I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 11 July 2019

6.00pm

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Office
39 Glenmall Place
Glen Eden

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Greg Presland

 

Deputy Chairperson

Saffron Toms

 

Members

Sandra Coney, QSO

 

 

Neil Henderson

 

 

Steve Tollestrup

 

 

Ken Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Brenda  Railey

Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

 

8 July 2019

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21 820 781

Email: brenda.railey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

11 July 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw, 2019 - Amanda Hookham-Kraft                                                                                                     5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Waitākere Ward Councillor Update                                                                             9

12        Consideration of Chicken Management Options & Rodent Control Activity - Titirangi Village                                                                                                                            11

13        Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery                       41

14        Auckland Transport's update for July 2019                                                              45

15        Chair's July 2019 report - Greg Presland                                                                  49  

16        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members were reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

            Specifically members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

The following are declared interests of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

Board Member

Organisation/Position

Sandra Coney

-   Waitemata District Health Board – Elected Member

-   Women’s Health Action Trust – Patron

-   New Zealand Society of Genealogists – Member

-   New Zealand Military Defence Society – Member

-   Cartwright Collective – Member

-   Titirangi RSA – Member

-   Portage Trust – Member

-   West Auckland Trust Services – Director

-   Community Waitakere – partner has contract

Neil Henderson

-   Portage Trust – Elected Member

-   West Auckland Trust Services (WATS) Board – Trustee/Director

-   Kaipatiki Project - Employee

Greg Presland

-   Lopdell House Development Trust – Trustee

-   Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust – Trustee

-   Combined Youth Services Trust – Trustee

-   Glen Eden Bid – Member

-   Titirangi Ratepayers and Residents Association - Member

-   Waitakere Ranges Protection Society - Member

-   Titirangi RSA - Member

-   Maungakiekie Golf Club - Member

Steve Tollestrup

-   Waitakere Licensing Trust – Elected Member

-   Waitakere Task force on Family Violence – Appointee

-   Piha RSA - Member

Saffron Toms

Nil

Ken Turner

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

Member appointments

Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council:

Board

Organisation/Position

Sandra Coney

-   Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

Neil Henderson

-   Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

-   Rural Advisory Panel - Member

Steve Tollestrup

-   Glen Eden Business Improvement District - Member

-   Aircraft Noise Consultative Committee Group - Member

-   Local Government New Zealand Zone One Committee - Member

Greg Presland

-   Glen Eden Business Improvement District (alternate)

Saffron Toms

-   Ark in the Park

-   Manukau Harbour Forum - Chair

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 27 June 2019, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.1       Deputation: Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw, 2019 - Amanda Hookham-Kraft

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Amanda Hookham-Kraft, on behalf of the Auckland Composting Network.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Amanda Hookham-Kraft will provide a presentation to the proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw, 2019.

3.         The Auckland Composting Network is made up of many individuals and collective groups working, teaching and facilitating regenerative development and practices throughout Auckland. 

4.       Understanding the primary function of composting as a soil amendment and a globally known and recognised effective climate mitigation strategy when carried out within a whole system approach. 

5.       Initiatives beyond community gardens are recognized and endorsed as effective, regenerative and pro- social means of managing and minimising waste and collectively enabling Auckland to proactively engage with the Climate and Environmental crisis that we are now experiencing.

6.       The presentation will outline views on the current draft Bylaw (including important amendments and/or inclusions), case studies functioning both in Waitakere and other areas of Auckland, shared with collected data of the positive effects and results they bring.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation of views on the proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw, 2019 and thank Amanda Hookham-Kraft of the Auckland Compost Network, for her attendance.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

11 July 2019

 

 

Waitākere Ward Councillor Update

 

File No.: CP2019/12365

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the Waitākere Ward Councillors to verbally update the Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      thank Waitākere Ward Councillors Linda Cooper and Penny Hulse for their update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

11 July 2019

 

 

Consideration of Chicken Management Options & Rodent Control Activity - Titirangi Village

File No.: CP2019/12635

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider options for the management of chickens at Titirangi Village and to note recent activity to better manage rodents (predominantly rats) on council owned assets and in partnership with the community in the Titirangi Village area and surrounds.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local residents and businesses in the Titirangi Village area raised concerns around the negative impact of the wild chicken population around the village. This included concerns about the increased number and size of rats (attracted by chicken feed) and the negative impact of the chickens on amenity, public health, road safety and the ecological surrounds of the area. (Attachment A)

3.       To enable a local board decision on management of the chicken population staff commissioned Wildlands consultants to undertake a survey of chicken numbers at the site and develop a report to determine and analyse options for chicken management in Titirangi Village. The Wildlands report ‘Management Options for Chickens in Titirangi Village’ July 2019 is attached to this report (Attachment B).

4.       In summary the report has concluded that there is a large population of wild chickens in Titirangi Village that are causing visible public health and safety issues. Several rats were observed during the chicken survey and the report concludes that this is likely a direct consequence of feeding the chickens.

5.       To address the problem the Wildlands report recommends that all wild chickens are removed from the site and surrounding areas. They have prepared two options:

1)      remove the entire population; or

2)      remove most of the population and undertake ongoing management to maintain a small population of chickens

6.       Staff recommend that local board supports the Wildlands recommendation to remove the entire population. Taking this approach will fully remove the negative effects of the wild chicken population and may positively impact on the number of rodents in the surrounds. This recommendation involves rehoming where possible with humane culling to occur secondarily.

7.       As is noted in the report previous attempts to manage the chicken population have not received the buy-in of all members of the community. This negatively impacted on the success of the approach. There is a risk that some members of the community do not agree with the removal of the population and this may continue to negatively impact on the desired outcomes. This will attempt to be mitigated by community engagement.

8.       The approximate cost of the recommended approach is $25,000 initially for the capture and rehoming option. There is no regional funding for chicken control nor is it a prioritised pest control activity. The local board will need to determine if it wants to fund this activity from its LDI budgets. If the local board chooses this option staff can manage the contract for delivery in the current financial year.

9.       Over the last few weeks Auckland Council has taken additional measures to deal with the rat population in Titirangi. This has included increasing rodent control activity in local parks and facilities and working with community groups to support control measures on private properties. It is proposed that the local board continue to endorse and support this community activity.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve option one ‘the removal of all wild chickens from the Titirangi Village and surrounding areas’ and note that this approach will focus on capture and rehoming with culling as a secondary option.

b)      request staff to identify local board LDI funding to manage the wild chicken population in the 2019/2020 financial year and approve this investment

c)      note the additional activity to control the rat population on local assets

d)      continue to support community pest control, as appropriate, through existing mechanisms such as advocacy and local board community funding.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Local residents and businesses in the Titirangi Village area raised concerns around the negative impact of the wild chicken population around the village.

11.     A deputation and public input at the May 2019 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting included much complaint from community members on the topic and the tabling of a presentation with photographs to illustrate the extent and the problem and community concerns. (WTK/2019/54 and WTK/2019/58). The presentation from the deputation from Tanya Wilkinson is attached as Attachment A to this report.

12.     Concerns described the negative impact of the chickens on amenity, public health, road safety and the ecological surrounds of the area and noted additional concern around the increased number and size of rats (attracted by the chicken feed) in the village.

13.     The local board and council have also received a number of complaints on both topics. There is a high level of community frustration that the chicken population has gotten out of control and some have linked the chicken population with the increase in rats. The Titirangi rat and chicken scenario has also resulted in many media reports and queries from local, national and international agencies.

14.     An increase in rodent populations is not entirely unexpected as we head into winter as this is the season when we typically see a spike in rodent infestations as they seek out food and shelter. However, this year’s well documented super mast has increased the issue beyond normal levels in several environments.

15.     The council has limited regulatory powers to control chickens, rats and non-native species under both its own bylaws and the Biosecurity Act. Management of wild chickens is not a priority activity within council’s biosecurity, parks or facilities work programmes. Chickens are not a classified ‘pest’ under the current pest management strategy or proposed plan and are therefore not prioritised for pest management control.

16.     The council has authority to act in its parks and open spaces and has increased rodent control measures on local facilities.

17.     It is the responsibility of homeowners and businesses to manage pests such as rats, mice and possums on their own premises. Council investigated and is implementing support for business owners and private residents, including traps on private property and community pest free work.

18.     While the council has limited powers to control chickens, rats and non-native species under both bylaws and the biosecurity act, in the short term it Longer term, it has commissioned a report on chicken control options to go to Waitākere Ranges Local Board in July and is investigating the support it can give to business owners and private residents, including placing traps on private property.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     Following the local concern, council commissioned Wildlands to develop a report on chicken control options to go to Waitākere Ranges Local Board. Wildlands have delivered this report and it is attached to this agenda as Attachment B to this report.

The extent of the problem

20.     In summary the report has concluded that, following a survey, there are an estimated 100-200 birds, including newly hatched chickens. The chicken population is well-fed and rodents (specifically rats) also benefit from the abundance of food supply on site. The report concludes that wild chickens and rats are causing a number of amenity as well as health and safety issues throughout Titirangi Village and that both the chicken and increasing rat population pose ecological issues for local flora and fauna.

Management Options and Methodologies

21.     Wildlands recommend that the site is managed to reduce or remove the chicken and rat populations. They also recommend that most if not all of the chickens are removed, and that control will need to occur on both public and private land. Private land will need to be in voluntary manner.

22.     Wildlands have developed two main options for the management of wild chickens at Titirangi Village:

1)   Removal of the entire population

2)   Removal of most of the population and undertaking ongoing management to maintain a small population of chickens

23.     Wildlands have described the potential methods to give effect to these options including capture and rehoming where possible. They have also looked at options which include cull, poison or maintain the population – see Table 1 in Attachment B.

24.     As shown in Table 1 below, staff have assessed the options against various criteria including removal of the problem, alignment to local board plan objectives, cost, ease of implementation and responsiveness to community concern. These criteria were chosen as they reflect considerations the local board may wish to apply to their consideration of this topic.

Table 1. Staff analysis for chicken control options against relevant criteria

Option

Removal of Problem

Alignment to LB Plan Outcomes[1]

Cost

Ease of Implementation

Responsive to Community Concern

Option one – remove entire population

High

High

Medium

Medium – dependent on community buy-in

High

Option two – remove majority of population and maintain a small number

Medium – reduction

Medium

High - ongoing

Medium – dependent on community buy-in

 Medium

 

25.     On balance staff recommend that the local board supports the Wildlands recommendation to remove the entire population of chickens as this option most strongly aligns to the local board’s aspirations (as described in its local board plan), responds to community concerns raised and will reduce the likelihood of ongoing issues and cost. The second option is not recommended as it leaves part of the problem in place and previous attempts to maintain a small population of chickens at Titirangi Village have proven unsuccessful.

Logistical Considerations & Methodology

26.     As described in the report the recommended option will involve capture and rehoming where possible. Staff note that there have been several offers to rehome the hens. Any rehoming would be supported by communication on the requirements for keeping birds and poultry expected under Auckland Council’s Animal Management Bylaw 2015 – as described in appendix three to Attachment B. Culling will be a last resort option for the recommended approach. In the event of this scenario this will be undertaken in a humane manner by qualified contractors and or staff.

27.     It is important to note that rehoming hens is much easier than roosters. Staff will attempt to rehome roosters where possible, but it is likely that some will need to be culled to deliver on the recommended option.

28.     Previous attempts to control the chicken population to manageable levels at Titirangi Village have been unsuccessful as not all members of the community have supported the removal or reduction in chicken population. This negatively impacted on the success of approach. There is a risk that some members of the community do not agree with the removal of the population and this may negatively impact on the desired outcomes.

29.     As described in the Wildlands report the success of the recommended approach is reliant on stopping the feeding of the chickens so that they can be managed. Ongoing community support and buy in for the recommended approach will be essential.

Rats – a growing problem?

30.     Community feedback has linked the chicken problem to the evident rat problem. It is clear from the community pictures (see Attachment A) that rats are feeding on the chicken feed. In addition, during the survey undertaken by Wildlands it was noted that rats were observed feeding during the day with the chickens and that they were habituated to the feeding regime.

31.     An increase in rodent activity is common in the winter months as rodents seek out food and shelter. However, this year’s well documented super mast has increased the issue beyond normal levels in several environments.

Increased Council Activity

32.     The council has authority to act in its parks and open spaces and has increased rodent control measures on local facilities at ten sites around the Titirangi Village area from 25 June 2019. At the time of writing this report no bait take has been taken across all (10) rat devices installed within the Titirangi Village area.

33.     Our contractors have undertaken three checks on the devices to date and noted no bait has been taken. The technician has observed that locals are still feeding the chicken population. Having more than ample food options are the most likely reason why the rats are not showing any interest in the bait.  

34.     The contractor’s recommendation is that in order to provide successful control on the existing rat population, both the chickens and their supply of food (feed and food scraps) will need to be addressed first.

Community Action

35.     It is the responsibility of homeowners and businesses to manage pests such as rats, mice and possums on their own premises. Council’s Pest Free Auckland programme is a community-centric programme to eradicate pest species and restore Auckland’s natural environment. The programme has capacity to support community groups, schools and mana whenua with conservation action, including the provision of tools, resources, and specialist advice. Council investigated and is implementing support for business owners and private residents, including traps on private property and community pest free work.

36.     Staff and the Chair of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board have been working with community groups to support community and individual pest control options. They have supported the South Titirangi Neighborhood Network who will set up and lead a bait station network (with tools/devices ordered by council) in the village. Until a village champion is trained up to maintain the bait stations, the regional parks team will service the bait stations on an interim basis as a way of supporting the community which has, and continues to, support the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park.

37.     Staff will continue to work with the Titirangi community to support private efforts including targeting landowners in the village for permission to access and maintain bait stations. This is funded from the Natural Environment Targeted Rate and supported by Pest Free Auckland.

38.     It is possible that community groups may apply for local board contestable funding to support pest control efforts. These will support the council investment in this space and it is recommended that the local board favorably consider any applications of this type as they would align strongly to the local board plan outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     Staff have been working with Auckland Transport who have supported control. It is noted that control in the road corridor has particular safety issues and there is a preference to

40.     Staff from Community Facilities, Environmental Services, Parks and Licencing and Compliance have worked collaboratively to deliver on the activities described in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     This report and activity described within in it, is in response to community concerns raised about the chickens and rats and was commissioned by the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

42.     As described in the options analysis table the recommended option gives effect to five out the six local board plan outcomes. It will protect the indigenous and heritage values of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area, and the unique natural habitats and will also help local communities feel good about where they live. The recommended option will have a positive impact on the local area of Titirangi Village and the surrounding environment. Members of the community who have advocated for better management of the chickens and rats will have their concerns addressed.

43.     Members of the community who may not wish the chickens to be controlled may be negatively impacted by the recommended option. Option two, maintaining a small population of chickens, may mitigate this impact. However, this may also impact the outcomes sought.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     It is recognised that environmental management and the control of exotic species for the protection of indigenous habitat has integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

45.     Specific consultation and engagement with mana whenua has not been carried out as part of the development of these options or on this topic. However, it is recognised that management of exotic species in the Waitākere Ranges is of importance and generally supported by mana whenua in their role as kaitiaki of natural environments.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     Approximate funding costs have been provided for the purposes of this report back. These are subject to procurement and change but they provide a base point to inform discussion on the options and indicative quantum of costs to aid decision making.

47.     If the local board approves the recommended options, to remove all chickens, the approximate financial implication is a one-off cost of either $17,500-22,500 or $13,000-$18,000 depending on the level of re-homing able to be achieved. This excludes potential community engagement and support the local board may wish to add to the option. It is recommended that an indicative total budget of $25,000 is allocated to this option to cover all costs.

48.     If the local board approves option two, to maintain a small population of chickens at Titirangi Village, then there would be the initial approximate control cost of around $18,000, $2,000-3,000 for no feeding signage, plus two monitoring visits per annum (ongoing) to check on numbers. Further control costs will depend on how fast or big the numbers grow to. If the chickens are not feed and or reintroduced, then there will be no additional control cost. If chickens are fed and more get dumped, then control would be undertaken before the numbers get back to current levels. Potential future costs for the maintenance of this nature are estimated to be $5,000-10,000 per annum.

49.     Following local board consideration of this matter staff will work through its procurement processes to ensure value for money and fair costings of the work.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     As described in this report there is a risk that the recommended option will be unsuccessful in the event the chickens continue to be fed. This will attempt to be mitigated by engagement with the community. Given previous attempts to control the population have failed because of this ongoing feeding this is a likely risk and mitigation may not be successful.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Subject to local board consideration and funding, regional staff have confirmed that they can manage the contract for the recommended approach within the current financial year.

52.     Community support for rodent and pest control will continue as described in the report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Deputation - May 2019 - Waitakere Ranges - Chickens and Rats

19

b

Wildlands Report July 2019 - Chicken Management Options, Titirangi Village

21

     

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mara Bebich - Stakeholder Manager, Infrastructure & Environmental Services

Brett Butland, Director Pest Free Auckland, Infrastructure & Environmental Services

John Cranfield, Area Manager Operational Management & Maintenance, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

11 July 2019

 

 

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

11 July 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

11 July 2019

 

 

Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery

File No.: CP2019/12283

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery has been developed to ensure Auckland is better prepared to recover from a disaster.

3.       The planning framework sets out in the document:

a)    identifies community values and priorities

b)    sets a vision for recovery

c)    focuses on the consequences to be addressed in recovery

d)    focuses on building capacity and capability and addressing barriers

e)    identifies actions to build momentum.

4.       It has been developed with local board engagement over 2018 and local board feedback is now sought particularly on:

a)    community values

b)    community priorities

c)    the vision

d)    the way we will work in recovery

e)    the work to be done to be better prepared for recovery.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      review and provide feedback on the draft Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Following the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes, the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 was amended and new guidelines were issued requiring better preparation for, and implementation of, recovery from a disaster.

6.       Auckland Emergency Management began development of the Resilient Recovery Strategy to ensure Auckland is better prepared. This included:

a)    workshops on recovery with local boards between 24 May and 12 July 2018

b)    reporting back on the workshops in September 2018

c)    presentations to local board cluster meetings in March and November 2018

d)    updating local boards on the development of the Resilient Recovery Strategy in November 2018 and advising that a draft would go the Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee in February 2019.

7.       At the beginning of this year, the Resilient Recovery Strategy was renamed ‘Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework to Recovery’ (refer Attachment A) as it better described the document’s intent and contents.

8.       The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee approved the draft pathways document for targeted engagement in February 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The development of Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery followed the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management’s ‘Strategic Planning for Recovery’ guidelines [issued by the Ministry of Civil Defence Emergency Management, DGL 20/17].

10.     The pathways document is structured around this process, as illustrated in the components of Figure 1 on page 3 of the document:

i)       Identifying community values and priorities

The planning framework set out in the pathways document is described as community centric. Community values and priorities guide us in our preparations enabling recovery to be set up and implemented in a way that helps to meet community needs and aspirations.

An initial set of community values and priorities was derived from workshops with local boards and advisory panels. They will be refined through community engagement as a part of actions to build a better understanding of recovery.

ii)      Setting the recovery vision

The pathways document sets the vision whereby ‘Auckland’s people, communities, businesses and infrastructure are well-placed to recover from a disaster.’

Being well placed means being well-prepared.

iii)     Anticipation of consequences and opportunities of Auckland hazards and risks

Anticipating potential consequences and opportunities from the impacts of Auckland’s hazards and risks provides insight into what might be required of a recovery. Auckland’s hazards and risks are identified in the Group Plan and some are the focus of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan. Building on previous work is part of the work programme resulting from the planning framework under the pathways document.

iv)     Building capacity and capability, addressing barriers to recovery

Another way in which the planning framework is community centric is in the way we will work in a recovery. Taking a collaborative, partnership approach means structuring and implementing recovery in a way that maintains its focus on community outcomes.

A significant recovery will require ‘big government’ structures and processes to effectively mobilise resources and coordinate large scale effort. Such approaches can seem remote from local communities. Effort is required to ensure good communication and community engagement are effectively maintained.

v)     Identifying actions to build momentum

Another significant focus is the work to be done to be better prepared. There are 43 actions identified under five focus areas: Recovery is communicated; Recovery is understood; Capacity and Capability is available; Collaboration is supported; and progress is monitored and evaluated.

The actions will form a work programme to be implemented in the lead-up to the review of the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan which is due by October 2021, unless delayed by events.

11.     Against this background, comments and views on the pathways document strategy is particularly required on:

a)    community values

b)    community priorities

c)    the vision

d)    the way we will work in recovery

e)    the work to be done to be better prepared for recovery.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     Many parts of the Auckland Council group potentially become involved in responding to a disaster and subsequent recovery. The planning framework in the pathway’s document seeks to provide clarity about what will be required to support effective collaboration across the council group in recovery.

13.     Views from across the council group are being sought during targeted engagement through June and July 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     Auckland’s hazards and risks may give rise to events with local, sub-regional or region-wide impacts. Their consequences will be influenced by the circumstances of the time and place in which the event took place.

15.     Local board views on their community’s values and priorities are important in determining the way we will work together collaboratively in recovering from a disaster.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     Recovery addresses the consequences of an emergency and their impacts across the natural, social, built and economic environments. The goals, objectives and execution of recovery holds implications for iwi, environmental guardianship, Māori communities (iwi, hapu and mataawaka), marae, assets and the Māori economy.

17.     Building relationships amongst Auckland’s Māori communities to develop a deeper understanding of our potential collaboration across reduction, readiness, response, resilience and recovery, is a goal of Auckland Emergency Management. It is also part of the work plan arising from the planning framework set out in the pathways document.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications arising out of this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery and the work programme it will establish are intended to address the risk of Auckland being unprepared to recover from a disaster.

20.     Recovering from a disaster is complex, lengthy and costly. An absence or lack of preparation can:

a)    delay commencement of recovery efforts and lengthen the time taken to complete recovery

b)    inhibit multi-agency collaboration

c)    lead to increased costs, disruption and distress for affected communities and individuals.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Local board feedback will be collated and considered for reporting to the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee and incorporation into the final iteration of the pathways document.

22.     The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee will receive the final iteration of Pathways to Preparedness: A Planning Framework for Recovery for approval in August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Wayne Brown - Principal Recovery Advisor

Authorisers

Jennifer Rose, Response and Recovery Manager

Sarah Sinclair, General Manager, Auckland Emergency Management

Louise Mason, General Manager, Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

11 July 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport's update for July 2019

File No.: CP2019/12921

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waitakere Ranges Local Board on transport matters in their area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report updates the Board on the Safe Speed Bylaw, Parau Footpath, West Coast Road Safety, Piha Road Reseal and next steps for the Transport Safety and Community Safety Funds and other current issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Transport’s update for July 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report addresses transport related matters in the Local Board area.

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways and reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Safer Speed Bylaw Consultation

5.       AT is currently fast-tracking implementation of a speed management plan for Auckland and Public Consultation has closed on the Speed Bylaw. Auckland Transport received 11,719 submissions on its proposal to reduce speeds on some 700km of high-risk roads around the region.

6.       ATs’ team of analysts have been reading through each and every piece of feedback and grouping these into relevant themes. This coding process helps to give AT a high-level understanding of the public’s views as well as making it easier for us to dig deeper into the detailed feedback that requires further investigation. 

7.       AT has a team of seven road safety engineers analysing the feedback. The comments received range from general views on speed limits and road safety to location specific feedback on the roads included in the proposed bylaw. 

8.       AT also received feedback requesting reductions in speed limits on 876 kilometres of roads which were not part of the proposal that we consulted on. Some of the location specific feedback is resulting in our engineers carrying out further investigations to assess the road safety issues that have been raised.

9.       The feedback will be used to create a report which will also include AT’s responses. AT expects to publish the report in the next three to four months.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

10.     The other issues reported are confined to Auckland Transport and do not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Parau Footpath Installation

11.     AT are proposing a footpath along Huia Road in Parau. Currently, there is no footpath connecting Parau village to the school bus stops further down Huia Road or the beach via Armour Road.

12.     Alongside this new footpath, we are also proposing the following improvements:

·     Four new pram crossings to make crossing the road easier

·     Coloured road surfacing raising awareness of people crossing

·     Broken Yellow Lines on the corners of Huia and Staley Road and along Huia Road leading up to Shirley Road to improve visibility of pedestrians.

13.     This proposal is part of our region-wide footpath programme that aims to improve walking connections across Auckland.

14.     The period for feedback is 25 June to 9 July. Board members have been sent copies.

West Coast Road Safety Project

15.     AT a workshop in August the Board will be briefed on a proposal to improve pedestrian safety in particular for crossing West Coast Road. It is the first phase it a number of proposals for the town centre.

Piha Road Reseal

16.       AT are currently seeking feedback from Mana Whenua on the preliminary designs for Piha Road. Following this we will be able to provide more information on a date for the public information drop in session etc.

Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund

17.     Staff are currently assessing the projects workshopped and put forward for potential funding from The Transport capital and Community Safety Fund. Once the assessments are complete the information will be referred to board workshop and then to a Board meeting

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     For all projects consideration of impacts and opportunities for engagement will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Auckland Transport provides the Waitakere Ranges Local Board with the opportunity to comment on the transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Bruce Thomas – Elected Members Relationship Manager (Western Boards)

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

11 July 2019

 

 

Chair's July 2019 report - Greg Presland

File No.: CP2019/12868

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Waitākere Ranges Local Board members on projects, activities and issues.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the Chair’s report for July 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

Matariki celebration and Crescendo Trust

3.       There was a local celebration of Matariki outside the Glen Eden library.  The Kura from Hoani Waititi marae were involved and provided their usual outstanding cultural performance.

4.       Further entertainment was provided by some young artists associated with Crescendo Trust.  This trust, that I have not previously heard about, provides mentoring and assistance to budding musicians.  It is based in different parts of Auckland and out west has a base in the Corbans Estate Art Centre.

A person standing in front of a store

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5.       The three artists were outstandingly good.  So good that I asked to meet with David Atai who had accompanied them and had supported them with sound and backing music.  It turns out that David was previously with Nesian Mystic, who are in my mind one of the best bands the country has produced.  Their Polyunsaturated album seems to be on regularly during summer in my home.

6.       We also met David Parker who is a well-known local muso and the man behind the Titirangi Festival of Music.  It was a great chance to talk about the educational, therapeutic and valuable role that music plays.  I am keen to see what Council can do to help this Trust.  And, the local board now has a stunning collection of local young artists we can now hire for local events particularly, for Beats and Eats, which is our attempt to enliven Glen Eden.

Climate emergency resolution

7.       I recently had the opportunity of talking to the Environment and Community Committee of Auckland Council.  I told them about the board’s resolutions in support of declaring a climate emergency.  The meeting was interesting.  During public input, there was a series of passionate presentations from members of the public.  The presentation from young people was particularly compelling.  The young have the most to lose.

8.       After a spirited debate the motions were passed.

9.       People may ask what will this resolution achieve?  It is symbolic only and will not of itself achieve anything.  But the driver is that our world is facing an environmental crisis.  And we, and by this I include elected representatives, need to keep reminding ourselves of this. 

10.     The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report indicated that if temperatures increase by 1.5 degrees celsius or more, we face unprecedented risks and weather events.  Current trends in emissions suggest that we are facing a temperature increase of over 3 degrees.  To use the words of Greta Thunberg:

                   ”Either we reach a tipping point where we start a chain reaction with events way beyond human control, or we don’t. Either we go on as a civilization, or we don’t. There are no gray areas when it comes to survival.”

11.     Currently Auckland Council’s goal is to achieve a 40% reduction in greenhouse gas generation by 2040.  Under the recently released Zero Carbon bill the Government is proposing that New Zealand becomes carbon neutral by 2050.  This will mean that Auckland Council needs to aggressively review its target.  Not only are we facing a climate crisis, but we are facing various environmental crises.

12.     It has been estimated that at current rates of degradation all of the world’s top soil could be gone within 60 years.  Our fisheries are crashing with predictions that by 2048 fishing stocks will be depleted.  And a recent UN report suggests that a million different species are facing extinction within the next 50 years.  These changes are not solely related to climate change.  The use of unsustainable farming and fishing techniques play their part.  But climate change is also having an effect.

13.     There has been a world-wide movement to declare climate change emergencies.  Local Councils are doing the same.  I believe that declaring the emergency is the correct thing for us to do.  So that we can focus our minds on what we have to do to make sure that our kids can grow up in basically a not too different world to the world that we grew up in.

Titirangi’s Chicken and rat crisis

A bird standing in front of a chicken

Description automatically generated

14.     This is not the sort of news that a village likes to have however, for a while, Titirangi was internationally famous for its chicken and rat crisis.  The rats, or at least the large numbers of them, are a more recent phenomenon although there have been rats in the bush for decades.  But numbers have recently spiked.

15.     Many are concerned that the large numbers of chickens that we have are causing the large numbers of rats.  I don’t think it is that simple.  There have been a number of reports of a significant mega mast throughout the country.  Basically, the forest is producing too many seeds and the rats are going for it. 

16.     Council had previously arranged for action to be taken to reduce chicken numbers.  Earlier actions to humanely rehome them was clearly not working.  A contract that had been arranged for implementation in December 2017 was for reasons that I still do not fully understand not proceeded with.  Since then, there has been some inter-departmental churn as departments tried to work out who had responsibility to deal with it.

17.     I am aware that some people have questioned what the Local Board has been doing about the issue.  Alas we are 6 dedicated representatives and six dedicated staff and none of us have rat or chicken eradication skills. But, we are keen to do what we can.

18.     Council’s problem is that it has limited powers to control chickens, rats and non-native species under bylaws and the Biosecurity Act.  To deal with the immediate problem, it has increased rodent control activity in local parks and facilities and local roads.  I went for a walk through the village recently and spoke to local business workers and I understand the rat problem has been greatly reduced.  This will help to hold the problem but to resolve the issue there will need to be enhanced trapping of rodents.  I met with representatives from the South Titirangi Neighbourhood Network who perform great work in the peninsular.  They are keen to help and Council has committed to providing them with further resources to address the rat problem.

19.     In relation to the chickens the local board is considering a report on chicken control options.  There are some kind-hearted individuals in the community who feed the chickens.  I would ask that they stop as there are too many chickens and roosters in the area.  One other feature about the chicken population is that they drive out the native birdlife and numbers of Tui and Kereru seem to be down.

20.     It would be great if we could convert the South Titirangi peninsular into a native bird sanctuary.  One dominated by Kereru and not by chickens.

The Mayor’s million tree campaign

21.     Phil Goff had pledged that if he became mayor Auckland Council would plant a million trees.  That milestone has now been reached and the millionth tree has been planted.  The programme is one that I have always thought was a great idea.

22.     A recently released scientific analysis suggests that the world could reduce the effects of climate change by planting lots of trees, about a trillion of them and that we have the spare land to do this.  That is 125 per person on the planet or 207 million for all Aucklanders.  One down 206 to go …

Paturoa Kauri

23.     Legal protection for Awhi Awhi has recently been lifted.  And, concerns have been expressed to me that two magnificent roadside Kauri may also be under threat.  If the analysis is correct, there will have to be a significant retaining wall constructed in the road reserve and the trees would have to go.

24.     Awhi Awhi’s plight highlights how difficult it is to protect trees in the urban area.  Law changes made a few years ago meant that general tree protection rules were no longer effective.  I was always surprised at this because there are so many things that the Resource Management Act can regulate, for instance, the shade and intensity of the colour that you paint your house yet. it was thought that trees should be exempt from more rigorous control.

25.     And they pay an important role, especially out west.  They hold banks together and prevent subsidence, they deal with stormwater, they sequester carbon and they provide a habitat for native flora and fauna, not to mention exotic creatures.  And, they make Titirangi a special tranquil place to live in.  My view is that as far as possible we need to be protecting every single Kauri we have, especially the large ancient ones.

26.     With the onset of Kauri dieback and with a cure or an immune strain still not having been discovered, we should make sure that all existing kauri are protected.  Particularly those who remain healthy despite being ringbarked in an area where kauri dieback is well and truly established.  The fact that Awhi Awhi survived this event without developing dieback, at least so far, suggests that we should be careful before consigning her to an early death.

27.     The local board recently passed resolutions urging Council to reinstate significant ecological area zoning on both Awhi Awhi and on the roadside Kauri.  And for the roadside Kauri, I would prefer that there was as much protection of them as possible.  Subject to existing legal obligations I would prefer that Auckland Council, as owner of the trees, determined that they will not be felled no matter what.

 

 

Zig zag track – now reopened

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28.     I went for a walk on it recently and I was very happy with the way that it has been completed.  Kauri trees have been protected by boardwalks.  Other areas have compacted finish and there was no sign of mud anywhere.

29.     The local community is also very pleased that it is now re-opened and usage has been high.  I hope and trust that some of the other closed tracks particularly the Mahoe track and the Bill Haresnape Track will also be repaired and reopened in the near future.

Playhouse Theatre

30.     I am pleased that relationships with the trust that oversees the theatre have been strengthened recently.  The building is an important part of local history and an iconic part of the village.

31.     The building is looked after by a charitable trust.  It used to be that there was a Council representative on the board but through historical events this ceased.  The board has worked on improving relations with the trust.  We have received a request from the trust to appoint a local board member in an advisory role to the trust.  Because of the pending election we will not be able to do this until after October.

Regards

Greg Presland

Waitakere Ranges Local Board Chairperson

greg.presland@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Phone +6421998411

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



[1] Specifically against the following local board plan outcomes (1. people actively protect the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area, 2. our unique natural habitats are protected and enhanced, 3. local communities feel good about where they live, and 6. our community spaces, parks, sports and recreation facilities meet local needs and are easy to get to)