I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 25 July 2019

5.15pm

Local Board Office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Paul Walden

 

Members

Shirin Brown

 

 

John Meeuwsen

 

 

Bob Upchurch

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Safia Cockerell

Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

 

17 July 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 283 8212

Email: safia.cockerell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Park Road Reserve - Gail Marshall                                                                    5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Councillor's update                                                                                                       7

12        Endorsement of the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan 2019                               9

13        Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update July 2019                                25

14        Approval of Stage 1 Mātiatia Plan and next steps                                                   29

15        Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery                       41

16        Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing                                                                           65

17        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 105

18        Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings                                      113

19        Governance Forward Work Programme                                                                 123

20        List of resource consents                                                                                         127  

21        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal)  - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring the calm, bring all things good, bring peace….good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 27 June 2019, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Park Road Reserve - Gail Marshall

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Gail Marshall will be in attendance to speak to the board about cleaning up Park Road Reserve in Surfdale.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank Gail Marshall for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

Councillor's update

File No.: CP2019/12555

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         note the verbal update from the Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

Endorsement of the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan 2019

File No.: CP2019/07548

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan for the Waiheke Local Board’s endorsement (see Attachment A).

3.       The Waiheke Local Board identified in its 2017 local board plan that it is vital that Waiheke remain free of kauri dieback. In response to this, staff developed a draft Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan, which outlines key actions that will be undertaken to protect kauri ecosystems on Waiheke from the spread of kauri dieback.

4.       The draft action plan, which was a revised version of an earlier action plan discussed with the local board in 2017, was discussed with the local board at a workshop on 9 May 2019. The local board requested that the draft action plan be discussed with Forest and Bird and other interested parties.

5.       The draft action plan was discussed with Forest and Bird and the Department of Conservation on 18 June 2019. A number of additional activities were identified, particularly in the infrastructure and community engagement and compliance workstreams. These activities included:

·        considering track closures for an indefinite period of time to protect high value kauri ecosystems

·        restricting access to high value kauri areas via unformed or paper roads

·        investigating how the Auckland Council District Plan – Hauraki Gulf Islands Section – Operative 2018 can be used to support the protection of kauri from kauri dieback disease, including the limitation of soil movement

·        improving the integration and cooperation of kauri dieback ambassadors with other ambassadors active on Waiheke

·        advocating for the designation of Waiheke as a Kauri Forest Protection Area under the proposed National Pest Management Plan – Kauri Dieback

·        producing additional and improved kauri dieback information to support landowners and others in preventing the spread of kauri dieback.

6.       These activities have been included and highlighted in the revised draft action plan (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      endorse the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The 2017 Waiheke Local Board Plan identifies an outcome around ‘Waiheke’s environment is treasured’. As part of this outcome, the board indicated that it is vital that Waiheke continues to be free of kauri dieback.

8.       The kauri dieback infrastructure programme has identified local parks on Waiheke that contain kauri. Investigations to identify possible kauri dieback mitigation options were completed in June 2019, and will be presented to the local board in workshops in July and August 2019. Planning for potential mitigation works in Whakanewha Regional Park is also underway.

9.       There are a wide range of other activities designed to protect kauri on Waiheke and reducing the risk of kauri dieback reaching Waiheke, such as the kauri dieback surveillance programme, community outreach and education, and enhancing the kauri dieback compliance programme. These are described in more detail in the draft Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan (Attachment A).

Developing the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan

10.     In response to the need to protect kauri on Waiheke from the spread of kauri dieback, staff have developed a draft Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan. This was presented to the local board for discussion at a workshop on 9 May 2019.

11.     The draft action plan is based on previous staff recommendations workshopped with the local board in 2017, with subsequent amendments to reflect the introduction of the natural environment targeted rate-funded kauri dieback programme.

12.     The draft action plan lists key activities for five workstreams, as detailed below:

·        kauri dieback surveillance to ensure that reliable, accurate and up-to-date data on the distribution and spread of the disease is collected to manage kauri dieback and monitor the effectiveness of management methods over the long-term. On Waiheke, surveillance focuses on checking that kauri dieback is not present

·        kauri dieback infrastructure, which applies to Auckland Council land and refers to hygiene (cleaning) stations, vehicle and bicycle washdown facilities and any physical works that result in track upgrades to achieve ‘kauri-safe’ standards

·        working with mana whenua, which reflects Auckland Council’s commitment to engaging with mana whenua and recognises kaitiakitanga of Waiheke iwi and hapū over the Hauraki Gulf environment, including the ngāhere and kauri health

·        community engagement and compliance, which aims to prevent the spread of kauri dieback disease through a combination of bringing about behaviour change, working with private and other landowners to assist with protecting kauri, and ensuring compliance with relevant rules and regulations

·        kauri dieback treatment and research, which involves supporting scientific research into kauri dieback and contributing to the National Kauri Dieback Programme.

13.     At its workshop on 9 May 2019, the local board requested that feedback be sought from Forest and Bird, the Department of Conservation, and other interested parties. A meeting with Forest and Bird and the Department of Conservation was held on 18 June 2019 to discuss the proposed Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan. This resulted in a number of additional activities for inclusion in the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan. These have been highlighted in red in the revised draft action plan (Attachment A).

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Consulting on the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan

14.     Auckland Council staff met with representatives of Forest and Bird and the Department of Conservation on 18 June 2019 to discuss and obtain feedback on the draft plan.

15.     Feedback was generally supportive of the draft plan and its direction. Staff and meeting participants worked through the proposed activities for each workstream, and a number of changes were identified and additions requested.

16.     The requested modifications are summarised below:

·        a number of minor changes to clarify the intent or expand on the activity described

·        the addition of activities in the kauri dieback infrastructure workstream, in particular:

o   the consideration of track closures for an indefinite period of time (as opposed to temporary track closures to protect kauri while track upgrade works are undertaken), as part of the mitigation programme

o   restricting access to high value kauri areas via unformed or paper roads, as part of the mitigation programme

o   investigating to what extent the provisions of the Auckland Council District Plan – Hauraki Gulf Islands Section – Operative 2018 can be used to support the protection of kauri from kauri dieback disease, including the limitation of soil movement

·        an addition to the community engagement and compliance workstream, as follows:

o   providing focused and high-impact public information on kauri dieback that is Waiheke-specific. This should specifically address the importance of alternatives to planting kauri trees as these may provide a stepping stone for contamination, and supporting the purchase/use of local and/or eco-sourced plants and seeds.

17.     The draft action plan has been amended to address this feedback, and these amendments are shown in Attachment A in red text.

Options for the Waiheke Local Board’s consideration

18.     The Waiheke Local Board has the following options to consider in relation to the draft action plan:

·        Option A – endorse the draft Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan (Attachment A) to enable a staged approach to kauri dieback prevention on Waiheke

·        Option B – do not endorse the draft plan and continue kauri dieback prevention actions without a planned approach or timeframes.

19.     Table 1 below provides an analysis of the options above against key criteria, using the following rating scale:

Rating scale

Rating definitions

üüü

High alignment with Waiheke local board objectives and council’s kauri dieback programme

üü

Medium alignment with Waiheke local board objectives and council’s kauri dieback programme

ü

Low alignment with Waiheke local board objectives and council’s kauri dieback programme

X

No alignment with Waiheke local board objectives and council’s kauri dieback programme

 

Table 1. Options analysis in relation to the draft Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan

Criteria

Option A – endorse the draft action plan (recommended)

Option B – do not endorse the draft action plan

Protection of high value kauri ecosystems on Waiheke

üüü

ü

Alignment to Waiheke Local Board Plan

üüü

X

Ease of implementation

üüü

üü

Cost

üüü

üü

Enables mana whenua engagement and kaitiakitanga

üüü

ü

Enables community engagement

üüü

ü

20.     Based on the options analysis above, staff recommend that the board endorse the draft action plan (option A). This will allow the identified activities to be resourced and implemented in a timely manner, with progress related to specific activities being reported to the local board on an annual basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The kauri dieback programme team includes representatives from Environmental Services, Parks, Sports and Recreation, and Community Facilities to ensure that all aspects of the kauri dieback programme are undertaken in an integrated manner.

22.     The draft Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan has been developed through consultation with each of these departments, and staff represented in the kauri dieback programme team have indicated their support for the proposed actions within the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     In May 2019, a workshop was held with the local board to present the draft Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan. The board indicated its support for protecting kauri and preventing the spread of kauri dieback disease to Waiheke.

24.     The actions within the draft plan will potentially have localised impacts, such as long-term track closures. However, any high impact actions will be presented to the board for consideration prior to implementation. Staff will work alongside the Department of Conservation to any impacts arising from these actions are well-communicated with both residents and visitors to Waiheke.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Kauri is a taonga species that supports a distinct Aotearoa forest ecosystem, sustaining indigenous flora and fauna. Auckland Council, in partnership with mana whenua, have a responsibility for the protection of the spiritual, economic and ecological values associated with this taonga and the ecosystems it supports.

26.     Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua kaitiaki kaimahi representatives have stressed the importance of kauri and expressed a desire to work more closely with the council and the Department of Conservation. Staff will work with mana whenua on the approach to kauri dieback on a site by site basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     In May 2018, the Governing Body approved a natural environment targeted rate to support environmental initiatives, including addressing kauri dieback. The rate will raise $311 million over the duration of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 (resolution GB/2018/91).

28.     The costs of implementing the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan will be funded by the natural environment targeted rate. The targeted rate will fund operational maintenance costs for tracks to meet the elevated standards over the 10-year period of the targeted rate work programme. Following on from this, the costs will revert to the board’s maintenance and renewals schedules.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     The draft Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan seeks to minimise the risk of kauri on Waiheke being infected with kauri dieback. There are two three potential risks in relation to option A (endorsing the plan):

·        the plan is not supported by key stakeholders and the Waiheke community. This risk will be mitigated by staff working with key stakeholders and undertaking ongoing community engagement with regard to kauri dieback

·        the plan is not implemented. This risk is low as relevant staff, departments and external organisations have been involved in the plan’s development and are supportive of the activities outlined.

·        despite implementation of the plan, kauri dieback still establishes on Waiheke (or is there already) via unknown or unrestricted pathways (such as landscape supplies), non-compliance with best practice or due to the identified protection measures not being adequate to eliminate the risk. The mitigation of this risk lies in undertaking, monitoring and reporting the activities set out in the plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Following the board’s endorsement of the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan, staff will continue to implement the activities that have already commenced, for example the scoping of mitigation works and development of a work programme. This will be workshopped with the local board in July and August 2019, prior to being presented for decision making in September 2019.

31.     Other activities described in the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan will be implemented in accordance with the timeframes set out within the plan.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan 2019

15

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Phil Brown – Biosecurity Manager

Authorisers

Gael Ogilvie – General Manager Environmental Services

Mace Ward – General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Barry Potter – Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Helgard Wagener – Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update July 2019

File No.: CP2019/12562

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board on transport related matters in their area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The report focuses on a number of current issues:

·        10 Year Transport Plan consultation.

·        Proposed toilet upgrade for Mātiatia Ferry Terminal.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Report July 2019.

b)      support the proposed upgrade of toilet facilities at the Mātiatia Ferry Terminal and recommend that this work be considered a priority, given the large numbers of people who will be using the terminal over the coming summer period.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report addresses transport related matters on Waiheke and includes information on the status of the local board transport capital fund.

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. They report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in their Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·        be safe

·        not impede network efficiency

·        be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       A summary of the LBTCF is contained in the below.

Waiheke Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$1,214,794

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$153,274

Remaining Budget left

$1,061,520

 

Ten Year Transport Plan

7.       The 10 Year Transport Plan for Waiheke Island, a key aspect of the new MOU signed between the Waiheke Local Board and Auckland Transport, has been completed to a draft for consultation stage. Public consultation begins on 26 July and runs through until 25 August.

Matiatia Toilets – Proposed upgrade

8.       Auckland Transport is currently working on a proposal to increase the capacity of toilet facilities at the Mātiatia Ferry Terminal. The proposed design would essentially double the capacity of the current facilities. Potential designs have been discussed with the local board and a preferred layout agreed. This information has been given to the designers to inform their design. This proposal does not have funding confirmed at this time and therefore the timing of this work is yet to be confirmed.

Npū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

9.       The impact of information (or decisions) in this report are confined to AT and do not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Renewal works at Kennedy Point

10.     Upgrade work at Kennedy Point is progressing well but unfortunately delay have been experienced in putting in place the temporary lighting in the car park. However, the bases for the temporary lighting are in place and the lighting should be installed with the next couple of weeks.

Renewal work at Mātiatia (Old Wharf)

11.     Work on the old wharf at Mātiatia is now 99.9 per cent complete, with just a few minor details to be finalized.

Putiki Road Speed Tables

12.     Auckland Transport has investigated the Putiki Road speed tables and there are definite deficiencies in the construction in terms of meeting Auckland Transport’s specifications for speed tables and their ability to slow traffic down. Discussions are currently underway with the contractor to determine the best way of remedying this situation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

13.     Interactions with mana whenua is done on a project specific basis. There is no direct impact because of this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

14.     There are no financial implications by receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

15.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

16.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board in August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

Approval of Stage 1 Mātiatia Plan and next steps

File No.: CP2019/12838

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Stage 1 Mātiatia Plan and confirm next steps on transport and non-transport outcomes, testing of commercial opportunities, funding and development of the Stage 2 Mātiatia Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In May 2018 the Waiheke Local Board obtained a delegation to make land-use and development decisions over public land at Matiatia. Since then a broad land use plan and principles and outcomes document have been developed which the board is now ready to approve.

3.       A detailed design plan covering transport and non-transport activities at Mātiatia will be developed once transport funding is confirmed which is expected within the next 12 months.

4.       With decision-making for Mātiatia commercial leases now sitting with the Waiheke Local Board, it has begun investigating opportunities and funding sources to test what might/mightn’t work to support the configuration and component parts of the Mātiatia Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve the Stage 1 Mātiatia Plan consisting of Landuse Areas, Principles and Outcomes.

b)      note that a Stage 2 final Mātiatia Plan including detailed design and layout proposals will be developed and publicly consulted on once options for transport development at Mātiatia are confirmed.

c)      request that Community Facilities call for expressions of interest to investigate commercial opportunities for uses of the Harbourmasters building.

d)      confirm that the existing improvements known as the barn and corral, occupied in terms of a lease dated 6 September 2013 as varied on 1 September 2018, be removed after the expiry of the occupancy agreement on 30 September 2019 and that use of the area will be included in investigations of future commercial opportunities centred around the Harbourmasters building including public parking.

e)      confirm that the remaining fixed term lease will continue and that other monthly tenancies will be reviewed as part of the development of the Stage 2 Mātiatia Plan.

f)       work with Auckland Transport, Community Facilities and potential lessees to identify funding opportunities to support costs associated with testing commercial opportunities at Mātiatia noting that existing buildings are in a poor condition and are expected to need significant investment in the near future.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

History

5.      In the first ten years since public purchase of the Matiatia Bay land in 2005, a number of attempts have been made to agree designs, obtain funding for, and progress development of this land. None advanced to development through lack of continuity, funding or community support.

6.       In 2016 the Waiheke Local Board decided that if a development was to be achieved which the Waiheke community could support, it needed to lead the process. A timeline of key initiatives since 2016 is included here.

·    June 2016 - the Waiheke Local Board establishes a Mātiatia Strategic Plan team and funds Direction Matiatia Inc. to lead on community engagement

·    October 2016 – Mātiatia Strategic Plan Phases 1 & 2 report received

·    October 2017 - a significant survey by Direction Matiatia Inc. clarifies the Waiheke community’s expectations for development at Matiatia

·    May 2018 - Waiheke Local Board obtains a delegation from the Auckland Council Governing Body to make land-use and development decisions at Matiatia

·    June 2018 – Waiheke Local Board confirms funding for development and implementation of the Matiatia plan is its No.1 priority and its One Local Initiative

·    June 2018 – Auckland Transport purchases the Owhanake carpark from Watercare to secure its use and development for carparking

·    July 2018 - $15m is included in the Auckland Regional Land Transport Plan 2018-2028 in years 2020/21 and 2021/22 to fund transport development at Mātiatia subject to confirmation of NZ Transport Agency funding

·    August 2018 – First meeting of Matiatia Plan Project Team made up of Waiheke Local Board, Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, ATEED, Direction Mātiatia Inc. and Ngati Paoa reps

·    May 2019 – Mātiatia Stage 1 Plan Interested Parties workshop held

·    June 2019 - Commercial lease at Mātiatia are transferred from Panuku Development Auckland to Auckland Council enabling future decision-making by the Waiheke Local Board

Mātiatia Plan development

7.       The Mātiatia Plan is being developed in two stages. Stage 1 consists of written Principles and Outcomes and a broad Landuse Plan. The content of these has been guided in large part by results of a comprehensive survey of Waiheke community attitudes and views on Matiatia undertaken in August 2017 by Direction Matiatia Inc. for the Waiheke Local Board.

8.       The survey showed strong (70 per cent+) support for improved green open space, an improved keyhole, protection of the natural environment, better facilities to handle tourism, better public transport as long as it is convenient/cost-effective and a visitor centre. It also showed strong opposition (85 per cent+) to residential buildings, an events centre and visitor accommodation. 63 per cent wanted more carparking and around 30 per cent supported some light commercial activity and a cultural centre.

9.       86 per cent of respondents also said they knew parts of Mātiatia are Wāhi Tapu, a place or resource of special, cultural, historic, metaphysical and / or of significance to Ngāti Paoa/other mana whenua.

10.     The stage 1 plan was developed and agreed by the Mātiatia Plan Project Team at workshops in August and December 2018, tested with interested parties in May 2019 and finalised at the project team’s June 2019 meeting. It consists of a one page Principles and Outcomes statement and a map showing proposed landuse areas.

 

Principles and Outcomes (see Attachment A)

11.     The Principles and Outcomes are given effect to in the landuse plan. There are five Principles which describe in high level language what Mātiatia should be. They recognise that Mātiatia is first and foremost a transport hub, that it should be an attractive and welcoming place where the natural environment is protected and enhanced, where the values of mana whenua are recognised and where development reflects these values.

12.     Below that are twelve outcomes, separated into four transport outcomes and eight other outcomes. Of the four Transport Outcomes;

·    the first reiterates that safe and efficient movement is the main focus of the Stage 1 Matiatia Plan.

·    two focusses on public carparking. One proposes that all public parking is user pays. This recognises that demand for carparking often outstrips supply and that user pays is one tool to manage this constraint and encourage more use of public transport.

·    the other carparking outcome proposes that public parking be mostly located at the Owhanake carpark or in the bay but away from the foreshore. This recognises that the foreshore should be largely free from development. It also recognises that the increased bus frequency and direct servicing of Owhanake carpark from October 2019 should make use of that carpark more attractive.

·    the fourth confirms the intention that transport activity nearest the foreshore and wharf will prioritise other transport services such as buses, tourist vehicles, taxis, pick-up and drop-off, mobility parking, cycling and walking.

 

13.     The eight non-transport outcomes cover the following matters:

·    Protection of the foreshore and other natural areas from development

·    Recognition of Ngati Paoa cultural values

·    Addressing stormwater and associated issues as part of any developments

·    Creating or improving walkway connections

·    Confirming that no land will be sold and there will be no residential or visitor accommodation

·    Noting that a visitor/cultural centre will be explored

·    Confirming that commercial development will be lease only and done in a manner which supports all other outcomes

Landuse Areas (see Attachment B)

14.     The landuse plan consists of a large aerial photo of Mātiatia with “activity” areas superimposed over this in different colours. The landuse plan supports and gives effect to the Principles and Outcomes Statement. The plan key describes each of these areas as follows:

·    Movement 1- a general vehicle movement and commercial activity area. This covers land which is already used for transport and commercial activity and is seen as suitable for that purpose. It includes the wharf/ferry terminal, the entire Owhanake carpark landholding, and the developed part of the bay except for the foreshore. Actual use will be determined in the Stage 2 Mātiatia Plan.

·    Movement 2 – constricted shared space with vehicle use also to be determined in Stage 2. This covers the keyhole and public drop-off and turning area at the wharf arrival point. It has been separated from Movement 1 and described as “constricted” because its size and shape raises health and safety issues which need to be addressed.

·    Conservation area – bush, wetlands, streams, walkways. This area covers all main bush, wetland and stream areas and confirms the intention outlined in the principles and outcomes to protect and enhance these areas.

·    Place area – foreshore, generally undeveloped. An area generally following the shape of the bay and extending landwards for around 80m-90m inland has been set aside to protect its open space values and in recognition of its cultural significance to Ngati Paoa (see below). Much of the existing front carpark would be removed for these reasons. South of the existing foreshore carpark a 20m strip of this land is already open space being part of the Church Bay Esplanade Reserve. The Place area recognises that public land on the foreshore should generally remain as open space.

·    Scheduled Maori heritage site. This is the area on the foreshore shown with an irregularly shaped white dotted line. It was notified by Auckland Council in March 2019 as a change to the Hauraki Gulf Islands District Plan in recognition of its significance to mana whenua. The district plan includes provisions which require certain activities in this area to obtain resource consent and be assessed against certain criteria. It is shown as an overlay to the landuse plan to recognise its existence and purpose and because mana whenua have yet to formally advise on how they would like to see it used and managed.

15.    The Principles and Outcomes and Landuse Plan were considered at a meeting of interested parties on 15 May. Invitations were sent to groups with a greater interest in Mātiatia than the public generally. These included commuter interests, transport operators (tour vehicles, buses, taxis, rental cars, Fullers) police, coastguard, local iwi and mana whenua. Twenty two representatives of these groups attended. Groups were largely the same group that was invited to the first such meeting in September 2016 as part of Phases 1 & 2 of the initial Mātiatia Strategic Plan.

Commercial Leases

16.     Mātiatia commercial leases have recently transferred from Panuku to Auckland Council and are now managed by Community Facilities. Decision-making over commercial activity now sits with the Waiheke Local Board resulting from the 2018 delegation to the Waiheke Local Board to make land-use and development decisions on public land at Mātiatia.

17.     As a result building condition reports have been prepared for the Harbourmasters and associated buildings which are leased and discussions on future opportunities have commenced.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Stage 1 plan development

18.    Work on developing the Stage 1 Mātiatia Plan has progressed more slowly than anticipated. The decision to work with Ngati Paoa has extended the timeline as internal iwi issues have made it challenging to get engagement and responses. In addition, options for transport design or layout need to be developed as part of the transport funding process with the NZ Transport Agency which has its own timeline.

19.     Overall, participants in the 15 May 2019 Interested Parties workshop were supportive of the Principles and Outcomes. None of the Principles or Outcomes were rejected or opposed outright, except for the request by the Ferry Users Group for free parking generally as of right, rather than a user-pays approach.

20.     The material presented was the same as outlined above except for the “Movement 2” area which had at that stage been proposed as for “pedestrian movement, water access, and wharf service vehicles”. This proposal received considerable adverse reaction because it indicated that commercial vehicles, buses, shuttles and taxis would be excluded from the keyhole area. There was also concern that the pick-up and drop-off areas would move further away from the terminal, which would make access more challenging for those with mobility challenges or heavy bags.

21.     There were some questions and concerns about what the Scheduled Maori Heritage site meant, and particularly that it suggested existing and future development would be excluded. Attendees were advised that feedback was being awaited from Ngati Paoa. Ngati Paoa Trust Board made it clear at the workshop that their expectation was that the area received protection and appropriate recognition.

22.     The general feeling of the workshop was that the broad statements and land use ideas made sense and were hard to disagree with. Attendees expressed a wish that the project team got on with the detailed plan as it would be that which most interest and feedback would be received on.

23.    The plan was also presented to a Waiheke Transport Forum workshop on 13 June by which time the above Movement 1 area changes had already been made. Transport Forum attendees generally reiterated the same views as provided in the interested parties workshop, and supported the idea of just getting on and developing the detailed Stage 2 plan. A request was received from the Forum that the Principles and Outcomes statement include specific reference to accessibility and mobility parking needs.

Changes and final stage 1 plan

24.     As a result of this feedback, the project team changed the “pedestrian area” to “Movement 2 (constricted shared space with vehicle use determined in Stage 2)” - see paragraph 12. This change accepts the validity of the concerns raised, recognizes that there are constraints on what this area can be used for, and that these will be addressed in the Stage 2 plan.

25.     As a result of the specific Waiheke Transport Forum feedback on accessibility and mobility parking, the following wording changes are proposed:

Principles - Mātiatia is:

a.   An efficient, and safe and accessible multi-modal transport hub for Waiheke

 

Transport Outcomes

d.   Transport activities nearest the foreshore and terminal will ensure accessibility needs are met, and prioritise the needs of Metro buses and other transport operators, pick up and drop off, mobility parking, cycling and walking, and water access

 

26.    It was also noted that due to scale, the landuse plan could have been read to suggest that the southern boundary of the red Movement 1 area extended to or over the main stream running through this area. This was not intended. To clarify this matter, permanent streams have been shown on the landuse plan and the northern side of the green Conservation area has been moved slightly north to include the stream and its northern bank (see Attachment B).

Approval of stage 1 plan

27.     The project team considered an officer proposal to publicly consult on the stage 1 plan and decided that wider public consultation was not necessary at this time. This is because the stage 1 plan components are very generic, have broadly stakeholder support with the above proposed changes and as most feedback has been that the real interest is in the designed layout stage 2 plan, which will be fully consulted on.

Formal approval of the stage 1 plan at this time will enable work to continue where it doesn’t conflict with transport outcomes funding processes.

Commercial Lease changes

28.     While future commercial activity will be determined under the Mātiatia Plan, a number of existing leases in and around the Harbourmasters building have expired or will soon expire. This provides an opportunity for the board to test whether certain types of commercial activity might be viable in this area. This will assist with decisions on commercial activity under the Mātiatia Plan and the configuration and layout of transport activity. For example, there may be commercial activities which attract people passing through Mātiatia and make it more of a destination.

29.     It will be at least 12 months before the business case to enable funding for transport options at Matiatia is completed and further time after that for designs to be agreed. Commercial lease options will need to take account of the need to upgrade the Harbourmasters building. A number of Waiheke based businesses have already indicated an interest in using the Harbourmasters and Community Facilities will commence discussions with these parties, and report back to the board in due course.

30.     Condition reports prepared by Community Facilities for the Harbourmasters and associated buildings have shown that they are in generally poor condition and will require significant investment to make them suitable for longer term commercial use. This includes wastewater management. Discussions with Community Facilities and Finance are continuing to identify funding streams for this work.

31.     The Harbourmasters carpark lease expires on 30 September 2019 and it is proposed that existing buildings associated with the lease which are in poor condition be removed and at least part of the area reinstated as paid public parking.  It also enables parking for other potential uses of the Harbourmasters building to be considered.

32.     Discussions will be needed with Auckland Transport about use of revenue generated from paid public carparking at Mātiatia on land now controlled by the board. In the past this has gone to AT as a matter of course as AT has developed and managed carparking. The above lease changes provide the impetus to consider this matter further.

33.     A number of other leases not associated with the Harbourmasters building have also transferred across, some fixed term, some month by month. It is proposed to retain these without change for the time being pending further progress on the Matiatia Plan development and transport outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     Completion of the Matiatia Plan will put to rest 15 years of ad hoc and uncoordinated management of public land at Mātiatia and provide the basis on which future funding and development can progress. The Stage 1 Mātiatia Plan is a key step forward in achieving this.

35.     The Waiheke Local Board and Auckland Transport are working in partnership on the plan and future development, and the recent MoU signed between the parties and the proposed 10-year Transport Plan for Waiheke are key elements of this relationship.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     The Mātiatia Plan and associated investigations are being led by the Waiheke Local Board as decision-maker over non-Auckland Transport land at Mātiatia. Each Auckland Council local board has identified one priority project for regional funding, known as its One Local Initiative (OLI). The Waiheke Local Board has selected Mātiatia as its OLI.

37.     This report reflects the directions set by the Waiheke Local Board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     The Waiheke Local Board and the Matiatia Plan Project Team have worked with Ngati Paoa on the development of the Mātiatia Stage 1 Plan. Ngati Paoa Iwi Trust representatives have been involved in plan development since late 2017 and both it and the Ngati Paoa Trust Board have provided feedback on their aspirations for Mātiatia against the Stage 1 plan. Written formal feedback from both entities is awaited and can be reported if received in time for the business meeting.

39.     Representatives of Piritahi Marae also attended the 15 May 2019 Interested Parties workshop and outlined their views on the stage 1 plan.

40.     In March 2019 Auckland Council notified a modification to the Hauraki Gulf Islands District Plan to recognize the cultural value to mana whenua of a number of sites in the Hauraki Gulf Islands. The site located on the foreshore at Mātiatia Bay has been included in the Mātiatia Stage 1 Plan and is shown by the white dotted line in Attachment A.

41.     Both the Ngati Paoa Trust Board and the Ngati Paoa Iwi Trust have provided informal feedback on the significance of this area to them as part of the Mātiatia Plan project. Both want to see the area protected and recognized. More detailed formal feedback is awaited particularly on what protection means, what (if any) development they see as appropriate and what role they see for themselves in this.

42.     The decision to produce the Mātiatia Plan in two stages provides the best opportunity for mana whenua feedback to influence development decisions at Mātiatia.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     The Waiheke Local Board has funded all work to date on developing and progressing the Mātiatia Plan from its LDI opex budget. Costs have been minimised by having community engagement being led by Direction Matiatia Inc.

44.     Discussions with Community Facilities and Finance are ongoing on how to fund commercial activity in and around the Harbourmasters building given looming costs and realities around revenue from buildings which are in poor condition.

45.     The Matiatia Plan and subsequent development is the board’s One Local Initiative (OLI). To date transport funding only has been allocated to the OLI on the basis that this is significant and transport development is the major element to delivering on the Matiatia Plan. It is anticipated that further discussion will be needed about non-transport funding as the Stage 2 Mātiatia Plan development progresses.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     The Waiheke Local Board had hoped to have a final Mātiatia Plan completed in this term. As noted above only the stage 1 plan will be completed. The decision to prepare the plan in two stages enables associated timeline and complexities to be advanced and resolved and should enable a quality, agreed final Mātiatia Plan to be produced in 2020.

47.     Costs associated with buildings transferred from Panuku and to activate and test commercial associated opportunities are not currently funded.  As outlined in this report, the Waiheke Local Board intends to investigate commercial opportunities at Mātiatia to provide information to support final content of the Mātiatia Plan. This results from some leases expiring and building condition reports identifying imminent costs. Discussions with Council Community Facilities and Finance to address funding needs are underway.

48.     The Waiheke Governance Pilot aims to test the impact of providing more authority to the Waiheke Local Board. The May 2018 delegation to the board to make landuse and development decisions at Mātiatia is the basis of progress to date. It is important to the board and for the integrity of the pilot, that Council is open to different ways of doing things at Mātiatia, as sought by the board where there is no reason not to do so. This equally applies to the provision of funding.

49.     Ongoing internal Ngati Paoa mandate discussions have delayed engagement and responsiveness and contributed to the decision to produce the Mātiatia Plan in stages. Officers are advised that resolution of these issues should be progressed later this year. The stage 2 plan must incorporate Ngati Paoa views as these will in part shape outcomes from the plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     The key next steps post approval of the Stage 1 Mātiatia Plan are:

·   Community Facilities investigating commercial lease opportunities at Mātiatia to inform content of the Stage 2 Mātiatia Plan

·   Auckland Transport progressing the business plan to enable funding for transport development at Mātiatia to be accessed

·   Development of the Stage 2 Mātiatia Plan including formal public engagement in concert with the above in 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Stage 1 Mātiatia Plan - Principles and Outcomes

37

b

Stage 1 Mātiatia Plan - Landuse Areas

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

John Nash - Programme Manager,Waiheke & Gulf Islands

Authoriser

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery

File No.: CP2019/12273

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery has been developed to ensure Auckland is better prepared to recover from a disaster.

3.       The planning framework set out in the document:

·        Identifies community values and priorities

·        Sets a vision for recovery

·        Focuses on the consequences to be addressed in recovery

·        Focuses on building capacity and capability and addressing barriers

·        Identifies actions to build momentum.

4.       It has been developed with local board engagement over 2018 and local board feedback is now sought particularly on:

·        community values

·        community priorities

·        the vision

·        the way we will work in recovery

·        the work to be done to be better prepared for recovery

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      review and provide feedback on the draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Following the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 was amended, and new guidelines were issued requiring better preparation for, and implementation of, recovery from a disaster.

6.       Auckland Emergency Management began development of the Resilient Recovery Strategy to ensure Auckland is better prepared. This included:

·        workshops on recovery with local boards between 24 May and 12 July 2018

·        reporting back on the workshops in September 2018

·        presentations to Local Board Cluster Meetings in March and November 2018

·        updating local boards on the development of the Resilient Recovery Strategy in November 2018 and advising that a draft would go the Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee in February 2019.

7.       At the beginning of this year the Resilient Recovery Strategy was renamed ‘Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework to Recovery’ (refer Attachment A) as it better described the document’s intent and contents.

8.       The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee approved the draft Pathways document for targeted engagement in February 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The development of Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery followed the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management’s ‘Strategic Planning for Recovery’ guidelines [DGL 20/17].

10.     The Pathways document is structured around this process as illustrated in the components of Figure 1 in the Pathways document (page 3):

i)        Identifying community values and priorities

          The planning framework set out in the Pathways document is described as community centric. Community values and priorities guide us in our preparations enabling recovery to be set up and implemented in a way that helps to meet community needs and aspirations.

          An initial set of community values and priorities was derived from workshops with local boards and advisory panels. They will be refined through community engagement as a part of actions to build a better understanding of recovery.

ii)       Setting the recovery vision

          The Pathways document sets the vision whereby “Auckland’s people, communities, businesses and infrastructure are well-placed to recover from a disaster.”

          Being well placed means being well-prepared.

iii)      Anticipation of consequences and opportunities of Auckland hazards and risks

          Anticipating potential consequences and opportunities from the impacts of Auckland’s hazards and risks provides insight into what might be required of a recovery. Auckland’s hazards and risks are identified in our Group Plan and some are the focus of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan. Building on previous work is part of the work programme resulting from the planning framework under the Pathways document.

iv)      Building capacity and capability, addressing barriers to recovery

          Another way in which the planning framework is community centric is in the way we will work in a recovery. Taking a collaborative, partnership approach means structuring and implementing recovery in a way that maintains its focus on community outcomes.

          A significant recovery will require ‘big government’ structures and processes to effectively mobilise resources and coordinate large scale effort. Such approaches can seem remote from local communities. Effort is required to ensure good communication and community engagement are effectively maintained.

v)      Identifying actions to build momentum

          Another significant focus is the work we need to do to be better prepared. There are 43 actions identified under five focus areas: Recovery is communicated, Recovery is understood, Capacity and Capability is available, Collaboration is supported, and progress is monitored and evaluated.

          The actions will form a work programme to be implemented in the lead up to the review of the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan which is due by October 2021 unless delayed by events.          

11.     Against this background comments and views on the Pathways to Preparation: A Planning Framework for Recovery strategy is particularly required on:

·        community values

·        community priorities

·        the vision

·        the way we will work in recovery

·        the work to be done to be better prepared for recovery

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     Many parts of the Auckland Council group potentially become involved in responding to a disaster and subsequent recovery. The planning framework in the Pathway’s document seeks to provide clarity about what will be required to support effective collaboration across the Council group in recovery.

13.     Views from across the council group are being sought during targeted engagement through June and July 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     Auckland’s hazards and risks may give rise to events with local, sub-regional or region-wide impacts. Their consequences will be influenced by the circumstances of the time and place in which the event took place.

15.     Local board views on their community’s values and priorities are important in determining the way we will work together collaboratively in recovering from a disaster.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     Recovery addresses the consequences of an emergency and their impacts across the natural, social, built and economic environments. The goals, objectives and execution of recovery holds implications for iwi, environmental guardianship, Māori communities (iwi, hapu and mataawaka), marae, assets and the Māori economy.

17.     Building relationships amongst Auckland’s Māori communities to develop a deeper understanding of our potential collaboration across reduction, readiness, response, resilience and recovery is a goal of Auckland Emergency Management. It is also part of the workplan arising from the planning framework set out in the Pathways document.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications arising out of this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery and the work programme it will establish are intended to address the risk of Auckland being unprepared to recover from a disaster.

20.     Recovering from a disaster is complex, lengthy and costly. An absence or lack of preparation can:

·        delay commencement of recovery efforts and lengthen the time taken to complete recovery

·        inhibit multiagency collaboration

·        lead to increased costs, disruption and distress for affected communities and individuals.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Local board feedback will be collated and considered for reporting to the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee and incorporation into the final iteration of the Pathways document.

22.     The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee will receive the final iteration of Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery for approval in August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Wayne Brown - Principal Recovery Advisor

Authorisers

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

Jennifer Rose - Head of Recovery

Sarah Sinclair - Chief Engineer

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing

File No.: CP2019/13164

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to formally provide feedback on the Productivity Commission’s (the commission) inquiry into local government funding and financing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 4 July 2019, the Productivity Commission released its draft report relating to its local government funding and financing inquiry.

3.       The inquiry’s key aim is establishing whether the existing funding and financing arrangements are suitable for enabling local authorities to meet current and future cost pressures.

4.       The commission’s draft report:

·        raises eight questions

·        highlights 67 findings

·        makes 30 recommendations.

5.       Local boards are advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission, need to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

6.       Auckland Council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019. Submissions on the inquiry close on 29 August 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Central Government asked the Commission to conduct an inquiry into local government funding and financing in July 2018. The inquiry’s terms of reference require the commission to examine the adequacy and efficiency of the current local government funding and financing framework and, where shortcomings in the current system are identified, examine options and approaches for improving the system.

8.       The inquiry’s terms of reference do not call for an assessment of, or changes to the current scope and responsibilities of local government.

9.       The Commission’s issues paper was released on 6 November 2018. The council made a submission on the issues paper which was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee. The council’s submission to the issues paper can be found as Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The draft report is available on the commission’s website

11.     The commission’s ‘At a glance’ document can be found as Attachment B and its ‘A3 overview’ is at Attachment C.

12.     The draft report states that:

·        the current funding and financing framework is broadly sound but that councils need new tools to help them deal with some specific cost pressures

·        if councils struggle to deal with rising costs, or are not incentivised to improve their performance, communities are unlikely to reach their potential

·        the funding and financing framework for local government must incentivise good performance and enable local authorities to deliver quality amenities and services that reflect the preferences and aspirations of their communities.

13.     The commission has found that the existing funding model is insufficient to address cost pressures in the following four areas and that new tools are required:

·        supplying enough infrastructure to support rapid urban growth

·        adapting to the impacts of climate change

·        coping with the growth of tourism

·        the accumulation of responsibilities placed on local government by central government.

14.     The commission also considers the three-waters sector an important area for investigation.

15.     The inquiry’s terms of reference have also been amended to require the commission to consider whether a tax on vacant land would be a useful mechanism to improve the supply of available housing. The addition is a result of the Tax Working Group’s final report to the government.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The council group’s impact and views will be developed and presented for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission, need to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

18.     Any formal feedback received after 29 July and before 19 August 2019 will be provided to the Finance and Performance Committee to seek their endorsement to incorporate in the council’s submission. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff will also seek input from the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications in deciding to make a submission. However, there may be positive or negative financial implications if the government decides to implement any of the recommendations made by the Productivity Commission. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     If the local board does not contribute to the submission, then there is a risk that the Auckland Council family’s position on this inquiry will not reflect issues that are important to the local community.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     The council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

23.     A workshop to discuss the draft council submission with the Finance and Performance Committee has been scheduled for 15 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Council submission on the issues paper - approved by the Finance and Performance Committee on 6 November 2018

69

b

'At a glance' - Local government funding and financing

99

c

'At a glance' - A3 briefing

103

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2019/12566

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the report from Chairperson Cath Handley.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairs Report July 2019

107

b

WLB Climate change submission

109

c

WLB Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities Bill submission

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings

File No.: CP2019/12567

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached is a copy of the record of proceedings of the Waiheke Local Board workshop held on 20 June, 27 June, 4 July and 11 July 2019.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings of the Waiheke Local Board workshop held on 20 June, 27 June, 4 July and 11 July 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20190620 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

115

b

20190627 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

117

c

20190704 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

119

d

20190711 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/12569

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.         Attached is a copy of the Governance Forward Work Programme for Waiheke which is a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Programme.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme

125

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 

List of resource consents

File No.: CP2019/12571

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.         Attached are the lists of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 16 to 22 June, 23 to 29 June, 30 June to 6 July and 7 to 13 July 2019.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the lists of resource consents lodged related to Waiheke Island from 16 to 22 June, 23 to 29 June, 30 June to 6 July and 7 to 13 July 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resource consent applications received from 16 to 22 June 2019

129

b

Resource consent applications received from 23 to 29 June 2019

131

c

Resource consent applications received from 30 June to 6 July 2019

133

d

Resource consent applications received from 7 to 13 July 2019

135

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 July 2019