I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will be held on:

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 28 August 2019

3.00pm

Reception Lounge
Level 2
Auckland Town Hall
305 Queen Street

Ngā Hui a te Poari Kaitohutohu mō te Pokapū o Te Tāone Nui o Tāmaki Makaurau /

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Ms Viv Beck

Business Improvement District

Deputy Chair

Mr Andrew Gaukrodger

Corporate sector

Members

Mr Ngarimu Blair

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

 

Ms Noelene Buckland

City Centre Residents Group

 

Mr Greg Cohen

Tourism/Travel

 

Ms Pippa Coom

Waitematā Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Mr Ben Corban

Arts and Cultural Sector

 

Mr Terry Cornelius, JP

Retail sector

 

Mr George Crawford

Property Council of NZ

 

Cr Chris Darby

Auckland Council (Mayor’s alternate)

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Auckland Council

 

Mr Mark Kingsford

Corporate sector

 

Cr Mike Lee

Liaison Councillor, Auckland Council

 

Ms Amy Malcolm

Tertiary Education (University of Auckland & Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr James Mooney

Urban design/institute of architects

 

Mr Nigel Murphy

Tertiary Education (University of Auckland & Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr Adam Parkinson

City Centre Residents Group

 

Mr Patrick Reynolds

Transport representative

 

Mr Michael Richardson

Business Improvement District

 

(Quorum 10 members)

 

 

Kalinda  Gopal

Senior Governance Advisor

23 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 723 228

Email: kalinda.gopal@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


Terms of Reference

(Excerpt –full terms of reference available as a separate document)

 

These terms of reference set out the roles, responsibilities and working arrangements for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

The board is a key advisory body, with no decision-making or autonomous budgetary authority.

The board advises Auckland Council on achieving the vision and strategic outcomes of the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan, the expenditure of the City Centre Targeted Rate, the development portfolio and city centre issues. Auckland Council includes:

 

·       The Governing Body and its relevant committees

·       Waitematā Local Board

·       Council controlled organisations

 

Membership:

 

The board will comprise of up to 16 external city centre stakeholders and three elected members. The board will have between 15 and 19 members at all times.

 

External board members will have an association with an Auckland City Centre group or organisation and have the ability to understand and provide expert advice on Auckland City Centre issues. The membership includes a position for mana whenua.

 

The board’s term ends one month prior to the next local government elections in 2019.

 

 

Purpose of City Centre Targeted Rate

(Excerpt –full information available in a separate document)

 

Background

 

The City Centre targeted rate is to help fund the development and revitalisation of the city centre. The rate applies to business and residential land in the City Centre area.

Activities to be funded

 

The City Centre redevelopment programme aims to enhance the city centre as a place to work, live, visit and do business. It achieves this by providing a high-quality urban environment, promoting the competitive advantages of the city centre as a business location, and promoting the city centre as a place for high-quality education, research and development. The programme intends to reinforce and promote the city centre as a centre for arts and culture, with a unique identity as the heart and soul of Auckland. The rate will fund expenditure within the following activities: Regional planning; Roads and footpaths; Local parks, sports and recreation.

 

The targeted rate will continue until 2024/2025 to cover capital and operating expenditure generated by the projects in the City Centre redevelopment programme. From 2016/2017, unspent funds from the targeted rate have been used to transition the depreciation and consequential operating costs of capital works to the general rate so that from 2019/2020 these costs will be entirely funded from general rates.


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

ITEM    TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                                  PAGE

1           Apologies                                                                                                                                    5

2           Declaration of Interest                                                                                                             5

3           Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                                         5

4           Extraordinary Business                                                                                                          5

5           Ports of Auckland Air Quality Monitoring                                                                         7

6           Funding for assertive outreach to rough sleepers in the city centre                      11

7           America's Cup leverage and legacy frameworks                                                          33

8           Update on the delivery of city centre programmes                                                      47

9           Summary of Auckland City Centre Advisory Board information updates, memos and briefings - 28 August 2019                                                                            77

10         Activate Auckland 2018/2019                                                                                            123

11         Sector panels - review and end of term reporting                                                      141 

12         Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1           Apologies

 

Apologies from Deputy Chairperson A Gaukrodger and Mr M Kingsford have been received.

 

 

2           Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3           Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting held on Wednesday, 24 July 2019 as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4           Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)         The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)          The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)         The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)          That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)         the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

Ports of Auckland Air Quality Monitoring

File No.: CP2019/15317

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on air quality monitoring undertaken by Ports of Auckland Limited between January 2018 and February 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ports of Auckland Limited has a vision to become a leading sustainable port at the global level. As part of their sustainability work, they are seeking to reduce the negative impacts of the port on neighbouring communities. This includes the impact of emissions from the port and shipping.

3.       To further that goal, Ports of Auckland is gathering baseline information about the direct emissions from their own business and their customers’ activities. It is also collecting information on the impacts of port activities on the local environment. Specifically, an ambient air quality monitoring station was installed and operated continuously at Gladstone Park, Parnell, from 27 January 2018 to 17 February 2019.

4.       Quarterly reports were produced by Watercare throughout the monitoring period, which include detailed air quality information.

5.       This report provides the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board with a summary of the monitoring data and comparison with ambient air quality guideline values. It provides an interpretation of the data with respect to trends and likely sources of air pollutants.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)       receive the update on air quality monitoring undertaken by Ports of Auckland between January 2018 and February 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Council’s 2016 emissions inventory identified the port and shipping as a possible significant source of a number of contaminants to the Auckland airshed. The inventory identified overseas shipping as the main source of sulphur emissions to the Auckland airshed.

7.       In response, Ports of Auckland, in conjunction with Auckland Council, initiated a monitoring programme for 12 months to assess the impacts of port activities and international shipping on ambient air quality. Gladstone Park in Parnell was selected as one of the monitoring sites.

8.       Monitoring started in January 2018 and finished in February 2019. Levels of nitrous oxide (NOx), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5), as well as meteorology were monitored on a continuous basis for the 12-month period. A further site adjacent to the entrance to the naval base in Devonport was added to the monitoring programme in September 2018, which is still monitoring SO2 and meteorology.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The monitoring has shown that air quality in Parnell showed 100 per cent compliance with the relevant National Environmental Standards set by the Ministry for the Environment.

10.     On most measures air quality was either excellent (pollutant concentration less than 10 per cent of the guideline or standard) or good (between 10 per cent and 33 per cent of the guideline or standard) during the monitoring period.

11.     The PM10 concentrations were the highest of the contaminants monitored, but even this was still rated ‘good’ for 80 per cent of the monitoring time, and acceptable (between 33 per cent and 66 per cent of the guideline or standard) for the remaining 20 per cent of the time.

12.     Ports of Auckland will present a summary of the results from the monitoring at the Parnell site to the 28 August 2019 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting.

13.     The likely sources of contaminants impacting the ambient air quality at the Parnell site will be discussed as part of this presentation, as well as the ongoing analysis aimed at quantifying the impact of port activities on local air quality. The presentation will outline Ports of Auckland’s plan to continue this monitoring at a location further west at a site more directly downwind of the port under north easterly winds. It is hoped that this monitoring will also provide an opportunity to be able to measure the effect of the introduction of the new international regulations on fuel quality.

14.     From 1 January 2020, the sulphur content of fuel used by ocean-going vessels will be required to reduce from 3.5 per cent to 0.5 per cent under the International Maritime Organisation’s MARPOL VI directive. The monitoring will start before the new directive comes into force and so will be able to measure any improvements in the local air quality because of the directive.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The air quality monitoring programme outlined in this report was undertaken by Ports of Auckland, in conjunction with Auckland Council. Watercare Services Limited and Tonkin and Taylor Limited were contracted to maintain the monitoring equipment and to analyse the results.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Ports of Auckland is based within the Waitematā Local Board area. As such, the local board receives regular updates on Ports of Auckland activities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     Ports of Auckland, operating under the principles of manaakitanga and kaitiakitanga are pro-actively monitoring the impact of their activities on air quality, to identify whether there is a problem caused by the port, and to act if a problem is identified. Where any aspects of the programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no city centre targeted rate funding implications arising from this report. The air quality monitoring programme detailed in this report is funded through existing Ports of Auckland operational budgets with non-financial assistance from Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     Monitoring was undertaken to identify if there is a risk to people living in Auckland from poor air quality because of emissions arising from the port. The monitoring has identified that air quality meets the required standards and ongoing monitoring aims to determine if this also applies to other locations near the port. Mitigation options will depend on the findings of this additional monitoring.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     A presentation will be provided at the August 2019 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting to discuss these findings in more detail. Ports of Auckland will work with Auckland Council, who also has monitoring underway, to keep the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board informed about air quality matters.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jordan Hurunui - Senior Community Engagement Advisor, Ports of Auckland

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

Funding for assertive outreach to rough sleepers in the city centre

File No.: CP2019/15488

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the funding request for the assertive outreach service proposals from the Auckland City Mission and Lifewise, totalling $600,000 from the city centre targeted rate over the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Despite significant investment from central and local government, there is still an unmet need for support services for people experiencing homelessness in the Auckland city centre.

3.       In June 2019, the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board resolved to support in principle assertive outreach service proposals from Lifewise and Auckland City Mission totalling $600,000 over two years (resolution number CEN/2019/27).

4.       Assertive outreach expands on traditional outreach services to provide early intervention and more specialist support to support homeless people into emergency or transitional housing, on a pathway to long-term stable housing.

5.       The proposed collaborative outreach service will expand on existing services by adding more medical professionals with specialist competencies in alcohol and drug treatment, mental health and allied health services, as well as a team of people with lived experience of homelessness who will be trained as peer outreach workers.

6.       The key objectives are to identify individuals most in need of support, to engage with individuals on their own terms, deliver effective, timely and individualised support, and connect through to sustainable housing options. This will significantly reduce rough sleeping in the city centre.

7.       Benefits to the city centre community will include early intervention and comprehensive support for individuals in need, reduced numbers of rough sleepers in the city centre, a decrease in incidents reported by city centre residents and businesses, and a reduced burden on the health and emergency services.

8.       If the funding request is not endorsed outreach services will continue at the current level, but they are currently under resourced to meet growing demand.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)       endorse the funding request for the assertive outreach service proposals from the Auckland City Mission and Lifewise, totalling $600,000 from the city centre targeted rate over the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Homelessness is a complex issue which results from multi-layered social, structural and individual factors including national policy settings and economic conditions, immigration, access to health and social services, discrimination, family violence, employment and poor health. The housing market is also a key driver, generating high levels of unmet demand for social and affordable housing.

10.     Statistics New Zealand defines homelessness as including those sleeping rough, in temporary accommodation, sharing temporarily or living in uninhabitable dwellings. The level of homelessness across Auckland region increased by 26 per cent between the 2006 and 2013 censuses.

11.     In the 2013 census, 20,296 people were homeless in Auckland, and 29 percent of those were aged between 15 and 24 years. Based on the average increase between censuses, homelessness could reach more than 26,000 by 2021.

12.     In June 2019, staff presented proposals from Lifewise and Auckland City Mission to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board to seek support for funding for an assertive homeless outreach service from the city centre targeted rate portfolio.

13.     The Auckland City Mission outreach team will comprise of professionals with specialist competencies in alcohol and drug assessment and treatment, mental health and allied health, along with knowledge of the issues unique to homelessness/rough sleeping.

14.     The Lifewise outreach team will be staffed by trained peer outreach workers. They will comprise of people with lived experience of homelessness in the city centre who are also trained in peer support. The peer outreach team will be focused on building authentic relationships of trust with people who have been long term rough sleepers in the city centre and central Auckland, and who are the most vulnerable. They will also have a specific focus on youth. 

15.     The board resolved to support in principle the assertive outreach service proposals from Lifewise and Auckland City Mission and the consideration of the funding request from the city centre targeted rate portfolio (resolution number CEN/2019/27).

16.     A strategic assessment was completed by staff for these assertive outreach proposals to assist the board’s funding recommendation from the city centre targeted rate.

17.     The key objectives of this collaborative assertive outreach service are to:

·    identify highly vulnerable and marginalised individuals in the Auckland city centre by name

·    engage and provide peer support to rough sleepers and chronic homeless on ‘their terms’ to build trust, which increases the likelihood of success

·    deliver effective, timely and individualised assessment, intervention and case management to rough sleepers and chronic homeless

·    connect people experiencing homelessness to health and social services and sustainable housing options through Housing First Auckland

·    significantly reduce homelessness and rough sleeping in the city centre.


 

18.     Benefits to the city centre community will include:

·    early intervention and improved support for vulnerable individuals

·    individualised plans to support -term housing solutions and other support services

·    a more integrated and coordinated system of care focused on ending homelessness

·    reduced numbers of rough sleepers in the city centre, and a decrease in incidents long reported by city centre residents and businesses

·    reduced burden on public system including health, emergency services, courts, corrections and council resources.

19.     This will in turn contribute to the Auckland Plan outcomes of Belonging and Participation, Māori Identity and Well-being, and Homes and Places, and support Auckland Council’s position that homelessness should be rare, brief and non-recurring.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Rationale

20.     The Council to Homeless Persons[1] defines assertive outreach as a form of persistent and purposeful street outreach that aims to end homelessness for people sleeping rough, with a foundation of building rapport and trust.

21.     Assertive outreach is different from traditional outreach programs because it is a deliberate and strategic attempt to end homelessness through the provision of outreach services to immediately intervene in an individual’s rough sleeping and facilitate transitions to transitional and longer-term housing.

22.     An international evidence review[2] in 2017 led by Crisis, the national charity for homelessness in Great Britain, identified assertive outreach as one of the five key principles to ending homelessness and homelessness prevention. This review identified that assertive outreach significantly reduces the number of rough sleepers, with numbers reducing by approximately two thirds within three years under the Rough Sleeper Unit Programme in England and by more than a third within two years in the Scottish Rough Sleepers Initiative.

23.     An Australian study[3] found that an assertive outreach programme in Sydney assisted 42 people into permanent housing in the first year and engaged with a further 291 people. A Brisbane-based assertive outreach program successfully assisted 69 people into permanent social housing in the first 14 months of operation. It provided a range of multidisciplinary support services and outreached to public places and homes post-homelessness. The study concluded that multidisciplinary teams that include health professionals are critical in improving the health and wellbeing of those sleeping rough, and in supporting their capacity to access and subsequently sustain their housing.

24.     An independent evaluation of the Auckland City Mission outreach service in February 2017 identified resource and capacity issues as barriers to improving the success of the service in ending homelessness in the city centre and recommended multi-disciplinary activity as a key area for further development.

25.     To truly end homelessness, it is critical that the systemic and socio-economic factors which drive housing insecurity are addressed. However, until this is achieved, assertive outreach plays a major part in early intervention to reduce the time new rough sleepers spend on the street and provide more intensive services to chronic rough sleepers.


 

Options for assertive outreach in Auckland

26.     The combined funding proposals from Auckland City Mission and Lifewise were assessed against the criteria outlined in Table 1 below:

Table 1. Assessment of options for assertive outreach funding proposals

 

Criteria

Option A – endorse the allocation of city centre targeted rate funding towards the proposed assertive outreach package (recommended option)

Option B – status quo – do not endorse funding (maintain existing outreach service levels)

Alignment to city centre targeted rate purpose and vision

üüü

X

Strategic alignment to other homelessness initiatives

üüü

ü

Potential impact on ending city centre homelessness

üüü

ü

Funding need (no alternative funding sources)

üüü

N/A

Rating scale

Rating definitions

üüü

High alignment to criteria

üü

Medium alignment to criteria

ü

Low alignment to criteria

X

No alignment to criteria

 

Recommended option

27.     The Lifewise and Auckland City Mission proposals present a combined approach of multi-disciplinary specialist professionals and a peer-led team to provide complementary outreach services to support the diverse range of individuals sleeping rough. Through the existing Housing First Auckland project, Auckland City Mission and Lifewise have demonstrated that they can work in a collaborative and coordinated way, which avoids duplication and maximises their collective impact.


 

28.     Investing in assertive outreach will achieve the following outcomes:

·    every person sleeping rough in the city centre is offered support and rough sleepers who are reluctant to engage with existing services have access to a peer to peer alternative

·    almost every person rough sleeping in the city centre is known by name and there is a plan to assist each person into housing along with other supports

·    people rough sleeping in the city centre are well-supported on their path out of homelessness

·    outreach services are well-integrated with other housing and support options

·    intensive housing and support are allocated to people who have the most obstacles to stable tenancy and who are most vulnerable.

29.     In addition to being a pilot project, the two-year term of this assertive outreach package helps to bridge the period until Auckland City Mission’s HomeGround facility and the upgraded Greys Avenue housing development come on-stream. 2021 is a focus for Auckland as the city hosts the Asia Pacific Economic Conference (APEC) and the America’s Cup event.

Alternative options

30.     Other initiatives considered for recommendation to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board, include Housing First, Mission HomeGround, Orange Sky, and the Street Guardian programme, which have each received funding from alternative sources. The Auckland City Mission and Lifewise assertive outreach proposals are therefore the only proposals being presented to the board at this time.

31.     Despite significant investment from central and local government for projects like Housing First Auckland and Mission HomeGround, there is still an unmet need for support services for people experiencing homelessness in the city centre.

32.     It is the complementary benefits of the two parties of the proposed assertive outreach that will produce the most impact for the homeless community. To consider the two portions separately would undermine the multidisciplinary approach and reduce the effectiveness of the service.

33.     If this funding request is not endorsed (status quo option), outreach services will continue at the current level, however they are currently under resourced to meet growing demand. There are also some individuals who choose not to interact with existing services, who may be more likely to engage with the proposed peer-led approach outlined in the Lifewise proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     In 2017, the Environment and Community Committee agreed the council’s position that homelessness should be ‘rare, brief and non-recurring’ (resolution number ENV/2017/118). The committee also confirmed that the council’s role should be to strengthen levers to improve, prevent and end homelessness, to lead and coordinate development of a regional, cross sectoral homelessness plan, and to fund a range of initiatives that support people who are experiencing homelessness.

35.     Auckland Council has been working with central government, non-government agencies, Māori and philanthropic organisations to develop Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa – the regional cross-sectoral homelessness plan for Auckland. A draft strategic framework has been developed and an implementation plan (roadmap) is being prepared. Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa focuses on systems change and includes focuses on prevention and early intervention as well as crisis response interventions.


 

36.     In the preparation of this report, staff have consulted with Auckland Council’s Community and Social Policy team which is leading and coordinating the development of Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa, and this assertive outreach proposal aligns to the draft regional framework.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     The Waitematā Local Board continues to be active in its responsiveness to emerging needs and issues of Waitematā’s homeless community. In March 2019, the local board allocated funding of $12,000 towards the following (resolution number WTM/2019/34):

·    $10,000 grant to Lifewise Auckland to support scoping of an Auckland Housing Help Centre – the centre will provide an information, advice and navigation services for people with housing needs in the city centre, co-located with a youth housing initiative

·    $2,000 for a volunteer training and appreciation event hosted by the local board – this event will acknowledge and thank the volunteers who give their time to support the homeless community in the area, grow volunteer networks, and include training from the Auckland City Mission outreach team.

38.     A further $20,000 has been allocated in the local board’s 2019/2020 Arts, Community and Events work programme for other homelessness initiatives in Waitematā.

39.     The proposed assertive outreach initiatives will have a significant impact on the lives of rough sleepers in the city centre, who are among Auckland’s most vulnerable citizens. This in turn will revitalise and enhance the city centre.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     Māori are disproportionately affected by homelessness and have the second highest rate of homelessness, after Pacific peoples. In the 2013 census, 32 percent of the homelessness population identified as Māori and more than 40 percent of people on the social housing register identify as Māori. The Ira Mata Ira Tangata – Auckland’s Homeless Count in September 2018 found that 43 percent of people living without shelter were Māori.

41.     Auckland City Mission and Lifewise have strong links with mana whenua, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and a number of urban marae. More than 60 percent of Auckland City Mission clients are Māori, and Mission HomeGround will provide an opportunity to strengthen their programmes for Māori. The multidisciplinary approach taken in the proposed assertive outreach proposal will also strengthen support for Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     In 2016, the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board endorsed $2 million to support the redevelopment of emergency housing provider James Liston Hostel through the city centre targeted rate (resolution number CEN/2016/46).

43.     This contributed to the successful redevelopment of the hostel, which was completed in June 2019 and included a new roof, counselling clinic rooms and increasing its capacity from 45 beds to 52. It also includes a women’s-only wing for the first time. James Liston’s operating model supports tenants to stay for up to twelve weeks and provides assistance to find permanent accommodation. 

44.     Further investment is required to support a response to homelessness in the city centre. The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board’s allocation of financial resources to the assertive outreach services will make a significant contribution towards improving services provided to rough sleepers in the city centre. As homelessness has such a high impact on this area, there is strong rationale to support projects responding to homelessness initiatives from the city centre targeted rate.

45.     This report seeks the board’s support in principle to consider providing $600,000 of city centre targeted rate funding towards homelessness initiatives over the next two years.

46.     Staff have explored alternative sources of funding for this package within the council and related entities, but no other budget is available for this purpose.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     Potential risks associated with approving the assertive outreach proposal, and their respective mitigations, are summarised in Table 2.

Table 2. Potential risks and proposed mitigations for the Auckland City Mission and Lifewise proposals

Risk

Mitigation

Lack of available housing to place people engaged by assertive outreach service

·     The use of the VI-SPDAT (triage tool), by-name list and co-ordinated access processes will help match people to the housing and support options that best meet their needs

·     Advocacy for an increased number and range of housing and support options to meet people’s needs.

·     Assertive outreach will be integrated with Housing First Auckland programmes

Delay in implementing assertive outreach service while recruiting key personnel

·     Auckland City Mission’s outreach team is currently operational and will only need to recruit two additional staff. A two-year pilot period will enable Auckland City Mission to attract strong candidates for the role.

·     Lifewise has a pool of trained peer support workers and volunteers so the recruitment process is likely to be rapid.

Individuals choose not to engage with assertive outreach services

·     For the first time people will have a choice between engaging with a peer or with a professional outreach worker. One of the benefits of the peer service is that there are existing relationships with parts of the community, and this will help the rapid establishment of trust and provide an engagement platform that has authenticity in the homeless community.

·     Part of the development of co-ordinated access processes in the city centre is the creation of multiple touchpoints where people can access housing and support services. Therefore, assertive outreach will not be the only way that people can access support.

·     Auckland City Mission also offer a range of options where people can connect to support, for example through the Calder Centre and Haeata. Lifewise also has the Merge Café and community team

Potential for duplication or misalignment of services between two providers working collaboratively

·     Auckland City Mission and Lifewise have demonstrated experience of working collaboratively as Housing First Auckland providers

·     The development of a by-name list and additional protocols regarding data sharing will enable the Lifewise and Mission outreach teams to co-ordinate their service provision to avoid duplication

 

Continued growth in number of rough sleepers irrespective of this intervention

·     Additional council and central government initiatives to address structural factors which drive homelessness

·     A shared goal across government, Council, non-government organisations and businesses that homelessness will be rare, brief and non-recurring which drives co-ordinated and effective action

Lack of support for ongoing funding of the service at the end of pilot period

·     Demonstrable benefits from the investment in enhanced outreach services

·     Monitoring and evaluation processes in place to capture learnings and outcomes

 

48.     The number of people in Auckland experiencing homelessness is likely to remain high and will possibly get worse unless there is a systematic and coordinated effort from all partners and stakeholders to end it. The proposed assertive outreach proposal is an evidence-based approach focused on early intervention to get rough sleepers off the street and into permanent accommodation, in partnership with Housing First Auckland.

49.     Existing homelessness outreach services are under-resourced to meet the growing demand. Increased and more targeted resource will increase capacity and capability of these teams and will enable them to work in a more coordinated way with other service providers.

50.     An issue of growing concern in the city centre is antisocial behaviour. While not necessarily related to homelessness, some issues include aggressive begging and an increase in synthetic drug use. When these issues are related to homelessness the outreach services can provide support by connecting with the relevant agencies.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Subject to funding being approved, Auckland City Mission and Lifewise will provide a progress report to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board after the first year, and an evaluation of the package at the end of the two-year period.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Lifewise Outreach Proposal

19

b

Auckland City Mission Assertive Outreach Proposal

27

c

City Centre Targeted Rate - assessment criteria July 2018

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Natalie Hansby – Practice Manager – Operations, Arts Community and Events, Community Empowerment

Authorisers

Graham Bodman – General Manager Arts Community and Events

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

America's Cup leverage and legacy frameworks

File No.: CP2019/15895

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on the America’s Cup leverage and legacy frameworks.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board with an update on the America’s Cup leverage and legacy frameworks, as requested at the board’s 24 July 2019 meeting (resolution number CEN/2019/36).

3.       Leverage and legacy represent two of the workstreams that form part of the America’s Cup programme of works. A diagram outlining the programme of works has been included as Attachment A to this report.

4.       The leverage and legacy project seeks to identify, maximise the opportunities and evaluate the outcomes from hosting the America’s Cup in 2021. Through targeted leverage and legacy activity, we can enhance Auckland and New Zealand’s reputation and deliver on key environmental, economic, social and cultural outcomes.

5.       One of the three aspirational legacy goals of the America’s Cup is to accelerate the (sustainable) social and physical transformation of Auckland’s waterfront, including creating new public spaces, calmer water spaces and improved environmental outcomes.

6.       The America’s Cup programme concludes shortly after the America’s Cup Match in March 2021. The infrastructure built for the 36th America’s Cup will be available to be used by potential future America’s Cups for a ten-year period. In the meanwhile, the Wynyard Quarter will return to a new business as usual and host a range of activities to ensure a vibrant waterfront.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)       receive the update on the America’s Cup leverage and legacy frameworks.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       In the context of the America’s Cup, leverage is defined as activities outside the normal running of the event which result in benefits to either enhance or add to the impacts already created by the event. Legacy is defined as long-term and sustainable benefits which are aligned with existing strategic objectives, achieved by using the event itself, or the attention created by the event, to catalyse and advance these impacts.

8.       The role of the legacy and leverage workstreams is to identify shared and multi-stakeholder goals and activities that, through connection, can be made more successful.


 

9.       A series of leverage and legacy workshops were held with crown agencies, Auckland Council agencies, America’s Cup Event Limited and the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum between August 2018 to April 2019 to identify legacy and leverage opportunities and outcomes which could be realised from the America’s Cup event. Attachment B provides a summary of the workshop attendees.

10.     The America’s Cup leverage and legacy frameworks (see Attachments C and D) were endorsed by the America’s Cup Joint Chief Executive Group on 24 June 2019. The frameworks are focused on coordinating and delivering initiatives, which support the four America’s Cup programme outcomes of place, economic wellbeing, participation and storytelling.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The leverage framework outlines four leverage goals which reflect the national, Auckland and mana whenua strategic shared priorities under the America’s Cup programme outcomes.

·    Goal 1 - supports the place outcome, to maximise the opportunities to strengthen and profile sustainable destination management, whilst promoting positive environmental outcomes

·    Goal 2 - supports the economic wellbeing outcome, to showcase business, trade and investment (with a focus on leading edge technology and innovation) both domestically and internationally. A leverage plan initiative to support goal 2, as an example, could be a series of offshore events and activities delivered by government and council agencies using America’s Cup to link potential investors and businesses with Auckland and New Zealand

·    Goal 3 - supports the participation outcome, to develop opportunities for national pride by engaging New Zealand - Aotearoa in the 36th America’s Cup

·    Goal 4 - supports the storytelling outcome, to deliver authentic and powerful stories about Tāmaki Makaurau and Aotearoa, our people, business, place and future both domestically and internationally.

12.     The legacy framework outlines three aspirational legacy goals which reflect the national, Auckland and mana whenua strategic priorities relating to water, the environment and culture. The spotlight of America’s Cup can contribute to wider strategic outcomes for Auckland and New Zealand – using the event as a catalyst and platform for legacy activities.

·    Goal 1 - accelerating the (sustainable) social and physical transformation of Auckland’s waterfront:

o continuing the transformation that began in 2000 when Aucklanders turned their face to the water and towards a publicly accessible waterfront - further opening gateways to the Gulf beyond. This will include creating new public spaces, calmer water spaces and improved environmental outcomes.

·    Goal 2 - cleaning up our waters (freshwater and marine) and our islands:

o America’s Cup presents a unique opportunity to focus on the mauri, cultural and environmental health of the Waitematā and the Hauraki Gulf, and the waters which flow into it. Improving our waters is fundamental to mana whenua, Auckland Council and the crown. Legacy projects may include mussel bed restoration, litter traps and marine biosecurity infrastructure.


 

·    Goal 3 - our voices are reflected:

o ensure our voices continue to be heard long after America’s Cup itself is over – to celebrate our cultural heritage and the taonga of the Hauraki Gulf, so that New Zealanders and visitors understand, value, protect Tīkapa Moana and beyond. This includes the use of Tāmaki Makaurau and Te Reo Māori across all key platforms, and the integration of mana whenua storytelling into projects.  A strong environmental narrative will showcase kaitiakitanga and empower kiwis and visitors to care for nature. This goal also supports the long-term collaborative development of sustainable destination management for the Waitematā and the Hauraki Gulf.

13.     The frameworks will be used to prepare detailed leverage and legacy plans, which are still under development. These plans will focus on adopting multi-partner initiatives that deliver outcomes via a collaborative approach, recognising the spirit and importance of collective action as expressed in the America’s Cup whakataukī:

He waka eke noa

Kia eke panuku, kia eke Tangaroa

We’re in this waka together

Through all our efforts, we will succeed.

14.     As previously reported to the board, out of scope of these frameworks are:

·    Auckland Council’s strategic planning processes, including the review of the City Centre Master Plan that is currently underway, and

·    implementation of Wynyard Hobson resource consent conditions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     A series of leverage and legacy workshops were held with crown agencies, Auckland Council agencies, America’s Cup Event Limited and the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum between August 2018 to April 2019 to identify legacy and leverage opportunities and outcomes which could be realised from the America’s Cup event. Attachment B provides a summary of the workshop attendees.

16.     The America’s Cup leverage and legacy frameworks (see Attachments C and D) were endorsed by the America’s Cup Joint Chief Executive Group on 24 June 2019. The frameworks are focused on coordinating and delivering initiatives, which support the four America’s Cup programme outcomes of place, economic wellbeing, participation and storytelling.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Leverage and legacy frameworks goals will provide benefits for the local board areas that are impacted by the America’s Cup.

18.     The America’s Cup programme is committed to providing regular engagement with the four local boards that will be most impacted; Devonport-Takapuna, Ōrākei, Waiheke and Waitematā.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     A series of workshops were held with crown agencies, Auckland Council agencies, America’s Cup Event Limited and the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum between August 2018 to April 2019 to identify legacy and leverage opportunities and outcomes which could be realised from the America’s Cup event.


 

20.     The frameworks will be used to prepare detailed leverage and legacy plans, which are still under development. These plans will focus on adopting multi-partner initiatives that deliver outcomes via a collaborative approach, recognising the spirit and importance of collective action as expressed in the America’s Cup whakataukī:

He waka eke noa

Kia eke panuku, kia eke Tangaroa

We’re in this waka together

Through all our efforts, we will succeed.

21.     This whakataukī has been chosen in partnership with mana whenua to encapsulate the spirit of the America’s Cup 36 (AC36) programme.

22.     Mana whenua is represented in the Leverage and Legacy Project Steering Group and in each of the workstreams; leverage, legacy, and data and evaluation.

23.     The AC36 programme continues to work with mana whenua to enable them to provide guidance on tikanga and fulfil their role as kaitiaki throughout the programme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There is currently no funding available for leverage and legacy. Accordingly, the approach to both the legacy and leverage frameworks and the subsequent plans is to identify and to align America’s Cup outcomes and goals to existing crown and council-funded projects and strategic objectives, along with potential projects and opportunities to partner with the private and philanthropic sectors. Individual organisations carry their own responsibility for leveraging America’s Cup.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a risk that what may be identified in the legacy plans cannot be delivered with the current baseline-only resource level.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board and local boards will continue to receive progress updates in the lead up to the America’s Cup event.

27.     A presentation will be provided by the leverage and legacy project team and Panuku at the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board’s 28 August 2019 meeting to discuss these leverage and legacy frameworks in more detail.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

AC36 Programme of works

39

b

AC36 Key stakeholder engagement / workshop attendees

41

c

AC36 Leverage Framework

43

d

AC36 Legacy Framework

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Martin Shelton - Programme Director America’s Cup 36

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

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28 August 2019

 

 

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28 August 2019

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

Update on the delivery of city centre programmes

File No.: CP2019/15348

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview on key progress and milestones on city centre projects that are underway and are funded through the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The city centre targeted rate portfolio budget 2019/2020 was endorsed by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board at its 24 July 2019 meeting (resolution number CEN/2019/35).

3.       The city centre targeted rate investment portfolio provides funding for projects in the city centre.

4.       Staff will provide an overview of the projects within the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio at the board’s 28 August meeting, focusing on the status of city centre projects and milestones. (Attachment A)

5.       In addition, an update on the Access for Everyone pilot – High Street is attached as part of this presentation (Attachment B).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)       note the update on city centre programmes.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Overview of CCTR projects

49

b

Access for Everyone pilot update

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Oliver Smith - Manager Programmes Delivery

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

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28 August 2019

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

Summary of Auckland City Centre Advisory Board information updates, memos and briefings - 28 August 2019

File No.: CP2019/14477

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive updates on the following projects:

a)       Access for Everyone concept pilot – High Street is reported separately. Refer to item 8 of the agenda.

b)       Victoria Street Linear Park project (Attachment A)

c)       Public Amenity project (Attachment B).

2.       To note progress on the forward work programme (Attachment C) and provide a public record of memos, workshop or briefings that have been distributed for the board’s information since 24 July 2019. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information report for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board which aims to provide public visibility of information circulated to members via memo and other means, where no decisions are required. A summary of these updates has been provided below:

City Centre Targeted Rate 2019/2020

4.       The Finance and Performance Committee approved the revised city centre targeted rate budget for 2019/2020 at its meeting held on 21 August 2019 (resolution number FIN/2019/94).

Victoria Street Linear Park project

5.       The City Centre Masterplan (2012) envisages Victoria Street as a green link between Victoria Park and Albert Park, taking on a linear park character. The Victoria Street Linear Park project supports the objectives of increased pedestrian amenity and will include an assessment of parking, servicing and loading requirements. More details on this project are included in Attachment A to this report. 

City Centre public amenity project update

6.       The City Centre Public Amenities report, commissioned by the council and published in March 2018, reviewed the current council decision-making processes regarding public amenity provision in the city centre. An update was provided to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in May 2019, where the board indicated its support for the public amenity investigations being undertaken (resolution number CEN/2019/22).

7.       A cross-council working group has been established to progress the report’s recommendations. The working group is considering public toilets, showers and lockers as priority infrastructure. A gap analysis of public toilets was undertaken in June 2019 to understand the current amenity provisions. More details on the gap analysis are included in Attachment B to this report. 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)       note the summary of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board information report - 28 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo update: Victoria Street Linear Park project

79

b

Memo update: City Centre Public Amenity project update

103

c

Forward work programe

117

d

CCTR portfolio budget 2019/2020

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tam White - Senior Governance and Relationship Advisor

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

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28 August 2019

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

 

 

AUCKLAND CITY CENTRE ADVISORY BOARD FORWARD WORK PROGRAMME 2019

Edited August 2019

 

 

Area of work

Description of work

Board’s role

Expected timeframes

IN PROGRESS / UPCOMING AGENDA ITEMS

Downtown programme of works (including transport)

The Downtown programme of works delivers a connected and accessible waterfront, prepare for the growth of cruise and ferry services and support further activation of Queens Wharf.  The programme has been brought forward to align with the America’s Cup event (AC36) in 2021.

·     To receive update and provide feedback on the Downtown programme of works.

Progress to date:

-     A report was considered on 18/7/18 on the Downtown Infrastructure Development programme. Resolution CEN/2018/40. A copy of the response to the Board’s requests is included in Attachment A.

-     For information the current delivery programme report was agreed by the Planning Committee on 5/9/17. Resolution PLA/2017/111

-     An update on options on Quay Street East public amenity and accessibility will be provided to the ACCAB early 2019.

-     Resolution CEN/2019/19

-      22 May workshop: Queens Wharf workshop

-      City Centre Traffic Management Plan has been deferred (tba)

-      resource consents timings and the impact on the delivery programme will be reported back after internal sign off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(tbc) 2020

 

Karangahape Road precinct programme of works (including transport)

The Karangahape Road will deliver improved pedestrian spaces around key transport hubs while leveraging off development opportunities from the City Rail Link.

·     To receive update on the Karangahape Road project.

Progress to date:

- A powerpoint presentation was tabled at the 17/4/19 meeting. A follow up memo was circulated to members in May. A copy is attached as Attachment B.

·     To receive an update on Myers Park Underpass (stage 2b).

-     workshop was held on 22 May 2019. The report was considered in July, res CEN/2019/34 

 

 

 

 

July 2019

City Centre Masterplan 2040

The 2012 CCMP set out a compelling vision for the heart of Auckland. PLA/2-18/121(a) directs council to produce an online masterplan. This provides an opportunity to replace the existing six-year refresh period with a programme of rolling updates, while retaining the core vision for the city centre.

·     To provide input and provide feedback on the City Centre Master Plan.

Progress to date:

-     A report approved by the Planning Committee  Resolution PLA/2018/121

-     A report was considered by ACCAB at its Feb meeting and resolved to hold a workshop to provide feedback on the work programmes. Resolution CEN/2019/4

-      CCMP and Waterfront Plan workshop: 4 April 

-      ACCAB formalised its feedback on 22 May 2019 on the CCMP refresh. Resolution CEN/2019/21

-    A workshop was held in July on the engagement plan and the proposed consultation material for public engagement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 2019

Learning quarter programme of works

Including works in Albert Park and streetscape upgrades in the areas around city centre university campuses.

·     To provide input and feedback on the learning quarter programme of works. Deferred due to alignment with Learning Quarter working group work programme.

tbc 2019

Midtown programme of works (including transport)

The Midtown programme of works is a coordinated programme to deliver improved pedestrian and public spaces around key transport hubs while leveraging off development opportunities from the City Rail Link, bus infrastructure and the New Zealand International Convention Centre.

·     To receive update and provide feedback on the Midtown programme of works.

Federal Street upgrade stage two project:

Progress to date:

-     The update report was considered on 21/11/18 seeking feedback on the preliminary design. Resolution CEN/2018/64.

-      The board requested staff to follow up on the Waitematā Local Board feedback to ensure cycle access isn’t lost on Federal Street. Staff have advised that a cycle access ramp between Federal Street and Mayoral Drive has been detailed in the preliminary design, separated from the area of the existing footpath by a new concrete wall.

-      Detailed design phase is complete, and documentation has been submitted for review.

-      Ongoing liaison with Auckland City Mission regarding the HomeGround development. It is expected that construction for Federal Street upgrade will start later in Quarter 3 this year.

Wellesley Street bus improvements project:

Progress to-date

-     A report was presented on 24/10/18 meeting on progress and upcoming next steps for the Wellesley Street bus improvements project. Resolution: CEN/2018/60. The next phase: commence a business case and once detailed designs are developed, these will be brought back to the board for feedback.

-     An update was circulated in April.

City Rail Link: Albert Street reinstatement

Progress to date:

-     A presentation was provided on 21/11/18. Resolution CEN/2018/65

-     Further update will be provided in Feb 2019.

-     An update report was considered at the board’s Feb meeting. A further update on the revised layout was presented at the June meeting supported by the board resolution CEN/2019/28   

-      request an update on lower Queen Street and lower Albert Street project costs

Victoria Linear Park project

Progress to date:

-     A memo was circulated to members in May.  An update was provided at the August meeting agenda.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To be advised.

 

 

August 2019

City Rail Link update

The City Rail Link Project is a significant infrastructure project to enhance the capacity and performance of Auckland rail services and improve transport outcomes in Auckland. There will be four new and reconfigured station as part of the project - Britomart Station, Aotea Station, Karangahape Station and Mt Eden Station.

·     To be informed of the CRL project

Progress to date:

-     An update on the CRLL delivery presentation was provided on 24/10/18.

To be advised 2019

Homelessness

The council is developing its position and role on affordable housing including homelessness, and will engage with the board on the development and implementation plan.  

·     To provide city centre community input on the council’s homelessness programmes.

Progress to date:

-     A report was presented on 22/08/18 on Auckland Council’s operational response to homelessness. Resolution CEN/2018/46 . The board also noted that options for funding homelessness to be considered as part of the CCTR review process.

-     The report on ‘Response to homelessness in the Auckland city centre’ was on the June meeting agenda. Resolution CEN/2019/27   

-      report back in August re funding assessment process

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 2019

Public amenities

Including toilets, showers, lockers, and drinking fountains.

·     To receive update and provide feedback for the city centre public amenities project.

Progress to date:

-     An update was provided at the 22 May 2019 meeting Resolution CEN/2019/22.

-     gap analysis update – refer to August agenda

-     request information on the status and maintenance arrangements of closed toilets and toilets in relation to bonus area resource consents.  

 

 

 

August 2019

 

To be advised 2020

Activate Auckland Programme (including Tactical Urbanisation)

This programme enables a people-led place activation process which aims to transform visitor, resident and business experiences in the city centre. This is achieved by providing temporary, low-cost built form interventions to trial projects in the public realm, while providing support to people and the economy during this period of significant development. The Activate Auckland programme complements the council’s existing strategic delivery initiatives and maximises collaborations on existing and new projects.

·     To receive update and provide feedback on the Activate Auckland Programme, as part of the city centre targeted rate programme of works. An update will be provided in June as more work on financial is yet to be completed.

August 2019

America’s Cup 2021

Planning and development of areas to host America’s Cup 36 (AC36 programme).

·     To be informed around plans for the America’s Cup 2021, including their potential impact on the city centre programme of works.

Progress to date:

·     The update report and the presentation was provided at the 17/04/2019 meeting.

- A response to the board’s request for information was circulated and is attached to the June and July agendas.

- Further update on legacy plans request will be provided at the August meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 2019

City Centre Public Art Plan

The City Centre Public Art Plan aims to provide the vision and rationale for investment in public art in the centre city through to 2025. It takes into account all other relevant existing strategies and plans for the city centre area including the public art work floor scheme bonus.

·     To receive update and provide feedback on deliverables arising from the City Centre Art Plan, towards which the city centre targeted rates makes a contribution.

To be advised 2020

City Centre Cleaning Services

Town centre cleaning and maintenance services will be transferred to Community Facilities from Auckland Transport and Waste Solutions, as part of the rationalisation of these services across Auckland. This was originally scheduled to go live on 1 July 2018, but has been postponed until 1 July 2019.

·     To provide feedback for the city centre cleaning and maintenance services.

Progress to date:

A report was considered on 27/6/18 Res CEN/201832

-     An update on streetscapes pertaining to the city centre cleaning services was provided at the May meeting. Resolution CEN/2019/23 

 

 

 

complete

City Centre Targeted Rate Portfolio

The city centre targeted rate portfolio of works is the schedule of projects that are funded by the city centre targeted rate that formed part of the long-term plan.  They are endorsed by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board and approved by the Finance and Performance Committee. The current version of the work programme is known as City centre targeted rate portfolio 2018-2019 (attached to this agenda).

·     To provide feedback and endorse the city centre targeted rate portfolio of work, for recommendation to the Finance and Performance Committee.

Progress to date:

-     A report was considered on 21/11/18 on the prioritisation of projects requiring strategic assessment. Res CEN/2018/66

-      report to Finance and Performance Committee by memo attached to this agenda.

-      final report to ACCAB for allocation.

-     The board also noted that further discussion regarding the St Matthews request will be considered at the CCTR review round clause b) iv) res CEN/2018/64

-      workshop was held on 4 April on CCTR strategic assessment and 26 June 2019.

-      endorsement of the CCTR portfolio budget at 24 July 2019 (reportres CEN/2019/35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing update as required

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

Activate Auckland 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/15442

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on Activate Auckland’s expenditure for the 2018/2019 financial year, outcomes achieved, and noting upcoming projects for 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Activate Auckland represents a collection of complementary techniques and tools to deliver physical interventions and activation programming across the city centre.

3.       Activate Auckland is guided by the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan and associated frameworks, such as the Aotea and Downtown frameworks and the Karangahape Road Plan.

4.       The objectives of Activation Auckland relate to:

·    participation - to promote and enable place activation that engages, empowers and mobilises people in the city centre

·    responding to change - to support the people of the city centre and its economy during a period of significant growth

·    collaboration - to support new and existing strategic delivery initiatives by maximising partnerships and collaborations.

5.       The Activation programme is achieved using a range of place activation tools including physical interventions, digital technology, event programming, partnerships, facilitation and advocacy.

6.       This report provides the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board with an outline of expenditure for the 2018/2019 financial year and provides a work programme for 2019/2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)       note the update on Activate Auckland’s expenditure for the 2018/2019 financial year, outcomes achieved, and projects planned for 2019/2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Activate Auckland Plan was developed to deliver change using ‘lighter, quicker, cheaper’ methods of delivery to improve the quality of life for the citizens. The methods used are place activation and tactical urbanism. The combination of the two assists with disruption mitigation as the city grows.

8.       Activate Auckland:

·    supports citizens in being stewards and champion of their places

·    helps create people-centric places through a mix of collaborative activations and design influenced interventions

·    facilitates and incentivises inter-agency partnerships to enhance the city centre experience, providing opportunities to share ideas, resources and expertise, and in doing so leverage greater value

·    establishes and embeds tactical urbanism approaches to transformation that are lighter, quicker, cheaper to inform and complement transformation projects

·    supports a creative, proactive approach to disruption management during construction so the city centre remains a vital and enjoyable place to live, work, play, visit and do business.

9.       Auckland’s city centre is experiencing an unprecedented level of development activity with public and private works planned to take place over the next decade.

10.     For the duration of the works, challenges to businesses, residents and visitors will be experienced in different ways.

11.     Activate Auckland will help to mitigate these challenges and supporting development response that has been piloted through a number of projects in the city centre.

12.     This report provides the board with an update on expenditure for the 2018/2019 financial year and outlines the proposed projects and areas of focus for 2019/2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Expenditure over 2018/2019 financial period been split between several target areas – these are detailed on the spreadsheet included as Attachment A and summarised in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Activate Auckland expenditure for 2018/2019

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Projects planned for 2018/2019 are listed as follows:

Activations General

Artweek Auckland

Auckland Festival of Photography

Dance Week

Random Acts of Kindness Day

Sense Walks

Christmas in the city – Access for Everyone Trial

Auckland Central Library

Auckland Writers and Readers festival

New Zealand Fashion Week

Chromacon

DocEdge Festival

Activations: Māori and Pacific

Te Paparahi, Toi Māori - Māori Art Guide

Heritage Festival – Māori Modernism

He Wiki Kiriata Māori – Māori Film Festival

Pā Rongorongo

Pasifika at the Central Library

Matariki

Seaport Festival

Activations: Equipment

Storage and delivery of equipment for activations and events

Book Bike

Development Response

Contribution to development response programmes, development of tools, development mapping and creation of strategic documents

Digital Placemaking

Emerging Auckland website and touch screen mapping tool

Community Placemaking

Griffiths Gardens

For the Love of Bees

High Street Placemaking

Community and Business Support

BusinessPac

Universal Design Conference

K Road Identity Project

General Business Costs

Phones

Travel and transport

Staff training

Office supplies

Marketing

 

15.     The total budget for 2018/2019 was $1 million, and the total spend on the above projects was $843,300. The remainder of the budget was carried forward to the 2019/2020 financial year.

16.     The Activate Auckland programme in the 2019/2020 financial year will cover eight key work programmes which are outlined in Attachment B. In summary, these work programmes include:

·    community-led initiatives and activations that support and reflect the needs of the diverse central Auckland population, particularly those who are affected by development works

·    digital technology and wayfinding tools that improve and assist the legibility of the urban realm

·    developing new tools to support development response and monitoring the impacts of development

·    investigating opportunities for BusinessPac and other business support initiatives.

17.     The achievement of the goals within the Activate Auckland programme requires collaboration between Auckland Council, other council group (such as Auckland Transport, Auckland Libraries, Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development, and Regional Facilities Auckland), and external groups and organisations in the city centre including Splice and Lifewise.

18.     The Activate Auckland programme has been developed in collaboration with these groups to ensure that the team is supporting a diverse range of activations that address the needs of our partners throughout the city centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     Auckland’s city centre falls within the Waitematā Local Board boundaries. The local board receives regular updates on Activate Auckland initiatives. The most recent update was in February 2019 on the Karangahape Road development response programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Activate Auckland supports the Tāmaki Makaurau journey towards achieving Māori Design outcomes that are embedded, expressed and enabled throughout the activation programme. These included activities that were hosted at Pa Rongorongo and the Griffiths Gardens including the Rongoa Garden and Rāhina Hauora sessions and cultural events such as Matariki, Māori Modernism at the Heritage Festival, the Māori Film Festival and Te Wiki o te reo Māori Walks.

21.     Activate Auckland through its programme have formed a partnership with mana whenua in relation to Māori design and arts practitioners.

22.     The Māori design outcomes achieved in 2018/2019 are detailed in Attachment A.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The 2018/2019 budget expenditure is noted in Attachment B. City centre targeted rate funding allocated towards this programme in 2018/2019 was $1,000,000 and $843,300 was spent. The remainder of the budget was carried forward to 2019/2020.

24.     The proposed budget for 2019/2020 financial year is $1,000,000, which was endorsed by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board as part of the city centre targeted rate portfolio budget 2019/2020 at its July 2019 meeting (resolution number CEN/2019/35).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no risks arising from this update report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     The Activate Auckland team will implement the programme in the 2019/2020 financial year as outlined in Attachment B of the report. Updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board (or equivalent following the local government elections) in the new political term.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Activation Programme 2019/2020

129

b

Activate Auckland Expenditure

135

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Barbara Holloway – Team Leader City Centre Activation

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 August 2019

 

 

Sector panels - review and end of term reporting

File No.: CP2019/15491

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on draft content for the end of term reporting and feedback received so far from board members to inform future operations of the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)       receive the initial findings of the survey

b)       provide additional feedback to confirm the board’s overall recommendations for the incoming Mayor.

 

Horopaki

Context

2.       The council’s sector and demographic advisory panels are a Mayoral appointment and their term therefore ends one month before the council elections. The purpose of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board has been to provide advice to Auckland Council on achieving the vision and strategic outcomes of the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan, the expenditure of the City Centre Targeted Rate, the development portfolio and city centre issues.

3.       A survey has been distributed to board members by email to capture views on the key achievements of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board over the 2016-2019 term as well as feedback on what improvements could be made to the way the board operates. This feedback will be used to develop an end of term report to the current council and recommendations to the incoming Mayor to inform future arrangements.

4.       Initial feedback from the survey will be shared at the meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

5.       A report will be presented to the governing body that incorporates board members’ views on key achievements of the panel during the 2016-2019 term.

6.       Recommendations for changes to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will be developed in response to survey feedback and will be presented to the incoming Mayor later this year.


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol Hayward - Principal Advisor Panels

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

     

    



[1] https://chp.org.au/

[2] Crisis (2017) Ending Rough Sleeping: What Works? An international evidence review

[3] Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute bulletin, issue 161 February 2013: What role does assertive

outreach play in ending homelessness for people who are sleeping rough?