phil Goff – organised by St Heliers Business Assoc and St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Assoc.

20 June                       OLB Business Meeting – St Chads

27 June                       OLB Workshop

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatory

Author

Toni Millar – Local Board Member

Date: 8 July  2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – Ros Rundle

File No.: CP2019/12968

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board request Auckland Transport to provide via their Road Works and Disruptions Schedule which is published on a weekly basis to include all road works.  Specifically referring to service contractor work e.g. Vector, Chorus, Gas works, watercare etc

 

Portfolio Lead: Economic Development

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Community; Transport (Joint)

Economic Development

St Heliers Business Association

Update from St Heliers business association

On-going consultation with Auckland Transport regarding the Safety Improvements.  A working group has been set up and is meeting regularly.

Promotions in St Heliers

1.      Elemental is Auckland’s new winter festival.  Celebrating Auckland’s energy and vibrancy through light, cuisine, culture and entertainment for the month of July.

St Heliers is promoting “Fire by the sea”, on 19th of July Fire performers will be in St Heliers from 6.30pm through to 9.30pm. This is live on social media and now featured in the Elemental website from ATEED.

La Fourchette, Annabelles, Moretons all have designed a meal for the month of July that capitulates the elements of either, fire, earth, water or air.

2.      Be in to win competition.  Each $25.00 spend customer to receive a unique code to enter the competition.  Sponsored by Bayleys and House of travel

3.      Secret life of pets: Great library events to tie in with this, fun prizes.

Change of Police:

Todd Martin, the local constable has now moved to the Police Harm Prevention Group, new constable taking over and will be based in Newmarket.

Remuera Business Association

Update from Remuera Business Association

Roadwork and Changes

AT still not reopening Clonbern Carpark.  Petition and cross street banner implemented for media campaign. Petition gained 5,000 in store and online signatures so far.

AT holding Board meeting on 11th June 2019.  Since the RBA meeting the outcome from the AT Board meeting is noted below.

“The outcome from the AT Board meeting held on 11 June is that the car park will not be removed from council control.  The transfer to Panuku is on the condition that any development includes the provision of 200 car parks (20 more than what currently exists.)  Panuku will work closely with AT through the transfer process.  Once transferred, Panuku will draft a development strategy which will determine how to best release value for Council and the ratepayer while retaining the public carpark needs.  The development strategy will also focus on quality design and outcome for the centre.”

Roadworks are usually notified through the AT maintenance schedule unfortunately some service contractors do not apply for approval to AT and therefore these works do not appear on the AT maintenance schedule.  This usually means that local businesses are unaware of works going on outside their businesses.  Often this mean loss of car parks for an undetermined length of time and adds more stress on our local businesses and ultimately loss of business.

Mission Bay Business Association

Auckland Transport update for Mission Bay

Pedestrian safety consultation with Auckland Transport had previously informed us that they will infill the gaps in the streetscape roadside garden strips with larger plants when the rain starts, still waiting for this to happen.

Mission Bay town centre safety improvements.  The working group has been convened consisting of a representative of the MBBA, the MBKRA and the OLB as well as the local councillor for Orākei and AT representatives. The first meeting was held in May. Minutes and terms of reference were circulated by AT and the MBBA have replied with suggested changes to both.  

Orākei Local Board Update:  Asset Upgrades -  The toilet/changing rooms will be replaced rather than renovated and funds have been allocated from the 19/20 budget. The playground will undergo a large upgrade during the same financial year.

Received funding for the clock tower lighting and also for the ongoing safer cities connection and associated costs. The photo frame was not approved however there is still an opportunity to engage with the board on this. Deco Lights are arranging a meeting with AT to discuss the clock tower lighting.

General • Pigeons are an issue in Mission Bay. Follow up with the council pest control officer as part of an overall programme to eradicate pests in Mission Bay. 

Community

Megastars Awards Night 2019

Attended a special awards ceremony to recognise all our amazing Walking School Bus volunteers and Travelwise Lead Teachers across Auckland.  Four of our local schools were finalists, Kirsten Beggs from Kohimarama School, Cathy Preston from St Heliers School and Kath Manning from Meadowbank School and Chaehee Park from Churchill Park.  Congratulations to all the finalists, you are amazing.

Orākei Youth Leadership 

Friday 28 June 2019 at the Meadowbank Community Centre, a group of young people attended “Amplify”. 

Youth wanting to make a difference in our community met for a morning of networking, were inspired by young speakers and attended workshops during the morning.  Great that our youth are given a platform to hear their ideas to make a difference for the future.

Eastern Bays Network Meeting update from some members of the group:

Men’s Shed – advised they have 150 members.  Have made 1500 rat traps to date

Kohimarama Bowling Club – Indoor bowls being played at present and taking bookings for the hall as a venue

Pauline from Meadowbank Community Centre advised that there is a core group of hirers using the centre which include special interest groups offering art classes, tai chi,  yoga and more.

There is a youth leadership event called “Amplify” to take place on 28 June.

Chloe from Fire Emergency advised that they are doing presentations for elderly and lower socio groups regarding the importance of smoke alarms.

Tess from CAB continuing with the draft copy of Venues Booklet for the Orākei Local Board area.

Joanne from St Heliers Library advised that they are organising Win with Words – creative writing for Years 7 and 8.

Aunty Margaret demonstrated Maori Tai Chi

Sue from Remuera Library advised that she is also organising Win with words for Year 7 and 8.

 30 students attended a creative writing workshop to assist them with their essays for the competition.

The library has talks on the first Tuesday of the month.  Talk in July is being presented by Greg Murray on the Silver backed gorillas in Uganda.

Members of staff assist members from the Orākei Marae with technology and phone queries.

David Blakey from Ellerslie Theatrical Society advised that One Act plays are coming back to the theatre in August.  He advised that they have local play wrights, and they are using new talent in the areas of directors, lighting designers and sound designers.

Geoff Andrews from Auckland Community Accounting is offering a free accounting service for clubs societies and not for profit organisations, where treasurers and other board members of small to medium community groups can bring queries to trained accounting students under the supervision of a Chartered Accountant.  Queries can include assistance with understanding the treasurer’s role, help with completing annual returns or difficulty working with accounting software etc.

Emma from Kelly Tarlton advised that they had a successful clean up on Hatfields Beach last month.  There is an a plastic free Orākei event starting again on 10 July.

Anne Cave from Selwyn Community Education are having a full day of learning about India, history, food and culture.

Activities: As well as answering many queries from our community I attended the following:

1 – 30 June 2019

Date                           Activities

June                            description

4                                  Attended Mission Bay Business Association

5                                  Attended the Orākei Local Board Volunteers Awards evening

6                                  Attended update for Stonefields Community Centre

                                    Attended Orākei Local Board workshop

                                    Attended an extra-ordinary OLB meeting

7                                  Attended the Crazy for You Play at Selwyn College

10                                Attended St Heliers Village Association meeting

11                                Attended Remuera Business Association meeting

                                    Attended presentation update by Barfoot and Thompson Stadium

                                    Attended Auckland Transport update

                                    Attended the update for Eastcliffe Retirement Village from Ngāti Whātua

13                                Attended the Orākei Community Association meeting

14                        Attended the Orākei Basin Walkway opening with the OLB members

                            Attended the Walking Bus Awards “Megastars” presentation

18                        Attended presentation from ATEED on the NACRA series at the Landing in December

                            Attended the Auckland Netball Board meeting

19                        Attended a presentation from Ngāti Whātua regarding the Framework for the Vision for the Whenua Rangatira and Pourewa

                            Attended the meeting with the Mayor of Auckland Phil Goff organised by the St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association and the St Heliers Village Association

20                        Attended the Business Meeting for Orākei Local Board

21                        Attended an International dinner organised by the St Heliers Centre

26                        Attended the Eastern Bays Network hosted by Ngāti Whātua

                            Attended an update on the OBC by Council officers

27                        Attended a Learn about Medicinal Plants at Tahuna Torea Reserve

                            Attended the OLB weekly workshop meeting

28                        Attended ‘Amplify’ a Youth Leadership initiative by the OLB

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Photo Gallery - June 2019

207

     

Signatory

Author

Ros Rundle - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date:  5 July 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – David Wong

File No.: CP2019/12985

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report is received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board note the feedback provided to Council planners on the following developments:

i)        18 Allum Street

ii)       14 Keith Avenue

iii)      Kohimarama Yacht Club – boat storage and ramp.

 

Portfolio Lead: Community

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Economic Development; Events, Landowner Approvals and Leases; Resource Consenting and Regulatory (Joint)

Community (& Youth)

2.       Barfoot and Thompson Stadium Board meeting – discussion on Selwyn College/Ministry of Education deed of lease to ECCT;

3.       Key impact of the new lease is a clause requiring the lessee to remove the building and any capital works – no later than the expiry date. The Board is seeking legal advice from Kensington Swan to establish a more equitable lease term.

4.       Roofing upgrades and funding applications continue to be sought; including funds for new van.

5.       Meeting with planners re- a resource consent for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Rawa Limited

6.       Debrief on Barfoot and Thompson Stadium /council funding requisite update (Brian Thomlinson – General Manager)– conference call; 11 June – key issues: challenges of balancing college and community availability of the stadium; the need for major events to provide adequate revenue sources; and ongoing major maintenance of the venue including roof repairs

7.       Ōrākei Basin Walkway opening

8.       Ellerslie Residents Association – 17 June; covered discussion on the Ladies Mile cycle way removal. The ERA refuted the AT response – AT did not support the removal based on lack of crash data for cyclists. ERA welcomed further investigation by AT on the Ballarat Paper Road and access requirements. ERA were planning a candidates and mayoralty public meeting ahead of the October elections.

9.       Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association – discussion on the Mission Bay Shopping complex development with the public hearings due on 30 July – 6 August 2019. MBKRA will engage a planning lawyer and planner to formalise their submission. Continued discussion on the potential usage of the Mission Bay Bowling club and availability back to the community. Refer Panuku response – Attachment A.

Events

10.     Glover Park Memorial Trees opening; with Members Davis, Parkinson and Claridge

11.     Mayor Phil Goff public meeting with St Heliers Bay Residents Association. Key discussion focussed on the St Heliers business village pedestrian crossing and loss of parking – and the intention to defer any further work. Strong opposition coming from residents on the Freedom Camping bylaw; and the need to ensure accountability of CCO’s.

12.     Attendance at Amplify Youth forum – an opportunity to outline leadership and community awareness across various colleges including Selwyn, Glendowie.

Resource Consenting and Regulatory

13.     Outboard Boating Club conference call – update on the latest discussion of Council staff and OBC; and the continued impasse over the fencing arrangements. Options of layout in terms of reserve land and OBC land for access and car turning manoeuvrability were proposed. Key outcome was to firstly remove the fence and start to negotiate on options of accessibility for the public to the OBC ramps and reserve.

14.     Clonbern Road carpark debrief – Panuku and Remuera Residents Association

15.     Planning and consenting feedback provided on the following developments:

·   18 Allum Street; Attachment B

·   14 Keith Avenue; Attachment C

·   Kohimarama Yacht Club; Attachment D

16.     Completion of OLB feedback on 12 Waimarie Street (Oceania Retirement Village) with Member Davis –proposal to present on behalf of OLB feedback on 22 July

Activities: 9 June 2019 -  6 July 2019

Date

Activities

11 June 2019

·         Barfoot and Thompson Stadium – community /council funding update

·         Meeting with planners re- a resource consent for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Rawa Limited

13 June 2019

·         OLB workshop

14 June 2019

·         Orakei Basin walkway opening with all members of OLB and Ngati Whatua Orakei

16 June 2019

·         Glover Park Memorial trees – official opening

17 June 2019

·         Clonbern Road carpark– Panuku/Remuera Residents Association debrief

19 June 2019

·         Phil Goff public meeting – St Heliers Residents Association – in attendance with Members Davis and Rundle

20 June 2019

·         OLB Business meeting

25 June 2019

·         Barfoot and Thompson Stadium meeting

26 June 2019

·         OBC leasing/license to occupy debrief - Council Parks, Sports and Reserve

27 June 2019

·         OLB workshop

28 June 2019

·         Amplify Youth Forum – Meadowbank Community Centre; attendance

with Members Parkinson, Claridge and Rundle

2 July 2019

·         Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association

4 July 2019

·         OLB workshop

 


 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Panuku Response - Mission Bay Bowling Club

213

b

Ōrākei Local Board Feedback - 18 Allum Street

215

c

Ōrākei Local Board Feedback - 14 Keith Avenue

223

d

Ōrākei Local Board Feedback - Kohimarama Yacht Club

227

e

Photos - July 2019

231

     

 

Signatory

Author

David Wong - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 6 July 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/06452

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Ōrākei Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Ōrākei Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the draft governance forward work calendar as at July 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - July 2019

235

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings

File No.: CP2019/13008

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Board workshops are an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be, and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

3.       Attached are copies of the Ōrākei Local Board workshop records taken during workshops held on 6, 13 and 27 June 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board records for the workshops held on 6, 13 and 27 June 2019 be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop proceedings - 6 June 2019

241

b

Workshop proceedings - 13 June 2019

245

c

Workshop proceedings - 27 June 2019

247

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action

File No.: CP2019/13022

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from staff.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolution pending action register - July 2019

253

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

   

  


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 9.1      Attachment a    Support information - C3 Proposed Christmas Event Page 259


Ōrākei Local Board

18 July 2019