I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Community Development and Safety Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 15 August 2019

9.30am

Rainbow Youth

10 Abbey Street, Newton

Auckland

 

Ngā Hui a te Komiti Whanake Hapori me ōna Kaupapa Āhuru /

Community Development and Safety Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

Theme: Belonging and Participation

 

 

 MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

 

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

IMSB Member Tony Kake

 

 

IMSB Member Dennis Kirkwood

 

 

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

 

Cr Greg Sayers

 

 

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

 

Cr Wayne Walker

 

 

Cr John Watson

 

 

Cr Paul Young

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

 

(Quorum 7 members)

 

 

Sonya Inger, Governance Advisor

9 August 2019

Contact Telephone: (09) 977 6050

Email: sonya.inger@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


Terms of Reference (Delegations)

 

Parent committee:    Environment and Community Committee

 

Responsibilities and key projects

 

The committee is responsible for regional community development and safety, including:

 

·         grants for regional events, arts and cultural organisations

·         arts, culture and heritage

·         alcohol harm reduction strategy (recommendation to Environment and Community Committee)

·         homelessness plan (recommendation to Environment and Community Committee)

·         work with the six demographic advisory panels to give visibility to the issues important to their communities and help effect change

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities.

 

Except:

(a)    powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)    where the committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)     where a matter is the responsibility of another committee

(d)    the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(e)    the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million

(f)      the approval of final policy

(g)    deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest, and which are controversial

(h)    the commissioning of reports on new policy where that policy programme of work has not been approved by the Environment and Community Committee

(i)      the power to establish sub – committees


Community Development and Safety Committee

15 August 2019

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          5  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    5

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          5

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

8          Belonging and participation                                                                                         7

9          A sense of belonging                                                                                                    9

10        New Zealand Police update - Diversity Liaison Officers                                         13

11        Libraries’ inclusiveness of Auckland’s Rainbow communities                             15

12        Arts, Community and Events supporting Rainbow communities                         17

13        Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2019/2020 – Round One                         19

14        Forward Work Programme                                                                                       105  

15        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

Apologies were received from Cr J Bartley and Mayor P Goff on council business.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 9 July 2019, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 

Belonging and participation

File No.: CP2019/13963

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To support the Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel hosted item on the 15 August 2019 Community Development and Safety Committee meeting agenda on belonging and participation and to inform the committee on this matter.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Development and Safety Committee is hosting a series of themed individual meetings throughout 2019 with advisory panels to hear about their work.  It has been agreed that the respective panel will co-host the item and suggest the theme, speakers and venue for consideration by the committee chair. 

3.       The Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel is the final session and in discussion with the panel and committee chair the theme for this session has been agreed as belonging and participation.

4.       The Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel chose belonging and participation as the theme for this meeting because Rainbow communities are more likely than others to face mental distress, homelessness, and social isolation because of discrimination and stigma. 

5.       The panel wanted to share with the committee the ways their communities have a sense of belonging and feel included.  The panel believes that Rainbow people are also resilient, more likely to volunteer than their peers (other young people), and if people have a strong sense of identity this can be a source of wellbeing.

6.       The panel has asked their guests to share their stories to relate what belonging means to them and where in Auckland they have a sense of belonging, what gets in the way of belonging and what enhances belonging for Rainbow communities. They have also been invited to share what advice they would like to give to Auckland Council to promote belonging and participation.

Presentations

7.       Moira Clunie has been a member of the Auckland Council Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel since its inception. Her work focuses on improving the mental health and wellbeing of New Zealand’s diverse Rainbow population. Moira leads the youth sector initiative Te Ngākau Kahukura, chairs OUTLine’s board, and is working towards a Master of Social and Community Leadership with a focus on Rainbow community leadership in suicide prevention.

8.       Moira will introduce and contextualise belonging and participation as the panel’s chosen theme and will outline community research findings from the Rainbow Panel 3 Questions Report and why these findings are important.

9.       Greyson Alejandro Ramos Taghoy identifies as trans-non-binary, queer, and deaf/hard of hearing young person. He describes himself as a deeply compassionate and passionate creative, who loves to help others, take care of the world, and give back whenever he can. He loves to spend time reading, sky-watching, and bothering his friends (especially his partner) with cat memes.


 

 

10.    Amanda Aarons set up Holding Our Own (HOO) years ago when her son came out and she realised there was no support available for families in Auckland at the time. Members include parents, children, brothers, sisters, aunts and uncles, grandparents and friends of the LGBTQ+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer) community. The members are supported to accept their diverse children, straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, gender fluid, transgender and queer.  HOO believes that LGBTQ+ children should not have to fight discrimination, nor should they have to fight for equality alone. HOO does that together.

Topic

11.     A staff report outlining work towards Rainbow communities, belonging and participation is included separately on this agenda.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      thank the Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel and presenters for their work in putting together this session and assisting the committee in understanding the subject.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duncan Glasgow – Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 

A sense of belonging

File No.: CP2019/14681

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the committee with an overview of the work Auckland Council is doing to understand the needs of Rainbow communities and to foster an inclusive Auckland where everyone belongs.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A literature review has helped to build an understanding within the council of the challenges that Rainbow communities in Auckland face. Three broad themes emerged: the challenges of visibility, discrimination and health impacts.

3.       This report informed the development of the Auckland Plan which celebrates our diversity and includes a key focus area of ‘an inclusive Auckland where everyone belongs’.

4.       The Diversity and Inclusion team are developing a Rainbow Plan to engender a sense of belonging both within the council and through council facilities and actions.

5.       A staff presentation will provide a brief summary of these areas of work. This presentation complements the separate item at this committee meeting facilitated by the Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel on belonging and participation.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive this report and the accompanying high-level presentation from staff in relation to work being carried out within the council to build understanding of Rainbow communities and to engender a sense of belonging both within the council and through council facilities and actions.

b)      note that this information assists the committee in understanding the issues important to Rainbow communities living and working in Tamaki Makaurau.

Horopaki

Context

Auckland’s rainbow communities: challenges and opportunities

6.       A report produced in 2017 by the council’s policy team in partnership with the research and evaluation team on Auckland’s vibrant and diverse rainbow communities to outline key challenges that rainbow communities in Auckland face, on an individual and collective level.

7.       ‘Rainbow communities’ is a broad umbrella term that covers a diversity of sexual orientations, as well as gender and sex identities. The report deliberately refers to this term throughout, to provide a standardised approach to terminology and to honour the space that this umbrella term allows for acknowledging difference and diversity.   

8.       Three broad themes emerged in the literature review, namely the challenges of visibility; discrimination; and health impacts. It is acknowledged that these challenges overlap and intersect with each other to a large degree.

9.       This report informed the development of the Auckland Plan 2050.

The Auckland Plan 2050

10.     The Auckland Plan 2050’s ‘Belonging and Participation’ outcome envisages a future where “all Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities and have the chance to develop to their full potential”.  

11.     Key focus areas are ‘foster an inclusive Auckland where everyone belongs’ and ‘recognise, value and celebrate Aucklanders’ differences as a strength’. 

12.     Based on feedback from rainbow communities, “gender, gender identity and sexual orientation” were included in the council's definition of diversity within the plan.

13.     We value and celebrate our diversity and cultural richness and our city is stronger for it.

14.     New Zealand legislation incorporates the principles of inclusion, anti-discrimination and human rights. However, discriminatory practices and prejudicial attitudes towards people continue to play out in every-day life and impact on emotional and mental health.

15.     We need to be proactive to ensure a sense of belonging and positive life experiences for all Aucklanders. We need to be open to learning about and valuing differences, and to understanding our shared and different histories.

16.     This will lead to living together with greater acceptance, trust and mutual respect, and people working together to create a shared future.

Capturing data on sexual identity and gender diversity

17.     In 2018, the council made a submission to Statistics New Zealand on developing a statistical standard for sexual identity.

18.     This was followed by the collection of wellbeing data for people of different sexual identities for the first time as part of the 2018 General Social Survey (GSS).

19.     Statistics New Zealand also announced in June 2019 that the gender diversity of New Zealanders will be better reflected in future statistics with new information collected in household surveys.

The Rainbow Plan

Rainbow Staff Network

20.     Since starting our Diversity and Inclusion work programme two years ago, our staff networks have grown in strength. Council’s Rainbow Staff Network (previously known as GiLBerT) has revitalised and is now a very active and visible network at Council. The Rainbow Staff Network actively supports council’s commitment to diversity and inclusion and its leadership has helped to embed rainbow inclusion into our workplace.

21.     Rainbow Staff Network members, supported by our Diversity and Inclusion and Communication teams, led council’s strong presence in the 2018 Pride Parade – we had 300 people on our float, a massive increase from 12 people in 2016.

22.     In 2019, the Rainbow Staff Network played a key role in helping council to navigate through our response to the challenges that the Auckland Pride Parade was facing. The Rainbow Staff Network, with our Community Events and Diversity & Inclusion team, and advice from our Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel, guided council’s response to the issues raised in a careful and considered way, supporting our staff through this challenging time.

23.     Rainbow Staff Network members have worked hard to ensure that our internal celebrations for Pride are growing each year. This year, led by Network members, all of our corporate buildings and many of our libraries proudly flew Rainbow, Trans and Bi Pride Flags and provided information about the Pride Festival and resources focused on Rainbow communities. We have stories on our intranet and ‘Our Auckland’ during Pride and Rainbow Staff network members have been visible in these stories.

Proud centres

24.     Council’s community centres play a unique and important role in our city, as they give us the opportunity to support people to come together, connect, learn, share and participate in almost endless different ways. Looking at creative way to leverage these spaces is as core part of the Community Places team’s approach to operating them.

25.     As the Pride Board navigated through the challenges of the 2019 Pride Parade, council’s Community Places team, with guidance from our Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel, felt strongly that the Pride festival had to be something that Aucklanders could experience, participate in and access all across Auckland, not just in the inner city. 

26.     Encouraged by the clear direction in our local board plans, the Proud centres brought life to council’s strategic objective of engaging all of Auckland’s communities by creating new ways to entice people into community spaces. It allowed maximum participation by Rainbow community members and broadened the reach of the Pride festival by activations that occurred throughout Auckland.

27.     The result was 30 free community-led activities across eight council owned community facilities in Waitematā, Henderson-Massey, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Puketāpapa, Whau, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Manurewa local board areas. Proud centre events included films, talks, sporting events, markets, exhibitions and workshops, culminating in the Queen of the South drag competition. Over 1000 people attended the events which were flamboyant, fun, a little edgy, visually and socially unmissable and free.

Rainbow Tick

28.     Auckland Council is the first local government organisation in New Zealand to receive the Rainbow Tick. Because we are a large and complex organisation, we participated in the Rainbow Tick process division by division, ensuring that all parts of council had the chance to participate. This has led to a very high awareness of Rainbow Tick across council.

29.     We are now moving forward with implementing Rainbow Tick’s recommendations and also connecting with other stakeholders including the Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel and Rainbow Staff Network to strengthen the response.

All Gender Bathrooms

30.     We have introduced ‘all gender’ toilets in our corporate buildings. The all gender toilets provide a safe space for people who are transgender or gender diverse and don’t feel able to safely or easily use toilets labelled with a male or female sign.

Government Rainbow Conference

31.     In 2018, council was a financial sponsor of the inaugural Government Rainbow Conference. Rainbow Staff Network members attended the conference and co-presented with our Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel. The conference was very well attended by government and non-government Rainbow identified employees. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.    An end of term report outlining the work and achievements of the Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee at their September meeting.

33.     This will be followed by a report from the council’s Research and Evaluation team that reflects an evaluation into the demographic advisory panels and recommendations for the incoming mayor and governing body.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol Hayward - Principal Advisor Panels

Authoriser

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 

New Zealand Police update - Diversity Liaison officers

File No.: CP2019/13314

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an update on the training and participation of the police Diversity Liaison officers at a district level.

2.      To discuss the planned restructure of the Diversity Liaison officers at a national level.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the update and thank the New Zealand Police representative/s for their attendance.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sonya Inger - Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 

Libraries’ inclusiveness of Auckland’s Rainbow communities

File No.: CP2019/07913

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To provide an update from the Central City Library Queer Communities Outreach project including:

·          New staff inductions

·          Learnings from recent co-design sessions

·          Collection Refresh at Central City Library

·          Adult literacy: name and gender change project

·          Event: Speed dating for queer friendships

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the report and thank library staff for their update.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sonya Inger - Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 

Arts, Community and Events supporting Rainbow communities

File No.: CP2019/14090

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a verbal update about Arts, Community and Events activity supporting Rainbow communities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Arts, Community and Events staff will provide an overview of projects that support Rainbow communities including:

·    Community Places Proud centres

·    Community Empowerment response to Rainbow youth homelessness

·     Regional community grants support for Big Gay Out and Pride Festival

·    Arts and Culture initiatives supporting Rainbow communities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the verbal update about Arts, Community and Events activities supporting Rainbow communities.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amanda Kelly - Principal Advisor, arts, Community and Events

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 

Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2019/2020 – Round One

File No.: CP2019/14489

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grant applications for the 2019/2020 Regional Event Fund round one.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Regional Event Fund 2019/2020 has a total budget of $600,000.

3.       Staff received 29 applications for the first-round totaling $2,064,223, which includes an application for Orewa Beach Carnival requesting $1.3 million.

4.       Staff have assessed the applications and recommend 24 events for one-off funding totaling $345,500 based on their alignment to the Events Policy funding criteria. This includes an application from Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park for $40,000, which staff recommended is approved as a multi-year funding agreement until 2021/2022.

5.       In 2018/2019, the Community Development and Safety Committee approved $55,000 per annum multi-year regional event funding for ASB Polyfest until 2020/2021 (COM/2018/22), which includes an allocation from this funding round for 2019/2020 as part of the funding agreement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      approve the following funding allocations from the 2019/2020 Regional Event Fund, listed below by application number:

Event

Recommended funding type

Recommended funding allocation

Show Jumping Waitemata World Cup Festival

 

One-off

10,000

Chica Gilmer Trophy Tier 3 Girls Tournament (Hockey)

One-off

3,000

The Auckland Highland Games and Gathering

One-off

15,000

The New Zealand Ukulele Festival

One-off

12,500

The Farmers Santa Parade

One-off

15,000

2020 Korean Day

One-off

10,000

Auckland International Buskers Festival

One-off

33,000

New Zealand Taiwan Day 2019

One-off

10,000

The Coastal Challenge - coastal adventure run/walk

One-off

7,500

Puhinui International Horse Trials

One-off

17,500

Tempo Dance Festival 2019

One-off

20,000

King of the Bays

One-off

6,000

Walk the Line 2020

One-off

4,000

Auckland Anniversary Day Regatta

One-off

15,000

Auckland Pride Festival

One-off

25,000

2020 Sir Graeme Douglas International Track Challenge

One-off

7,500

New Zealand Community Football Cup (NZCFC) 2019

One-off

17,500

The Partners Life DUAL

One-off

15,000

Ending HIV Big Gay Out 2020

One-off

15,000

2019 Aotearoa Māori Sports Awards

One-off

8,000

Mahurangi Regatta

One-off

4,000

Japan Day 2020

One-off

10,000

Te Ahurea Tino Rangatiratanga Kapahaka Secondary competition 2019

One-off

25,000

ASB Polyfest (year two of three-year agreement)

Multi-year 2018/2019 to 2020/2021

55,000

Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park

Multi-year 2019/2020 to 2021/2022

$40,000

Total

 

$400,500

Horopaki

Context

6.       The 2018-2028 Long-term Plan established a Regional Event Fund budget of $600,000 for 2019/2020, to fund externally organised regional events through a contestable grants scheme. 

7.       Staff received 29 applications (Attachment A) for the first-round totaling $2,064,223, which includes an application for Orewa Beach Carnival requesting $1.3 million. This compares with 30 applications for the first round in 2018/2019 totaling $674,183.

8.       In 2018/2019, the Community Development and Safety Committee approved $55,000 per annum multi-year regional event funding for ASB Polyfest until 2020/2021 (COM/2018/22), which includes an allocation from this funding round for 2019/2020 as part of the funding agreement.


 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Application assessment

9.       Staff assessed each application against regional event funding criteria outlined in the policy (Attachment B).

10.     Each application has been assigned an overall score as an initial guide to establish where funding might be prioritised (Attachment C).

11.     Scores reflect how well the events align with the following criteria, with percentages indicating the weighting applied to each area:

·    Supports key priorities - 12 per cent.

·    Delivers desired impacts - 12 per cent.

·    Expands the variety or range of events on offer - 12 per cent.

·    Level of positive community benefits generated - 10 per cent.

·    Amount of community support, involvement and/or active partnerships - 12 per cent.

·    How effectively the event was run in the past or how well planned - 12 per cent.

·    Other considerations as outlined in the policy - 12 per cent.

·    Alignment with Māori priority - eight per cent.

·    Alignment with youth priority - eight per cent.

12.     Staff also considered the event budget, plans, organiser experience, accessibility, previous event outcomes, and whether the event connected with key Auckland occasions such as Matariki, or Auckland Anniversary weekend and whether the applicant had received significant other funding from council for the same event.

13.     The events recommended for funding include a balance in regional location and in representation of sporting, arts and cultural themes.

14.     Of the 23 events recommended for funding, eight are sports related and 16 relate to arts and culture.

15.     The geographic spread of applications recommended for funding is shown below:

16.     The recommended funding allocations are based on the scores from assessment against policy criteria, consideration of the additional factors and comments from the review panel.

Applications recommended for funding

17.     Staff recommend 24 events to be approved for funding and five to be declined.

18.     Some applications align with priorities for event funding as well as other council grant funds such as arts and culture and sport and recreation.

19.     Staff considered overlaps to ensure a coordinated approach is taken to the overall provision of council funding to these events. In some situations, grants will be provided from one grant fund, and in others the total funding may be shared between two or more grant funds.

20.     The application of The Farmers Santa Parade for $65,000 includes $50,000 which has already been established as a non-contestable dedicated budget.  The balance of $15,000 represents the level of contestable funding that was provided in the 2018/2019 year and has been recommended for funding again this year.  Consideration will be given to consolidating these budgets into one amount in future years to ensure consistency and transparency of decision making.

21.     Table 1 outlines the events that are recommended to be approved, including funding amount and their alignment with key priorities as outlined in the funding criteria.

 

Table 1: Events recommended for funding and strategic alignment

Event

Alignment with key priorities

Requested funding

Recommended funding

Show Jumping Waitematā World Cup Festival

Sport, celebration of

excellence

20,000

10,000

Chica Gilmer Trophy Tier 3 Girls Tournament (Hockey)

Sport, celebration of

excellence

4,000

3,000

The Auckland Highland Games and Gathering

Cultural festival

40,000

15,000

The New Zealand Ukulele Festival

Children and youth

20,000

12,500

The Farmers Santa Parade

Christmas, families and children

65,000

15,000

2020 Korean Day

Cultural festival

20,000

10,000

Auckland International Buskers Festival

Anniversary weekend

40,000

33,000

New Zealand Taiwan Day 2019

Cultural festival

20,000

10,000

The Coastal Challenge - coastal adventure run/walk

Sport, distinctive event

20,000

7,500

Puhinui International Horse Trials

Sport, celebration of

excellence

40,000

17,500

Tempo Dance Festival 2019

Arts, free events

25,000

20,000

King of the Bays

Sport, distinctive event

30,000

6,000

Walk the Line 2020

Youth, celebration of

excellence

15,000

4,000

Auckland Anniversary Day Regatta

Anniversary weekend

20,000

15,000

Coca Cola Christmas in the Park

Christmas, families and children

45,000

40,000

Auckland Pride Festival

Diverse Communities

30,000

25,000

2020 Sir Graeme Douglas International Track Challenge

Sport, celebration of

excellence

20,000

7,500

New Zealand Community Football Cup (NZCFC) 2019

Diverse Communities

45,520

17,500

The Partners Life DUAL

Sport, distinctive event

30,000

15,000

Ending HIV Big Gay Out 2020

Diverse Communities

30,000

15,000

2019 Aotearoa Māori Sports Awards

Maori, Sport, celebration of excellence

10,000

8,000

Mahurangi Regatta

Anniversary weekend

6,000

4,000

Japan Day 2020

Cultural festival

20,000

10,000

Te Ahurea Tino Rangatiratanga Kapahaka Secondary competition 2019

Maori, youth,

celebration of

excellence

25,000

25,000

Total

 

$640,520

$345,500

22.    In 2016/2017, $40,000 per annum multi-year funding to Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park was approved until 2018/2019 (ART/2016/27). Staff recommend approving the Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park application for the 2019/2020 Regional Event Fund round one, as per Table 1, and renewing the multi-year funding agreement from 2019/2020 to 2021/2022 as this event is well established and scores highly in alignment with strategic funding priorities.

Applications recommended for decline

23.     Five applications are recommended to be declined for funding for the following reasons:

·    Low participant and/or audience numbers, in most cases less than 500, relative to the amount of funding requested.

·    More closely aligned with priorities for other council grant funds and which did not have distinctive aspects supporting complementary event funding.

·    Primary focus is having participant development, training and networking.

·    Low alignment with the scope definition, priorities, or desired outcomes for regional events, including events better classified as local events.

24.     Table 2 shows the events that staff recommend be declined.

Table 2 – Events recommended to be declined

            Event

            Reason for decline

          Orewa Beach Carnival

            The scale of the event, and level of funding sought put this outside the scope of regional funding. A major events funding application may be more appropriate.

 

         Waitangi @ Waititi 2020

            Support for current Waitangi Day events is provided through a non-contestable funding budget which forms part of a regional approach to celebrating the day that also includes local board funding and a council delivered event.

            It is recommended that any additional funding requests for community delivered events continue to be considered within this approach.

          New Zealand Short Course Championships (Swimming)

            Event currently runs with a funding surplus.

          Islam Awareness week

            Smaller scale event which promotes understanding of a particular religion. Not a regional event funding priority.

          Rodders Beach Festival

            Low level of alignment with funding priorities.

Multi-year funding

25.     In previous years, the Community Development and Safety Committee approved multi-year regional event funding for:

·    ASB Polyfest - $55,000 per annum for three years, 2018/2019 – 2020/2021 (COM/2018/22)

·    Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park - $40,000 for three years, 2016/2017 – 2018/2019 (ART/2016/27)

26.     $55,000 funding will be provided to ASB Polyfest for 2019/2020 as year two of three under the current multi-year agreement.

27.     The existing multi-year funding commitment for Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park ended in 2018/2019. Staff recommend that a further multi-year funding agreement for Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park be established for a term of three years at $40,000 per annum. The event is a well-established regional event and scores very highly in alignment with strategic funding priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Applications may be for events that connect with other areas of council delivery. These may include events taking place in council venues or on council land, or receive council funding for other aspects of their work. In these cases, staff consult relevant bodies that may have an interest in the projects and take this information into account when presenting recommendations for funding.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Local boards were consulted on, and contributed to, the development of the Events policy.  The administrative process associated with the assessment and allocation of the regional event fund applies principles and criteria outlined within the policy.

30.     Regional event funding occurs in parallel with, and is complementary to, local event funding rounds operated by local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The policy recognises a responsibility to engage and build relationships with Māori stakeholders in designing, planning and delivering regional events of mutual interest.

32.     The events action plan in the policy also places a focus on support for Māori events in the context of a diverse, balanced region-wide programme. This priority is indicated in fund information and guides to encourage applications for Māori events.

33.     Table 3 provides comparative analysis of regional funding to events with a Māori focus, including having significant Māori content, participation and/or audience.

Table 3 – Regional funding provided to events with a Māori focus

Funded regional events with a Māori focus

2019/2020

  Round 1

(proposed)

2018/2019

Round 2

 

2017/2018

Round 1

2017/2018

Round 2

 

2017/2018

Round 1

Number

3 out of 25

6 out of 17

3 out of 27

5 out of 14

3 out of 32

Total value

$88,000

$55,000

$88,000

$48,000

$82,500

Percentage of total round value

22%

29%

22%

33%

18%

 

34.     The three events that are recommended to be approved for funding in 2019/2020 round one, which have a Māori focus are:

·    Te Ahurea Tino Rangatiratanga Kapahaka Secondary competition 2019

·    2019 Aotearoa Māori Sports Awards

·    ASB Polyfest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     Staff recommend allocating $400,500 in round one, out of the total budget of $600,000. This leaves a remaining budget of $199,500 which can be allocated in a second funding round with decisions made in February 2020.

36.     Grants are allocated to events which support outcomes and align with funding priorities and criteria outlined in the Events Policy. Realisation of funding benefits will be associated with the successful delivery of events.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     There is a risk that events will not be successfully delivered in accordance with event plans submitted in grant applications. Staff mitigate this risk through the evaluation process by considering the experience of event organisers and prior experience of holding the event.

38.     In many cases council is one of several funders of an event and the ability of event organisers to raise funding from multiple sources increases confidence based on the independent assessment of other funders.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Following funding approval, staff will provide funding agreements for recipients and the distribution of funding will commence once the agreements have been signed by the applicants.

40.     A second funding round for 2019/2020 will be open in November and December 2019, with allocations to be approved at the February 2020 committee meeting. This will be a general round open to all applications and focused on the policy priority areas of Māori, youth and winter events, as well as gaps in the events calendar.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Application Summaries

27

b

Event Policy - Regional Event Fund Prioritisation Criteria

101

c

Regional Event Fund Grant Summary Schedule

103

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David McIntosh - Senior Business Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19

 

Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/13288

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward work programme

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sonya Inger - Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

15-Aug-19